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Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness Are the Keys to Understanding the True Nature of the Universe

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Robert Lanza is one of the most respected scientists in the world—a US News & World Report cover story called him a "genius" and a "renegade thinker," even likening him to Einstein. Lanza has teamed with Bob Berman, the most widely read astronomer in the world, to produce Biocentrism, a revolutionary new view of the universe. Every now and then a simple yet radical idea sha Robert Lanza is one of the most respected scientists in the world—a US News & World Report cover story called him a "genius" and a "renegade thinker," even likening him to Einstein. Lanza has teamed with Bob Berman, the most widely read astronomer in the world, to produce Biocentrism, a revolutionary new view of the universe. Every now and then a simple yet radical idea shakes the very foundations of knowledge. The startling discovery that the world was not flat challenged and ultimately changed the way people perceived themselves and their relationship with the world. For most humans of the 15th century, the notion of Earth as ball of rock was nonsense. The whole of Western, natural philosophy is undergoing a sea change again, increasingly being forced upon us by the experimental findings of quantum theory, and at the same time, towards doubt and uncertainty in the physical explanations of the universe’s genesis and structure. Biocentrism completes this shift in worldview, turning the planet upside down again with the revolutionary view that life creates the universe instead of the other way around. In this paradigm, life is not an accidental byproduct of the laws of physics. Biocentrism takes the reader on a seemingly improbable but ultimately inescapable journey through a foreign universe—our own—from the viewpoints of an acclaimed biologist and a leading astronomer. Switching perspective from physics to biology unlocks the cages in which Western science has unwittingly managed to confine itself. Biocentrism will shatter the reader’s ideas of life—time and space, and even death. At the same time it will release us from the dull worldview of life being merely the activity of an admixture of carbon and a few other elements; it suggests the exhilarating possibility that life is fundamentally immortal. The 21st century is predicted to be the Century of Biology, a shift from the previous century dominated by physics. It seems fitting, then, to begin the century by turning the universe outside-in and unifying the foundations of science with a simple idea discovered by one of the leading life-scientists of our age. Biocentrism awakens in readers a new sense of possibility, and is full of so many shocking new perspectives that the reader will never see reality the same way again.


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Robert Lanza is one of the most respected scientists in the world—a US News & World Report cover story called him a "genius" and a "renegade thinker," even likening him to Einstein. Lanza has teamed with Bob Berman, the most widely read astronomer in the world, to produce Biocentrism, a revolutionary new view of the universe. Every now and then a simple yet radical idea sha Robert Lanza is one of the most respected scientists in the world—a US News & World Report cover story called him a "genius" and a "renegade thinker," even likening him to Einstein. Lanza has teamed with Bob Berman, the most widely read astronomer in the world, to produce Biocentrism, a revolutionary new view of the universe. Every now and then a simple yet radical idea shakes the very foundations of knowledge. The startling discovery that the world was not flat challenged and ultimately changed the way people perceived themselves and their relationship with the world. For most humans of the 15th century, the notion of Earth as ball of rock was nonsense. The whole of Western, natural philosophy is undergoing a sea change again, increasingly being forced upon us by the experimental findings of quantum theory, and at the same time, towards doubt and uncertainty in the physical explanations of the universe’s genesis and structure. Biocentrism completes this shift in worldview, turning the planet upside down again with the revolutionary view that life creates the universe instead of the other way around. In this paradigm, life is not an accidental byproduct of the laws of physics. Biocentrism takes the reader on a seemingly improbable but ultimately inescapable journey through a foreign universe—our own—from the viewpoints of an acclaimed biologist and a leading astronomer. Switching perspective from physics to biology unlocks the cages in which Western science has unwittingly managed to confine itself. Biocentrism will shatter the reader’s ideas of life—time and space, and even death. At the same time it will release us from the dull worldview of life being merely the activity of an admixture of carbon and a few other elements; it suggests the exhilarating possibility that life is fundamentally immortal. The 21st century is predicted to be the Century of Biology, a shift from the previous century dominated by physics. It seems fitting, then, to begin the century by turning the universe outside-in and unifying the foundations of science with a simple idea discovered by one of the leading life-scientists of our age. Biocentrism awakens in readers a new sense of possibility, and is full of so many shocking new perspectives that the reader will never see reality the same way again.

30 review for Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness Are the Keys to Understanding the True Nature of the Universe

  1. 4 out of 5

    William Richburg

    A Worldview That Works For The 21st Century Perhaps the most important book about science ever written. The authors, both scientists with impeccable credentials, have made an enormous contribution to human civilization that will raise the consciousness of every serious open minded reader.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Susan Botich

    Robert Lanza has been noted as a brilliant biologist, having accomplished significant breakthroughs in stem cell research as well as other contributions to medical science. In Biocentrism, he elucidates an extremely challenging concept for the reader bound to the status quo to grasp: that the universe is actually a perception of consciousness, not a static "out there" reality. Lanza explains step-by-step how this is so, using known and quantified laws of physics and other sciences, and explains Robert Lanza has been noted as a brilliant biologist, having accomplished significant breakthroughs in stem cell research as well as other contributions to medical science. In Biocentrism, he elucidates an extremely challenging concept for the reader bound to the status quo to grasp: that the universe is actually a perception of consciousness, not a static "out there" reality. Lanza explains step-by-step how this is so, using known and quantified laws of physics and other sciences, and explains his claim in an exquisite, elegant yet easy-to-understand language so that any lay person can easily grasp what he is saying. He also has a wonderful sense of humor that pops through at the most unexpected times that brings a lightheartedness to the weight of his subject. I highly recommend this book to everyone who enjoys exploring the age-old quandary of the origin of the universe.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Delta

    This is one of those books that I will always believe changed my life. It's also going to be one of the few books I read more than once. Biocentrism helped me understand how I am not alone in this universe, but a part of it, and realize that I do matter in the grand scheme of things, if only to create the world around me. I came across this theory after reading James Rollins' "The Eye of God" and it was nothing like I expected. Since reading this book I have felt much closer to the universe and This is one of those books that I will always believe changed my life. It's also going to be one of the few books I read more than once. Biocentrism helped me understand how I am not alone in this universe, but a part of it, and realize that I do matter in the grand scheme of things, if only to create the world around me. I came across this theory after reading James Rollins' "The Eye of God" and it was nothing like I expected. Since reading this book I have felt much closer to the universe and more aware of the world around me. I have comforted friends who suffer from bouts of depression and loneliness, including myself. Don't get me wrong, this is a difficult read; possibly the most difficult I have ever read. But if you put the time into it and really apply the concepts, it could open you up to a world you never knew was around you.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wayne

