website statistics Booked - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Booked

Availability: Ready to download

In this electric and heartfelt follow-up to Newbery Medal–winner The Crossover, soccer, family, love, and friendship take center stage as twelve-year-old Nick learns the power of words as he wrestles with problems at home, stands up to a bully, and tries to impress the girl of his dreams.  From the dynamic team behind the graphic novel edition of The Crossover. Twelve-year- In this electric and heartfelt follow-up to Newbery Medal–winner The Crossover, soccer, family, love, and friendship take center stage as twelve-year-old Nick learns the power of words as he wrestles with problems at home, stands up to a bully, and tries to impress the girl of his dreams.  From the dynamic team behind the graphic novel edition of The Crossover. Twelve-year-old Nick is a soccer-loving boy who absolutely hates books. In this graphic novel version of Booked, the follow-up to the Newbery Medal–winning novel The Crossover, soccer, family, love, and friendship take center stage as Nick tries to figure out how to navigate his parents’ divorce, stand up to a bully, and impress the girl of his dreams. These challenges—which seem even harder than scoring a tie-breaking, game-winning goal—change his life, as well as his best friend’s.


Compare

In this electric and heartfelt follow-up to Newbery Medal–winner The Crossover, soccer, family, love, and friendship take center stage as twelve-year-old Nick learns the power of words as he wrestles with problems at home, stands up to a bully, and tries to impress the girl of his dreams.  From the dynamic team behind the graphic novel edition of The Crossover. Twelve-year- In this electric and heartfelt follow-up to Newbery Medal–winner The Crossover, soccer, family, love, and friendship take center stage as twelve-year-old Nick learns the power of words as he wrestles with problems at home, stands up to a bully, and tries to impress the girl of his dreams.  From the dynamic team behind the graphic novel edition of The Crossover. Twelve-year-old Nick is a soccer-loving boy who absolutely hates books. In this graphic novel version of Booked, the follow-up to the Newbery Medal–winning novel The Crossover, soccer, family, love, and friendship take center stage as Nick tries to figure out how to navigate his parents’ divorce, stand up to a bully, and impress the girl of his dreams. These challenges—which seem even harder than scoring a tie-breaking, game-winning goal—change his life, as well as his best friend’s.

30 review for Booked

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cassie Thomas

    I absolutely love they are turning these stories into graphic novels. We have so many Booked, and Kwame fans in general. This will NOT stay on my shelf once it's there! I absolutely love they are turning these stories into graphic novels. We have so many Booked, and Kwame fans in general. This will NOT stay on my shelf once it's there!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Copy provided by Young Adult Books Central Nick Hall lives with his mother, who is a horse trainer currently between jobs, and his father, who is a professor of linguistics who has written a dictionary about interesting words that he is always encouraging Nick to read. Nick, however, is all about playing soccer with his friend Coby, and isn't a fan of words. This causes him some problems with his teacher, Ms. Hardwick, who manages to assign an amazing amount of books. These even include Hucklebe Copy provided by Young Adult Books Central Nick Hall lives with his mother, who is a horse trainer currently between jobs, and his father, who is a professor of linguistics who has written a dictionary about interesting words that he is always encouraging Nick to read. Nick, however, is all about playing soccer with his friend Coby, and isn't a fan of words. This causes him some problems with his teacher, Ms. Hardwick, who manages to assign an amazing amount of books. These even include Huckleberry Finn, in which Nick is assigned to find examples of malapropism when he gets in trouble in class. To the teacher's surprise, he gives her two examples in a black out poem, which she finds amusing. Classmate April, on whom Nick has a crush, also finds his love of words amusing, and encourages him to read more books. The two attend a cotillion type dance class together as well. The cool school librarian, Mr. MacDonald, who wears Chuck Taylors, reading themed tee shirts, and was a rap producer before he became a school librarian also encourages Nick to read, giving him a biography of Pele. Colby and Nick are very excited about playing in a soccer tournament in Dallas, but Nick's parents have some life changing news; they are separating, and Nick's mother is moving to Kentucky to take a job as a horse trainer. Adding to Nick's stress are two school bullies who have been suspended, but everything in his life brings him to a point where he tells his father he wishes he were dead, and they immediately take him to counseling. Nick isn't a huge fan of the doctor, but does examine his issues with him. When Nick isn't feeling well during a soccer game (a fact which attributes to food poisoning, and perhaps the fact that April has come to watch him play), he is knocked out and injures his ankle in a bad play, and when he is in the hospital, the doctor tells him there is worse news; his appendix has ruptured, and he has to have surgery immediately before an infection sets in. While Nick is glad his mother has returned home, the doctor tells him he won't be able to play soccer for three weeks, which means he will have to miss the Dallas tournament. He spends time in the hospital, and is so bored that he reads books that Mr. Mac and April recommend to him. This leads to April bringing her book club to his house and meeting his mother, who thinks she is great and invites her to go horse riding with Nick. Nick thinks that things are looking up, but as his health improves, his mother heads back to Kentucky, and Nick learns that life changes constantly. This is an adaptation of Alexander's novel in verse, and while I don't have the original at hand to compare, it almost seemed that the majority of the text was included in the adaptation, with Anyabwile's excellent drawings accompanying it. Unlike traditional graphic novels, that are arranged like comic books with speech bubbles and squares of scenes, this has the words, which are in various font sizes, on the page. There are a lot of definitions of words in boxed footnotes as well. Since I feel a need to look at all of the pictures in graphic novels and think about how they support the text, this took me longer to read than the novel in verse, but readers who like graphic novels and use the pictures to support their understanding of the words will appreciate the pictorial backup. Anyabwile's black and white drawings, with green accents that bring in the color from the cover of the novel in verse, are always expressive and engaging, and readers who enjoyed his work in the adaptation of the popular Crossover and Rebound will be glad to pick up this new title. There are not as many sports graphic novels as I would like, but there have been a few more lately. Yang's Dragon Hoops (basketball), Johnson's The Breakaways (soccer), Wilson's Play Like a Girl (football), and Dawson's Fifth Quarter (basketball) are ones to keep in mind for readers who enjoy Alexander's series, and Anyabwile's work can also be seen in the memoir by Tommie Smith about his life and his 1969 Olympic experience, entitled Stand. Victory: Raising My Fist for Justice. (September 2022)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Fischer

