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Why Pro-Life?: Caring for the Unborn and Their Mothers (Today's Critical Concerns)

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So much is at stake in the abortion debate. If pro-choicers are right, precious freedoms are in jeopardy. If pro-lifers are right, innocent children are being robbed of their most basic freedom—life. Though bumpersticker slogans prevail, the facts are rarely presented. We need clear and credible answers to the central questions of the abortion debate. For those who have ha So much is at stake in the abortion debate. If pro-choicers are right, precious freedoms are in jeopardy. If pro-lifers are right, innocent children are being robbed of their most basic freedom—life. Though bumpersticker slogans prevail, the facts are rarely presented. We need clear and credible answers to the central questions of the abortion debate. For those who have had abortions or are currently considering one, for pro-choicers and fence-straddlers alike, Why Pro-Life? provides answers to these questions in a concise, straightforward, and nonabrasive manner. Head: Human Life Begins…When? No issue is more divisive or troubling than abortion. Many believe that we have to choose between helping women and helping children. This book shows how critical it is that we help both. In a concise, non-abrasive fashion, Randy Alcorn offers compassionate, factual answers to the central issues of the abortion debate. [Insert Sarah Marie Switzer image] An award-winning photo of an operation on Sarah Marie Switzer, a twenty-four-week unborn child with spina bifida. Sarah, here grasping a surgeon’s finger, was reinserted into her mother’s womb and born two months later, nine weeks premature. [Insert 3-D Real-Time ultrasound image] A 3-D ultrasound photo of a baby 21 weeks after conception—just over halfway through the pregnancy. Modern technology offers a window to the womb that is changing the face of the abortion debate. Story Behind the Book There have always been likable people who hold to wrong positions on ethical issues—including slavery and anti-Semitism. Sincere people can be wrong and often are. We need a clear presentation of what is true. Randy Alcorn has intervened for the unborn and their mothers—and at great personal cost. In writing this book on one of today’s critical issues, he has endeavored to lay out well-supported facts on why the pro-life position is right and true when it comes to valuing human life.


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So much is at stake in the abortion debate. If pro-choicers are right, precious freedoms are in jeopardy. If pro-lifers are right, innocent children are being robbed of their most basic freedom—life. Though bumpersticker slogans prevail, the facts are rarely presented. We need clear and credible answers to the central questions of the abortion debate. For those who have ha So much is at stake in the abortion debate. If pro-choicers are right, precious freedoms are in jeopardy. If pro-lifers are right, innocent children are being robbed of their most basic freedom—life. Though bumpersticker slogans prevail, the facts are rarely presented. We need clear and credible answers to the central questions of the abortion debate. For those who have had abortions or are currently considering one, for pro-choicers and fence-straddlers alike, Why Pro-Life? provides answers to these questions in a concise, straightforward, and nonabrasive manner. Head: Human Life Begins…When? No issue is more divisive or troubling than abortion. Many believe that we have to choose between helping women and helping children. This book shows how critical it is that we help both. In a concise, non-abrasive fashion, Randy Alcorn offers compassionate, factual answers to the central issues of the abortion debate. [Insert Sarah Marie Switzer image] An award-winning photo of an operation on Sarah Marie Switzer, a twenty-four-week unborn child with spina bifida. Sarah, here grasping a surgeon’s finger, was reinserted into her mother’s womb and born two months later, nine weeks premature. [Insert 3-D Real-Time ultrasound image] A 3-D ultrasound photo of a baby 21 weeks after conception—just over halfway through the pregnancy. Modern technology offers a window to the womb that is changing the face of the abortion debate. Story Behind the Book There have always been likable people who hold to wrong positions on ethical issues—including slavery and anti-Semitism. Sincere people can be wrong and often are. We need a clear presentation of what is true. Randy Alcorn has intervened for the unborn and their mothers—and at great personal cost. In writing this book on one of today’s critical issues, he has endeavored to lay out well-supported facts on why the pro-life position is right and true when it comes to valuing human life.