    This book of biocentrism is a scientific book. It is one of the best books I have ever read. Not that it was entertaining. It wasn't. What this book did was introduce me to some of the most amazing experimental accomplished in the realm of quantum physics and some conclusions that can be drawn. There is not any argument in the scientific community about much of the results of experiments in quantum physics but it has become clear that quantum physic is ill equipped to explain many things. Thus c This book of biocentrism is a scientific book. It is one of the best books I have ever read. Not that it was entertaining. It wasn't. What this book did was introduce me to some of the most amazing experimental accomplished in the realm of quantum physics and some conclusions that can be drawn. There is not any argument in the scientific community about much of the results of experiments in quantum physics but it has become clear that quantum physic is ill equipped to explain many things. Thus came along biocentrism. The concepts in biocentrism has its roots in quantum physic testing but a great deal of thought and reflection is required to objectively delve into this exciting new field. One of the quantum physics experiments that is astounding is the two photons that go through a slit and are divided by space. Observing one photon which is a subatomic particle causes it to change and exhibit wave characteristics with vertical polarization. The twin photon separated by considerable space immediately changes from a particle to a wave with horizontal polarization. This leads to a conclusion that philosophers for years have speculated upon. Space and time do not exist in the real universe but are only fabrications of the human mind to enable us to sort things out. Another concept is that if you could travel at the speed of light you could be everywhere in the universe at the same time. Putting it another way if you were in a space ship approaching the speed of light the cosmos would look like a basketball in front of you. For engineers, philosophers, and scientist this is a must read book. I think everybody should read this book. This book gets as close to religion as science has ever done. I love reading science books that explain complex ideas in a way that can be easy visualized. This book does this. The more I learn the more the reality of a supreme being and eternal life are manifested. The body dies but the spirit lives on. As the scientists will say energy never is destroyed it only changes form. And science shows we are energy. It can be measure as equivalent to a 100 watt light bulb. So read this book and let your mind be stretched. You will find it fascinating.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Wulf

