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The Seventh Queen

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After the gasp-inducing cliffhanger ending of The Frozen Crown, the exciting conclusion to the epic story of Askia—a warrior, witch, and queen-to-be—as she confronts the monster that stole her throne…and is holding her prisoner to steal her magic. The Empire of Vishir has lost its ruler, and the fight to save Seravesh from the Roven Empire is looking bleak. Moreover, Askia After the gasp-inducing cliffhanger ending of The Frozen Crown, the exciting conclusion to the epic story of Askia—a warrior, witch, and queen-to-be—as she confronts the monster that stole her throne…and is holding her prisoner to steal her magic. The Empire of Vishir has lost its ruler, and the fight to save Seravesh from the Roven Empire is looking bleak. Moreover, Askia has been captured by power-hungry Emperor Radovan, who plans on making her his wife simply so he can take her magic as his own, killing her in the process. Aware of his ex-wives’ fates, Askia must find a means of avoiding this doom, not only for the sake of Seravesh, but now for Vishir as well. She must put both nations first and remember Ozura’s advice: you must play the game in order to survive. Askia was born a soldier, but now it’s time to become a spy. But it’s hard to play a game where the only person who knows the rules wants to kill her. And time is a factor. The jewel Radovan has put around her neck will pull her power from her in thirty days. Worse, Vishir might not even have that long, as the two heirs to the throne are on the verge of civil war. Without any hope for help from the south, without any access to her magic, alone in a hostile land, Askia is no closer to freeing her people than she was when she fled to Vishir. In the clutches of a madman, the only thing she’s close to is death. Yet she’d trade her life for a chance to save Seravesh. The problem: she may not have that choice. 


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After the gasp-inducing cliffhanger ending of The Frozen Crown, the exciting conclusion to the epic story of Askia—a warrior, witch, and queen-to-be—as she confronts the monster that stole her throne…and is holding her prisoner to steal her magic. The Empire of Vishir has lost its ruler, and the fight to save Seravesh from the Roven Empire is looking bleak. Moreover, Askia After the gasp-inducing cliffhanger ending of The Frozen Crown, the exciting conclusion to the epic story of Askia—a warrior, witch, and queen-to-be—as she confronts the monster that stole her throne…and is holding her prisoner to steal her magic. The Empire of Vishir has lost its ruler, and the fight to save Seravesh from the Roven Empire is looking bleak. Moreover, Askia has been captured by power-hungry Emperor Radovan, who plans on making her his wife simply so he can take her magic as his own, killing her in the process. Aware of his ex-wives’ fates, Askia must find a means of avoiding this doom, not only for the sake of Seravesh, but now for Vishir as well. She must put both nations first and remember Ozura’s advice: you must play the game in order to survive. Askia was born a soldier, but now it’s time to become a spy. But it’s hard to play a game where the only person who knows the rules wants to kill her. And time is a factor. The jewel Radovan has put around her neck will pull her power from her in thirty days. Worse, Vishir might not even have that long, as the two heirs to the throne are on the verge of civil war. Without any hope for help from the south, without any access to her magic, alone in a hostile land, Askia is no closer to freeing her people than she was when she fled to Vishir. In the clutches of a madman, the only thing she’s close to is death. Yet she’d trade her life for a chance to save Seravesh. The problem: she may not have that choice. 

30 review for The Seventh Queen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Renaissance Kate

    ARC received! After that cliffhanger ending in book #1 I'm so tempted to dive in now, but I'll probably wait until closer to release. 😬 Thank you to Avon and Harper Voyager via Netgalley for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are my own. ARC received! After that cliffhanger ending in book #1 I'm so tempted to dive in now, but I'll probably wait until closer to release. 😬 Thank you to Avon and Harper Voyager via Netgalley for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    LIsa Noell "Rocking the Chutzpah!"