30 review for Why Pro-Life?: Caring for the Unborn and Their Mothers (Today's Critical Concerns)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I was really hoping to read a book that helped me understand the pro-life position. This was not the book. Apparently, pregnancy is a doddle that lasts 3-4 months and doesn't interfere at all with your health or ability to live your normal life. Life begins at conception, except in the case of all the eggs that naturally don't implant or spontaneously abort, which don't count; life that matters only begins at conception if a man notices it. Also, every time I double checked any facts, they turned I was really hoping to read a book that helped me understand the pro-life position. This was not the book. Apparently, pregnancy is a doddle that lasts 3-4 months and doesn't interfere at all with your health or ability to live your normal life. Life begins at conception, except in the case of all the eggs that naturally don't implant or spontaneously abort, which don't count; life that matters only begins at conception if a man notices it. Also, every time I double checked any facts, they turned out to be lies -- the author thinks abortion is more dangerous than birth, doesn't understand cancer at all (did you know that pregnancy doesn't affect cancer treatment at all? Neither did any doctor, just this pro-life guy). I was left with the idea that the pro-life movement has a deep disrespect not just for women but for science and facts. According to him, the male equivalent to abortion is raping any women they see -- just as the right of all men to have sex with any woman they see needs to be restricted, a woman's right to abortion needs to be restricted. I wish I were making this analogy up. Because after all, your rights end when they impact someone else. At that point, I began to see that Randy Alcorn and I live in very different universes. Still looking for a book that deals with this issue competently.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    I have always been staunchly pro choice but with certain things happening lately I have had a serious change of heart. After reading this book, it only confirms my decision. And I've had an early term chemical abortion when I was 18, so I have an idea of what I'm talking about. There's a lot more emotion and guilt that plagues a woman than is revealed in the pro choice movement. It is sad to say neither side can tell the whole truth. I have always been staunchly pro choice but with certain things happening lately I have had a serious change of heart. After reading this book, it only confirms my decision. And I've had an early term chemical abortion when I was 18, so I have an idea of what I'm talking about. There's a lot more emotion and guilt that plagues a woman than is revealed in the pro choice movement. It is sad to say neither side can tell the whole truth.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Convicting and convincing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Adam Calvert

    It's amazing how compelling and convicting simple logic can be. This book is great for educating Christians on why the pro-life movement is worthy of their consideration (and action). And Randy Alcorn doesn't make it so much about politics rather than actual people. Even in talking about steps to take he doesn't sound the alarm for everyone to go protesting outside of abortion clinics. But he does show that everyone can have a part to play, even including caring for those single mothers who deci It's amazing how compelling and convicting simple logic can be. This book is great for educating Christians on why the pro-life movement is worthy of their consideration (and action). And Randy Alcorn doesn't make it so much about politics rather than actual people. Even in talking about steps to take he doesn't sound the alarm for everyone to go protesting outside of abortion clinics. But he does show that everyone can have a part to play, even including caring for those single mothers who decided not to get an abortion. The book is essentially well-reasoned arguments for why a Christian should have an actual stake in the pro-abortion/pro-life movement. It's not meant to give anyone the ability to go out and defend the pro-life position to non-Christians (that's going to be found in his larger ProLife Answers to ProChoice Arguments). But it certainly gives Christian readers the evidence they need to know that they no longer can turn the back to this "issue" or put it to the side. Life is something for which we must take a stand. And Mr. Alcorn argues persuasively that that thing in the mother's womb is indeed life.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kent

    Solid review of why it makes sense to be pro-life. The author spends time on the biological, philosophical, and logical reasons why it is proper to defend life. Excellent chapters on why the feminists from 1900 forward (except Sanger) were mostly pro-life. Good book for anyone who wants reinforcement of his pro-life beliefs or wants to be ready when challenged by the those who defend abortion as practiced in America today.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeanmarie Hilt

    When people think of the anti-abortion movement, thoughts of judgmental, woman-hating zealots carrying signs and attacking abortion clinics unfortunately come to mind. In Why Pro-Life: Caring for the Unborn and their Mothers, author Randy Alcorn presents the case against abortion in a way that is compassionate, non-judgmental, and supported by scientific research and historical notes. Although the book is not an all-encompassing treatise, it does discuss the ‘big questions’ associated with abor When people think of the anti-abortion movement, thoughts of judgmental, woman-hating zealots carrying signs and attacking abortion clinics unfortunately come to mind. In Why Pro-Life: Caring for the Unborn and their Mothers, author Randy Alcorn presents the case against abortion in a way that is compassionate, non-judgmental, and supported by scientific research and historical notes. Although the book is not an all-encompassing treatise, it does discuss the ‘big questions’ associated with abortion without using the Bible – rape, incest, medical complications, etc. If you are pro-life, this book will help you to be able to explain why. If you are pro-abortion, this book would be useful to read for understanding the ‘other side’s’ reasoning. If you are on the fence, this book would be a useful resource in beginning to form your opinion. Alcorn addresses the issue from the woman’s and from the child’s standpoint, advocating that abortion is a crime against both parties and highlighting inconsistencies in the pro-abortion position. In the child’s defense, Alcorn establishes the fetus’ identity as a human who is independent from his/her mother by examining when life begins and what constitutes humanity and ‘meaning’ in life. Defending the woman, the author stresses that she is a victim whose welfare is gravely affected when she harms her child. Although some issues seem to be addressed only briefly, I appreciated the author’s dedication of chapters to ways of helping women and to how those who have participated in aborting a child can find healing and peace. Finally, the author was careful to cite his sources. In this small book (only 136 pages), the author included 13 pages of endnotes in which he cited the sources of his information, which would allow the skeptical reader to explore more deeply his claims. I would recommend this book. Abortion is a controversial issue that deserves our attention, and this book is informative and convincing yet tactful presentation of the pro-life position.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lillie

