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Amedeo Modigliani, embittered and unrecognized genius, dies of meningitis on a cold January day in Montparnasse in 1920. Jeanne Hébuterne, his young wife and muse, follows 48 hours later, falling backwards through a window. Now a ghost, Jeanne drifts about the studio she shared with Modigliani—for she was not only his favorite model, but also an artist whose works were lat Amedeo Modigliani, embittered and unrecognized genius, dies of meningitis on a cold January day in Montparnasse in 1920. Jeanne Hébuterne, his young wife and muse, follows 48 hours later, falling backwards through a window. Now a ghost, Jeanne drifts about the studio she shared with Modigliani—for she was not only his favorite model, but also an artist whose works were later shut away from public view after her demise. Enraged, she watches as her belongings are removed from the studio and her identity as an artist seemingly effaced for posterity, carried off in a suitcase. Thus begins Loving Modigliani, retelling the story of Jeanne Hébuterne’s fate as a woman and an artist through three timelines and three precious objects stolen from the studio: a diary, a bangle, and a self-portrait of Jeanne depicted together with Modi and their daughter. A century later, Jeanne Hébuterne’s artwork will be rescued from oblivion.


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Amedeo Modigliani, embittered and unrecognized genius, dies of meningitis on a cold January day in Montparnasse in 1920. Jeanne Hébuterne, his young wife and muse, follows 48 hours later, falling backwards through a window. Now a ghost, Jeanne drifts about the studio she shared with Modigliani—for she was not only his favorite model, but also an artist whose works were lat Amedeo Modigliani, embittered and unrecognized genius, dies of meningitis on a cold January day in Montparnasse in 1920. Jeanne Hébuterne, his young wife and muse, follows 48 hours later, falling backwards through a window. Now a ghost, Jeanne drifts about the studio she shared with Modigliani—for she was not only his favorite model, but also an artist whose works were later shut away from public view after her demise. Enraged, she watches as her belongings are removed from the studio and her identity as an artist seemingly effaced for posterity, carried off in a suitcase. Thus begins Loving Modigliani, retelling the story of Jeanne Hébuterne’s fate as a woman and an artist through three timelines and three precious objects stolen from the studio: a diary, a bangle, and a self-portrait of Jeanne depicted together with Modi and their daughter. A century later, Jeanne Hébuterne’s artwork will be rescued from oblivion.