    Thank you to NetGalley and Clairon Books for the opportunity to review the graphic novel version of Booked by Kwame Alexander. Kwame Alexander has established himself as a master at writing engaging high-interest books that include deep thinking and complex vocabulary. I was thrilled when I first learned that some of his books were being adapted into graphic novels because that makes them even more accessible to young readers. Although Booked doesn't follow the traditional graphic novel format wi Thank you to NetGalley and Clairon Books for the opportunity to review the graphic novel version of Booked by Kwame Alexander. Kwame Alexander has established himself as a master at writing engaging high-interest books that include deep thinking and complex vocabulary. I was thrilled when I first learned that some of his books were being adapted into graphic novels because that makes them even more accessible to young readers. Although Booked doesn't follow the traditional graphic novel format with panels and word balloons, the words and illustrations still work together to create a cohesive story. Nick is a twelve-year-old soccer player. He isn't a fan of books, but his dad requires him to read from a dictionary in order to increase his vocabulary. Nick faces challenges related to soccer, bullying, girls, and his parents' relationship. Through it all he has the support of his best friend Coby, the school librarian, and a counselor. I believe that many young readers will be able to relate to the struggles that Nick experiences. I would recommend this book to my middle school students and believe that it would also appeal to some high school students. #Booked #NetGalley #Bookstagram #graphicnovels

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Grateful to Edelweiss and Etch/HMH Books for Young Readers for the E-ARC of this book. I love that Kwame Alexander’s popular middle grade books are being reimagined as graphic novels. While his books have already been loved by many students, this format will make them accessible to an even bigger audience. I loved re-visiting this story, but in graphic novel format. Same great story, and now we have visuals. I’m sure some will prefer the original which is in a verse novel format, but I am happy Grateful to Edelweiss and Etch/HMH Books for Young Readers for the E-ARC of this book. I love that Kwame Alexander’s popular middle grade books are being reimagined as graphic novels. While his books have already been loved by many students, this format will make them accessible to an even bigger audience. I loved re-visiting this story, but in graphic novel format. Same great story, and now we have visuals. I’m sure some will prefer the original which is in a verse novel format, but I am happy to have both options as I truly think it will widen the range of readers to which I will hand off this book. My only complaint is that sometimes I didn’t love the chapter titles. They felt confusing - are they part of the page or separate from the text and especially when some of the text was larger later in the page. I also was taken aback by the illustrations of Mr. Mac. Not sure what I had in my mind, but that wasn’t what I was expecting for some reason! I truly enjoyed having the chance to connect with these characters and this story again.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christy Broderick