    Although Randy Alcorn is a Bible-believing Christian, he doesn't depend on the Bible to show that abortion is wrong. He documents science as recognizing that life begins at conception, and he uses logic to show that if it's wrong to take the life of three year old child, it's equally wrong to take the life of a three month old unborn baby. He presents facts and logic for nonbelievers who would not respond to a Biblical message. But he presents a Christian message to those who have been involved Although Randy Alcorn is a Bible-believing Christian, he doesn't depend on the Bible to show that abortion is wrong. He documents science as recognizing that life begins at conception, and he uses logic to show that if it's wrong to take the life of three year old child, it's equally wrong to take the life of a three month old unborn baby. He presents facts and logic for nonbelievers who would not respond to a Biblical message. But he presents a Christian message to those who have been involved in abortion, whether it is a mother who aborted her child, a man who convinced his wife or girlfriend have an abortion, or someone who influenced women by their strong advocacy for abortion. He shares the Salvation message. He quotes Scripture that abortion is a sin, one of many sins committed by all people. He covers the need to repent and ask for forgiveness, and he describes the grace and mercy of God and Christ paying off our sins. He talks directly to Christians to answer a question he gets often: isn't pro-life activism a distraction from the Great Commission? Alcorn points out that the greatest commandments are to love God with all our hearts, minds, and strength and to love our neighbors as ourselves. Saving lives certainly qualifies as loving our neighbors. Also the Great Commission has two parts: making disciples in all the world and doing all that Jesus commanded. Jesus commanded us to care for the needy and vulnerable. Women considering abortion and their unborn babies at risk of death are definitely vulnerable. Alcorn isn't content to leave reader's philosophically pro-life. The last chapter of the book includes dozens of ways to get involved, from becoming informed enough to be able to persuade others to running for office. When we realize the magnitude of this problem, surely all right-thinking people will stand up for unborn children, individuals with disabilities, the elderly, and anyone considered unwanted in our society.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael O'Brien