51 review for Loving Modigliani: The Afterlife of Jeanne Hébuterne

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie DeMoss

    Loving Modigliani is one of those books that is so good that I don’t feel my review will do it justice. It is so good that I stopped halfway through and bought it in print version because I only had an electronic copy. I always keep print copies of my favorite books. It is so good that I didn’t want to put it down, and I was sad when it was finished. This is my humble attempt at a review and my bow to an accomplished author, Linda Lappin, who has woven together a remarkable piece of fiction base Loving Modigliani is one of those books that is so good that I don’t feel my review will do it justice. It is so good that I stopped halfway through and bought it in print version because I only had an electronic copy. I always keep print copies of my favorite books. It is so good that I didn’t want to put it down, and I was sad when it was finished. This is my humble attempt at a review and my bow to an accomplished author, Linda Lappin, who has woven together a remarkable piece of fiction based on real events. It is Paris, 1920. It is also Jeanne Hébuterne's day of death, 48 hours after her common-law husband, Amedeo Modigliani, died of tuberculosis. Modigliani was an artist of portraits and nudes who died basically destitute, but became famous years later. As the book begins, we meet Hébuterne on the street where her body lies after she fell or jumped, despondent and hugely pregnant, out of a window. We follow her spirit to a wheelbarrow rumbling through the streets of 1920's Paris, which is described in such detail that we feel we are there. We watch along with Hébuterne’s spirit as her belongings are stolen, including her diary, a bangle, and a family portrait. We flash back with her to her life with Modigliani and her own growth as an artist. We cheer her as she struggles to move forward and begins to search the afterlife for her beloved “Modi.” In a separate timeline in the 1980s, an art student stumbles upon some long hidden secrets and is given a window into the life of Jeanne Hébuterne. What will she do with this information and who will try to stop her? This is an amazing historical novel with sub-genres of fantasy, mystery, and the paranormal. It is a tribute to the art world of Paris, specifically the post-impressionist era of the early 1900s. Linda Lappin’s ability to describe the sights, sounds, and smells of 1920's Paris transports us there immediately. Her portrayal of the art and artists of that time is meticulously researched. Her ability to create a work that seamlessly binds together history, mystery, fantasy, and the paranormal is awe-inspiring. Her characters are so real you can see them, feel them, love them, and hate them. Lappin’s description of Hébuterne’s afterlife is full of unexpected turns, pitfalls, and surprises with huge nods to the art world. The realities of Jeanne’s life with Modigliani are shown to us, from infidelity to drunkenness to abuse and neglect, but above all we are shown Jeanne’s all-consuming love for this man, so well described in this book. Lappin shares the spirit and talent of Jeanne Hébuterne in so many ways, through her art, her music, and her steadfast determination and willingness to buck the rules of society. I wish I could speak more of the last line of the book without giving out any spoilers, but it is a perfect ending, tying everything together. My personal rules for historical novels, regardless of sub-genre, is that they must transport me to that time and place. Loving Modigliani did this instantly. They must also teach me something, and I learned so much about the 1900s Paris art scene that I am interested into exploring it further. Although I was given a free digital copy via Netgalley, I also bought a copy on Amazon. My review is voluntary and my opinions are my own.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Where to start describing this exquisite book? Loving Modigliani floored me. The novel imagines the life of the little-known artist Jeanne Hébuterne, common-law wife to her better-known partner, the artist Amedeo Modigliani. As the title suggests, it does so largely from the perspective of Jeanne after her death, along with those who would preserve her legacy, for reasons both personal and historic. The novel was both wildly imaginative and painstakingly researched, a balance I imagine is hard to Where to start describing this exquisite book? Loving Modigliani floored me. The novel imagines the life of the little-known artist Jeanne Hébuterne, common-law wife to her better-known partner, the artist Amedeo Modigliani. As the title suggests, it does so largely from the perspective of Jeanne after her death, along with those who would preserve her legacy, for reasons both personal and historic. The novel was both wildly imaginative and painstakingly researched, a balance I imagine is hard to pull off. Lappin's prose is elegant and simple, much like the lines of a Modigliani portrait. Jeanne was beautifully rendered, and felt more real to me as a ghost than many flesh-and-blood characters often do when written by less-accomplished writers. Lappin's poignant vision of the afterlife reminded me at times of Erin Morganstern's sublime descriptions of the Starless Sea, and I wanted to stay in that world forever. And yet the sections narrated by the young art history student were no less captivating, replete with the intrigue, suspense, and tight plotting of an Iain Pears mystery. By the novel's end, Lappin has woven the various threads of the narrative together into what I imagine a tapestry might look like if Monet had worked with warp and weft instead of oil and brush. There is enough resolution to be satisfying, and she provides enough detail for the reader to get the sense of what they have just read, yet she doesn't do the work for us. We must squint, stand back, consider the piece from various angles, and ultimately decide the degree to which we wish to draw the impressions together into a concrete and coherent whole, or whether we prefer to sit back, content to let the sensations of the piece wash over us. Either way, the novel is wholly satisfying. In short, Loving Modigliani is a stunning novel that will have wide appeal. Lovers of historical fiction, art history, fantasy, and mysteries will all find something to love in its pages. I am grateful to Ms. Lappin, Serving House Books, and NetGalley for providing me with a review copy in exchange for my honest opinion. This is a novel that would be well-worth paying for.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Celia