    A fun and very “bookish” graphic novel that not only talked about soccer, but included great book recommendations and some blackout poetry. Thanks again to NetGalley and Etch/HMH Books for Young Readers for allowing me to read this ARC in exchange for feedback. This book is about a young boy, named Nick, who loves playing soccer, but doesn’t love that his parents are dealing with issues at home. His father loves words and makes Nick read a dictionary, so a lot of new and interesting words end up A fun and very “bookish” graphic novel that not only talked about soccer, but included great book recommendations and some blackout poetry. Thanks again to NetGalley and Etch/HMH Books for Young Readers for allowing me to read this ARC in exchange for feedback. This book is about a young boy, named Nick, who loves playing soccer, but doesn’t love that his parents are dealing with issues at home. His father loves words and makes Nick read a dictionary, so a lot of new and interesting words end up in this graphic novel (including their definition, which is helpful). Nick is also dealing with bullies, so with the help from friends (and his crush), he learns how the power of words can help him down the road. I also really enjoyed the fact that this book offered some book recommendations that I didn’t know anything about, so they are on my to-read list. Not only that, but this book even had some pages of blackout poetry included (which I LOVE), so that was an extra delight!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Daisey

    Although I have read a few of Kwame Alexander's books, I have not read the original version of this one. As with The Crossover, this story is about so much more than sports. This title is actually a reference to both soccer and books. Nick loves soccer and is a good player, but he's also dealing with a lot at home, along bullies and even a medical issue. His dad is a linguistics professor and he's required to read his dad's dictionary of weird and wonderful words when really he does not want to Although I have read a few of Kwame Alexander's books, I have not read the original version of this one. As with The Crossover, this story is about so much more than sports. This title is actually a reference to both soccer and books. Nick loves soccer and is a good player, but he's also dealing with a lot at home, along bullies and even a medical issue. His dad is a linguistics professor and he's required to read his dad's dictionary of weird and wonderful words when really he does not want to read at all. Yet, as the story goes on, we see him figure things out with the support of his family, a really great friend, and a few others who encourage him to actually start enjoying reading. *I received an electronic copy of this book for honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    KA

    The graphic novel version of Kwame Alexander's Booked would be a good addition to the middle or high school library collection. The minimalist drawings are still attention-grabbing and build off of and enhance the text. I have actually not read the verse novel version of Booked, so the whole storyline was new to me. I did feel the story was a little jumbled or choppy at times, bouncing between aspect's of Nick's life. But the story was not hard to follow, the topics will be relatable for younger The graphic novel version of Kwame Alexander's Booked would be a good addition to the middle or high school library collection. The minimalist drawings are still attention-grabbing and build off of and enhance the text. I have actually not read the verse novel version of Booked, so the whole storyline was new to me. I did feel the story was a little jumbled or choppy at times, bouncing between aspect's of Nick's life. But the story was not hard to follow, the topics will be relatable for younger kids, and the pacing was appropriate Thank you to the publishers and #NetGalley for the ARC.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Owen Blake

    I liked this book a lot, it reminded me of my last season of soccer. I won't say anything else so you have to read this amazing book! I liked this book a lot, it reminded me of my last season of soccer. I won't say anything else so you have to read this amazing book!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Maria Rowe

    Stellar! Another amazing book by Kwame Alexander. His love of words and language is especially clear in this story. The bold, powerful images go perfectly with the text. What a delight!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kellie Burke

