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The woman who never made a match of her own is making matches for everyone else in this hilarious comedy of manners from the author of Mr. Malcolm's List. Sophronia Lattimore had her romantic dreams destroyed years ago and is resigned to her role as chaperone for her cousin. Still, she cannot sit idly by when she becomes aware that a gentleman is about to propose to the wro The woman who never made a match of her own is making matches for everyone else in this hilarious comedy of manners from the author of Mr. Malcolm's List. Sophronia Lattimore had her romantic dreams destroyed years ago and is resigned to her role as chaperone for her cousin. Still, she cannot sit idly by when she becomes aware that a gentleman is about to propose to the wrong woman. She sends him an anonymous letter that is soon the talk of the town, particularly when her advice proves to be correct. Her identity is discovered and Sophie, formerly a wallflower, becomes sought after for her “expert” matchmaking skills. One person who seeks her out is the eligible and attractive Sir Edmund Winslow. As Sophie assists Sir Edmund in his pursuit of a wife, she wishes she could recommend herself as his bride. However, she vows to remain professional and uninvolved while aiding him in his search (especially since the gentleman surely does not return her affections). Three unexpected arrivals soon show up at Sophie's door—the man who once broke her heart, a newlywed who is dissatisfied with the match Sophie made for her, and the man madly in love with Sophie's cousin—all wanting her attention. But when her onetime beau and Sir Edmund both appear to be interested in her, Sophie can’t figure out if she’s headed for another broken heart­­ or for the altar. How can she be expected to help other people sort out their romantic lives when her own is such a disaster?


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The woman who never made a match of her own is making matches for everyone else in this hilarious comedy of manners from the author of Mr. Malcolm's List. Sophronia Lattimore had her romantic dreams destroyed years ago and is resigned to her role as chaperone for her cousin. Still, she cannot sit idly by when she becomes aware that a gentleman is about to propose to the wro The woman who never made a match of her own is making matches for everyone else in this hilarious comedy of manners from the author of Mr. Malcolm's List. Sophronia Lattimore had her romantic dreams destroyed years ago and is resigned to her role as chaperone for her cousin. Still, she cannot sit idly by when she becomes aware that a gentleman is about to propose to the wrong woman. She sends him an anonymous letter that is soon the talk of the town, particularly when her advice proves to be correct. Her identity is discovered and Sophie, formerly a wallflower, becomes sought after for her “expert” matchmaking skills. One person who seeks her out is the eligible and attractive Sir Edmund Winslow. As Sophie assists Sir Edmund in his pursuit of a wife, she wishes she could recommend herself as his bride. However, she vows to remain professional and uninvolved while aiding him in his search (especially since the gentleman surely does not return her affections). Three unexpected arrivals soon show up at Sophie's door—the man who once broke her heart, a newlywed who is dissatisfied with the match Sophie made for her, and the man madly in love with Sophie's cousin—all wanting her attention. But when her onetime beau and Sir Edmund both appear to be interested in her, Sophie can’t figure out if she’s headed for another broken heart­­ or for the altar. How can she be expected to help other people sort out their romantic lives when her own is such a disaster?

30 review for Miss Lattimore's Letter

  1. 4 out of 5

    PlotTrysts

    An enjoyable traditional Regency with a few kisses and lots of promenading in the Grand Pump Room of Bath, Miss Lattimore's Letter recalls Jane Austen's Persuasion and Georgette Heyer's Black Sheep or Bath Tangle. It is always fun to read a historical romance that takes place outside of London's ballrooms, and there are plenty of different Bath details to keep you interested. The plot itself involves Sophie (Sophronia), a slightly older heroine at 28, who manages to find herself the object of tw An enjoyable traditional Regency with a few kisses and lots of promenading in the Grand Pump Room of Bath, Miss Lattimore's Letter recalls Jane Austen's Persuasion and Georgette Heyer's Black Sheep or Bath Tangle. It is always fun to read a historical romance that takes place outside of London's ballrooms, and there are plenty of different Bath details to keep you interested. The plot itself involves Sophie (Sophronia), a slightly older heroine at 28, who manages to find herself the object of two men's amorous affections. How she handles the love triangle makes up the meat of the story. Subplots include a young couple in a tempestuous marriage and Sophie's younger cousin who is struggling with making a decision in a love triangle of her own. Strengths of the book include complex characterization, especially of Sophie and her family, and the diversity of settings mentioned earlier. If you're looking for a clean, enjoyably lower-angst historical with some good-natured humor, this fits the bill. This objective review is based on a complimentary advanced reader copy of the novel.