    My thanks to Harper/Avon, Greta Kelly and Netgalley. I loved the first book. So much so, that I couldn't wait for the next! Askia and her world was fantastic! Too much of this book was Askia, the captive. I hated it! I think that the worst thing of all is that fairytale ending. I am totally a sucker for those! But, not when it's wrapped up in the last 70 pages, and presented to me with a red bow! Someone so powerful just can't be defeated so quickly! "As a wrap up?" This should have been a trilo My thanks to Harper/Avon, Greta Kelly and Netgalley. I loved the first book. So much so, that I couldn't wait for the next! Askia and her world was fantastic! Too much of this book was Askia, the captive. I hated it! I think that the worst thing of all is that fairytale ending. I am totally a sucker for those! But, not when it's wrapped up in the last 70 pages, and presented to me with a red bow! Someone so powerful just can't be defeated so quickly! "As a wrap up?" This should have been a trilogy. Granted, I'd have been bummed by this second, but it needed more! My opinionl Greta Kelly knows how to start a kick ass book, but boy howdy...she stinks at the finish line! Not recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    3.5/5 rounded up. So I very much want to chime into the book world and say that this duology (The Frozen Crown being the first!) deserves a bit more attention than its gotten. I hadn’t heard anything about it and just picked it up at a used book sale for a pretty cover. Is this amazing, ground breaking work? No. But it is a LOT better (in my opinion of course!) then a lot of books in the YA/NA fantasy field that seem to get weighed down in attention. Though maybe the no expectations made it bett 3.5/5 rounded up. So I very much want to chime into the book world and say that this duology (The Frozen Crown being the first!) deserves a bit more attention than its gotten. I hadn’t heard anything about it and just picked it up at a used book sale for a pretty cover. Is this amazing, ground breaking work? No. But it is a LOT better (in my opinion of course!) then a lot of books in the YA/NA fantasy field that seem to get weighed down in attention. Though maybe the no expectations made it better for me? *Shrug* Either way, I look forward to Greta Kelley’s work in the future as she maybe smooths out some of the rough edges from her debut novels. Now I was super vague in the first book because honestly I liked how twisty the book ended up being for me. This one is less so but I don’t want to spoil anything still especially the ending of the last book. So sorry you don’t really get a summary. Our main character Askia is back though of course, and I continued to love her. I’m basically a sucker for snark and someone willing to defend others. Our world building expanded and we got a look at other places and the society within them. With that, came new and interesting characters. Kelly is really good at character writing, dialogue, and tension. She slips in rather powerful moments in quiet ones. I absolutely loved and wanted to highlight random lines in the book. ("Only a man would think a woman was safer without her voice," - one I can literally quote just from the top of my head at this point days later). The big problem with this novel is the pacing though. I don’t know if Kelly was trying to avoid the dreaded ‘second book syndrome’ by creating just two books, but what we ended up with was a book that went slow, slow, slow and then super duper fast. I’m a total weirdo in the book community who LOVES benign world building. You could tell me how taxes work in the society and I would be like huh, cool! The first half of this book is a LOT of that (well ok, not taxes but world building) and political maneuvering and backstabbing and I liked it! buuuut I kept looking at the page count and wondering how on earth it would be wrapped up well enough for satisfaction with less and less time available. I was right to be worried. The fate of two kingdoms is wrapped up in about twenty pages. That’s not enough! And while I understood the reasoning of the ending, I think it wasn’t the best move to have us so separated from characters and places we had already grown attached to. I could have read an entire third book of Askia dealing with all the fallout from this one. We don’t even know the fates of some characters! (….spin off novel?) But other than that rather glaring problem, I still enjoyed it. I do hope in the future Kelly gives herself or is given free reign to make the epic political drama/romance I think she is capable of. Because here, I think she was a little hobbled by fitting it into a neat little duology. I will one hundred percent check out her next books. Also, maaaybe higher a new editor. This was a first edition but I should not be catching misspellings and errors. I'm not that good at grammar (see entire above as proof). Conversation question: Any favorite underhyped books recently? least favorite overhyped ones?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/11/22/... Although it was only a ten-month wait between The Frozen Crown and The Seventh Queen, I have to say even that felt too long given the scream-worthy cliffhanger the first book left us with. Needless to say, as soon as I received my review copy of the audiobook from the publisher, I fell upon it like a ravening wolf. As the story picks up from where things left off in The Frozen Crown, be aware that this review may discuss ev 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/11/22/... Although it was only a ten-month wait between The Frozen Crown and The Seventh Queen, I have to say even that felt too long given the scream-worthy cliffhanger the first book left us with. Needless to say, as soon as I received my review copy of the audiobook from the publisher, I fell upon it like a ravening wolf. As the story picks up from where things left off in The Frozen Crown, be aware that this review may discuss events and contain possible spoilers from previous novel. Our protagonist princess Askia of Serevesh has been captured by the tyrant emperor Radovan, having failed in her mission to repel the Rovan invasion and retake her rightful place on the throne. Now she is also forced to wear a cursed necklace that would steal her magic, which is Radovan’s true prize. However, the transfer process itself takes time—thirty days to be exact. This at least gives Askia a chance to hatch up an escape plan, which is determined to do before her time runs out. Even as a prisoner in her enemy’s domain, our protagonist is not helpless. A death witch, her powers allow her to see and communicate with the dead. Very quickly, she makes allies of the ghosts of Radovan’s late wives, six other women whom he had imprisoned and murdered for their magic. They know better than anyone what Radovan is capable of, but they also know his weaknesses and what makes him tick, and Askia is not about to let that advantage go to waste. Meanwhile out in the world though, the Vishir empire is also in turmoil, having just lost its ruler. His two heirs now vie for power, leaving the Roven empire free to press its attack, making Askia’s changes to win back Seravesh look grimmer than ever. With the threat of a civil war on the horizon, what kind of world would she return to even if she somehow manages to escape? I definitely enjoyed The Seventh Queen, but probably not as much as its predecessor. This by no means makes it a bad sequel, just that perhaps the novelty has worn off slightly, and the fact that we have quite a different story this time. The biggest change is given away in the publisher description: “Askia was born a soldier, but now it’s time to become a spy.” The story reflects this with far fewer displays of her martial prowess and a general lack of kickassery, focusing more on her cloak-and-dagger skills. This made for a more subtle, low-key kind of book, and with the events of The Frozen Crown still relatively fresh on the mind, my expectations required a bit of adjustment. In addition, the story was noticeably slower, making a lot of the book felt like filler, even when it was not. Much of the early plot took place on the castle grounds following Askia as she learned her way around, getting to know the resident ghosts. Even with her thirty-day deadline looming, we just didn’t have that same sense of urgency which was a constant presence throughout the first book. Granted, we still had those vibes here, but they were relatively muted, which didn’t really mesh with the desperation of Askia’s situation. That said, we still got to see her resourcefulness at play here—just in a different way. If I’m to be honest, I quite liked seeing this side of Askia. Slow-burning plot notwithstanding, it was a joy watching her brilliant mind at work teasing out solutions to her problems and calculating risks with that brilliant mind. We also got some political intrigue, some romance. Everything came together nicely in the end too—exactly as expected, as some might say, with all the pieces falling into place just a tad too neatly. However, I don’t really begrudge the book that. The characters were all very well written, and with everything they’ve been through to get to this point, my heart could only feel contentment at that picture perfect ending. All in all, a duology worth reading. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: a hidden gem! And mad respect as well to narrator Imani Jade Powers who once again delivered a pitch perfect performance for the audiobook edition of The Seventh Queen.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alex (The Scribe Owl)

    Oh my gosh, why are the covers for this series so stunning? 🤩

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer (jm_bibliolater)

    After devouring The Frozen Crown this summer, I was extremely excited to read The Seventh Queen. From the first page I was absolutely, completely entranced by Askia's story. I love how Greta Kelly made the story a dual point of view but still kept it mostly on Askia. Askia is a complete badass warrior witch queen. She's smart and cunning and finally takes something for herself instead of sacrificing everything for her kingdom. Overall, I recommend The Seventh Queen to readers who: * Have read The After devouring The Frozen Crown this summer, I was extremely excited to read The Seventh Queen. From the first page I was absolutely, completely entranced by Askia's story. I love how Greta Kelly made the story a dual point of view but still kept it mostly on Askia. Askia is a complete badass warrior witch queen. She's smart and cunning and finally takes something for herself instead of sacrificing everything for her kingdom. Overall, I recommend The Seventh Queen to readers who: * Have read The Frozen Crown - do not read this book without reading the first * Love ghosts especially of the queen variety * Love shocking curves in a plot. I had no idea how the story would go although I did predict part of the ending. * Love a swoon-worthy warrior who accepts a queen for who she is * Love a villain who thinks he has good intentions My only complaint is that I wanted more on an ending! I want to know if certain plot lines occur (as in a certain marriage) and how other plot lines commenced (as in how the other kingdoms fare). An epilogue would have been best UNLESS there is a plan for more books to come. Thank you Harper Voyager for the advance copy