    Confident and in control on the soccer field, middle schooler Nick struggles off the field between issues with his parents and dealing with schoolwork. He rather be playing or daydreaming about soccer but instead he has his English teacher nagging him to pay attention and his linguistics professor dad making him memorize vocabulary words. But with some prodding from the librarian and his crush to join the school book club Nick may find he may not hate reading and that he has more people on his s Confident and in control on the soccer field, middle schooler Nick struggles off the field between issues with his parents and dealing with schoolwork. He rather be playing or daydreaming about soccer but instead he has his English teacher nagging him to pay attention and his linguistics professor dad making him memorize vocabulary words. But with some prodding from the librarian and his crush to join the school book club Nick may find he may not hate reading and that he has more people on his side then he thinks. An ode to both soccer and words, Kwame Alexander’s novel in verse brings authenticity to the middle school experience. Booked: The Graphic Novel takes Alexander’s original book and adds Dawud Anyabwile’s bold black and white illustrations to bring additional life to the story. With splashes of the same shade of green the graphics are simple but striking, using bold lines, different sized words, and varying layouts to convey the emotions of the language. Nick also unintentionally sprinkles the vocabulary words he’s forced to learn throughout his speech and a graphic with the word’s definition is given on the same page, tying the words into the story. The multifaceted characters are what really make Booked shine though. The characters are complex and given enough details to feel like real people without slowing down the pace of the book. For instance, the librarian is a former rap producer who survived a brain tumor and now runs the Nerds and Words book club at school. In a few sentences Alexander develops this interesting side character that even without the illustrations the reader can visualize clearly. Weaving an ode to words and language into a strikingly illustrated sports story, Booked: The Graphic Novel will appeal to a wide range of readers who will relate to the struggles of growing up.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    “𝑫𝒓𝒂𝒈𝒐𝒏𝒇𝒍𝒊𝒆𝒔 𝒂𝒓𝒆 𝒆𝒍𝒆𝒄𝒕𝒓𝒊𝒄, 𝑵𝒊𝒄𝒌. 𝑳𝒊𝒌𝒆 𝒃𝒐𝒍𝒕𝒔 𝒐𝒇 𝒍𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕𝒏𝒊𝒏𝒈, 𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒓𝒐𝒄𝒌𝒆𝒕 𝒊𝒏𝒕𝒐 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒅𝒂𝒚. 𝑻𝒉𝒂𝒕’𝒔 𝒉𝒐𝒘 𝑰 𝒘𝒂𝒏𝒏𝒂 𝒍𝒊𝒗𝒆.” What business do I have reading a graphic novel in June that doesn’t come out until January 2022? I was too excited to check this one out. Booked is a graphic adaptation of Kwame Alexander’s 2016 National Book Award Long List nominee. Nick Hall loves soccer and hates reading. Nick’s father is a linguistics professor and has him read his dictionary each night to build his vocabulary. But th “𝑫𝒓𝒂𝒈𝒐𝒏𝒇𝒍𝒊𝒆𝒔 𝒂𝒓𝒆 𝒆𝒍𝒆𝒄𝒕𝒓𝒊𝒄, 𝑵𝒊𝒄𝒌. 𝑳𝒊𝒌𝒆 𝒃𝒐𝒍𝒕𝒔 𝒐𝒇 𝒍𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕𝒏𝒊𝒏𝒈, 𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒓𝒐𝒄𝒌𝒆𝒕 𝒊𝒏𝒕𝒐 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒅𝒂𝒚. 𝑻𝒉𝒂𝒕’𝒔 𝒉𝒐𝒘 𝑰 𝒘𝒂𝒏𝒏𝒂 𝒍𝒊𝒗𝒆.” What business do I have reading a graphic novel in June that doesn’t come out until January 2022? I was too excited to check this one out. Booked is a graphic adaptation of Kwame Alexander’s 2016 National Book Award Long List nominee. Nick Hall loves soccer and hates reading. Nick’s father is a linguistics professor and has him read his dictionary each night to build his vocabulary. But that’s not Nick’s only problem: he wrestles with problems at home, deals with bullies, and tries to impress the girl of his dreams. Will Nick discover the power of words, and how they can help solve his problems? I loved this book - it’s quick paced, well-plotted, and emotional. Not having read the original book, this story was all new to me; it is written in free verse poetry, and I loved the flow of the text. I also adored how the text adds to how interesting this book is to read; the words are not set up like a typical graphic novel with a traditional comic book layout. The use of new words was really cool (like mewling or limerence), and the fun footnotes that explain them and how Nick gets caught up in the love of books, saying that sometimes they stay slow but then you "𝒈𝒆𝒕 𝒄𝒂𝒖𝒈𝒉𝒕 𝒊𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒎𝒐𝒏𝒔𝒐𝒐𝒏 𝒂𝒏𝒅 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒔𝒕𝒐𝒓𝒚 𝒊𝒔 𝒖𝒏𝒑𝒖𝒕𝒅𝒐𝒘𝒏𝒂𝒃𝒍𝒆.” I will definitely be on the lookout for the original novel, along with Alexander’s The Crossover (in novel and graphic novel form). Booked is a great story for middle schoolers about the power of language, the thrills and setbacks of life, soccer, family, love, and friendship. Thank you to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt & NetGalley for the ARC!