  2. 4 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    Cupid’s pen produces a few inkblots. Whilst I enjoyed Sophronia Lattimore and Sir Edmund Winslow, at many times I felt I was watching a Wayang Kulit play (Javanese Shadow puppets) or a mashup of other novels I read, particularly Austenian. Interfering in the romantic life of two couples, from her chaperone / wallflower position Sophie decides to take action to change their fate. Imagine her surprise when society decides she’s a talented matchmaker. Letter writing is such an art! Since her father di Cupid’s pen produces a few inkblots. Whilst I enjoyed Sophronia Lattimore and Sir Edmund Winslow, at many times I felt I was watching a Wayang Kulit play (Javanese Shadow puppets) or a mashup of other novels I read, particularly Austenian. Interfering in the romantic life of two couples, from her chaperone / wallflower position Sophie decides to take action to change their fate. Imagine her surprise when society decides she’s a talented matchmaker. Letter writing is such an art! Since her father died, Sophie has lived in her aunt’s household, at her pleasure. Sophie had once looked for an engagement wth an ardent suitor, only to have the bounder up and marry a wealthier woman. Of course her society concluded that it was Sophie’s fault the gentleman had looked elsewhere. So the rotter gets off scot free. Grr! Sophie is Austen’s Emma-like in her interference in others life, although Heyer-like in her willingness to look at her efforts and consider the truth about her so called wisdom. The opening scene is rather funny. Alain does convey a lively sense of humor and wit at times, although I still don’t feel fully satisfied with the story as a whole. It’s in this scene that Sophie meets the socially reclusive Sir Edmund. Rather endearing. Where Alain loses me completely is where Sophie’s ex-suitor (ex-swine IMO), Mr. Maitland, re-emerges as a widower and she contemplates him as future husband material. Really! The road to happiness is strewn with pebbles, not quite boulders, and misinterpretations. An enjoyable read nonetheless. A Berkley Group ARC via NetGalley

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Martin

    Sophie Lattimore has been a poor relation staying with her aunt and cousin for a number of years. She often finds herself in the background at social events and was not surprised when she overheard two people talking. Priscilla Hammond, diamond of the first water, is conversing with childhood sweetheart Charles Beswick and it sounds like they have feelings for each other. Sophie knows that Priscilla is being courted by Lord Fitzwater and she also knows that her cousin's friend Lucy Barrett is in Sophie Lattimore has been a poor relation staying with her aunt and cousin for a number of years. She often finds herself in the background at social events and was not surprised when she overheard two people talking. Priscilla Hammond, diamond of the first water, is conversing with childhood sweetheart Charles Beswick and it sounds like they have feelings for each other. Sophie knows that Priscilla is being courted by Lord Fitzwater and she also knows that her cousin's friend Lucy Barrett is in love with him. So she decides to write an anonymous letter...which has unexpected consequences. Her identity gets out and people begin to believe that she is some sort of gifted matchmaker. Nothing could be further from the truth. Sophie is approached by Sir Edmund Winslow who asks her to help him find a suitable match. Sophie is interested in him and hopes that he would find her his perfect match. But when Mr. Maitland, the man who broke her heart at eighteen reappears and begins courting her again, Sophie becomes very confused about what she wants for her life. This isn't the only romantic tangle in the story. Priscilla and Charles marry but they aren't getting along and Priscilla comes to Sophie for more romantic advice. And Sophie's cousin Cecelia is also torn between Mr. Hartwell who is kind and loves her and Lord Courtney who would be the catch of the season but is both boring and stupid. It takes time and lots of amusing situations before all the various lovers are paired off with their proper mates in this engaging historical romance.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    What a fun and enjoyable book. I love light reads with romance and a bit of intrigue. Miss Lattimore sends out a letter to a Gentleman letting him know he is going to propose to a woman that doesn’t really love him. With that this wonderful book starts. I really like Sophie as an MC she was very funny. She wants the best for everyone however once she is discovered as the writer of the letter thing get a bit messy. People call her a matchmaker but can she be one with only on letter sent and 2 mat What a fun and enjoyable book. I love light reads with romance and a bit of intrigue. Miss Lattimore sends out a letter to a Gentleman letting him know he is going to propose to a woman that doesn’t really love him. With that this wonderful book starts. I really like Sophie as an MC she was very funny. She wants the best for everyone however once she is discovered as the writer of the letter thing get a bit messy. People call her a matchmaker but can she be one with only on letter sent and 2 matches? Well Sophie feels like she needs to make things better. As she tries to help others she finds herself possibly falling for Sir Edmund some one she has said she will help find a wife. Will she get her own happily every after? I really liked how all the characters fell into play. I really loved how so many of the characters reminded me of Jan Austen characters. And I loved the trip to Bath. It felt like I was there and that is just the way a book should make you feel. It should transport you to that place. I now want to go to Bath and visit. Overall a great regency romance and fun read. This book comes out in August 2021. **Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC**