    After reading a lot on relativity, quantum mechanics, and consciousness, this is the first book where I felt that the author had a solid grasp of all three and was able to bring something to the conversation. The Western scientific revolution was predicated on an ontology of objective things that had an existence independent of observers. The periodic table we encountered in high school science is a good example. It exists independent of the reader of the table or the observer of the elements. Th After reading a lot on relativity, quantum mechanics, and consciousness, this is the first book where I felt that the author had a solid grasp of all three and was able to bring something to the conversation. The Western scientific revolution was predicated on an ontology of objective things that had an existence independent of observers. The periodic table we encountered in high school science is a good example. It exists independent of the reader of the table or the observer of the elements. The observer is an afterthought, and superfluous to the elements, which have their own concrete existence. However, this view of the world - though utilitarian in that it produces technology such as the computer I am using to write this review - ignores that the entire ontological structure is in fact built through the very observation of the observer that it ignores. The book begins by examining the Zen-koan-like question "If a tree falls in the woods and there is no-one there to hear it, does it make a sound?" The authors approach this question in a way that distinguishes sense perception from the phenomena it perceives. "Sound" is a perception - it requires an observer. Things do not make sound - we perceive certain phenomena as sound. Sound is an emergent phenomenon at the intersection of consciousness, senses, and stimulus. The author uses this to show how closely, and transparently, consciousness and observing are bound to our observations; and how difficult it is for us to reason about the world with this distinction. This is by no means the first time I'd encountered the question of the tree in the woods, but before reading this, it had never occurred to me that the language of "sound" intrinsically implies an observer. Otherwise the "what happened" is merely pressure waves in air. These only become "sound" when perceived through the ear of an observer that processes this phenomenon as sound. No observer = no "sound"; merely pressure waves. Observation is invisibly embedded in our language and the ideal of objectivity promoted by classical science is an illusion. Lanza uses this example to cause the observer to show up in classical physics. This is just the beginning, though. The discoveries of Quantum Mechanics, beginning in the 20th century, turned the ontological basis of science on its head. It turns out that the universe does not exist in the concrete fashion depicted in the periodic table when no-one is looking at it. Ignoring the consciousness of the tree for the moment - if there is no observer present, not only does the tree not make a sound when it falls - it doesn't even exist! Not only the existence of concrete elements beginning from atoms, but even the phenomenon of time and space themselves are dependent on observation. In other words, time and space are not an objective background against which reality takes place, but rather they emerge from the interaction of the universe and our experience. Consciousness really is at the centre of everything that we know about the world. Time and space, and even concrete matter do not appear unless consciousness is present. Quantum mechanical experiments have given us knowledge of what the universe "looks like" when no-one is looking: it is an uncollapsed wave function - a state of undetermined probability. Relativity was the first clue that experience dictates the nature of reality - with changes to space and time taking place depending on the observer - and quantum mechanics has shown that it is not merely a late-stage artifact of reality, but at its very core. Lanza then takes us further, to show how the primacy of consciousness not only explains both relativity and quantum mechanics, but reconciles the two. Having personally spent over a decade studying yoga and Eastern philosophy, in addition to my western scientific and engineering education and career, I found this book to come the closest of any I have read to date in presenting an accurate synthesis of the two. I've read many books that misrepresented either, and sometimes both, in their efforts. Having given the author credit for presenting a synthesis, in some respects his original material represents a more accurate presentation of ancient ideas than when he is explicitly presenting "Eastern religion" or philosophy. Those parts are a superficial presentation, dwelling on the popularly-known aspects like unified consciousness (Advaita) or reincarnation. There are other aspects of Vedic cosmology that are more interesting in light of the findings of relativity and quantum mechanics and the desire of the author to explain these things in light of consciousness. In a discourse on the nature of the material world (a section of Eastern philosophy known as "Sankhya" or "Distinction"), material nature is described in the Srimad Bhagavatam as "pradhana" - an undifferentiated state of potential: "The unmanifested eternal combination of the three modes is the cause of the manifest state and is called pradhana. It is called prakriti when in the manifested stage of existence." SB. 3.26.10 The discussion continues to describe the various object of sense perception ("sound", "sight", etc), the sense organs ("ears", "eyes"), which are material, and then the senses ("hearing", "vision") and mental apparatus, which are of a subtle material nature, through which consciousness experiences the world (SB. 3.26.11-14), and then explains that both time and the appearance of space of variegated experience arise from the undifferentiated material potentiality through the injection of consciousness (SB.3.26.15-19). This is, in fact, the argument being made by Lanza in this book. Quantum mechanical experiments reveal that the world exists as a cloud of undifferentiated, unmanifested "probability" until experienced by consciousness through senses, at which point it "collapses" into a deterministic state. The author of this book comes down against the Many Worlds interpretation of QM. Personally, I find the Many Worlds interpretation of QM to be more in line with the descriptions given in Bhagavatam, which - in addition to the consciousness-first nature of reality, and sensory-driven wave form collapse - deals with karma - fate and freewill. An Einsteinian block universe is experienced by living entities as a sequence of events. However, the sequence is "predetermined" in that time is a subjective experience - not an objective reality. This gives us a universe in which past, present, and future are already written, and are merely experienced sequentially. (Don't worry if you don't get that immediately - it took me a lot of reading about the implications of the physics arrow of time to get that). However, QM demonstrates that quantum uncertainty exists. This is one of the issues in reconciling Newtonian/Einsteinian physics of the macro-world with the Quantum Mechanical nature of the microscopic. The Many Worlds interpretation of QM allows that an unlimited number of static, predetermined Einsteinian block universes exist, but which universe you are in can change at every moment. Exactly this scenario is described in Bhagavad-gita, where Arjuna is shown "the Universal Form" - a vision of the Einsteinian block universe in which past, present, and future are all present and visible. He is told that the fate of his enemies is already sealed, but he has the free will to become the agent of that fate. The stage is set, the script is written, but the casting is open. In this model predetermination and free will co-exist, as they do in a Choose-Your-Own-Adventure. All the paths are there, already written; but which one you are on can change. The factors that influence the flow of a living entity through different paths (different universes == different fates) are discussed in Srimad Bhagavatam, Bhagavad-gita, and many other texts of Buddhist and Vedic-derivation. I'm looking forward to the book that builds on Lanza's offering with a more detailed exposition of the relationship between relativity, QM, and consciousness; the insights available in Eastern philosophies, and the issues of fate and free will. In some universes there will be a Joshua Wulf reading it. In others Joshua Wulf will be the writer. I wonder which one I will experience?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Before reading this book, I had always thought of time as somehow real. But now I know it isn't. Whey you look at a distant star, you think you are seeing light millions of years old. This is only because the science, in the last hundred years or so, has told us so. But, quantum entanglement means that if I am on that distant star, and I am quantumly entangled with you, the reader, then things happen simultaneously. These two principles seem to violate each other. How can things be millions of l Before reading this book, I had always thought of time as somehow real. But now I know it isn't. Whey you look at a distant star, you think you are seeing light millions of years old. This is only because the science, in the last hundred years or so, has told us so. But, quantum entanglement means that if I am on that distant star, and I am quantumly entangled with you, the reader, then things happen simultaneously. These two principles seem to violate each other. How can things be millions of light years apart but acting simultaneously? Here is a quote from Wikipedia: "Like Einstein, Schrödinger was dissatisfied with the concept of entanglement, because it seemed to violate the speed limit on the transmission of information implicit in the theory of relativity.[16] Einstein later famously derided entanglement as "spukhafte Fernwirkung"[17] or "spooky action at a distance."" But, as the observer knows, they are seeing the light from the stars now, as you look at that star, in the evening, in the sky, and hear the trees rustle around you. The time is now, not millions of years ago. It is all a very clever illusion, and we are creating it with our completely lost-from-source minds. And we believe it to be "real" and out of our control. But it is we, the observer, who are out of control. We need to become better observers. This book helps.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    I want all of my friends to read this so we can talk about it for hours. My only problem with this book was some questions he left answered (which did not compromise my rating because questions are not the same as criticism.) His premise is logically viable, it works very well with Bohm's hypothesis; however I would have enjoyed him exploring more of the various states of consciousness or even more of the neuroscience behind consciousness. I think it would have strengthened his argument if he wa I want all of my friends to read this so we can talk about it for hours. My only problem with this book was some questions he left answered (which did not compromise my rating because questions are not the same as criticism.) His premise is logically viable, it works very well with Bohm's hypothesis; however I would have enjoyed him exploring more of the various states of consciousness or even more of the neuroscience behind consciousness. I think it would have strengthened his argument if he was able to elaborate, for consciousness is not a static entity. Brain waves, for example: alpha, beta, theta, and delta, sleep, dreaming & altered states of consciousness that can come about through psychoactive drugs or meditation. Anyway, this was an amazing, horizon-expanding altered view of the universe. It annoyed me to read in some of the reviews that this was a philosophy book when he clearly used experiments and data from the literature to prove every point he made. It's like people skipped the intro, skimmed the first view paragraphs in each chapter and wrote it off as a new-age concept book written by a hippie. If life exists because consciousness exists, that could be the "theory of everything" that physicists & philosophers alike have been looking for since man could "think, therefore I am."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Linda Robinson

    Reading science/cosmology/metaphysical in combination makes me forget my name and all my passwords. But I zipped right through this book which leads me to believe that I am already on the path, or I totally don't get it. The book quotes a Zen saying, "Name the color, blind the eye," and perhaps putting a label to consciousness does the same to awareness. But the book addresses questions I have now. What was there before the Big Bang? What is the universe expanding into? Quantum physics doesn't a Reading science/cosmology/metaphysical in combination makes me forget my name and all my passwords. But I zipped right through this book which leads me to believe that I am already on the path, or I totally don't get it. The book quotes a Zen saying, "Name the color, blind the eye," and perhaps putting a label to consciousness does the same to awareness. But the book addresses questions I have now. What was there before the Big Bang? What is the universe expanding into? Quantum physics doesn't answer. The answer cannot be nothing, because nothing is not model-based reality. Quantum physics is working on finding a Grand Unified Theory (GUT) that wraps all this up nicely. In waves or strings, or M-theory, or vintage jacquard ribbon? Superposition experiments now underway might reveal something. But what if, the authors of Biocentrism query, what if consciousness is what created it all? Suppose that external and internal are just language distinctions. Suppose time and space are constructs of our consciousness?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Venturoni