    This is an excellent comprehensive book on all the arguments in favor of recognizing the humanity and right to life for the unborn. Mr. Alcorn 's points are logical, rational, and factually supported. The only area where I think he may be getting too far into the weeds and a bit off base was in the section where he argues against the birth control pill as a moral means of contraception. While I could follow his line of reasoning to a certain extent, I think it's also a case of taking a logical a This is an excellent comprehensive book on all the arguments in favor of recognizing the humanity and right to life for the unborn. Mr. Alcorn 's points are logical, rational, and factually supported. The only area where I think he may be getting too far into the weeds and a bit off base was in the section where he argues against the birth control pill as a moral means of contraception. While I could follow his line of reasoning to a certain extent, I think it's also a case of taking a logical argument too far to the point of reductio ad absurdem. However, this is only a comparatively small section-- on the whole, this is an outstanding book addressing well one of the great moral controversies of our time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This little book is good reading for pro-lifers. By Randy Alcorn, one of the evangelical Christians I highly respect, the book has lots of facts and quotes in it that support pro-life issues, and it's written in a very compassionate way. It's also a quick read, and it's very cheap on Kindle. I would recommend it to pro-lifers as well as those who would like to know more about the pro-life movement. I did skip over the chapter on biblical reasons why Christian should be pro-life, but I'm sure it' This little book is good reading for pro-lifers. By Randy Alcorn, one of the evangelical Christians I highly respect, the book has lots of facts and quotes in it that support pro-life issues, and it's written in a very compassionate way. It's also a quick read, and it's very cheap on Kindle. I would recommend it to pro-lifers as well as those who would like to know more about the pro-life movement. I did skip over the chapter on biblical reasons why Christian should be pro-life, but I'm sure it's is excellent and well sourced as the rest of the book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    This outstanding resource by Randy Alcorn moves through five sections: 1) The Basics; 2) The Child; 3) The Woman; 4) Other Important Issues; 5) Spiritual Perspectives. It's written for the average person with no spiritual background and covers a ton of territory addressing all of the sham arguments and difficult issues surrounding abortion. Everyone should read and hand out copies of this. This outstanding resource by Randy Alcorn moves through five sections: 1) The Basics; 2) The Child; 3) The Woman; 4) Other Important Issues; 5) Spiritual Perspectives. It's written for the average person with no spiritual background and covers a ton of territory addressing all of the sham arguments and difficult issues surrounding abortion. Everyone should read and hand out copies of this.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Incredible! I would give this more than 5 stars if possible, and I definitely plan to read it again. Abortion is the taking of a human life - the fact cannot be escaped. Human life is so precious, and ought to be treasured, whether adult, young child, or an unborn baby in the womb. It is not whether a child is "wanted" that gives him worth. It is the fact that he is created in the image of Almighty God. Mr. Alcorn presents the facts as they are, and makes a compelling case for the pro-life posit Incredible! I would give this more than 5 stars if possible, and I definitely plan to read it again. Abortion is the taking of a human life - the fact cannot be escaped. Human life is so precious, and ought to be treasured, whether adult, young child, or an unborn baby in the womb. It is not whether a child is "wanted" that gives him worth. It is the fact that he is created in the image of Almighty God. Mr. Alcorn presents the facts as they are, and makes a compelling case for the pro-life position, also showing that pro-choice is really "no choice". He shares the gospel and also offers practical ways for us to help the unborn babies and their mothers by getting involved in church or community pro-life programs, opening our homes to pregnant women, and many other options. Each person is fearfully and wonderfully made by our awesome Creator and life is a miraculous and beautiful thing! Abortion is a huge issue of our time, and I believe that every Christian should read this book. You will come away as a changed person. I certainly did!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I appreciated this book, which Randy Alcorn devotes (largely) to explaining the medical and logical reasons why abortion is wrong, but always with a feminist sensibility and a caring heart. As a Canadian, I am honestly not certain that making abortion illegal (even though I believe it is murder) would improve the moral landscape in my country. Should women who procure abortions be put in prison along with their doctors? This is the question he does not answer, and I wish he would have. This book I appreciated this book, which Randy Alcorn devotes (largely) to explaining the medical and logical reasons why abortion is wrong, but always with a feminist sensibility and a caring heart. As a Canadian, I am honestly not certain that making abortion illegal (even though I believe it is murder) would improve the moral landscape in my country. Should women who procure abortions be put in prison along with their doctors? This is the question he does not answer, and I wish he would have. This book reminded me again why, as a gay and disabled Evangelical Christian, I affirm a pro-life position. I will continue to do what I can so that, even if abortion remains legal (as it is likely to do given Canada's legal system), abortion ceases to be because we have removed the intersectional oppressions that give rise to the perceived need for abortions.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Graham Heslop

    Pastoral and sensitive, but uncompromising on the truth. I appreciated that Alcorn doesn't merely pick out a few verses of Scripture to show what God thinks about abortion; he relentlessly invites us as both thinking and feeling humans to reconsider the poor arguments made in favor of killing unborn children. The only evidence put forward that I wasn't entirely convinced by was the sociological statistics pertaining to women who have abortions. That being said, I think Alcorn's concern for the m Pastoral and sensitive, but uncompromising on the truth. I appreciated that Alcorn doesn't merely pick out a few verses of Scripture to show what God thinks about abortion; he relentlessly invites us as both thinking and feeling humans to reconsider the poor arguments made in favor of killing unborn children. The only evidence put forward that I wasn't entirely convinced by was the sociological statistics pertaining to women who have abortions. That being said, I think Alcorn's concern for the mother is a very necessary component for this debate. For the pro-life argument must - as the author says a few times - show they are not merely pro-birth or unconcerned about the mothers involved

  14. 5 out of 5

    Taija

    Excellent quick read on abortion. I personally feel like the chapters on the rape/incest argument is too short. Most defenders of pro-life say that only 1% of abortions are actually because of rape or incest, but one percent is still 14,000 victims - FAAAAR too many women for such a short chapter. The rape/incest objection is one that pro-lifers need to better educate themselves on. Don’t use the 1% excuse - that’s not good logic. I'm am 100% against abortion, but I'd like to see a fully develop Excellent quick read on abortion. I personally feel like the chapters on the rape/incest argument is too short. Most defenders of pro-life say that only 1% of abortions are actually because of rape or incest, but one percent is still 14,000 victims - FAAAAR too many women for such a short chapter. The rape/incest objection is one that pro-lifers need to better educate themselves on. Don’t use the 1% excuse - that’s not good logic. I'm am 100% against abortion, but I'd like to see a fully developed argument for these concerns rather than a quick page write up.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rick Hogaboam