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kayla (krakentoagoodbook)

    Actual rating: 3.5 stars

  8. 5 out of 5

    Korynne

    Askia starts this book in the same position she was in at the end of the first book (spoilers for The Frozen Crown ahead): she’s been captured by Radovan and imprisoned in his castle, wearing a necklace that will steal her magical power within thirty days and transfer it to him. Not a good situation to be in. Luckily, because she’s a death witch, she can see the ghosts of his six late wives, who provide her support and counsel her on how to get out of Radovan’s clutches. I really enjoyed The Froz Askia starts this book in the same position she was in at the end of the first book (spoilers for The Frozen Crown ahead): she’s been captured by Radovan and imprisoned in his castle, wearing a necklace that will steal her magical power within thirty days and transfer it to him. Not a good situation to be in. Luckily, because she’s a death witch, she can see the ghosts of his six late wives, who provide her support and counsel her on how to get out of Radovan’s clutches. I really enjoyed The Frozen Crown when I read it last year, but when I started The Seventh Queen, I quickly realized that I had forgotten so much of the first book, even though it has only been about seven months since I read it. This book reads more like a “Part Two” to the first book rather than a sequel, picking up at the exact spot, both mid-action and mid-dialogue, that the first book ended on. The further I read, the more I remembered about the story, naturally. I love Askia’s fierce nature and how she’s not willing to compromise her morals or beliefs to get what she wants. I think she’s a great protagonist to look up to. I felt like a lot of this book was preamble. At 20% of the way through, I felt like I was still waiting for the story to get going. Askia runs her mouth and is given a tour of the castle grounds and learns about the social hierarchy in Roven. The whole book is about how she is gallivanting around Roven without dying, but we forget that the plot of the first book is that she was trying to save her kingdom and people from her cousin who is currently trying to rule. I feel like that original plotline kind of got forgotten about in The Seventh Queen. This book almost feels like it’s part of a different series from the first book because of the change in direction of the plot. It feels like Askia’s intentions have changed and the point of the novels has shifted. I honestly didn’t care as much for Askia’s story in this book as I did in The Frozen Crown, and I missed the romance aspect with Illya, which was very minor in this book. We get one chapter from Illya’s POV in the beginning and one chapter in the middle, but I really would have liked more. It feels like his two short chapters were only included to help foreshadow the reveal of a specific detail at the end of the book, and they also felt like they were included as an afterthought. I sadly found my mind wandering quite a bit during The Seventh Queen and I struggled to stay focused on the story. I loved The Frozen Crown, but its sequel didn’t live up to the hype for me. I still liked it a bit and would recommend the duology as a whole, but I’m disappointed the second book wasn’t a five-star read for me like the first book was. I enjoy Greta Kelly’s writing style though and I look forward to checking out more stories from her in the future. I received a copy of the ebook from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My Book Blog: Storeys of Stories

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marianna Brown

    I can't even begin to explain how disappointed I am in this book. Everything the first book did well, was ruined by how average this book became. I don't even care to think on it any further. I can't even begin to explain how disappointed I am in this book. Everything the first book did well, was ruined by how average this book became. I don't even care to think on it any further.

  10. 5 out of 5

    ShannaBanana✨

    Ok. So this had a lot of potential but it fell flat for me. It was a lot of Askia doing the same things. All of the action was at the end. Illyn… how unsurprising and unpredictable THAT twist was 🙄 It was nice to see him care for Iskander in the very beginning before he left. I really wanted to love this one but I didn’t.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shawna