    I bought this book a couple of years ago on a whim, and it forever changed how I look at the universe. Biocentrism is scientific theory mixed in with some philosophy and metaphysics. Lanza does a good balancing act, and his theories are compelling. The idea that physicists have had it exactly backward the past hundred-plus years, that the universe is in fact a construct of our own minds and cannot exist without us, not the other way around, is mindblowing. I think Lanza is onto something

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kitap

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read this book at the prompting of a friend from a church I frequent. He is an emeritus professor of biology who recommended this book to me by way of answering my question about how he reconciles science, specifically neo-Darwinian evolution, with his liberal Anabaptist Christian theology. I'm not sure I'm satisfied with that answer. Anyhow, here is the spoiler, all Lanza's "Principle of Biocentrism" spelled out as on pp. 159-60: (view spoiler)[ First Principle of Biocenrism: What we per I read this book at the prompting of a friend from a church I frequent. He is an emeritus professor of biology who recommended this book to me by way of answering my question about how he reconciles science, specifically neo-Darwinian evolution, with his liberal Anabaptist Christian theology. I'm not sure I'm satisfied with that answer. Anyhow, here is the spoiler, all Lanza's "Principle of Biocentrism" spelled out as on pp. 159-60: (view spoiler)[ First Principle of Biocenrism: What we perceive as reality is a process that involves our consciousness. An "external" reality, if it existed, would—by definition—have to exist in space. But this is meaningless, because space and time are not absolute realities but rather tools of the human and animal mind. Second Principle of Biocentrism: Our external and internal perceptions are inextricably intertwined. They are different sides of the same coin and cannot be divorced from one another. Third Principle of Biocentrism: The behavior of subatomics particles—indeed all particles and objects—are inextricably linked to the presence of an observer. Without the presence of a conscious observer, they at best exist in an undetermined state of probability waves. Fourth Principle of Biocentrism: Without consciousness, "matter" dwells in a undetermined state of probability. Any universe that could have preceded consciousness only existed in a probability state. Fifth Principle of Biocentrism: The structure of the universe is explainable only through biocentrism. The universe is fine-tuned for life, which makes perfect sense as life creates the universe, not the other way around. The "universe" is simply the complete spatio-temporal logic of the self. Sixth Principle of Biocentrism: Time does not have a real existence outside of animal-sense perception. It is the process by which we perceived changes in the universe. Seventh Principle of Biocentrism: Space, like time, is not an object or a thing. Space is another form of our animal understanding and does not have an independent reality. We carry space and time around with us like turtles with shells. Thus, there is no absolute self-existing matrix in which physical events occur independent of life. (hide spoiler)] No surprise, the reception to this book by the scientific community has been mixed, because its major premise challenges "common sense," the basic presumption, scientific or otherwise, that the world "out there" is real. While I wouldn't go so far as to call the book's thesis "baloney" as has another reviewer (mainly because I am agnostic about the nature of reality and the ability of talking monkeys to encapsulate it, either in ink squiggles on a page or through small mouth noises) I would definitely agree that this book fails to make a persuasive case for a thesis that is, to put it mildly, counterintuitive. Additionally, I have to wonder if the author really set out to write his memoirs rather than a philosophical treatise, because at least 20% of the material in the book consists of details from the author's life that have little, if any, bearing on his thesis. I now know that Lanza's dad was a gambler, that his sister became a mentally ill drug addict, that Lanza had many brushes with greatness as a young man (he even makes a comment about the value of name-dropping!), what his 10-acre island property looks like, and that many media outlets regard him as a "genius." [N]othing can be perceived that is not already interacting with our consciousness, which is why biocentric axiom number one is that nature or the so-called external world must be correlative with consciousness. One doesn't exist without the other. What this means is that when we do not look at the Moon the Moon effectively vanishes—which, subjectively, is obvious enough. If we still think of the Moon and believe that it's out there orbiting the Earth, or accept that other people are probably watching it, all such thoughts are mental constructs. The bottom-line issue here is if no consciousness existed at all, in what sense would the Moon persist, and in what form? (p. 35) When we observe the words printed in a book, its paper seemingly a foot away, is not being perceived—the image, the paper, is the perception—and as such, it is contained in the logic of this neurocircuitry. A correlative reality encompasses everything, with only language providing separation between external and internal, between there and here. Is this matrix of neurons and atoms fashioned in an energy field of Mind? (p. 149) Lanza's actual thesis of "biocentrism" isn't actually all that novel. It is a re-packaging of Advaita Vedanta and Mahayana Buddhist understandings of Mind and Reality (as Lanza notes several times). It is a rehashing of the same "quantum mysticism" that is popular with the New Age, paradigm-shifting crowds (it is good to remember that there are multiple interpretations of quantum "weirdness" and thus that Lanza's isn't the only one). It draws on similar insights as Robert Anton Wilson's, and others', about how the mind is inextricably bound up with the world-as-perceived. For example, neuroscience agrees that the screen I see as I type these words is not something "out there" that is being perceived by me "in here," but that instead my perception of the screen consists of my brain organizing various energetic signals coming in through my senses and structuring them in such a way as to "create" the visual field/sensorium that I perceive as "out there." Meanwhile, the fly on the monitor receives different signals and interprets them as a gigantic wall upon which to stand, and so on. It is a truism to say that reality as we know it is only possible through our mechanisms of knowing, and so I have no problem agreeing that any of our experiences are only experienced because we are alive and aware to experience them. Any comment we can make about the "external" world is necessarily about our perceptions of that world, rather than the world-as-it-is. Questions about the absolute nature of a world separate from human consciousness of that world cannot be answered in any meaningful way, and as far as we know, because it is the only way we can know, "reality" arises as correlated subject and object, whatever that means. I can buy that, and it ain't news to the philosophical traditions of India and China, as well as to many Western philosophers. (In case you can't tell, I am a little irked at Lanza and his publicist for the grandiosity with which his "revolutionary ideas" are presented.) But it is one thing to note that there is an inextricable correlation in our lived experience between "inside" and "outside," and quite another to assert that this proves that there is in fact no world "out there" independent of the perceptions of minded, living beings. It proves instead that, by definition, we do not and cannot know what, if anything, the universe is like without minds to perceive it, and reminds at least this reader that some questions don't lend themselves to answers.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jafar