  5. 4 out of 5

    Littlebookworm

    At the age of twenty eight, Sophie Lattimore is resigned to her fate as a spinster. She is lucky that she has a place in her aunt's household, acting as her cousin Cecilia's chaperone. Still when Sophie acts upon some information she is chance to come across and sends an anonymous letter to a gentleman who is about to propose to the wrong woman, Sophie suddenly finds herself coming to the forefront of attention, garnering a reputation for herself as Lady Cupid. Soon others are coming to enlist h At the age of twenty eight, Sophie Lattimore is resigned to her fate as a spinster. She is lucky that she has a place in her aunt's household, acting as her cousin Cecilia's chaperone. Still when Sophie acts upon some information she is chance to come across and sends an anonymous letter to a gentleman who is about to propose to the wrong woman, Sophie suddenly finds herself coming to the forefront of attention, garnering a reputation for herself as Lady Cupid. Soon others are coming to enlist her help, including the handsome Sir Edmund Winslow, who is eager to find a wife. The only issue with this is that Sophie rather takes a liking to Sir Edmund herself, still she does not expect such feelings to be returned and so sets store to do her best for him. Soon enough however, Sophie has reason to rather regret her previous match-making, and when an old suitor of her own turns up, certainly she finds herself struggling to manage her own romantic life. My second book from Suzanne Allain, Miss Lattimore's Letter was very much in the same vein as her previous, Mr Malcolm's List, in that it was a light and easy Regency romance and comedy of manners. The story starts off in London, but soon moves to Bath, and follows the romantic entanglements of several couples. I liked Sophie as the main character, she made for a slightly older heroine than the standard for Regency romances, and I liked her story of a second chance at love. I did at first rather wonder at how she could seriously be contemplating accepting the man who had previously broken her heart, however, I think Allain managed to convey the predicament that Sophie was in, the choice between marriage and all that it offered including a family and spinsterhood. Still, out of her two suitors I much preferred Sir Edmund, who was sweet and gentlemanly and seemed to genuinely appreciate Sophie. That being said, their path to happiness was at times rather a frustrating one, and at times I did find it hard to understand Sir Edmund, and why he seemed so reticent in his courtship of her. However, all was revealed in the end, and again I could appreciate his reasoning. Some reviewers have commented that the story seemed a bit of a mash-up of Austen novels, and certainly I could see the nod to Emma perhaps, who had a penchant for match-making herself, and also to Persuasion, where the heroine Anne Elliot is a more mature character who has previously missed out on her chance at happiness. That being said Sophie was very much her own character. As said before, the story very much followed the romantic exploits of multiple couples, including Sophie's cousin Cecilia, who at times was rather selfish in her thinking but ultimately still a likable character, and the Beswicks, newly married thanks to Sophie's intervention, but who are not finding their married life all that plain sailing. Allain managed to juggle these various sub-plots relatively well, with a colourful cast. The story did rely on rather a lot of misunderstandings and such, all of which were eventually neatly resolved, and I did also feel that having so many sub-plots did detract a little from the central romance itself. I did like the family dynamics in the story, as whilst Sophie's aunt has previously merely done her duty by her, she comes to appreciate Sophie and is rather sweet towards her by the end. As with Mr Malcolm's List, the overall tone here is very light and at times some of the goings-on can seem a trifle silly, but once again it seems that is very much the intention, this being a comedy of manners. Overall, I once again enjoyed this offering from Allain as a fun and easy read, however, as before, I don't think her style will be for everyone, and this was too light a read to be emotionally satisfying for me personally. I've given it 3 stars, but it is likely more of a 2.5 stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Adams