    This narrative is based on a real person Jeanne Hébuterne, the 'wife' of Amedeo Modigliani, an Italian Jewish painter and sculptor who worked mainly in France. His nickname is Modi. Jeanne Hébuterne was a French artist best known as the frequent subject and common-law wife of the artist Amedeo Modigliani. She took her own life two days after Modigliani died, and is now buried beside him. They both died in 1920. I initially became interested in this book because my favorite genre is historical fict This narrative is based on a real person Jeanne Hébuterne, the 'wife' of Amedeo Modigliani, an Italian Jewish painter and sculptor who worked mainly in France. His nickname is Modi. Jeanne Hébuterne was a French artist best known as the frequent subject and common-law wife of the artist Amedeo Modigliani. She took her own life two days after Modigliani died, and is now buried beside him. They both died in 1920. I initially became interested in this book because my favorite genre is historical fiction. I LOVED the book, but let me tell you: THIS IS NO ORDINARY HISTORICAL FICTION. In fact, it packs in two more genres-fantasy and crime. Truly multi-genre!! Written in 6 parts, the first is entitled "Afterlife A Gothic Fairy Tale Out the Window January 26, 1920". We meet Jeanne as a dead person. All her thoughts are seen from the other side. She had jumped out a window to her death. Thinking as a dead person might..how immensely fascinating. Extremely imaginative too. Highlights: 1) the Paris of the Dead. Did you know that there is another Paris where only dead people live? 2) the trial of Jeanne because she was accused of double murder - her own and her unborn child. Jeanne is looking for Modi. Will she be allowed to be with him where he now resides... with the Immortals? Part 2 "Ghosts of Montparnasse The Missing Madonna 1981". An art student has come to Paris for a year to write a thesis on the Chilean artist, Manuel Ortiz de Zarate, whose studio was once located on these premises in the glorious years of Montparnasse. Modigliani had worked in the upstairs loft of these premises. She meets Annie Rosier who had been a model for Ortiz. Annie is more interested in talking about Modi than Ortiz. She mentions the Missing Madonna, a portrait of Jeanne and her baby girl, started by Modi and finished by Jeanne. Part 3 "The Notebooks of Jeanne Hébuterne" relates her life with her family and with Modi. These notebooks were bequeathed to the student by Annie. They are worth a fortune. Part 4 "The Missing Madonna 2". Annie and the student set off for Nice... looking for The Missing Madonna. Annie then says that it is too dangerous in Venice and they continue their journey to attempt to find the painting in Rome. Part 5 "Afterlife" Part 6 "The Holy Family of the Circus Venice, 2021" The story was well constructed. The phrasing was flawless; I do not think there was a word out of place. The last two parts were completely surprising to me and I leave them un-described. I leave it to the reader of this review to PLEASE READ THE BOOK. This is my first book by Lapin. It won't be my last. I originally got a free copy from the author in exchange for an honest review. I loved it so much, I paid for the Kindle copy. The review was a real pleasure to write. Will remember this book for a long time. Definitely in my top 10 for the year 2020 and my last book to finish that year. 5 stars

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karen Siddall

    With twists and turns at every step, this is a don’t-miss-it historical mystery!When her husband and mentor, renowned painter, Amedeo Modigliani, dies after a short but brutal illness, Jeanne, 21 and pregnant with their second child jumps out of a window of her parents’ Parisian flat two days later and also dies. As a spirit, she tries to reunite with Modi but eventually ends up returning to the apartment and studio they shared, where she watches people she knew remove her things, even discoveri With twists and turns at every step, this is a don’t-miss-it historical mystery!When her husband and mentor, renowned painter, Amedeo Modigliani, dies after a short but brutal illness, Jeanne, 21 and pregnant with their second child jumps out of a window of her parents’ Parisian flat two days later and also dies. As a spirit, she tries to reunite with Modi but eventually ends up returning to the apartment and studio they shared, where she watches people she knew remove her things, even discovering her one last secret artwork hidden in the wall space behind a large cupboard. The painting, one that Modigliani had begun, was of Jeanne and their child, but when he’d rejected his initial work, intending to destroy it and start over, she’d saved it and added his likeness to the family portrait. Dubbed a lost Modigliani, its existence had become a myth in the world of artists and art collectors. But now, she spends her time pacing the floor and practicing the violin, the one thing her ghostly self was allowed to grab and take with her into her afterlife.Time passes to 1981, and an American art history student comes to Paris to research her thesis on Manuel Ortiz de Zárate, another of the famous Montparnasse artists who happened to live and work on the floor below Jeanne and Modi. But seemingly at every stage of her local research, she runs into persistent whispers of Modigliani, Jeanne, and the lost painting. When a dying woman entrusts her with more than just whispers, she is compelled to follow the story.Loving Modigliani is a wonderfully imaginative and absorbing story that I honestly did not want to put down. The descriptions of Paris and Jeanne’s life were so vivid I felt I was there. I know I held my breath as I was introduced to the author’s vision of the ‘Other Paris’ – the Paris of the dead. The characters came to life for me as the story twists and turns both in Jeanne’s afterlife story and the art scholar’s search for the lost painting. Nothing is as it seems!The amount of research that must have gone into developing this story had to have been tremendous – not only the life and times of the well-known characters but also the places and practices of the era, including health care, medicine, death, and dying, and burial. The story definitely benefitted from all the work; it was interesting and exciting throughout. I am delighted to learn about this artistic woman, talented in her own right, who has apparently been kept in the shadows all these years.I recommend LOVING MODIGLIANI: THE AFTERLIFE OF JEANNE HÉBUTERNE to readers of historical mysteries, especially those that don’t want to get involved in a series, readers that enjoy stories set in Paris, and those that have an interest in the art world, the art scene of Montparnasse Quarter in the 1920s.I voluntarily reviewed this after receiving an Advanced Review Copy from the author.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Buck