    This book is a bunch of baloney. When I read The Master and His Emissary a few weeks ago, I complained that McGilchrist had written such a large tome to support his claim that I got lost putting it together. Lanza has gone to the other extreme. He’s making pretty much the biggest claim that anyone can make, i.e., explaining existence itself, and he’s put together a few chapters of hogwash to prove it. Lanza is not only sloppy in every aspect, he comes off totally smug and arrogant. You can almos This book is a bunch of baloney. When I read The Master and His Emissary a few weeks ago, I complained that McGilchrist had written such a large tome to support his claim that I got lost putting it together. Lanza has gone to the other extreme. He’s making pretty much the biggest claim that anyone can make, i.e., explaining existence itself, and he’s put together a few chapters of hogwash to prove it. Lanza is not only sloppy in every aspect, he comes off totally smug and arrogant. You can almost read “Look, aren’t I a genius” between the lines. He’s inserted a few stories from his own personal life for no apparent reason but self-infatuation. Lanza explicitly denies the reality of time and space. Implicitly, he also denies the existence of an objective reality outside ourselves. Nothing exists out there if there is no “consciousness” to observe it. He stays clear of defining this consciousness and explaining how it came about if nothing existed prior to it. What he offers in term of “scientific proof” is: a) the infamous double-slit experiment of quantum mechanics; b) the amazing fact that the constants of physics appear as if they’d been fine-tuned for the eventual emergence of starts and planets and life. As puzzling and inexplicable these two may be (there are theories and explanations), none of them can support Lanza’s claim by any stretch of imagination. The only chapter worth reading in the book is the one about the double-slit experiment and its different ingenious variations. I should have taken Deepak Chopra’s endorsement of this book as a bad sign. Lanza plays defensive in the introduction and says that he’s not trying to prove any New Age philosophies (I have to give him credit for realizing that this would be quite bad for a book that claims to be scientific), but in the end what he says is not more than some New Age mumbo-jumbo about the universe being a single and continuous consciousness, etc. – all with the pretense of being scientific.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Connor Adams

    Robert Lanza steps forward to prompt a paradigm shift in the way we think. For those of us who have been waiting for science to finally tackle (Or at least tickle) the behemoth question of consciousness and produce a piece of literature that can practically influence us in a down to earth manner regarding our daily rituals, without boiling down reality to a mass of random stupidity; this is for you. A wonderful, colourful read, striking the perfect balance between fact, story and wonder, leaving Robert Lanza steps forward to prompt a paradigm shift in the way we think. For those of us who have been waiting for science to finally tackle (Or at least tickle) the behemoth question of consciousness and produce a piece of literature that can practically influence us in a down to earth manner regarding our daily rituals, without boiling down reality to a mass of random stupidity; this is for you. A wonderful, colourful read, striking the perfect balance between fact, story and wonder, leaving out all the 'spooky knowledge' that so taints previous explanations of the sorts. Would recommend to all.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Sylvester

    “Biocentrism” by Robert Lanza and Robert Berman is excellent. Lanza is an M.D., and advanced cell scientist, and Berman a famous astronomer. They propose that life creates the universe and not the other way around, and that biology should be the discipline used to develop a “theory of everything” that accounts for life and consciousness to better understand reality, being and the cosmos. According to Lanza the physics model that Western science has employed has reached its limits in attempting t “Biocentrism” by Robert Lanza and Robert Berman is excellent. Lanza is an M.D., and advanced cell scientist, and Berman a famous astronomer. They propose that life creates the universe and not the other way around, and that biology should be the discipline used to develop a “theory of everything” that accounts for life and consciousness to better understand reality, being and the cosmos. According to Lanza the physics model that Western science has employed has reached its limits in attempting to explain the age-old questions raised by philosophers and theologians regarding the cosmos, the origin of existence and consciousness. Lanza challenges readers to question the claims of contemporary science such as where the Big Bang came from, the probability of our existence, and how consciousness arose from matter. Essentially Lanza makes the case that the more we know, the less we understand, and that answering the aforesaid questions requires a fundamental shift away from physics and toward biology. By extension, Lanza suggests the theory he proposes, Biocentrism, provides the answers physics cannot answer. Beyond offering the basis for a complete paradigm shift that opens new lines of investigation in physics and cosmology, Lanza suggests other researchers conduct “quantum superposition” experiments to either confirm or refute the theory. Like any decent resource, Lanza spends much of his time declaring the limitations of what we know before proceeding with his proposed theory that could help close those gaps. For example, we now know that 96% of the universe is dark energy and dark matter but we have little idea of what those are or how they operate. We understand and guide our lives based on animal conceptions of time and space but both are illusory. We have academic fleets dedicated to brain science but the holes in the methodologies used to explain consciousness is never discussed (a problem particularly rife in behavioral ‘science’). We suggest that life was an incredibly improbable chance event when it is more probable the universe was fine-tuned to support life. We operate within the confines of human language and logic, and due to these limitations, are “constitutional materialists, hard-wired, designed, to think linearly”, always seeking sociological and scientific certainty upon which to base the order of our lives. Much of biocentrism is explained through Lanza and Berman’s understandings of quantum theory and the bizarre relationships between subatomic particles. I have read several breakdowns of this theory by different scholars and felt Lanza’s was well explained. He also uses variations of the Anthropic Principle to support his arguments and ultimately concludes that consciousness must exist beyond our terrestrial realm, and that the content of our minds constitute “reality”, as humans throughout history have always suspected. Structurally Lanza’s book is user-friendly, particularly at the end where Lanza breaks down “Answers to Basic Questions” and the different ways in which Classical Science, Western Religions and advocates of Biocentrism would respond. The dialogue he sets forth helps exemplify what Western science cannot know and what Biocentrism can provide in consideration of the gaps exposed. I have also found fascinating how many scholars, building upon recent theoretical findings in physics, have concluded that these new theories increasingly support multi-universe, BiosLogos, and the Anthropic theories, the tenets of which line up with various aspects of millennia old Eastern religions. 5 stars out of 5 for Lanza and Berman!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    Brain successfully fried.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katelynd Rallo

