website statistics Stalin's War on Japan: The Red Army's 'Manchurian Strategic Offensive Operation', 1945 - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Stalin's War on Japan: The Red Army's 'Manchurian Strategic Offensive Operation', 1945

Availability: Ready to download

Did Japan surrender in 1945 because of the death and devastation caused by the atomic bombs dropped by the Americans on Hiroshima and Nagasaki or because of the crushing defeat inflicted on their armies by the Soviet Union in Manchukuo, the puppet state they set up in north-east China? Indeed, the Red Army's rapid and total victory in Manchukuo has been relatively neglecte Did Japan surrender in 1945 because of the death and devastation caused by the atomic bombs dropped by the Americans on Hiroshima and Nagasaki or because of the crushing defeat inflicted on their armies by the Soviet Union in Manchukuo, the puppet state they set up in north-east China? Indeed, the Red Army's rapid and total victory in Manchukuo has been relatively neglected by historians. Charles Stephenson, in this scholarly and highly readable new study, describes the political, diplomatic and military build-up to the Soviet offensive and its decisive outcome. He also considers to what extent Japan's capitulation is attributable to the atomic bomb or the stunningly successful entry of the Soviet Union into the conflict. The military side of the story is explored in fascinating detail - the invasion of Manchukuo itself where the Soviet 'Deep Battle' concept was employed with shattering results, and secondary actions in Korea, Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands. But equally absorbing is the account of the decision-making that gave rise to the offensive and the political and diplomatic background to it, and in particular the Yalta conference. There, Stalin allowed the Americans to persuade him to join the war in the east; a conflict he was determined on entering anyway. Charles Stephenson's engrossing narrative throws new light on the last act of the Second World War.


Compare

Did Japan surrender in 1945 because of the death and devastation caused by the atomic bombs dropped by the Americans on Hiroshima and Nagasaki or because of the crushing defeat inflicted on their armies by the Soviet Union in Manchukuo, the puppet state they set up in north-east China? Indeed, the Red Army's rapid and total victory in Manchukuo has been relatively neglecte Did Japan surrender in 1945 because of the death and devastation caused by the atomic bombs dropped by the Americans on Hiroshima and Nagasaki or because of the crushing defeat inflicted on their armies by the Soviet Union in Manchukuo, the puppet state they set up in north-east China? Indeed, the Red Army's rapid and total victory in Manchukuo has been relatively neglected by historians. Charles Stephenson, in this scholarly and highly readable new study, describes the political, diplomatic and military build-up to the Soviet offensive and its decisive outcome. He also considers to what extent Japan's capitulation is attributable to the atomic bomb or the stunningly successful entry of the Soviet Union into the conflict. The military side of the story is explored in fascinating detail - the invasion of Manchukuo itself where the Soviet 'Deep Battle' concept was employed with shattering results, and secondary actions in Korea, Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands. But equally absorbing is the account of the decision-making that gave rise to the offensive and the political and diplomatic background to it, and in particular the Yalta conference. There, Stalin allowed the Americans to persuade him to join the war in the east; a conflict he was determined on entering anyway. Charles Stephenson's engrossing narrative throws new light on the last act of the Second World War.

31 review for Stalin's War on Japan: The Red Army's 'Manchurian Strategic Offensive Operation', 1945