    Good, concise summary of the abortion issue from a pro-life perspective This is a brief and concise volume, not intending to be exhaustive but introductory to the issues of abortion. That being said, it is adequate in conveying the core concerns of the pro-life community. There's also possibility for further study based on all the works cited. For the price, this is the best book to recommend to someone exploring this consequential issue. Good, concise summary of the abortion issue from a pro-life perspective This is a brief and concise volume, not intending to be exhaustive but introductory to the issues of abortion. That being said, it is adequate in conveying the core concerns of the pro-life community. There's also possibility for further study based on all the works cited. For the price, this is the best book to recommend to someone exploring this consequential issue.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This is a small, quick read that presents the pro life argument without invoking religion. Contrary to popular belief, the pro life position is not merely religious dogma, but can be effectively argued without relying on the Scriptures. This book does just that. The author presents a lengthier argument in a separate book, but this one was a good place to begin.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aliyah

    Heart-breaking, enraging, moving, saddening, hopefilling.❤

  18. 5 out of 5

    Reader

    Excellent.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel B

    A great little book that manages to pack a ton of information into only about 150 pages! The author explains and defends the pro-life position as it applies to abortion and birth-control. The main portion of the book is written with scientific evidence to support this position; then in the appendix and last chapters, the author discusses a biblical defense and explains the Gospel of Jesus. Just a couple of minor things I noticed that I didn't care for: the author at one point states that "increasi A great little book that manages to pack a ton of information into only about 150 pages! The author explains and defends the pro-life position as it applies to abortion and birth-control. The main portion of the book is written with scientific evidence to support this position; then in the appendix and last chapters, the author discusses a biblical defense and explains the Gospel of Jesus. Just a couple of minor things I noticed that I didn't care for: the author at one point states that "increasing numbers of people hijack the term pro-life to argue against capital punishment or just war…" (p 61) but then later says "pro-life does not mean being pro-life only about babies." (P 80) I'm someone who is anti-capital punishment, and I would hesitate before claiming that the U.S., where I live, only ever engages in truly just wars. It seems to me that the author wants to have it both ways here… he wants to care about the lives of unborn children and their mothers, but not so much the lives of people whom he might view as "deserving" of death. I just can't agree with him on this. Life matters. Period. Apart from that, and one instance of profanity (included in a quotation), this is an excellent book that I highly recommend to people on either side of the life/abortion debate! Note: Included in the text are internet links to photos of in-utero babies. I wish they had simply been printed in the book. Turning them into "homework" makes it more likely that readers will not view them.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Arun Thamizhvanan

    So far people in conservative side have not had a book which clearly explains pro-life stance and why it is important/crucial. All the chapters except the last one is completely written purely from non Christian standpoint. Even from worldly point of view, pro-life makes sense while pro-abortion is ridiculously evil. The arguments given are spot on and it also shows where we get deceived. A must read for everyone!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    Alcorn brings a wealth of arguments from science and philosophy for the pro life position. He responds to some of the most ardent objections from the pro abortion crowd both convincingly and winsomely. Fantastic read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leah Cossette