    Thank you to NetGalley for the free E-ARC. I want to start off by saying book one was so good and that cliff hanger so intriguing, that I was basically dying to get to the second. With that said, so much of this book is spent with Askia being a captive. I love seeing how her plan comes together and the road bumps along the way. Having the old queens help her was really neat. But it realllllyy started to drag. I hate to say I was starting to get bored. The end started to pick up and was redeeming Thank you to NetGalley for the free E-ARC. I want to start off by saying book one was so good and that cliff hanger so intriguing, that I was basically dying to get to the second. With that said, so much of this book is spent with Askia being a captive. I love seeing how her plan comes together and the road bumps along the way. Having the old queens help her was really neat. But it realllllyy started to drag. I hate to say I was starting to get bored. The end started to pick up and was redeeming in that sense. However, it was was all wrapped up so fast you didn’t even get to enjoy it. I would have loved to see more of the escape, the inner turmoil of Askia and her decisions, Ilya and his background/their relationship. This either needed to be put into a trilogy or condensed. It’s not that I didn’t enjoy the court politics and escape build up per say. It’s that the pacing and tone just did a complete 180 between the took books. I’ll definitely be reading the finished version though and will recommend to specific readers I know would enjoy this.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I was provided an ARC via Netgalley, all opinions are my own. If you loved The Frozen Crown like I did, you are going to love the ending to this duology. This picks up where that leaves off. The Frozen Crown left us with quite the cliffhanger, and we pick up where that left us. You really will need to read book 1 to understand what is going on in this book or I feel you will be completely lost. This series is filled with political intrigue and the movements of the players start in the first book. I was provided an ARC via Netgalley, all opinions are my own. If you loved The Frozen Crown like I did, you are going to love the ending to this duology. This picks up where that leaves off. The Frozen Crown left us with quite the cliffhanger, and we pick up where that left us. You really will need to read book 1 to understand what is going on in this book or I feel you will be completely lost. This series is filled with political intrigue and the movements of the players start in the first book. If you picked up with with this book, you will have missed the build up and be confused as to who the players are and what their motivations are. Like book 1 this is a bit on the slower paced side, and I don't mean that as a negative. The pace fits the book and the plot, While there are some action scenes, this fantasy is not filled with magical battles and fight scenes. This is more of a chess match and a battle of wits as Askia not only has to figure out how to save herself but the entire empire before Radovan steals her magic and takes her life. While she is a warrior queen, she is also well equipped in court politics ang the games that nobles play to gain information and use it to gain the upper hand. We don't get a ton of explanation of the magic system in this book. The magic is pretty straightforward, but the magic system is mostly explained in book 1. We don't get much of a recap of what happened in the first book, which if you are like me you read it almost a year ago. The more I read of this the more I remembered what was happening, but the events and locations of the first book only play a small part in this book. They are connected but most of this book takes place in Radovan's stronghold, where he is keeping Askia captive while he takes her magic. While she can't wield her magic in her captivity, she is still able to use a bit of magic and is aided not only by those who have sworn to serve her in death but the queen who came before her. With the six queens on her side, she is able to gain valuable information not only about Radovan, but his court and the castle. She is able to strategize and maneuver around him while planning her escape and a way to save everyone she cares about. I really enjoyed how this all came together. This has magic, politics, a little romance, some action, and some good discussions about guilt, sacrifice, and doing what is right for the greater good. This is a solid duology and I highly recommend it! While I enjoyed the ending and felt it was fitting, I do feel that some readers will take issue with the lack of closure. The ending is a big open ended and doesn't give concrete answers to certain plot lines. This is one case that I feel like an epilogue maybe 5 years later would have been a nice touch. Then again it leaves things open for more books or for the reader to imagine what could be.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I won The Seventh Queen in a #Goodreads giveaway back in October 2021. Since this is book 2 of a duology, I needed to read the first book (The Frozen Crown) before I could read this one. If you would like to read my review on The Frozen Crown, I did write one after I finished it back in January. I actually listened to the audiobook for book 1, so I decided to do borrow the audiobook from my local library and listen to that while I'm driving and read my book other times. Something I struggled with I won The Seventh Queen in a #Goodreads giveaway back in October 2021. Since this is book 2 of a duology, I needed to read the first book (The Frozen Crown) before I could read this one. If you would like to read my review on The Frozen Crown, I did write one after I finished it back in January. I actually listened to the audiobook for book 1, so I decided to do borrow the audiobook from my local library and listen to that while I'm driving and read my book other times. Something I struggled with in the first book a d continues to struggle with in this book was character names. Thank goodness a character guide is included at the back of the book to help me keep track of who was who. Askia is fierce and powerful death witch, and she reminds me of Aelin from the Throne of Glass series. For a majority of this book, Askia is held captive by Radovan. While there isn't a lot of 'action' until the end of the book, the plot is moved along with planning/plotting, spying, and manipulating. The writing was so well done that it never effects the pacing of the story. I can't forget to talk about that amazing character development. All the main players in this book have depth and Greta Kelly did such a good job with her characters. Also, while romance is not the main focus of this series, there is a smidge of it in this book. And. I. Am. Here. For. It! Askia deserves to find love and it was beautiful. I really wanted a tiny bit more from the romance side of things, but I also realize that wasn't the point of this story. This was a bittersweet end to the Warrior Witch Duology. When I read the last line in the book, I had tears in my eyes. I could have read 2-3 more books from this world.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Becca Mee

    THE SEVENTH QUEEN was an outstanding and bittersweet conclusion to The Warrior Witch duology. Gretta Kelly's writing and approach to her story and her characters is such a breath of fresh air and super unique to her and she deserves to be commended for putting out not one, but TWO fantastic books. From the outset, the plot gets rolling and plows full steam ahead and never stops. Askia is a fierce and plain old awesome heroine who rolls with the punches and uses every tool at her disposal to put THE SEVENTH QUEEN was an outstanding and bittersweet conclusion to The Warrior Witch duology. Gretta Kelly's writing and approach to her story and her characters is such a breath of fresh air and super unique to her and she deserves to be commended for putting out not one, but TWO fantastic books. From the outset, the plot gets rolling and plows full steam ahead and never stops. Askia is a fierce and plain old awesome heroine who rolls with the punches and uses every tool at her disposal to put a stop to Radovan and escape in order to save her world from a dark evil. I adored the scenes with Askia and Radovan. Radovan is a really well-developed and multidimensional villain and the way Kelly presents him to the reader keeps him evil but shows that darker humanity beneath him and I love that sort of villain. And my baby Illya. I love him and Askia so much and their love story as they fight to get back to each other is just so good. There is chemistry and steam to make the heart soar real high. I also loved the rapport between all of the women, living and dead, in this book. They may not all be besties or have pure intentions but they support each other against the tyranny of men in ways only other women can. The ending to this book was nearly as explosive as the first book, although we leave things on a vague and bittersweet note that makes me hope to see more from this world. THE SEVENTH QUEEN is a feminist adventure of a book that has so much intrigue, romance and action, and I heartily recommend this duology to everyone who loves a good and feminist fantasy. Definitely one of the more underrated fantasy duologies out there and deserves all of the stars!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christina O.

    I’ve been struggling with final books in a series lately, but I was delighted to find that The Seventh Queen delivers as both a follow up to the first book and a conclusion. The story picks up right where if left off with that terrible cliffhanger in the first book. Although it takes a little while for Askia to find her feet, it has just as much political intrigue as the first book with the stakes being even higher. Askia is separated from all of the people who were friends and allies in the firs I’ve been struggling with final books in a series lately, but I was delighted to find that The Seventh Queen delivers as both a follow up to the first book and a conclusion. The story picks up right where if left off with that terrible cliffhanger in the first book. Although it takes a little while for Askia to find her feet, it has just as much political intrigue as the first book with the stakes being even higher. Askia is separated from all of the people who were friends and allies in the first book, but they are replaced by the ghosts of the previous six queens of Roven and it is so much fun to see each of their personalities and how they interact with Askia. I love how Askia uses her magic to spy and gather information, weaving magic with strategy. Illya is given a couple of POV chapters, but mostly so we can see what’s going on outside of Roven. It is really interesting to finally see from his perspective and it helps flesh out the mysterious character we saw in the first book while not feeling out of place. The Seventh Queen has all the political intrigue of the first book and continues to explore the nature of empires, the effects if has on cultures and people, and the way different cultures interact, while also being a fun, magical adventure. This duology is a solid fantasy series and would be great for fans of YA who are looking to explore adult titles. *Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing an E-ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Caroline | caro.library