  12. 4 out of 5

    D.T. Henderson

    Eh, a little cheesy with the “you got beat by a girrrllll!” jokes (at the same time, I’m in no way expecting the average middle school boy to be above that lol) and outdated slang “that was tight, BUT the emotional turmoil and helplessness Nick feels is excellent. The main character Nick feels like his whole life has been uprooted and left unbalanced when his parents lay a huge announcement on him. Soccer is one of the few things that centers him and provides joy to his now seemingly unstable li Eh, a little cheesy with the “you got beat by a girrrllll!” jokes (at the same time, I’m in no way expecting the average middle school boy to be above that lol) and outdated slang “that was tight, BUT the emotional turmoil and helplessness Nick feels is excellent. The main character Nick feels like his whole life has been uprooted and left unbalanced when his parents lay a huge announcement on him. Soccer is one of the few things that centers him and provides joy to his now seemingly unstable life. The parental drama will be very relatable for kids because Nick’s father is overly strict and hard on him (as an adult, I know he just wants Nick to have an education, so he can open more opportunities, but he was too overbearing even for me), his mother’s increased absence affects him, and he can’t find his voice to stand up to bullies at school. When his parents make huge decisions that don’t include him, he’s forced to get over it. At one point, his emotions boil over at his father’s continual chastisement where Nick says…(view spoiler)[ he wants to die. While Nick affirms he wasn’t suicidal, it’s this moment where his father realizes he needs to dial it back and show more emotional care/be more comforting. (hide spoiler)] Again, I thought the awkward navigation of emotional distress as a young teen and even the inclusion of counseling were great. A small nitpick: with the way the font is written when Nick is having a conversation with someone, you can easily lose track of who is speaking. Lastly, word up! * in my Wordgirl voice* This book includes a lot of great, uncommon words to build your vocabulary. c: 3.5

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ardie

    First, I have to say, I love Kwame Alexander’s books. He has an incredible ability to tell a heartfelt and gripping story through the tight restraints of poetry. He is a master of words. Alexander’s skill at poetic story telling still shines through the graphic novel version of his book... However, as much as I enjoyed reading this version of Booked, it wasn’t as powerful as other books I’ve read by Alexander. Booked offered so much to think about and work through, but it was missing that extra First, I have to say, I love Kwame Alexander’s books. He has an incredible ability to tell a heartfelt and gripping story through the tight restraints of poetry. He is a master of words. Alexander’s skill at poetic story telling still shines through the graphic novel version of his book... However, as much as I enjoyed reading this version of Booked, it wasn’t as powerful as other books I’ve read by Alexander. Booked offered so much to think about and work through, but it was missing that extra something that I’ve felt in his non-graphic novels. I think the problem is with me, though. As much as I enjoyed the graphics, I found them a bit distracting, and at one point the image shown didn’t correspond with the words on the page (ie. knee grabbing in the movie theatre). I enjoyed the story but would probably have enjoyed the traditional format better. That being said, I can see this graphic novel connecting with many young readers and being the door leads those readers to discover more of Alexander’s amazing stories. Thank you NetGalley for a free digital version of this book in exchange for an honest review. #NetGalley

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Nick is a star soccer player who doesn't see the value in reading books. Unfortunately for him, his father is a "Linguistics Professor with Verbomania" who expects Nick to read from his unique words dictionary on a daily basis. Nick is dealing with all of the usual stressors of middle school: bullies, crushes, and homework when his parents drop a bombshell on him...his mom is moving away for work and their marriage is in jeopardy. Can Nick overcome all of these obstacles to continue the pursuit Nick is a star soccer player who doesn't see the value in reading books. Unfortunately for him, his father is a "Linguistics Professor with Verbomania" who expects Nick to read from his unique words dictionary on a daily basis. Nick is dealing with all of the usual stressors of middle school: bullies, crushes, and homework when his parents drop a bombshell on him...his mom is moving away for work and their marriage is in jeopardy. Can Nick overcome all of these obstacles to continue the pursuit of his soccer dreams? Will April, his crush, help him refocus on interests outside of soccer? Be sure to check out this graphic novel adaptation of Booked when it releases in the Summer of 2022! Overall, I loved this book. I always like when authors include other books within their writing. This practice invites readers to seek out these other titles and read them too. The one flaw I found with this book is that the bullies are described as "pit-bull mean." As a pit bull owner, it's incredibly frustrating to hear stereotypes like this perpetuated. Pit bulls are incredibly sweet and loving animals who have received a bad reputation based upon how humans have treated them.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    Booked is an excellent adaptation of Kwame Alexander's middle grades book, published in 2016, under the same title. Nick Hall, an 8th grader at Langston Hughes, is struggling to balance his position on the soccer team, parent's separation, friendships, school work, and crush. Told in a combination of verse and graphics, this is a novel that students of all ages, genders, and interests will love. Similar to his other novels, it's about sports without actually being about sports. Teachers and libr Booked is an excellent adaptation of Kwame Alexander's middle grades book, published in 2016, under the same title. Nick Hall, an 8th grader at Langston Hughes, is struggling to balance his position on the soccer team, parent's separation, friendships, school work, and crush. Told in a combination of verse and graphics, this is a novel that students of all ages, genders, and interests will love. Similar to his other novels, it's about sports without actually being about sports. Teachers and librarians alike will love all the vocabulary and book references intertwined through the story. Personally, I loved the characterization of Mr. Mac - as a school librarian, I aspire to be him. Alexander and Anyabwile have done a great job with this story. There are a few sections of the story that seem to skip a little bit, probably due to turning it from a full book into a graphic novel. It does not impede the storyline. I will, without a doubt, be adding this book to my collection when it's officially released.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kate Waggoner