    Randy Alcorn takes on a big and divisive topic in this small book, so it's inevitable that he would fall short in some ways. All in all, I wasn't displeased by this book, but I wasn't impressed enough to say I liked it. As a Christian woman from a pro-life background, I'm going to need more than opinion to sway me on this. This review may be kind of disorganized and ramble-y, but so was the book, so I won't apologize. Alcorn, obviously, is of the pro-live movement. His stance is that life begins Randy Alcorn takes on a big and divisive topic in this small book, so it's inevitable that he would fall short in some ways. All in all, I wasn't displeased by this book, but I wasn't impressed enough to say I liked it. As a Christian woman from a pro-life background, I'm going to need more than opinion to sway me on this. This review may be kind of disorganized and ramble-y, but so was the book, so I won't apologize. Alcorn, obviously, is of the pro-live movement. His stance is that life begins at conception (as opposed to implantation, or development of the heart or brain). He holds that stance very firmly, repeatedly declaring it be a fact (this gets annoying in the first few chapters, but keep going. He does move on). The trouble is, he doesn't have anything to back up that "fact". There is no scientific OR biblical evidence that conclusively states that that is the truth. The difference between conception and implantation became important when Alcorn uses it to advocate the "fact" (really, opinion) that contraceptives cause abortion. Since Alcorn and I disagreed on this matter rather early on, the rest of the book after that felt like talking to a wall. It didn't get better when he called birth-control users child abusers. Alcorn is free to hold that belief, and it seems his heart is in the right place, but he's unyielding on this stance which is based on an unfounded opinion. Simply put, Randy Alcorn is a man. While he has done his share of reading (and writing) on fetal development, he seems rather blind to some of the realities of reproduction. I'm not saying he's a bad person. He's coming from an angle : Don't murder babies. This is a good angle to take. But in his focus on baby's life, he's overlooked the woman's. First of all, getting pregnant involves two people of different sexes. So why are we only policing one? If life begins when a sperm meets an egg, isn't the most effective way to reduce abortion to keep that sperm away from the egg? In other words: Control your noodle, lads. Alcorn never discusses this possibility, no doubt because it's abhorrent to men everywhere. But really if you don't want so many pregnant women, you should be supporting better sex ed and yes, decrease in sexual activity for men. Yet no pro-life man ever addresses stopping abortion in this obvious way. Interesting. Hmm. What Alcorn did discuss was that pregnancy is actually not that bad! According to him. Talk to any group of women, and you'll learn otherwise. There are health risks, economic drawbacks, and many women do face consequences at work for having kids. Many women suffer from post-natal complications up to a year after giving birth. And bills. Bills, bills, bills. No, birth is not as simple as heading down to your local hospital and spending an afternoon being tended by loving nurses. Then there's the after. Alcorn claims that having a baby shouldn't make that much of a difference, since women can still work and send their kids to daycare. Hah! Not when daycare costs half your paycheck, you noodle! It's been said before, and deserves to be said again: If men are allowed to abandon a pregnancy with no consequences, why can't a woman? (Because it's morally wrong, obviously, but why is it only wrong for us? Why are we always left being the last moral bastion in a culture where men are always yelling about their own perfect authority and strong leadership?) Look, I agree with Alcorn that surgical abortion is murder; children after the first trimester are identifiably human, with all the parts and pieces of a human being. His arguments on that front were very convincing, and he's right that people need to be educated about fetal development and options other than abortion. But he's coming at the problem from the wrong angle. Pro-lifers who are targeting pregnant women in their outreach are coming to the battle a little too late. If you want to stop abortion, you need to address the myriad of social issues that put women in that position. Poverty, marital abuse, lack of education, lack of resources, and so on. And you have to listen to women. Margaret Sanger, for example fought for women's reproductive rights not because she was eeevvvuuuuuulll, but because her own mother went through 18 pregnancies in 22 years. Margaret herself spent a lot of her childhood responsible for her surviving siblings, so of course she, like millions of women throughout history, went looking for a way of life that didn't involve being constantly pregnant. Now imagine if Sanger's father had given his wife a break instead of constantly impregnating her until she reached the sweet release of menopause. But no one expects better behavior from men; doing the right thing is for women, amirite? This is especially relevant when one remembers that the majority of women getting abortions are not the stereotyped 'slutty' non-white teenage girls. They're white women, adult women. Many of them identify as religious, many of them have already had a child. Most are poor, and many cite fear of being a single mother as a reason for wanting an abortion. These women want a way out not because they're evil whores, but because they don't want a kid. So how do you reach those women? How do you save their babies? You're going to have to start with their relations with men. (Wow, it's almost like God intended for men to be providers and protectors and men...don't do that. It's almost like men's abdication of moral or physical responsibility has far-reaching consequences. Who could have thought?) In Chapter Ten, Alcorn says something that sums up what I'm trying to get at: "Abortion fosters the attitude, "My comfort and happiness come first -- even if I have to disregard the rights of an innocent person to get them.". I agree with him. But honey, where do you think we learned that attitude from? You lost the fight against abortion when the Sexual Revolution happened ; in other words, when women began to be allowed to live in the way that men always have. Even Alcorn quotes Margaret Sanger, acknowledging that abortion is an attempt to get at"unlimited sexual gratification without the burden of unwanted children". In other words, we want what men have always taken for granted. The best way to stop abortion is to go back in time, make men behave themselves and be responsible for their dicks. Till that happens, the fight against abortion will always be a losing one. Is that wrong? Yes. But if you want to change it, there's another mission field right up the road that will accomplish the same ends: It's women. Take care of women. Protect them, educate them, employ them, fight against those who would discriminate against them. You know, like you were supposed to be doing all along. It wasn't all bad. I appreciated that Alcorn spoke to the responsibility of the church and listed many ways that Christians can get involved (aside from going to abortion clinics and screaming at pregnant women). He acknowledged that women deserve compassion rather than judgment, and has apparently acted on his beliefs. After I finished the book, I did something that I now have to do with all religious men: I googled whether or not he supported Donald Trump, so that I can then know whether he is a good person with a functioning brain. In Alcorn's case, I found this article. So though I disagreed with Alcorn on some of the points of this book, I came away impressed with him as a person. As I said above, I think he's trying to do the right thing, and is obviously deeply compassionate. He just needs some fact-checking.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joab John