    I really enjoyed this new adult fantasy duology. The writing is so good, and Askia is right up there with Aelin for me when it comes to strong female protagonists. Askia spends a lot of this book as Radovan’s captor, so a lot of the story progresses through planning, plotting, and politicking. Even though there wasn’t much action until the end, I didn’t think the book was slow. I was thoroughly engrossed in this dark fantasy world, and I thought the character development was fantastic. Romance is I really enjoyed this new adult fantasy duology. The writing is so good, and Askia is right up there with Aelin for me when it comes to strong female protagonists. Askia spends a lot of this book as Radovan’s captor, so a lot of the story progresses through planning, plotting, and politicking. Even though there wasn’t much action until the end, I didn’t think the book was slow. I was thoroughly engrossed in this dark fantasy world, and I thought the character development was fantastic. Romance is not a huge part of the story, but the romance followed MY FAVORITE TROPE (I can’t say what it is because spoilers). This was different from the first book in the series, but I loved them both. My only complaint is that I want more stories in this world! I would love a follow up that takes place 5-10 years later to see how these events play out in the long run. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the gifted eARC. Blog | Instagram

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    *Source* Publisher *Genre* Fantasy *Rating* 4.0 *Thoughts* The Seventh Queen is the second and final installment in author Greta Kelly's Warrior Witch duology. This story picks up immediately where The Frozen Crown left off. 21-year-old Princess Askia Poritskaya e-Nimri, rightful heir to the Frozen Crown of Seravesh, spent months with Black Wolf Legion battling invading soldiers of the Rovan Empire under Emperor Radovan. In order to save her country, she went on a courageous quest south to Vishir se *Source* Publisher *Genre* Fantasy *Rating* 4.0 *Thoughts* The Seventh Queen is the second and final installment in author Greta Kelly's Warrior Witch duology. This story picks up immediately where The Frozen Crown left off. 21-year-old Princess Askia Poritskaya e-Nimri, rightful heir to the Frozen Crown of Seravesh, spent months with Black Wolf Legion battling invading soldiers of the Rovan Empire under Emperor Radovan. In order to save her country, she went on a courageous quest south to Vishir seeking aid from Emperor Armaan who she later ended up accepting a marriage contract from. *Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews* https://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/20...

  18. 4 out of 5

    CasPerfitz~SLiTsReaD

    I read both books in 2 days and I must say, I really enjoyed it. What I love most is the heroine and her magic. The story equally interesting. But! Yeah, the but comes. Is this the end? Cause I feel like she has not fought the fight she came for from the start. Yes, this has a good ending but it also left so many questions that I hope there is more to this series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heather Burns-Schmidtke

    The story was captivating and kept you reading for the most part. It can drag a little in the middle but the ending and it's surprises are worth the wait! Greta's characters are very well written, you want to reach through the pages and give comfort or wipe a tear! Highly recommended. This was read as an ARC through Netgalley for an honest review. The opinions are my own! The story was captivating and kept you reading for the most part. It can drag a little in the middle but the ending and it's surprises are worth the wait! Greta's characters are very well written, you want to reach through the pages and give comfort or wipe a tear! Highly recommended. This was read as an ARC through Netgalley for an honest review. The opinions are my own!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    Book Review: The Seventh Queen By: Greta Kelly Genre: Fantasy Format: ARC thank you to @harpervoyager for my digital copy ♥️ This is the second book in the frozen crown series! If you haven’t read it already please do yourself a favor and read that first! This book got me hooked on page 1. After the major cliff hanger ya girl may have cried when I got to read this early. Anyways. This book is almost perfect. I’m a sucker for a love story and I was a bit disappointed we didn’t get the full closure we Book Review: The Seventh Queen By: Greta Kelly Genre: Fantasy Format: ARC thank you to @harpervoyager for my digital copy ♥️ This is the second book in the frozen crown series! If you haven’t read it already please do yourself a favor and read that first! This book got me hooked on page 1. After the major cliff hanger ya girl may have cried when I got to read this early. Anyways. This book is almost perfect. I’m a sucker for a love story and I was a bit disappointed we didn’t get the full closure we all wanted… BUT I am also very glad that Greta decided to add the girl power boss babe ending so I’m very much still impressed with how everything wrapped up nicely. Also those plot twists were insane. 5/5 go read the duology and thank me later ♥️

  21. 4 out of 5

    Modern Miss Granger

    This was a really great duology!! Very unique and fast-paced. I enjoyed it a lot.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mere