    Thank you to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children's Book Group and #Netgalley for allowing me the opportunity to read a digital ARC of the graphic novel Booked by Kwame Alexander. All opinions are my own. Nick loves soccer and hates book. His hatred is amplified by his father's love of words and the fact that Nick is required to read a dictionary written by his father. His life gets more complicated when his parents separate and his mom leaves Nick with his father while she goes to work in another Thank you to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children's Book Group and #Netgalley for allowing me the opportunity to read a digital ARC of the graphic novel Booked by Kwame Alexander. All opinions are my own. Nick loves soccer and hates book. His hatred is amplified by his father's love of words and the fact that Nick is required to read a dictionary written by his father. His life gets more complicated when his parents separate and his mom leaves Nick with his father while she goes to work in another state. At school, Nick has trouble with bullies and girls. I loved the original novel-in-verse version of Booked and the graphic novelization did not disappoint me. My students love the lyrical style and the pacing of the book. Even my most reluctant readers become absolutely captivated by Alexander's books. I love that Booked covers important themes related to family, divorce, bullying, and relationships. The illustrations in the graphic novel really bring the story to life and enhance the messages and emotions. This book is perfect for upper elementary and middle school libraries.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Marshall

    The graphic novel adaptation of Booked. This follows Nick who learns about the power of words as he deals with his problems. The sport focused on in Booked is soccer. Just like with Crossover this is more of an illustrated novel than a traditional comic. There aren't really panels, but the art is great. It enhances the story so much. The lettering changes size and style so even though all of the words from the novel are there it doesn't feel like you are reading a traditional novel because there i The graphic novel adaptation of Booked. This follows Nick who learns about the power of words as he deals with his problems. The sport focused on in Booked is soccer. Just like with Crossover this is more of an illustrated novel than a traditional comic. There aren't really panels, but the art is great. It enhances the story so much. The lettering changes size and style so even though all of the words from the novel are there it doesn't feel like you are reading a traditional novel because there is so much on the page that adds to the story. I love the color choices of black and white with green accents. It makes everything stand out. My students already love Booked, this version is going to have them even more excited. I have already let our school librarian know that they will need to carry this in the school's library. Creative Team: Written by Kwame Alexander Illustrated by Dawud Anyabwile

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    Graphic Novel I received an electronic ARC from Clarion Books through NetGalley. Alexander's books work well as graphic novels also. In this story, readers meet Nick and enter his middle school year. Typical school concerns - girls, homework, sports, fitting in, bullies (sadly) - make up his life. Drama at home as his parents have told him they are separating. His mom leaves for a job and he feels abandoned. Dad is strict and expects him to study beyond his schoolwork and develop an advanced vocab Graphic Novel I received an electronic ARC from Clarion Books through NetGalley. Alexander's books work well as graphic novels also. In this story, readers meet Nick and enter his middle school year. Typical school concerns - girls, homework, sports, fitting in, bullies (sadly) - make up his life. Drama at home as his parents have told him they are separating. His mom leaves for a job and he feels abandoned. Dad is strict and expects him to study beyond his schoolwork and develop an advanced vocabulary so he can succeed in life. The book is told entirely from Nick's perspective so readers need to see beyond his needs to the wider picture. The illustrations work well to keep the reader engaged and enhance the text provided. This is one that will fly off the shelf and provide opportunities for dialogue on middle school and family life.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Delonna Gibbs

    Booked by Kwame Alexander and Dawud Anywbwile is a MUST READ collaboration. The words and illustrations make Booked come to life. Nick is quick on his feet and mind. The journey in the book talks about friendship, first crushes, bullies, and family. Mr. Mac, the rappin' librarian, challenges Nick’s thinking about books. I appreciated how Nick is honest with Mr. Mac that he did not like reading. I’m sure a few of my students could also relate to that feeling. I loved all the fun vocabulary words Booked by Kwame Alexander and Dawud Anywbwile is a MUST READ collaboration. The words and illustrations make Booked come to life. Nick is quick on his feet and mind. The journey in the book talks about friendship, first crushes, bullies, and family. Mr. Mac, the rappin' librarian, challenges Nick’s thinking about books. I appreciated how Nick is honest with Mr. Mac that he did not like reading. I’m sure a few of my students could also relate to that feeling. I loved all the fun vocabulary words with definitions too. I can’t wait to share Booked with my students in January 2022. Hands down Booked is a MUST READ. In the meantime, check out Crossover (Graphic Novel), another example of the tag team Kwame and Dawud graphic novel. HAPPY READING!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Beyond the Pages with Eva Kim