    🌟Glowing review🌟⁣ ⁣ I absolutely adore Suzanne Allain's brilliant, witty, engaging regency writing! She is masterful with her turns-of-phrase and the way she delivers a witty line.⁣ ⁣ Miss Lattimore's Letter was the most fun regency romp, with a hilarious, unique, and delightful cast! And the way they all grew together and developed made my heart so squishy and happy. I felt like I was watching a Broadway play and at the end, I wanted to stand and shout and cheer for the cast! Sir Edmund also gave m 🌟Glowing review🌟⁣ ⁣ I absolutely adore Suzanne Allain's brilliant, witty, engaging regency writing! She is masterful with her turns-of-phrase and the way she delivers a witty line.⁣ ⁣ Miss Lattimore's Letter was the most fun regency romp, with a hilarious, unique, and delightful cast! And the way they all grew together and developed made my heart so squishy and happy. I felt like I was watching a Broadway play and at the end, I wanted to stand and shout and cheer for the cast! Sir Edmund also gave me some Darcy vibes in the best way.⁣ ⁣ I don't want to spoil anything, but I loved the ending. It was chaotic (in a good way), and surprising in true traditional regency form (Georgette Heyer would be so incredibly proud!) I couldn't stop reading. And I felt so satisfied in the end. My mouth hurt from smiling.⁣ ⁣ If you love traditional Heyeresque regency romances, you'll ADORE this one! This one is not steamy, and it’s not supposed to be! It’s about the plot and the fun antics of the cast, and I really appreciated how easy it was to escape into this book and laugh and smile!⁣ ⁣ Thank you @suzanne.allain for another lovely book!! And thank you @berkleyromance for the ARC! ⁣ ⁣ Content:⁣ - A few chaste kisses

  7. 5 out of 5

    smalltownbookmom

    This was an entertaining Regency romance in the vein of a cross between Jane Austen's Emma and Persuasion with a touch of the Bridgerton series thrown in for good measure. If you enjoy all the intricacies of Regency courtship this book will be right up your alley. Almost-spinster Sophie Lattimore becomes an unintended matchmaker much to her dismay and goes on an adventure to Bath with her younger cousin Cecilia where both ladies must choose between two eligible bachelors but have a hard time mak This was an entertaining Regency romance in the vein of a cross between Jane Austen's Emma and Persuasion with a touch of the Bridgerton series thrown in for good measure. If you enjoy all the intricacies of Regency courtship this book will be right up your alley. Almost-spinster Sophie Lattimore becomes an unintended matchmaker much to her dismay and goes on an adventure to Bath with her younger cousin Cecilia where both ladies must choose between two eligible bachelors but have a hard time making up their minds. Highly recommended for a light romantic diversion and fans of Mary Balogh, Julia Quinn or Martha Waters. Much thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for my advance review copy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ceylan (CeyGo)

    ✔️ a whimsical story - somewhat reminiscent of Jane Austen stories ✔️ the Cupid angle was cute ✔️ I enjoyed that there were multiple couples and stories throughout the book ✖️I missed the dual narrative that so many romance books now have 3.5 ⭐️

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    Miss Lattimore's Letter was a little slow getting started, and I had to set aside a bit of eye rolling over the reputation she got as a matchmaker after one anonymous letter, but I enjoyed it once I got into it. Multiple couples weave in and out of the story, more like a Jane Austen novel than many modern day romances (although way more focused on romance than on manners). I enjoyed the Bath setting. A clean, diverting read. I will be on the lookout for future books by the author. I read an advan Miss Lattimore's Letter was a little slow getting started, and I had to set aside a bit of eye rolling over the reputation she got as a matchmaker after one anonymous letter, but I enjoyed it once I got into it. Multiple couples weave in and out of the story, more like a Jane Austen novel than many modern day romances (although way more focused on romance than on manners). I enjoyed the Bath setting. A clean, diverting read. I will be on the lookout for future books by the author. I read an advance reader copy from Netgalley.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Etta

    Miss Lattimore’s Letter is a fun regency romance. The story follows twenty-eight year old spinster Sophronia (Sophie) Lattimore, who lives with her aunt and her cousin, Cecilia in Bath. She became a spinster after not securing an engagement during her own coming out Season. As it is Cecilia’s first season out, she is counting on Sophie to chaperone her. When Sophie overhears a man about to propose to the wrong woman, she writes an anonymous letter informing him of the right potential match. Miss Lattimore’s Letter is a fun regency romance. The story follows twenty-eight year old spinster Sophronia (Sophie) Lattimore, who lives with her aunt and her cousin, Cecilia in Bath. She became a spinster after not securing an engagement during her own coming out Season. As it is Cecilia’s first season out, she is counting on Sophie to chaperone her. When Sophie overhears a man about to propose to the wrong woman, she writes an anonymous letter informing him of the right potential match. The letter is discovered by society and soon Sophie finds herself with the reputation of a matchmaker. Because of her new reputation, Sir Edward Winslow who seeks her services approaches her. Over time, Sophie finds herself having romantic feelings towards Edward, but the situation becomes more complicated when a man from her past reappears. During her own Season, she was courted by Mr. Frederick Maitland, but he did not propose to her and ended up in a marriage with another woman. Now as a widower, he has re-entered her life to court her again. Sophie finds herself torn between the two suitors as she tries to navigate the best choice for her. Sophie’s love life is not the only focus of the story as Cecilia is dealing with her own love triangle between Mr. Hartley and Lord Courtney. The story is full of a lot of fun and exploration into the pressures on regency era couples. Lifelong matches are typically made in a short period of time, so some people end up with those with relationships that will not last. One such case is one of Sophie’s matches who is not satisfied with her current relationship. It is an interesting insight into the romances from this time period and the pros and cons of this type of “dating,” where some relationships end up working and others do not. As the novel follows more than one character, there is an element present for every reader. Overall, the novel is fast-paced and easy to understand each plot and subplot. There are multiple emotional growths for individual characters, friendships, family, and, of course, romances. The writing is witty and there are many humorous moments included throughout the pages. As the novel is on the shorter side, at times, I did wish for it to be expanded, especially some of the dialogues. There was a lot to enjoy in this novel and I look forward to reading more from the author in the future! [3.75 rounded to 4]