    What a delight, while weathering an extended home-stay that has kept me healthy but restless and consumed by an unfulfilled desire for travel, to get a chance to read Loving Modigliani! Linda Lappin’s new novel examines the complicated real and imagined aftermaths of the 1920 death of the artist Jeanne Hébuterne, lover and wife of the painter, Amadeo Modigliani. Little known at the time of her fatal fall from a window two days after Modigliani’s own demise from tuberculosis, Hébuterne has since What a delight, while weathering an extended home-stay that has kept me healthy but restless and consumed by an unfulfilled desire for travel, to get a chance to read Loving Modigliani! Linda Lappin’s new novel examines the complicated real and imagined aftermaths of the 1920 death of the artist Jeanne Hébuterne, lover and wife of the painter, Amadeo Modigliani. Little known at the time of her fatal fall from a window two days after Modigliani’s own demise from tuberculosis, Hébuterne has since emerged from the obscurity to which early 20th-century women artists were too often relegated. I found Loving Modigliani more lively than expected. Art history, thriller, fictionalized memoir, and travel accounts are deftly layered to reveal a rich universe peopled with artists, dealers, students, crooks, and mysterious strangers (with maybe a murderer tossed into the mix) over the century following Hébuterne’s fatal tumble. All are presented in exquisite detail, with characters and actions evocative of their respective eras. If life has grown dull, if you can’t travel right now, and want to, take a break. Ease into the armchair, open Loving Modigliani, and get ready for a whirlwind journey!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Miriam Polli

    I was fortunate to read this book when still in the galley form. Let me say it now, I loved this book. This is an ambitious read, vivid and imaginative. The poetic language is so compelling I read it through the early morning hours. For any reader who loves art and the story of Modigliani in addition to passionate love, you will find yourself absorbed in this imaginary world filled with moments that I found so authentic and hair raising. For me, it was one of those books that leaves a great sadne I was fortunate to read this book when still in the galley form. Let me say it now, I loved this book. This is an ambitious read, vivid and imaginative. The poetic language is so compelling I read it through the early morning hours. For any reader who loves art and the story of Modigliani in addition to passionate love, you will find yourself absorbed in this imaginary world filled with moments that I found so authentic and hair raising. For me, it was one of those books that leaves a great sadness when it's over.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gigi

    Part ghost story, part murder mystery, and part treasure hunt, Linda Lappin's Loving Modigliani is a haunting, genre-bending novel. Part ghost story, part murder mystery, and part treasure hunt, Linda Lappin's Loving Modigliani is a haunting, genre-bending novel.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tara Weiss