    At first I thought these guys were full of it. Everything that they started to approach seemed common sense and to be already proven with psychology and philosophy which in my mind are not to be considered a "science". I decided it would be best to actually read the whole book before making a proper judgement. As I read I realized the point. If you rated this book a low rating it's probably because you didn't get it. Trust me it took me a few times to read this just to grasp the concept fully. I At first I thought these guys were full of it. Everything that they started to approach seemed common sense and to be already proven with psychology and philosophy which in my mind are not to be considered a "science". I decided it would be best to actually read the whole book before making a proper judgement. As I read I realized the point. If you rated this book a low rating it's probably because you didn't get it. Trust me it took me a few times to read this just to grasp the concept fully. I have always been on the side of science and never believed perception or consciousness were relevant when discussing the matters of the universe. I love science because there is always an answer and there are very few exceptions to the laws and theories we have developed over the course of human history. What makes this book special is it's ability to force the reader to realize their place. The only reason why anything exists is because we exist to perceive it. I hate to admit it but psychology and philosophy may actually have a place in the world of science, something you would never catch me saying out loud.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This book must be read twice! I am into my second read and the clarity is overwhelming. Lanza points out and illustrates the flaws in majorly accepted scientific theory about the universe and how it is, and offers up the only possible alternative in his theory of Biocentrism -- a universe that springs from life (the observer), instead of a universe that exists independently of life.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    This book is fantastic. It presents a worldview entirely new to me, rooted in science and very exciting. Some of the science blew my mind. The only thing I still struggle with is other consciousness. Does reality exist where not you as the individual, but someone else sees it? How is consciousness tied to the individual? It probably isn't, because the book makes clear there are clear hints to a single consciousness (and no free will), but regardless, I'm still struggling with those questions. This book is fantastic. It presents a worldview entirely new to me, rooted in science and very exciting. Some of the science blew my mind. The only thing I still struggle with is other consciousness. Does reality exist where not you as the individual, but someone else sees it? How is consciousness tied to the individual? It probably isn't, because the book makes clear there are clear hints to a single consciousness (and no free will), but regardless, I'm still struggling with those questions.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Denise みか Hutchins

    I purchased this book when I saw it mentioned on an episode of Through the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman. It was presented there as an alternative to the preeminent string theory and I was enchanted by the idea. However, what I learned from this book ended up being so much more than that. Not only does Biocentrism, the theory, do more than simply explain the strange behavior of quantum particles, Biocentrism, the book, was an excellent starting point for all kinds of scientific knowledge. I didn’t I purchased this book when I saw it mentioned on an episode of Through the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman. It was presented there as an alternative to the preeminent string theory and I was enchanted by the idea. However, what I learned from this book ended up being so much more than that. Not only does Biocentrism, the theory, do more than simply explain the strange behavior of quantum particles, Biocentrism, the book, was an excellent starting point for all kinds of scientific knowledge. I didn’t just learn about a new theory, I learned about the various scientific experiments and scientific theories that lead the authors to come to the Biocentrism conclusion. If ever I so choose, I can find my way to all that additional science through this book’s bibliography and expand my scientific knowledge even further. I think this is the main reason I LOVED reading this book: it didn’t just shove a new idea in my face and say, “There! Accept it!”, it took the time to explain itself and teach me new things along the way. The two main facets, learning the tenets of a new and wildly different scientific theory and learning about all the solid evidence that supports that theory, worked in harmony to make the whole book extremely readable and eternally fascinating. Whether or not you end up convinced about this idea’s validity (I certainly am!), this is still an excellent book that sparks new ideas, can elicit extreme emotional response in its reader, is written in an easy style sprinkled with dry humor, and leads the reader to even more avenues of scientific exploration. My view of life and existence has been wholly altered by this book and I’m extremely glad I read it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Neil Hayes

    The central point of this book is that consciousness creates the universe, not the other way round. Although not a new insight, this compelling book is the best I have read to bring home the importance of this phenomenon, and the simplest explanation of the quantum physics behind it. Interweaved with the science is a charmingly personal account of some defining experiences in Lanza's life. A wonderful book, and to me a must-read for any student of the mind, the universe, or indeed practically an The central point of this book is that consciousness creates the universe, not the other way round. Although not a new insight, this compelling book is the best I have read to bring home the importance of this phenomenon, and the simplest explanation of the quantum physics behind it. Interweaved with the science is a charmingly personal account of some defining experiences in Lanza's life. A wonderful book, and to me a must-read for any student of the mind, the universe, or indeed practically anything.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Richard Pinnell

    The central theme of this book is that life creates the universe and that consciousness lies at the center of existence. This is not a new idea and there is absolutely nothing new in this book. Lanza draws on two main sources to back up this idea. The first is that consciousness appears to cause the wave function to collapse in the famous double slit experiment. The second concerns the anthropic principle and how it seems that universe is uncannily just right for life. Both of these 'proofs' are The central theme of this book is that life creates the universe and that consciousness lies at the center of existence. This is not a new idea and there is absolutely nothing new in this book. Lanza draws on two main sources to back up this idea. The first is that consciousness appears to cause the wave function to collapse in the famous double slit experiment. The second concerns the anthropic principle and how it seems that universe is uncannily just right for life. Both of these 'proofs' are open to various interpretations including the possibility that consciousness does indeed lie at the center of creation. However, that is only one possible conclusion that can be drawn and Lanza adds absolutely zero to the debate. He uses his book to lambaste physics and physicists for such like as not being able to tell us what came before the big bang, whilst at the same time declaring consciousness to be the be all and end all of everything without actually defining what consciousness is or offering any sort of explanation of how it came into existence or how it creates the physical universe. On top of that much of the book contains sections that have absolutely nothing to do with the subject matter and concern nothing more than Lanza's own life experiences. He uses these chapters to butter his own biscuit, blast his own trumpet and bang his own drum interspersed with a bit of name dropping. The worst book I've read all year!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Easy reading... difficult to process. Currently stuck in the twisted perspective of extrapolating my own existence from the behavior of subatomic particles in a laboratory double slit experiment. Taking a pause. ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Pause over. Finished the book months ago and just did not get back to review. Now that I'm putting my thoughts together,(some distance from Easy reading... difficult to process. Currently stuck in the twisted perspective of extrapolating my own existence from the behavior of subatomic particles in a laboratory double slit experiment. Taking a pause. ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Pause over. Finished the book months ago and just did not get back to review. Now that I'm putting my thoughts together,(some distance from the actual processing of Biocentrism's view of existence) the beauty and simplicity of this universe perspective captivates my idle thoughts and periodically shifts my entire relation to how this word actually works. It is a paradigm shifting thought manipulation that is actually quite a ride if you follow along.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Clark Knowles