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie Kim

    Stalin's War on Japan is an informative, albeit a bit dry, read discussing the few days leading up to Japan's surrender on August 15, 1945 with a marked focus on the Soviet Union's geopolitical strategy and the consequential maneuvers it made throughout the waning hours of WWII. Illustrating with excruciating detail the Soviet Union's invasion of Manchuria as part of the grand Manchurian Strategic Offensive Operation, Stephenson throws into question the dominant narrative that credits Hiroshima Stalin's War on Japan is an informative, albeit a bit dry, read discussing the few days leading up to Japan's surrender on August 15, 1945 with a marked focus on the Soviet Union's geopolitical strategy and the consequential maneuvers it made throughout the waning hours of WWII. Illustrating with excruciating detail the Soviet Union's invasion of Manchuria as part of the grand Manchurian Strategic Offensive Operation, Stephenson throws into question the dominant narrative that credits Hiroshima and Nagasaki as the defining events that put an end to the war. What could've been a compelling argument was somewhat overshadowed by an elongated description of individual battles, logistical struggles, and the shining leadership of Soviet officers that moved with shocking efficiency and speed. Perhaps an emphasis on the alarming success with which the Soviets were able to penetrate Manchuria, all the way down to northern Korea, was meant to supply evidence to the thesis that Stalin's invasion expedited Japan's surrender. I'm not sure, but I wish more of the book's real estate was dedicated to buttressing this main argument with more detailed and meaty references to Japanese sources (or at least the extensive literature around this debate that the author alludes to in the last chapter). Given that the title mentions Stalin, I expected there to be a lot more exposition on his logic, thought process, and ambition and how that translated into each of his decisions that deeply impacted the destiny of many Far Eastern countries. The first and last few chapters contain interesting discussions on the high-political fronts, including America's initial belief that the Soviet's involvement was crucial to ending the war and its bitter regrets fueled with hindsight when it realized the true consequences of befriending and enabling an enemy of an enemy. All in all, Stalin's War on Japan provides a refreshing angle of the final acts of WWII particularly because so much of the existing narrative focuses on America + Europe's role. I would recommend it if you're into military history and enjoy reading about the smaller details of what went on, but not so much if you're looking for a deeper interpretation of the politics and diplomacy that affected it. Thank you to the publisher for making this ARC available through Netgalley. // for more, check out Cups of Tea, my book review blog //

  2. 4 out of 5

    William Harris

    I have recently finished reading an ARC of Charles Stephenson's marvelous study of the Soviet attack on Japan in the closing months of World II entitled "Stalin's War On Japan", due to be published shortly by Pen and Sword. I am pleased to report that the volume is both well written and quite illuminating in its discussion of the Soviet actions which occurred in compliance with their treat obligations to the Western Allies. Among other things, the text includes a fairly detailed study of Soviet I have recently finished reading an ARC of Charles Stephenson's marvelous study of the Soviet attack on Japan in the closing months of World II entitled "Stalin's War On Japan", due to be published shortly by Pen and Sword. I am pleased to report that the volume is both well written and quite illuminating in its discussion of the Soviet actions which occurred in compliance with their treat obligations to the Western Allies. Among other things, the text includes a fairly detailed study of Soviet deployments and planning in the period leading up to hostilities. What is more, and perhaps most tellingly, it demonstrates how far the Soviet forces in the Far East had come since the collapse of Nazi Germany and its European satellites and allies in the West. The carefully coordinated and overwhelming forces Stalin assembled for his attack on the Kwantung Army as well as the superb leadership, training and equipment that marked the massive assault force demonstrated how far the Soviet military had come since they had first engaged Hitler's Wehrmacht. Just as important, the much vaunted Kwantung Army, once an elite and highly feared armed force instrumental in supporting and prolonging Japan's adventure in China and the war in Asia was revealed as nothing more than a paper tiger, long drained of its elite units and populated, in the end, by whatever the Japanese could throw into the line, with weak air support and practically no armored support against a Soviet force constructed on the model of the massive armored armies employed against the Nazis. It is a fascinating and little understood feature of the Pacific War, and should be read with an eye towards the US employment of nuclear weapons as well as the fear engendered among Western leaders by Japan's apparent determination to fight to the death. I urge anyone interested in the decision to deploy nuclear weapons as well as the early post war foreign machinations of the the former Allied states to examine this work, It is well worth our examination.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Mehlhopt

    Very interesting Nice to see history written as it should be and without a politically motivated bias.I hope that there are no more conflagrations like this in the future

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dud Dudley

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maze

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lee

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dimitri

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dipanjan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex Helm

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ludmila

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brent

  17. 4 out of 5

    K303

  18. 5 out of 5

    Louis Rossi

  19. 5 out of 5

    Adam Lee

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Conlon

  23. 4 out of 5

    WW2 Reads

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joe Collins

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  26. 4 out of 5

    Heresh Kevlar

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matt Francis

  28. 5 out of 5

    Citrus

  29. 4 out of 5

    .

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rory

  31. 5 out of 5

    Maggy Melbourne

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...