    Propping open the doors of intrigue, there's a triangle of light that reveals the romanticized mystique of the relationship between artist Amedeo Modigliani and Jeanne Hebuterne. There's a triad of sorts that Lappin applies as a vehicle to explain the passion of Jeanne Hebuterne, as this is her story and Modigliani only exists as a flickering candle, whisps of smoke reminding us he was there. And that is okay because what is explored is Hebuterne in life, and then her death that feels like you'v Propping open the doors of intrigue, there's a triangle of light that reveals the romanticized mystique of the relationship between artist Amedeo Modigliani and Jeanne Hebuterne. There's a triad of sorts that Lappin applies as a vehicle to explain the passion of Jeanne Hebuterne, as this is her story and Modigliani only exists as a flickering candle, whisps of smoke reminding us he was there. And that is okay because what is explored is Hebuterne in life, and then her death that feels like you've left one novel and started reading a Neil Gaiman novel for a bit. But, yet another story emerges as we are introduced to a young art student and now we've jumped ship into an adventurous quest to solve the mysterious disappearance of the Modigliani family portrait featuring Hebuterne, Modigliani, and their infant daughter. As each section of the story closes, it is a roll of the dice to see where you land while grasping the pieces of Hebuterne's life that swirl around. Finally, we land in the present, in post-Carnival Venice, where Hebuterne and Modigliani are seemingly reunited. Give in to the chaos and follow the story to the end. There's merit to applying Kabbalah theories and literary analysis to uncover symbolism that helps organize the story into a meaningful study of passion and art.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    Linda Lappin’s Loving Modigliani tells the story of the life and afterlife of Jeanne Hébuterne, who was Modigliani’s common-law wife - and a talented budding artist in her own right. We meet Jeanne in 1920, when she falls from a window just days after Modigliani dies of consumption. From there, we follow her into the afterlife, transcending space and time as she angrily watches family and acquaintances pick over her possessions, then crosses into a world of the dead, where she begins a long and a Linda Lappin’s Loving Modigliani tells the story of the life and afterlife of Jeanne Hébuterne, who was Modigliani’s common-law wife - and a talented budding artist in her own right. We meet Jeanne in 1920, when she falls from a window just days after Modigliani dies of consumption. From there, we follow her into the afterlife, transcending space and time as she angrily watches family and acquaintances pick over her possessions, then crosses into a world of the dead, where she begins a long and arduous quest to be reunited with her beloved. Jeanne’s story is picked up by an art student in Paris in 1981, who comes into possession of Jeanne’s diaries thanks to an old woman who is not all she seems. We also see a bracelet and lost painting of Jeanne’s move from place to place over the course of the book, until her work finally starts receiving the recognition it deserves, a century after her death. I really enjoyed both the ‘life’ and ‘afterlife’ elements of this novel. The ‘other side’ Lappin creates - featuring talking cats, black stars, and inescapable bureaucracy among many other things - is highly vivid and imaginative. The account of Jeanne’s short life contained in her diaries, meanwhile, is incredibly interesting and moving. I could really feel Jeanne’s excitement about going to art school in Paris, reinventing herself away from her stuffy bourgeois family, and falling madly in love for the first time. I also felt so sad, though, because she died at such a young age while ostracised by her family for getting pregnant out of wedlock, and Modigliani could be a drunken, abusive nightmare. Jeanne’s story reminded me of a few other books I’ve read this year that show male artists treating their partners badly and overshadowing them - Christine Dwyer Hickey’s The Narrow Land, Whitney Scharer’s The Age of Light, Brigitte Benkemoun’s Finding Dora Maar and Polly Samson’s A Theatre for Dreamers come to mind. At least the women in these other books got to live full lives, whereas we can only imagine what Jeanne might have achieved had she survived. It is a balm to see her work on exhibition in the final section and find out about her posthumous success in the afterword. The storyline with the art scholar also really captured my imagination. I always love reading about people making brilliant discoveries through research, so it really piqued my interest when she made contact with an eccentric but wily old woman, Annie Rosier, who knew Jeanne and was finally prepared to give up her secrets. There’s a lot of humour in this section as the pair go on a spontaneous, madcap trip across Europe to liberate the lost painting, involving comical characters and mightily suspicious deaths. Loving Modigliani is imaginative, poignant and intriguing.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    We are with nineteen-year-old Jeanne Hébuterne as she falls to her death, just days after her lover, the artist Modigliani, dies. It is a brutal death and together with her trapped spirit we witness the horror on her family’s faces as they see her crumpled, broken body in the courtyard of their Parisian apartment. As Jeanne comes to terms with what she has done, we are with her as she takes her first steps in the afterlife, desperate to do all she can to be reunited with her beloved Modi. With We are with nineteen-year-old Jeanne Hébuterne as she falls to her death, just days after her lover, the artist Modigliani, dies. It is a brutal death and together with her trapped spirit we witness the horror on her family’s faces as they see her crumpled, broken body in the courtyard of their Parisian apartment. As Jeanne comes to terms with what she has done, we are with her as she takes her first steps in the afterlife, desperate to do all she can to be reunited with her beloved Modi. With the help of unexpected new friends, she travels through portals that take her between a seemingly parallel Paris for the dead, the underworld, and even give her a glimpse into the future she missed. Death for Jeanne is like a dream where you never quite seem to get where you need to be, and where increasingly bizarre situations crop up to delay your progress. This is a book of many parts, each one as intriguing as the other. No sooner had I got settled into the afterlife, when we are transported back to Paris, in the 1980’s, where an art student writing her thesis is introduced to a mysterious elderly lady. Annie is one of the last people alive to have met Modi and Jeanne, but time is running out for her and she has secrets she needs to share, before it is too late. When Jeanne’s diaries turn up unexpectedly, decades after her death, the next part of this book takes us back into Montparnasse and the Parisian art scene during the First World War. The parties, the deceit, the poverty, the passion. We follow the young Jeanne as she begins to break away from the safety of her bourgeois family and find her independence with the artists she so admires. Each different part of this book captivated me and swept me up in the mystery of Jeanne’s life, and the final part, which was probably the most unexpected, brought everything together just perfectly and left me with a smile on my face. With Jeanne’s life and death being such an enigma, this isn’t the first fiction book I have read about her, and it certainly left me wanting to know more about Jeanne, Modi, his art, and their daughter. I couldn’t have picked a better book to begin a new year of reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Seraphia