    Some folks didn't like this book, but I really found it thought provoking. The writing is mostly crisp and clear and the the author's theory (that he calls Biocentrism) seems firmly grounded--at least as far as he can take it. He writes of quantum mechanics, relativity, and numerous experiments and related theories without allowing the mathematics to overwhelm the prose. His main idea is that our universe is not external, but inexorably linked to our conscious selves--we are the observers that m Some folks didn't like this book, but I really found it thought provoking. The writing is mostly crisp and clear and the the author's theory (that he calls Biocentrism) seems firmly grounded--at least as far as he can take it. He writes of quantum mechanics, relativity, and numerous experiments and related theories without allowing the mathematics to overwhelm the prose. His main idea is that our universe is not external, but inexorably linked to our conscious selves--we are the observers that make the universe as it is, not the other way around. I'm not well versed in the different facets of physics, but the book impressed me in its academic rigor, even as the author used an autobiographical structure to get his points across. He cites numerous other scientists to back up his claims and has several appendixes that include a more mathematical approach. He definitively distances himself from the Intelligent Design school of thought (he is a well respected biologist, medical doctor, and leading stem cell researcher, not a spiritualist or philosopher) and also quasi-scientific films like "What the Bleep do we Know." His theory does not come out of nowhere--he is quick to point out all the scientists that came before him that provided clues and building blocks of his theory. He is also quick to point out what so many physicists can't explain--how our observation of particle movement shapes that particle movement. Without our consciousness, the universe does not exist. I'm no scientist, but the mathematical proofs he provides are at the very least intriguing. And at the most, life altering. I found the entire book fascinating--and it has made me want to read more about the physics of the universe--and my place in it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    This is a trippy, wild and ultimately enjoyable ride of a book, one that makes a mockery of Goodreads star system, as I could have easily given it 2 stars or 5 stars - it's a collection of ideas thrown out surrounded by anecdote and with passion, and often without systematisation or thorough refutation of critics. Reading it, I kept being reminded of the writings of medieval scholars like Giordano Bruno - it has that feel of heady mix of philosophy and science that defies any attempts to keep rel This is a trippy, wild and ultimately enjoyable ride of a book, one that makes a mockery of Goodreads star system, as I could have easily given it 2 stars or 5 stars - it's a collection of ideas thrown out surrounded by anecdote and with passion, and often without systematisation or thorough refutation of critics. Reading it, I kept being reminded of the writings of medieval scholars like Giordano Bruno - it has that feel of heady mix of philosophy and science that defies any attempts to keep religion apart, and is driven by a passion to look at the world through a different lens. All of this is one way to say I have no idea if Lanza is a genius or a madman, the-only-one-who-sees or the-one-who-cant-see-the-obvious - but I think if you are trying to work that out, then you are denying yourself a treat. The book demands you consider the impossible, and in doing so, you can step to Lanza's side for a moment, and glimpse this pulsating world as he sees it, inextricably entertwined with our conciousness, not for us, but by us. It's a fascinating shift to make. The book's thesis is actually pretty simple - it's padded out with outrage about the direction of modern theoretical physics and wonderfully written if frequently-too-perfect-to-be-true anecdotes about Lanza's life. (The stories are important, they are both illustrative and representative of how Lanza draws his worldview from all inputs around him, refusing the typical 'objectivity' or isolation of science.) Anyway, his thesis: that the reason physics tells us that the world doesn't exist until observed is because, well, it doesn't exist until observed, by a never-defined 'consciousness', which may be one or many. Until then, it simply remains a series of possibilities, which is to say, it doesn't exist. Lanza views existence as created through interaction, without a conscious being to interact with, there is simply nothing there. Lanza spends a fair bit of time explaining the evidence for this in quantum physics, and is not above criticising the greats in doing so, but really his basic contention is that Science has found this so unbelievable that it has gone to enormous lengths to come up with alternate suggestions, ones which preserve an 'objectively existing' universe. I kinda loved reading the book, and not really because I think Lanza is right. I distrust any grand theory, and this is absolutely in that category. The evidence is also a little thinner than the enthusiasm, although Lanza's strongest ground is that physics is actually pretty crazy, and no-one's theories really make much sense outside mathematical modelling. But I loved the book simply for Lanza's courage to seek a worldview in a holistic sense, barging through philosophy, religion and the basic tenets of capital-S-science to do so, and even drawing simply on the way the world feels on a still morning near a lake. I am highly skeptical these days of the lines, the rules, that are drawn around science, as if it exists in a vacuum from the world we live in, as if peer review eliminates human bias and perception, and as if religious/philosophical ideas can be isolated somehow from paleontology or evolutionary biology, or even theoretical physics. By denying the assumptions, the worldviews, the concern over implications of this, we denude science, make it weaker, than if we acknowledged that our understanding of the world has many inputs, and they all impact each other. In short, I admire the Brunos, the Abelards, the al-Farghanis not because they challenged 'religion' but because they argued for the right to draw on all the tools at their disposal to understand the world and how it worked. There are moments when Lanza, drawing on biology and physics, and in demanding that taken together, they insist we look at the world through a different lens, invokes this spirit of pushing orthodoxy back so we can *see* differently. That's a kind of science we could use a little more of, even if I'd like it with a little more detail and a little less skimming over the contradictory bits

  24. 5 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    Lanza' Biocentrism constitues the take of two scientists, one a cell biologist, the other an astronomer, on the old mind/body "problem", attacking it not from the perspective of philosophy but from that of physics. Lanza, the primary author, being scientifically educated but not a physicist, explains elements of microphysics with accessible clarity and astrophysics and cosmology, with the help of his co-author, similarly. As someone trained in philosophy, much of what Lanza has to say was reminis Lanza' Biocentrism constitues the take of two scientists, one a cell biologist, the other an astronomer, on the old mind/body "problem", attacking it not from the perspective of philosophy but from that of physics. Lanza, the primary author, being scientifically educated but not a physicist, explains elements of microphysics with accessible clarity and astrophysics and cosmology, with the help of his co-author, similarly. As someone trained in philosophy, much of what Lanza has to say was reminiscent of what some philosophers, most notably Spinoza and Kant, have been maintaining for centuries. Lanza states it (p. 159) as the proposition that "there is no separate physical universe outside of life and consciousness." What he should have written was that we cannot know whether there is a "separate physical universe outside of life and consciousness", but then he is not a philosopher and not, apparently, much aware of history of epistemological or ontological thought within the discipline. Still, for those with more of a science than a philosophical background, the basic point gets across. For me, the best parts of this book were the autobiographical portions, many of which I found quite moving.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Excellent book - intriguing and thought provoking, from the tree falling in the Forest, to the speed of light and Einstein.