    I was quite skeptical of this book at first because I thought it would be another pointless rant saying, "Abortion is sin. Thou shall not do it. God told not to do it". But I was willing to give the book a try. From the very first pages I thought it gave a good account of the facts on both sides of the argument. And what caught me mainly about this book is when he tries to appeal to the readers by saying If you are pro choice and reading this book, then good for you. I hope this means you have a I was quite skeptical of this book at first because I thought it would be another pointless rant saying, "Abortion is sin. Thou shall not do it. God told not to do it". But I was willing to give the book a try. From the very first pages I thought it gave a good account of the facts on both sides of the argument. And what caught me mainly about this book is when he tries to appeal to the readers by saying If you are pro choice and reading this book, then good for you. I hope this means you have an open mind. If the pro life side proves to be as senseless and irrational as you may have been lead to believe, fine. You can give it the first hand rejection it deserves. But if it proves to be sensible, then I encourage you to rethink your position. If you're one of those many who are on the fence, with mixed feelings,I ask you to make this book part of your quest for truth. You can hear the pro choice position anywhere. But this may be your only chance to examine the pro life position. If you are pro life, I ask you to think through your position. If we're right, we need to learn how to intelligently and graciously inform others. One thing is certain: if abortion really does kill children and harm women, then theres too much at stake to stand on the fringes and do nothing.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    Before reading this book, I knew in my heart that I was pro-life. I guess I really never put much thought into why, other than it seems right to me. In "Why Pro-Life?" Randy Alcorn discusses the scientific reasons why abortion hurts mothers, babies and society. He makes a compelling case for when a baby is "alive." Alcorn explains how many post-abortion mothers suffer severe physical and emotional effects for years afterward. Most of his information is backed up with more than one source. He dra Before reading this book, I knew in my heart that I was pro-life. I guess I really never put much thought into why, other than it seems right to me. In "Why Pro-Life?" Randy Alcorn discusses the scientific reasons why abortion hurts mothers, babies and society. He makes a compelling case for when a baby is "alive." Alcorn explains how many post-abortion mothers suffer severe physical and emotional effects for years afterward. Most of his information is backed up with more than one source. He draws interesting parallels between the arguments of pro-abortion activists and history's pro-slavery, and pro-genocide rationalizations. The gruesome descriptions of the abortion procedure made my stomach turn, but it is important to recognize that fetuses have human bodies, brain waves, heartbeats, and life. This is a must read book. No issue is more divisive than abortion. It is important to know what you believe.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jung Sun

    I've been a sleeping pro-lifer, until recently when Obama brought it to the fore front. Now it's suddenly dire to become more well informed and active. I came away from this book really impressed with how Alcorn addressed various aspects of abortion, made it educational, not condemning but loving. Mainly statistics and quotes are used to support answers. The book isn't overly religious or relying heavily on Bible verses. Which is wonderful for when there's resistance to Bible verses or "religiou I've been a sleeping pro-lifer, until recently when Obama brought it to the fore front. Now it's suddenly dire to become more well informed and active. I came away from this book really impressed with how Alcorn addressed various aspects of abortion, made it educational, not condemning but loving. Mainly statistics and quotes are used to support answers. The book isn't overly religious or relying heavily on Bible verses. Which is wonderful for when there's resistance to Bible verses or "religious" talks. Without a doubt facts, science, and truth is overwhelmingly pro-life. Making it glaringly clear that the general public, especially women since abortion is being toted as a woman's issue, are being deceived. I learned some amazing things from this book and highly recommend it, to anyone because abortion affects everyone.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ben Zajdel