    Loving Modigliani is the first book that I have read by Linda Lappin and I have to say that this book really intrigued me from the blurb and the way that this story begins pulls me in and keeps me page-turning to read this haunting tale. Loving Modigliani starts off with the main character meeting a tragic end that I have to admit left me shocked and a bit confused. The detail hungry part of my brain wanted to know why she did this, but then I found myself pulled along as we follow her ghost as s Loving Modigliani is the first book that I have read by Linda Lappin and I have to say that this book really intrigued me from the blurb and the way that this story begins pulls me in and keeps me page-turning to read this haunting tale. Loving Modigliani starts off with the main character meeting a tragic end that I have to admit left me shocked and a bit confused. The detail hungry part of my brain wanted to know why she did this, but then I found myself pulled along as we follow her ghost as she experiences the new changes that she is undergoing and all the things that she is seeing and experiencing. Piece by piece this story comes together. There are some elements that surprised me (how those near her at the time of her death didn't really show much emotion) and how others peered at her like she was a curiosity. I love how this book is broke up into six parts. Each part is clearly marked so you know when there is going to be a transition and the time era shift that is coming as well, when there is one. It was a wonderful way to guide me through the story piece by piece with Jeanne. Of course, there are questions that I have that arise here and there throughout the book, but the author does such an excellent job answering them in the right moments to keep me eagerly wanting to know more. This book is so well written. We get some fact with fiction and it all blends together to create a uniquely beautiful story that bends genre and time as well. I am choosing to rate this book 4.5 out of 5 stars. There were a few dull moments that caused me to lose interest in the book so that I had to push to keep reading, but it was well worth it. I look forward to reading more by this author in the future.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Sunday

    This book was a wild run. It begins when Jeanne Hebuterne committed suicide on January 26, 1920 two days after her husband, Amedeo Modigliani died from a long illness of tuberculosis. She was 10 months pregnant with her second child and couldn't bear to live without him as she jumped out of a window. What's different is that in the beginning of the book, Jeanne is witnessing what has happened in the afterlife. A thin thread connects her ghost self to her body as she takes a glimpse of her life. J This book was a wild run. It begins when Jeanne Hebuterne committed suicide on January 26, 1920 two days after her husband, Amedeo Modigliani died from a long illness of tuberculosis. She was 10 months pregnant with her second child and couldn't bear to live without him as she jumped out of a window. What's different is that in the beginning of the book, Jeanne is witnessing what has happened in the afterlife. A thin thread connects her ghost self to her body as she takes a glimpse of her life. Jeanne's friends warned her about a life with Modigliani. It was well known that he was intimate with his models, he took drugs, he spent every penny he had at the bar and felt like a failure with his art. Yet, Jeanne overlooked these traits and said she didn't need money to be happy. It didn't matter that her mom, dad and brother were horrified that she left her family with an excellent reputation to be with this older man that was not only a starving artist but also Jewish. None of this mattered to her. This book was unique as Jeanne always wanted to be closely connected to the one she loved even after she died. As the book continues, the reader learns more about Jeanne when years later, her notebooks with sketches, drawings, shopping lists, poems and words are revealed to an American art history student working on her doctorate. Maybe it's not exactly how a young Paris girl would write a diary in those days but it was filled with a bit of mystery that made me want to find out more. They are many written reports and books about the high profile male Paris artists of the 1920s: Mondigliani, Cezanne, Turner, Gauguin, and Picasso. However, what about the women that married these men? Of course, it was a woman that decided to write about the artist that is not as well known: Jeanne Hebuterne. It was clear that an incredible amount of historical research was done to bring accuracy to this story. Overall, with a love of art, I enjoyed this book. My thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for allowing me to read this e-book in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Grosskopf