    Quick Summary: Score! My Review: Kwame Alexander and Dawud Anyabwile did a masterful job with Booked. I absolutely loved it! The artistry, the story, the impact was everything and more. What made this book so engaging was the realness and the authenticity. I appreciated the attention to detail, the different challenges each young character faced, and the very evident growth of the main character. This was brilliantly crafted. I am happy to say that it has earned a spot on my favorites shelf. Ratin Quick Summary: Score! My Review: Kwame Alexander and Dawud Anyabwile did a masterful job with Booked. I absolutely loved it! The artistry, the story, the impact was everything and more. What made this book so engaging was the realness and the authenticity. I appreciated the attention to detail, the different challenges each young character faced, and the very evident growth of the main character. This was brilliantly crafted. I am happy to say that it has earned a spot on my favorites shelf. Rating: 5/5 Recommend: Yes Audience: YA I'm incredibly grateful to the author, to the illustrator, to the publisher, and to NetGalley for granting me the privilege of reviewing a digital ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for the wonderful experience.

  21. 5 out of 5

    E. Edwards

    can we talk about these illustrations? enjoyable & so eye appealing. i am so happy i got the win in a Goodreads giveaway. i am new to Kwame's writing. and i will hope to read more soon. please check this one out. are you a fan of "comiXology"? $8.99 on Amazon. came out on hubby's birthday, August 2, 2022. so fun!! children's soccer books, children's marriage & divorce books. children's black & African American stories. i was raised on comics in the "newspaper", bet a lot of young folks don't kno can we talk about these illustrations? enjoyable & so eye appealing. i am so happy i got the win in a Goodreads giveaway. i am new to Kwame's writing. and i will hope to read more soon. please check this one out. are you a fan of "comiXology"? $8.99 on Amazon. came out on hubby's birthday, August 2, 2022. so fun!! children's soccer books, children's marriage & divorce books. children's black & African American stories. i was raised on comics in the "newspaper", bet a lot of young folks don't know NEWSPAPERS?? lol. any who. my brother had lots of paper comics books and i would read them when he was not looking, lol. he was a fan of like Spiderman, Superman, all those characters. was it MADD magazine ...that was a silly one. fun times.