    4.5 stars!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leighton

    Thank you to Avon and Harper Voyager and NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review! First off, I loved reading The Frozen Crown by Greta Kelly when it came out in January. I flew through that book - it was so easy to read - and I enjoyed it as well. I would categorize the series as between YA and adult fantasy, since the heroine is 22. My favorite aspect of that book was the political moves and court intrigue. I was reminded of watching Reign on TV. The dynamic between Askia and Ozu Thank you to Avon and Harper Voyager and NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review! First off, I loved reading The Frozen Crown by Greta Kelly when it came out in January. I flew through that book - it was so easy to read - and I enjoyed it as well. I would categorize the series as between YA and adult fantasy, since the heroine is 22. My favorite aspect of that book was the political moves and court intrigue. I was reminded of watching Reign on TV. The dynamic between Askia and Ozura reminded me so much of the dynamic between Mary Stuart and Catherine de Medici. If you enjoyed Reign but wish it had more fantasy elements, definitely check out The Frozen Queen, the first book of this duology. When I saw that I was approved to review The Seventh Queen (the second and final book of duology), I was so excited. I couldn't wait to start reading The Seventh Queen, and I'm happy to say it both met and exceeded my expectations. I enjoyed it even more than I enjoyed the first book. Thank you again to the publisher! - Warning: Spoilers for The Frozen Crown and The Seventh Queen will be below this line - If you read The Frozen Crown, then you know that the book ended on a major cliffhanger. Everything was all set for Askia's happily-ever-after when suddenly, everything gets cruelly ripped away from her. She's been kidnapped by her arch-enemy, the mad emperor Radovan, and just like with his previous wives, he plans to marry her and murder her so that he can steal her magic. When I finished the ending of The Frozen Crown, I was in disbelief, and i couldn't wait to get my hands on The Seventh Queen. Here is an excerpt from Chapter One of The Seventh Queen when Askia wakes up in Radovan's castle: "Radovan raised both hands, long fingers splayed as if to show the many riches of his stolen empire. "Welcome to Tolograd." ... I forced my hands down, pushing past the revolting realization that I had been changed and bathed while unconscious. So despite the fact that I only wore a thin white shift, I stared at Radovan as if I were swathed in silk and glittered with every jewel in my kingdom. No - empire." As I mentioned above, my favorite aspect of The Frozen Crown was reading how Askia balances what the demands of her heart with the demands of being Queen. Every move she makes, whether in court or at dinner, will have political repercussions, and she has to both clever and careful to not make the wrong move. The stakes are heightened in The Seventh Queen. The same court intrigue is present as in the first book, but now, Askia is literally in the court of her arch-enemy, who is strongly motivated to kill her. Any wrong move could result in her death or the deaths of the people of her country. Thankfully, Askia has her magical powers to help her maneuver her way in Radovan's court. Even though he has placed a chain on her to dampen her powers, she is still able to see ghosts, including the ghosts of Radovan's dead wives. Imagine having a crew of powerful women around you all the time, eager to help you defeat the tyrant who killed them. What a cool concept! If you're not really a fantasy reader, I wouldn't worry. The magical system is not complicated at all. The book reads more like a historical court novel with fantasy elements. Then, in the middle of the book, the book transcends that genre, and turns into a brutal adventure game of cat-and-mouse, as Askia and her allies escape Radovan's castle and do their best to survive. It all leads to an epic showdown at the end of the book, which left me very satisfied. Overall, if you're a fan of political novels with a dash of fantasy, or vice versa, definitely check out The Frozen Crown if you haven't already. And if you've already read The Frozen Crown and were on the fence about reading The Seventh Queen, I have to say go for it! I enjoyed The Seven Queen even more than I enjoyed The Frozen Crown. You won't regret read it when it comes out this December!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Etta (Chonky Books Review)

    The Seventh Queen is the final installment in the Warrior Witch duology. Since the series is continuous, it is highly recommended to read the first novel, The Frozen Crown, before reading this novel. This novel picks up where the last one left off and further explores the different empires, the war between them, and a lot of political intrigue. While the setting is different between the two novels, the politics, the twists and turns, and the stakes remain the same. Askia is a strong and determin The Seventh Queen is the final installment in the Warrior Witch duology. Since the series is continuous, it is highly recommended to read the first novel, The Frozen Crown, before reading this novel. This novel picks up where the last one left off and further explores the different empires, the war between them, and a lot of political intrigue. While the setting is different between the two novels, the politics, the twists and turns, and the stakes remain the same. Askia is a strong and determined character and it was nice to see her transition from a warrior to a spy to adapt to her circumstances. I eagerly anticipated finding out how everything would end. The story begins with Askia separated from those close to her as she is held captive by Emperor Radovan as his potential seventh wife. Not only is there a possible marriage on the horizon, but there is the impending danger of him stealing her magic and killing her. As a rare death witch, she begins to interact with the ghosts of the six previous queens of Rovan. She must use her magic to not only find a way to escape, but also continue to protect her people. Radovan proves to be a worthy opponent, so her quest is not easy. While she navigates from the inside of the palace, her guard, who also loves her, is set to try to rescue her. There are a few chapters from his POV, which I loved and there were more as he is an important character from both stories and it was great to see events from his perspective. The POV still mainly stays with Askia, but it was nice to add a little from Illya considering they are separated in this story compared to the first. While there are some readers that may not find this as strong as the first novel (and some that feel the opposite), I find both on fairly equal ground. The two novels worked together well as a duology and while there were some moments in this installment that I would like to be explored further in depth, I could wish the same for the first novel. The pacing of this story was a little slower than I would expect in a final installment as there is a lot of time invested into her navigating the Raven court. For me, I would have preferred the last 100 or so pages expanded on more and shorten the other parts. It was still an entertaining end to the duology with many twists along the way. Overall, this unique duology was very entertaining. While there is some action, there is a lot of focus on politics and the game that exists between rulers. With a lot of focus on the court of Vishir in the first novel and the court of Roven in this novel, it was nice to see the different politics in the world within the duology. As Askia is in Radovan’s presence, it was great to explore the villain and see more about his motivations. With Illya vying to reunite with Askia, I wish there was more from his perspective to further explore his character, but I appreciated the chapters that were included. This was a great duology with politics and ghosts and I cannot wait to read more from the author! **I give a special thank you to Netgalley and the publisher, Harper Voyager, for the chance to read this ARC. The opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.**