    I loved this book, bravo! What an imagination. An afterlife style devised by Linda Lappin that was completely original and unusual... dusty, surreal, humanized, darkly worldly, intriguing, and captivating. Throughout, after we meet an art historian and old woman connected to Modigliani and Jeanne's past, and the suspenseful adventure that occurs with long ago hidden paintings, a suspicious fellow following, and after reading the made up diaries of Jeanne to send us back to what life was like bef I loved this book, bravo! What an imagination. An afterlife style devised by Linda Lappin that was completely original and unusual... dusty, surreal, humanized, darkly worldly, intriguing, and captivating. Throughout, after we meet an art historian and old woman connected to Modigliani and Jeanne's past, and the suspenseful adventure that occurs with long ago hidden paintings, a suspicious fellow following, and after reading the made up diaries of Jeanne to send us back to what life was like before Jeanne's and her beloved Modigliani's deaths, and then, back to the afterlife in a surreal, but this time painterly, vibrantly colored, Gaugin island, but still with a spiritually deserted-vast-void feeling, we find movement for Jeanne in a more positive direction from her previous hellish after life in her desperate search for Modi. And finally a modern era exposition and the story there that ties this magnificent fiction. Throughout, there are echos of elements from life and the afterlife that interweave the story, tuning in to different fabrics of reality, blurring the line between realities. Highly recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Loving Modigliani: The Afterlife of Jeanne Hébuterne is an interesting read. It is the first I have read by Linda Lappin. She has proven to me that she is a very talented at weaving such a wonderful tale. I was fascinated with this story right from the start. After reading it, I had to search to find out more about Jeanne Hébuterne. Such a captivating character in real life. Loving Modigliani: The Afterlife of Jeanne Hébuterne is getting a very well deserved five plus stars from me. I highly rec Loving Modigliani: The Afterlife of Jeanne Hébuterne is an interesting read. It is the first I have read by Linda Lappin. She has proven to me that she is a very talented at weaving such a wonderful tale. I was fascinated with this story right from the start. After reading it, I had to search to find out more about Jeanne Hébuterne. Such a captivating character in real life. Loving Modigliani: The Afterlife of Jeanne Hébuterne is getting a very well deserved five plus stars from me. I highly recommend for readers who enjoy reading fiction based on true events. I would to get my hands on more books by Linda Lappin. She has earned herself a new fan. This book is really great and it should not be missed. I received Loving Modigliani: The Afterlife of Jeanne Hébuterne from the publisher. This review is one hundred percent my own honest opinion.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paulita Kincer