  22. 4 out of 5

    JoyAnn

    I finished this graphic novel in one sitting. I really enjoyed the characters. I wish Nick had stood up for his friend, Coby, at some point over the course of the novel. I'm used to interrupted poem breaks in books in verse but not in graphic novels, so that took me a moment to get used to. The minimalist drawings showed the action while letting the reader's imagination fill in some of the details. A lot of my students are fans of Alexander's original version and graphic novels, so they're sure I finished this graphic novel in one sitting. I really enjoyed the characters. I wish Nick had stood up for his friend, Coby, at some point over the course of the novel. I'm used to interrupted poem breaks in books in verse but not in graphic novels, so that took me a moment to get used to. The minimalist drawings showed the action while letting the reader's imagination fill in some of the details. A lot of my students are fans of Alexander's original version and graphic novels, so they're sure to love this. Students will also find something to relate to with everything that Nick is going through.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    Nick is a 12 year old who loves soccer and hates reading, despite being assigned to read his dad's dictionary every night. When his parents announce their separation and his best friend starts playing for a rival soccer team, Nick knows his year can't get any worse. Through an unexpected new friendship and a push from his rapping school librarian, Nick learns some lessons about life. Booked as a graphic novel is a great addition for students who loved the verse novel as well as The Crossover. Thi Nick is a 12 year old who loves soccer and hates reading, despite being assigned to read his dad's dictionary every night. When his parents announce their separation and his best friend starts playing for a rival soccer team, Nick knows his year can't get any worse. Through an unexpected new friendship and a push from his rapping school librarian, Nick learns some lessons about life. Booked as a graphic novel is a great addition for students who loved the verse novel as well as The Crossover. This version adds to the original making it a great option for comparison assignments. I read an ARC from NetGalley.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Thank you to Netgalley and Clarion Books for the review copy of this book. The novels in verse by Kwame Alexander are absolutely gorgeous. Booked - the graphic novel version - has the beautiful lyrical writing of the novel, paired with beautiful illustrations that add so much to the story. Booked follows soccer player Nick, who hates his father’s obsession with words. However, as he interacts more and more with the rapper turned librarian at his school, he learns how powerful words can be. I lov Thank you to Netgalley and Clarion Books for the review copy of this book. The novels in verse by Kwame Alexander are absolutely gorgeous. Booked - the graphic novel version - has the beautiful lyrical writing of the novel, paired with beautiful illustrations that add so much to the story. Booked follows soccer player Nick, who hates his father’s obsession with words. However, as he interacts more and more with the rapper turned librarian at his school, he learns how powerful words can be. I loved how bookish the story turned out to be as well as the sport aspect of the book. This is a book that I would recommend without hesitation to my students.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    This review is based on an ARC provided by Netgalley. I enjoy teaching the novel version to my students each year and watching it fly off my shelves after first chapter Friday's so I was ecstatic they have a graphic novel version as well. This graphic novel has beautifully paired the verse with images to convey the story. I was blown away with how well depicted it was and how the voice still came alive. Definitely will be adding this to my class library. For those students still hesitant to read This review is based on an ARC provided by Netgalley. I enjoy teaching the novel version to my students each year and watching it fly off my shelves after first chapter Friday's so I was ecstatic they have a graphic novel version as well. This graphic novel has beautifully paired the verse with images to convey the story. I was blown away with how well depicted it was and how the voice still came alive. Definitely will be adding this to my class library. For those students still hesitant to read a verse novel this might be the golden ticket to get them interested.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    This is a fantastic Graphic Novel adaptation of Kwame's Booked. This is going to be a hit with fans of the other books in the Kwame Alexander collection. I love the inclusion of words and definitions throughout the story. The topic is very timely as the main character struggles with his parent's separation and he is also dealing with a couple of bullies at school. The characters are very likable and realistic. I think this is an all-around win. This is a fantastic Graphic Novel adaptation of Kwame's Booked. This is going to be a hit with fans of the other books in the Kwame Alexander collection. I love the inclusion of words and definitions throughout the story. The topic is very timely as the main character struggles with his parent's separation and he is also dealing with a couple of bullies at school. The characters are very likable and realistic. I think this is an all-around win.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bea Turvey

    A brilliant graphic version of this popular sports novelist (poet). The same artist illustrated another book of his and this is just as full of movement, flowing with the words, giving a visual expression of the nature behind the words. The pictures are bold, and the lack of detail and colour makes it a less busy read than other graphic novels, which supports those who struggle with books that have 'too much' on the page. A brilliant graphic version of this popular sports novelist (poet). The same artist illustrated another book of his and this is just as full of movement, flowing with the words, giving a visual expression of the nature behind the words. The pictures are bold, and the lack of detail and colour makes it a less busy read than other graphic novels, which supports those who struggle with books that have 'too much' on the page.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    12 year old Nick is having a hard time with bullies, his parents divorce, and girls. He hates books but they might help him find the words he needs to help voice his side of everything going on. This is a important book in teaching kids there are better ways to communicate than acting out and that there can be consequences to everything you do, on and off of a sports field or court. The illustrations are awesome. This book is great for everyone even reluctant readers.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Patti Sabik

    The illustrations complimented the text extremely well and added to the overall aesthetic of this verse novel. I appreciated the minimal color palette because that forced the viewer to "read" the drawings and expressions of the characters. The font choice made you "feel" as if you really were the protagonist since the text is often written in second person. Nicely done. The illustrations complimented the text extremely well and added to the overall aesthetic of this verse novel. I appreciated the minimal color palette because that forced the viewer to "read" the drawings and expressions of the characters. The font choice made you "feel" as if you really were the protagonist since the text is often written in second person. Nicely done.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mary Blair

    Booked by Kwame Alexander is just another wonderful, relatable story for all kids to read. The graphic novel format allows for Kwame's story to be enjoyed by all types of readers. Soccer player, Nick, is faced with dealing with many challenges that our kids deal with in real life...bullying, relationships, and home challenges. I am sure that anyone who reads this book will enjoy it. Booked by Kwame Alexander is just another wonderful, relatable story for all kids to read. The graphic novel format allows for Kwame's story to be enjoyed by all types of readers. Soccer player, Nick, is faced with dealing with many challenges that our kids deal with in real life...bullying, relationships, and home challenges. I am sure that anyone who reads this book will enjoy it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...