    Why Pro-Life? is an excellent book that answers questions about the Pro-Life position. This book is small, only about one hundred pages, but covers plenty of information. Randy Alcorn attempts to make an argument for the Pro-Life position without using the Bible, and he does a stellar job. Using statistics, scientific research, historical notes, and psychological findings, Alcorn presents a convincing case against abortion. While not exhaustive, Why Pro-Life? covers just about every question you c Why Pro-Life? is an excellent book that answers questions about the Pro-Life position. This book is small, only about one hundred pages, but covers plenty of information. Randy Alcorn attempts to make an argument for the Pro-Life position without using the Bible, and he does a stellar job. Using statistics, scientific research, historical notes, and psychological findings, Alcorn presents a convincing case against abortion. While not exhaustive, Why Pro-Life? covers just about every question you could have about the abortion debate. From moment of conception to adoption resources, Alcorn has touched it all. I especially liked the grace and compromise he showed to victims of rape, incest, and those with medical complications. A small book that can be passed along, Why Pro-Life? is an excellent book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ginelle

    Alcorn addresses many questions and aspects that make the topic of abortion so difficult today. With chapters covering the baby's development, affects of abortion on the mother spiritual aspects, and more, he is constantly providing sourced references and statistics to follow up what he is saying. The whole book is written in a very informative style, rather than an accusatory or aggressive style. This make it easier to focus on the presented statistics and facts. I would honestly like to make a r Alcorn addresses many questions and aspects that make the topic of abortion so difficult today. With chapters covering the baby's development, affects of abortion on the mother spiritual aspects, and more, he is constantly providing sourced references and statistics to follow up what he is saying. The whole book is written in a very informative style, rather than an accusatory or aggressive style. This make it easier to focus on the presented statistics and facts. I would honestly like to make a regular habit of reading this book. I don't need any of the information to help me make my decision about my stance n abortion, but I would like to be able to remember some of the statistics that he gives, as well as some o his reasoning in preparation for future conversation that I might have.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stuart Turton

    Whenever divisive issues are concerned, it is necessary to stay grounded in logic, history and facts. But this by itself is inadequate, especially when it concerns killing babies. Alcorn demonstrates the right balance, as he moves beyond sound argumentation to make a compassionate plea, lest we forget what is at stake, especially when so much of pro-choice terminology seeks to disengage our understandably human and emotional impulses. This book is an accessible, well-argued, summative account on Whenever divisive issues are concerned, it is necessary to stay grounded in logic, history and facts. But this by itself is inadequate, especially when it concerns killing babies. Alcorn demonstrates the right balance, as he moves beyond sound argumentation to make a compassionate plea, lest we forget what is at stake, especially when so much of pro-choice terminology seeks to disengage our understandably human and emotional impulses. This book is an accessible, well-argued, summative account on the subject, which will strengthen pro-life convictions and further equip the reader for gracious and truthful encounters with those who may disagree. It is a great shame that the most appreciated review of the book on goodreads is one that is devoid of any acknowledgment of merit, and that is, unfortunately, like so much pro-choice rhetoric, grossly misleading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brian Watson

    This is a short and solid book reasoning for the pro-life position against abortion. It has some very good information and short chapters that deal with the major issues. I think it could have been improved by having more up-to-date facts regarding statistics. However, Alcorn has revised this book and a newer version was printed in 2012. I'm guessing he corrected that issue. If you were interested in reading one, short book on abortion, I would recommend this one. If you want a longer case agains This is a short and solid book reasoning for the pro-life position against abortion. It has some very good information and short chapters that deal with the major issues. I think it could have been improved by having more up-to-date facts regarding statistics. However, Alcorn has revised this book and a newer version was printed in 2012. I'm guessing he corrected that issue. If you were interested in reading one, short book on abortion, I would recommend this one. If you want a longer case against abortion, including good apologetics information, I would recommend Scott Klusendorf's The Case for Life.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rivqah Coover

    One of the most awesome books I have ever read. Thank-you so much, Randy. The copy I read was an earlier edition. I plan to get your newest edition, also, as well as some copies to share with others. I am also referring it over our family websites, www.LoveTheUnbornBabies.name and www.facebook.com/lovetheunbornbabies . I just want to thank you tremendously for such a wonderful book, and for making it available to others at such an affordable price. I think everyone ought to read this book. Pleas One of the most awesome books I have ever read. Thank-you so much, Randy. The copy I read was an earlier edition. I plan to get your newest edition, also, as well as some copies to share with others. I am also referring it over our family websites, www.LoveTheUnbornBabies.name and www.facebook.com/lovetheunbornbabies . I just want to thank you tremendously for such a wonderful book, and for making it available to others at such an affordable price. I think everyone ought to read this book. Please check out our websites and refer them to others. Thank-you!

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