    Exploring art and novels seems to go together, but this one goes a step further by exploring the afterlife of an artist. Everyone has heard of Modigliani, but how many know about his muse, an artist herself, Jeanne Hébuteme? This novel explored a subject that I didn't know a lot about. I'd heard of Modigliani and recognized some of his iconic paintings, but I knew nothing about his tragic life or that of his common-law wife Jeanne Hébuteme, who died a few days after Modigliani when she threw her Exploring art and novels seems to go together, but this one goes a step further by exploring the afterlife of an artist. Everyone has heard of Modigliani, but how many know about his muse, an artist herself, Jeanne Hébuteme? This novel explored a subject that I didn't know a lot about. I'd heard of Modigliani and recognized some of his iconic paintings, but I knew nothing about his tragic life or that of his common-law wife Jeanne Hébuteme, who died a few days after Modigliani when she threw herself from a window while nine-months pregnant. I barely these tragic figures in the novel before we were thrust into a bleak afterlife as Jeanne searched to be reunited with Modigliani, only to learn that he wasn't in the grayness of the dead in Paris, a place where the rich continued to look down on the poor, kicking them out of first class on ghost trains, and white men continued in their power, judging the lives of everyone in a ghost trial. I was super depressed thinking this world, not heaven, not hell, might be the fate of those who have died. Luckily, just before I threw the book aside in despair, we moved on to explore how the life and history of both Modigliani and Hébuteme continued, including artist notebooks and a long-missing painting. I'm always intrigued by missing paintings from World War II, as evidenced by my book The Summer of France. Love a story that supposes what might have happened to the pilfered artwork. In the end, this book definitely captured me, creating a world I couldn't have imagined for myself.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    From BonjourParis.com -- editorial review by M. Mullins When the lead character dies on page one, somehow you know a ghost must be waiting in the wings. The protagonist of Linda Lappin’s new novel is Jeanne Hébuterne—artist, model and common-law wife of the brilliant and wild Amedeo Modigliani... There are many things to like about this novel. If you’re longing to visit Paris, but can’t travel due to COVID-19 restrictions, this book will not only take you there, but will also bring alive the stre From BonjourParis.com -- editorial review by M. Mullins When the lead character dies on page one, somehow you know a ghost must be waiting in the wings. The protagonist of Linda Lappin’s new novel is Jeanne Hébuterne—artist, model and common-law wife of the brilliant and wild Amedeo Modigliani... There are many things to like about this novel. If you’re longing to visit Paris, but can’t travel due to COVID-19 restrictions, this book will not only take you there, but will also bring alive the streets and cafés of Montparnasse, the Marais, and the Île St-Louis in full multi-sensory detail — the history, clothes, sounds, smells, textures, and daily rhythms — of the past and present. If you’ve heard only the abridged drama of Modigliani and Jeanne as star-crossed lovers who died too soon, you will gain a deeper perspective with the story now told. If you enjoy a compelling mystery, you will be swept in and will find that not all the puzzles will be easily solved. You will have to rouse your inner sleuth.I f you want desperately to believe in the afterlife, the journey presented will give you hope. And if you are a supporter of the under-appreciated women artists of their time, you will applaud Lappin’s choice of subject and you’ll love the novel’s ending." Read the complete review @BonjourParis.com

  17. 5 out of 5

    C. Gonzales

    What a great book! I enjoyed this one without a doubt. Full of fantasy, history, mystery and so many other aspects that really set it apart. It doesn't fit into a genre box, it stands on its own blending fantasy in its best form, great characters who I cared about, as well as an overall interesting story The writing is concise and the the point. The author doesn't skirt around things and really shines the light on his characters and setting, while keeping the pace steady and keeping the reader on What a great book! I enjoyed this one without a doubt. Full of fantasy, history, mystery and so many other aspects that really set it apart. It doesn't fit into a genre box, it stands on its own blending fantasy in its best form, great characters who I cared about, as well as an overall interesting story The writing is concise and the the point. The author doesn't skirt around things and really shines the light on his characters and setting, while keeping the pace steady and keeping the reader on their toes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    A Wealth of Insight Without the curiosity of this author we would not have access to yet another female artist. She has opened my eyes to not only Jeanne Hebuterne, but to all the artists in her circle including Modigliani. I read this book with the internet open, enjoying the images of all the painters and the music of Schubert. I’m enriched. I’m grateful. And I look forward to ready Linda’s other books.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sian

    My review of Loving Modigliani is on my blog https://quirkybookreads.wordpress.com... My review of Loving Modigliani is on my blog https://quirkybookreads.wordpress.com...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sue Altman

    I do believe the book is brilliant. However, I am not a fan of fantasy.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Destiny Brown

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Tripp

  23. 4 out of 5

    RoseMarie McLoughlin

  24. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Mansfield

  25. 5 out of 5

    Srivalli

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shari

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paula

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Knight

  31. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Fisher

  32. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

  33. 5 out of 5

    ㋛ ㋡

  34. 4 out of 5

    Lari

  35. 5 out of 5

    Sheffcourt

  36. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Brand

  37. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  38. 5 out of 5

    Sherilyn

  39. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Chberlin

  40. 4 out of 5

    Gina Molinari

  41. 4 out of 5

    Peter Finn

  42. 5 out of 5

    Sherri Kaba

  43. 5 out of 5

    Patti

  44. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Varon

  45. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Travers

  46. 5 out of 5

    Barb

  47. 4 out of 5

    Jill

  48. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Wyse

  49. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Kramer Bussel

  50. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

  51. 4 out of 5

    Teresa A. Mauk

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