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashleah

    The Seventh Queen is the second book in the Warrior Queen duology by Greta Kelly. Here we follow what happens to Askia--a warrior, witch, queen, and empress--as she confronts the man/monster who stole her throne and holds her prisoner in order to steal her magic. She only has thirty days to figure out how to save herself from the fate of Emperor Radovan's previous wives. I absolutely inhaled the first book in the series, The Frozen Crown, this past May. Though I called some of the twists in the f The Seventh Queen is the second book in the Warrior Queen duology by Greta Kelly. Here we follow what happens to Askia--a warrior, witch, queen, and empress--as she confronts the man/monster who stole her throne and holds her prisoner in order to steal her magic. She only has thirty days to figure out how to save herself from the fate of Emperor Radovan's previous wives. I absolutely inhaled the first book in the series, The Frozen Crown, this past May. Though I called some of the twists in the first book, it also zagged a few times when I expected it to zig. Thanks to an amazing cliffhanger, I was very excited to be able to get my hands on an advanced copy of the conclusion from NetGalley. To be honest, I basically stalked the NetGalley site until this book was listed to be requested! Some folks have listed this as YA on Goodreads, but this feels more like Adult Fantasy to me. I could see the series being a good jump from YA for young adult readers. This is a really strong freshman outing for Greta Kelly. I think she sticks the landing. This book really picks up at about the 60% mark. Kelly does a great job at ratcheting up the tension and just keeping it there for a while, making me nervous for my favs. I've seen some other reviews that complained that this book was mostly about our queen Askia as a prisoner.t I really appreciated the way this book shows how tactically skilled Askia is on the micro scale, versus how the first book showed her leadership on a macro scale as she travels all around the world. I greatly enjoyed the growth of Askia's relationship with the ghosts of the previous six queens, and with other people in Radovan's court. We get a point of view chapter from Ilya in this book! I literally pumped my fist in the air, I was so hype about that. We also got some deep Ilya lore that I appreciated. Just like the first book, I called some of the twists but there were still quite a few times where the book really zagged when I expected it to zig. I was happily surprised by a few things in the final 10% of the book. I highly recommend this duology for fans of fantasy. Also like the first book, there's some slight romance and one particularly steamy scene that is fairly short. This duology still feels very adult fantasy and not YA, but I'd still recommend it as a good jump from YA for young adult readers. The conclusion is fairly open-ended and I really hope the author will write more in this series. Perhaps further interconnected duologies, or maybe start up a trilogy for the next part of the story of the world. Or maybe just novelas. Please, Greta Kelly, I need to know what happens to my favs. I received an advanced ebook copy of this book for review via NetGalley, but all opinions contained herein are my own.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    In the far northern city of Tolograd, Askia is the prisoner of Emperor Radovan, who stole her away from Vishir on the eve of her marriage to the now dead Emperor Armaan. Radovan aims to take Askia’s death witch powers for himself with the use of an aellium stone that strips her magic away over thirty days, after which Radovan will surely kill her. With thirty days left to live, Askia sets her sights on survival in a court full of secrets and betrayal, a goal that would feel impossible even witho In the far northern city of Tolograd, Askia is the prisoner of Emperor Radovan, who stole her away from Vishir on the eve of her marriage to the now dead Emperor Armaan. Radovan aims to take Askia’s death witch powers for himself with the use of an aellium stone that strips her magic away over thirty days, after which Radovan will surely kill her. With thirty days left to live, Askia sets her sights on survival in a court full of secrets and betrayal, a goal that would feel impossible even without the grisly timeline imposed by her new circumstances. To survive Vishir, Askia was forced to turn from warrior to politician. Now, to survive Tolograd, Askia will become a spy in a country that despises and mistrusts her for her powers, determined to find one last chance to save her country and her loved ones, if not herself, from destruction at the hands of the mad sorcerer Radovan. After the whirlwind ending of the first book, I was so excited to dive into The Seventh Queen and see the conclusion of the Warrior Witch duology. Askia is brave and tenacious, always trying to make the best of terrible situations while staying focused on the bigger picture. This book gives her so much opportunity to grow, and she gets much better at setting aside anger and discomfort so she can smooth talk Radovan, staying cool and honest without letting too much emotion leak through. Her strength lies in her ability to adapt, and to see the path through difficulties that will protect as many people as possible. There was a lot going on in this book, so many more layers of political intrigue and both magical and character history. It was interesting but felt busy at times. I felt like the author did an alright job of balancing the many new characters and interesting little reveals among the other plot points that carried forward from the first book. Askia has the benefit of the ghosts of the former queens to guide her, and where needed, reveal complex little secrets to her so that she can then share later in the book. Not the strongest story element, but it was effective, and I liked the different queens’ presences in the story. The ending felt chaotic and a little hurried too- things turn out alright, minus one rollercoaster of a romance, but I would have enjoyed more time for Askia to see her actions to a strong resolution and perhaps even see her homeland again. Altogether it was a strong second story that could have been two books with way more time to explore the new characters, their backgrounds, the repercussions of the magical disruptions around the world, the political situation, but with Askia at the center The Seventh Queen was still an entertaining and exciting read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Celene Seals

    WE HAVE A WINNER!! I thoroughly enjoyed the first book in this duology, The Frozen Crown. I loved this world and the concept this book brought with the various witches and their different specialities(fire, healer, truth, water, wind, & earth), and Askia being a rare death witch and with what all that entailed. It's fun and interesting and it brought something unique for me to enjoy. And with that heart-stopping cliffhanger at the end, I couldn't wait to dive into the second, and I'm so thankful WE HAVE A WINNER!! I thoroughly enjoyed the first book in this duology, The Frozen Crown. I loved this world and the concept this book brought with the various witches and their different specialities(fire, healer, truth, water, wind, & earth), and Askia being a rare death witch and with what all that entailed. It's fun and interesting and it brought something unique for me to enjoy. And with that heart-stopping cliffhanger at the end, I couldn't wait to dive into the second, and I'm so thankful I had it readily available! Second books sometimes don't live up to the build up or our high expectations, but I am thrilled to say that this is not the case with The Seventh Queen!! I was completely engaged in this book, more so than the first. This was an anxiety-inducing, nail-biting, I've got to find out what happens in this story book! I loved how the author wrote this book with the dead queens as major players in this storyline. It was never boring! I loved every Queen and every minute of this book. I loved the complex characters this story brought us like Qaden and Zosha. I could not put it down. I was anxious and excited to see how this story played out, but also reluctant, because I didn't want it to end. How were we going to wrap this up and I be content with that??! I am happy to say the second book is even better than the first and I'm really hoping down the road we can have a continuation of these characters and see how this story evolves! The plot twists, oh my! At one point, I literally gasped out loud, lying in bed late at night, because I did NOT see that coming, but I loved it! I can't wait for others to get to that point in the story, so I can discuss further with someone else! I will most definitely be recommending this series to friends and readers who enjoy YA and adult fantasy. I have read alot of fantasy books and it's always been my favorite genre, but it also can be the genre I am worried most about picking up and reading because I do have such high expectations for this category. It takes alot to "wow" me and this book did that! I love Sanderson, Maas, Bardugo, Wheeler, etc., and I can easily say that Greta Kelly is a major contender with this group! I am thrilled that I have read these books, discovered this author, and I look forward to reading more by Kelly! **Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for allowing me an advanced copy of this book and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my Goodreads account immediately and will post it to my Amazon & Instagram accounts upon publication.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sequoia Cron