  26. 4 out of 5

    John Spiri

    I was enthralled reading Lanza’s Biocentrism but now, after reading so many negative reviews, I ask myself why more critically than my initial reaction. Admittedly, the book stated what I wanted to read. As a reader with a steadfast interest in Eastern religions I found much of what I read to be confirmations for a take on reality that I find appealing and compelling: consciousness is primary and actually creates the physical world which is ultimately illusory. From the start I didn’t expect, no I was enthralled reading Lanza’s Biocentrism but now, after reading so many negative reviews, I ask myself why more critically than my initial reaction. Admittedly, the book stated what I wanted to read. As a reader with a steadfast interest in Eastern religions I found much of what I read to be confirmations for a take on reality that I find appealing and compelling: consciousness is primary and actually creates the physical world which is ultimately illusory. From the start I didn’t expect, nor did I get (nor would I have understood), hardcore scientific proofs for biocentric claims. Instead, Lanza reinterpreted experiments like the double slit and boldly offered a vision that makes sense given the mind-boggling results. The book is a call, an invitation, for people to view the world in a very different way. The question to me is, does biocentrism provide a more feasible explanation for the nature of the universe than science given the nature of the evidence? One of the most compelling criticisms of the book that I read was the fact that biocentrism is just one possible explanation for phenomena such as photons behaving as both wave and particle. Fair enough. No matter the degree of Lanza’s certainty, this is a proposal that will take far more evidence for scientific community to take seriously. But I loved the fact that a respected scientist would propose something so revolutionary (and again, something sages have essentially been saying for millennia). Another reasonable criticism is Lanza’s unwillingness to put tough questions to his own theory. For example, in the comparison at the end he listed extremely difficult questions for science such as ‘What was before the Big Bang’ and noted traditional science’s answer is “unknown” but merely put a few easy questions to biocentrism. One criticism that several reviewers noted was the author’s perceived arrogance. I suppose the perception of arrogance is going to depend a lot on how impressed we are with the writer’s message and writing style. When Lanza wrote about working with Skinner I took it as a statement of fact rather than an arrogant ‘Look at me!’ Anyway, I’d rather not play the game of trying to discern an author’s character defects. Without a doubt the switching to personal experiences that were only marginally related was questionable, probably more so for readers who work in science fields. But they held my interest well enough, and most of the time I could glean a bit of relevance in the passage. My hope is that readers, and scientists, will give this book a careful look despite its apparent drawbacks.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gladiatrix

    Many seem to either love or hate this book, or rather to either embrace it or harshly criticize it. Myself I have a more moderate opinion, I agree with the critics that it's not really a science book, and neither are the ideas in it completely new for the most part. If you're looking for hard scientific facts and don't have the patience for an author telling much of his life story in between chapters this book is definitely not for you. On the other hand if you yourself have given much thought t Many seem to either love or hate this book, or rather to either embrace it or harshly criticize it. Myself I have a more moderate opinion, I agree with the critics that it's not really a science book, and neither are the ideas in it completely new for the most part. If you're looking for hard scientific facts and don't have the patience for an author telling much of his life story in between chapters this book is definitely not for you. On the other hand if you yourself have given much thought to the questions about the true nature of the universe and the mystery of consciousness you might enjoy reading Robert Lanza's thoughts on them. He won't provide a final conclusion - which couldn't be expected since it's about the ultimate question, after all - but he'll rather relate some very personal life events on the way that guided him to the perspective he takes. Not groundbreaking but well written.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Reading Funk

    This book is another simulation theory kind of book. It's very thought provoking and worth reading. This book is another simulation theory kind of book. It's very thought provoking and worth reading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bianca A.

    This book is garbage and a waste of time. It's a clusterfuck of items that gets you lost in a maze designed to make the author seem intelligent, better yet more intelligent than the reader. It's just a story book piggy-backing on big names of scientists and philosophers with no real conclusion or value on its own. The whole idea of biocentrism claims that reality and time don't exist outside of our own heads, which is preposterous. A bunch of bogus and wishful thinking. I honestly don't remember This book is garbage and a waste of time. It's a clusterfuck of items that gets you lost in a maze designed to make the author seem intelligent, better yet more intelligent than the reader. It's just a story book piggy-backing on big names of scientists and philosophers with no real conclusion or value on its own. The whole idea of biocentrism claims that reality and time don't exist outside of our own heads, which is preposterous. A bunch of bogus and wishful thinking. I honestly don't remember how on earth I got a copy of this book and its sequel which I'm about to review next, but it was a grave mistake. I feel like I completely wasted my time after being pulled into a labyrinth of big questions and big promises where Lanza is just trying to blame science for having blind spots and not offering sufficient evidences for its claims. He is not adding any value or answers either, instead I cannot help but conclude this book was just a click-bait marketing scheme designed to take the money and attention of the naïve.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Donald LaPlante

    I found this information quite enlightening. I especially like the metaphors he used to teach concepts that are sometimes difficult to wrap one's mind around. I found that it synchronizes well with other teachings i have discovered as well as some new concepts that I was unaware of until reading this book. I especially like his story telling of his own life and the syncronicities that happened. I found this information quite enlightening. I especially like the metaphors he used to teach concepts that are sometimes difficult to wrap one's mind around. I found that it synchronizes well with other teachings i have discovered as well as some new concepts that I was unaware of until reading this book. I especially like his story telling of his own life and the syncronicities that happened.

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