    Thank you so much to Netgalley and Avon/Harper Voyager for allowing me to read and review this book! After the explosive ending of The Frozen Crown, THE SEVENTH QUEEN starts where we left off: Emperor Radovan has captured Askia and is keeping her prisoner in the Roven Empire. The amulet placed around her neck is pulling magic from her body and she only has 30 days to remove it and escape the clutches of Radovan. With the help of seeing the six dead Queens of Roven, Askia becomes a spy to find out Thank you so much to Netgalley and Avon/Harper Voyager for allowing me to read and review this book! After the explosive ending of The Frozen Crown, THE SEVENTH QUEEN starts where we left off: Emperor Radovan has captured Askia and is keeping her prisoner in the Roven Empire. The amulet placed around her neck is pulling magic from her body and she only has 30 days to remove it and escape the clutches of Radovan. With the help of seeing the six dead Queens of Roven, Askia becomes a spy to find out anything that could help her destroy her enemy and bring down Roven once and for all. In the Vishir Empire, the two princes left without their mother, the Queen, and their father, the Emperor, they both have to now fight to the death in order to see who will take the throne, though neither one is actually fit to rule. The Frozen Crown was one of my favorite fantasies of 2020 and being able to read and review it's sequel and conclusion, is a blessing. I greatly appreciate being able to find out what the heck happens after the crazy cliffhanger we were left on. I enjoyed THE SEVENTH QUEEN and hope to read a lot more from Greta Kelly in the future. Askia grows so much as a character, leaving her warrior roots behind for espionage. I enjoyed the interactions between her and Radovan. The two chapters from Illya's POV were great additions and I wish we had at least one or two more POVs from him or from Iskander with the fighting over the throne. I think it would have added a lot more to the story and to give us an idea of what was going on. I liked the Queen ghosts but it felt like there was too much. Askia didn't do a lot on her own, I get why she didn't and it would be easier to have the ghosts find out information for her but I felt like she counted on the Queens too much and would have been nice to see Askia take over, especially with her being a Queen herself. Askia is a badass character but I personally think her badassery got cut down while being prisoner to Radovan. Overall, I enjoyed the book and the conclusion, though I definitely wish there was "more". 4 stars

  29. 5 out of 5

    Authentikate

    Part fun. Part slog. Readers of fantasy will likely feel conflicted about this book. The second book starts just as the first book ended: Askia imprisoned. Ninety percent of this book was Askia walking around the castle grounds, talking to ghosts (part of her magic) and devising a way to escape. The plan involves some blackmail that truly could have been fleshed out more. (This isn’t a spoiler because most of the plan happens in passing/off page/ with little conflict). It was passed over and so Part fun. Part slog. Readers of fantasy will likely feel conflicted about this book. The second book starts just as the first book ended: Askia imprisoned. Ninety percent of this book was Askia walking around the castle grounds, talking to ghosts (part of her magic) and devising a way to escape. The plan involves some blackmail that truly could have been fleshed out more. (This isn’t a spoiler because most of the plan happens in passing/off page/ with little conflict). It was passed over and so the crux of her plan never seemed to *fully* happen. There were no consequences…disappointing and I don’t think people would “roll over” so easily. Weird that it felt to drag out and be rushed all in one. That takes skill (smirk). Here, readers will have hoped (in vain) that the story gets “good”… you know, the deliciously wicked rub-your-hands-together good. It doesn’t. So yeah, 90% of the book the reader is waiting (and waiting and waiting and waiting) for something to happen and when it does it’s a let down (see above) because it happens so easily. The rest of the “action” is a gratuitous sex scene (but then again, *something* needed to happen in the book) and the culmination of the “plan” which happens so fast you could blink and miss it. We do get a twist late in the book when I felt my “buy in” wane due to tedium…so, I didn’t really care. Making matters worse the story resolution was rushed. “Rushed”, come to think of it, isn’t the right word. It’s too slow a word. (Yeah…*that* rushed!) All in all, this second book of a duology read more like a bridge book to a third book. Strange pacing for a final installment. Yet, despite waning attention and interest, there were moments of enjoyment. 2.5 stars rounded up. I recommend this to those who’ve read book one and need to know how it ends. But I would wager many keen readers could guess at the ending after book one and many would be right. In that way, book two serves no real need. Sigh.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle Mathieu

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Interview up on https://newbooksnetwork.com/the-seven... The Seventh Queen (HarperCollins, 2021) is the second book in the Warrior Witch Duology, so the following review and questions for author Greta Kelly assume you’ve read the first one. If not, go get yourself a copy before listening to the podcast, so you don’t encounter any spoilers. The Frozen Crown ends with a cliffhanger. Princess Askia had travelled to Vishir in the hopes of convincing Emperor Armaan of Vishir to help her liberate her ow Interview up on https://newbooksnetwork.com/the-seven... The Seventh Queen (HarperCollins, 2021) is the second book in the Warrior Witch Duology, so the following review and questions for author Greta Kelly assume you’ve read the first one. If not, go get yourself a copy before listening to the podcast, so you don’t encounter any spoilers. The Frozen Crown ends with a cliffhanger. Princess Askia had travelled to Vishir in the hopes of convincing Emperor Armaan of Vishir to help her liberate her own kingdom of Seravesh. Seravesh, like many other countries, fell to the Roven Empire, ruled by Radovan. Radovan magnanimously offered to marry Askia himself and restore peace to her country. The biggest problem with his offer was that none of his wives survived more than six months. And then, of course, he dealt with dissent by ordering his fire witch to burn down entire towns along with the inhabitants. By the end of The Frozen Crown, Askia has a promising protector for her besieged country in the person of her husband-to-be, the polygamous but noble and charismatic Emperor Armaan of Vishir. The wedding and consummation of their union is disrupted when Radovan, a powerful witch, kills Armaan and his chief wife and kidnaps Askia. In The Seventh Queen we learn the secret to Radovan’s power. He steals the magic from his wives through the means of a magic stone, and he only needs Askia, a rare death witch, to complete his mastery over all forms of magic. Askia learns she has about a month before the stone fastened around her neck drains her completely of her power. In the meantime, the stone prevents her from using her magic , and lets Radovan to control her. Bereft of her magic and without her guards or sympathetic allies at court, Askia has to rely on her wits to exploit Radovan’s weaknesses, and make a plan to best him—no matter what it costs her personally.

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