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    SUMMARY: When Sophie Lattimore, a confirmed spinster, happens upon information that impacts an upcoming society betrothal, she writes an anonymous letter in hopes of making happier matches for those involved. But when she’s revealed as the letter’s author, the former wallflower becomes a hot commodity as the ton clamors for her expert matchmaking skills. I loved this book! It had strong Persuasion vibes as everyone (including Sophie) had pretty much relegated her to the shelf, but it was nice to SUMMARY: When Sophie Lattimore, a confirmed spinster, happens upon information that impacts an upcoming society betrothal, she writes an anonymous letter in hopes of making happier matches for those involved. But when she’s revealed as the letter’s author, the former wallflower becomes a hot commodity as the ton clamors for her expert matchmaking skills. I loved this book! It had strong Persuasion vibes as everyone (including Sophie) had pretty much relegated her to the shelf, but it was nice to see her gradual realization that other people’s assumptions don’t define you. I also enjoyed the romance between Sophie’s cousin Cecilia and Mr. Hartwell. The immature Cecilia took Mr. Hartwell’s devotion for granted and let her mother persuade her that landing a titled man would make her happier. Luckily, HEAs abound. Miss Lattimore’s Letter was excellently crafted and rife with wry observations. The author’s bio says she’s a screenwriter, which I think is evident from the way her plot was executed so neatly. I did read Mr. Malcomb’s List, one of her earlier books, beforehand in case the two were related. There is no need to do that as they’re both standalones, but they’re both great so feel free to check them out in no particular order. The story was a clean one, which I know not all you romance readers love, but it was appropriate in context and didn’t feel like anything was missing because of it. It was much more aligned with Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer than some other regency romances available today, and I wholeheartedly recommend you check it out if romance is your thing. ⭐⭐⭐⭐.5 Thank you to NetGalley, Berkley Publishing Group and the author for providing me a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ashlee (bookswithnopictures)

    While this is not a retelling of Persuasion, it gave me so many similar emotions. Maybe it's references to a letter or the years of solitude after a lost love? Either way, I have big love for both novels. Miss Lattimore - aka Sophie - writes a letter in order to see two couples seek their happily ever after unintentionally witnessing the angst and heartbreak of one couple and the potential loss of another. She does so anonymously but is quickly found out. To her credit, she sees a surge in popula While this is not a retelling of Persuasion, it gave me so many similar emotions. Maybe it's references to a letter or the years of solitude after a lost love? Either way, I have big love for both novels. Miss Lattimore - aka Sophie - writes a letter in order to see two couples seek their happily ever after unintentionally witnessing the angst and heartbreak of one couple and the potential loss of another. She does so anonymously but is quickly found out. To her credit, she sees a surge in popularity as a wallflower on the shelf when it so easily could have gone the other way. Her notoriety as a newly minted matchmaker has several individuals seeking her counsel. Sophie's confidence is shaken when she has a set of suitors and insecurities to navigate herself. This read is full of wit and whimsy. I thoroughly enjoyed the settings and characterizations of the full cast. It makes me want to visit Bath and take the waters, even if it does taste like drinking too many muddy vitamins. Thank you to Berkley and NetGalley for the advanced copy. All thoughts in this review are my own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jules

    Something I struggle with in romance novels and when the person the main character is supposed to be falling in love with is barely in it. A few scenes of “flirting “ and misunderstandings that were very obvious to the reader does not suffice for a satisfy bromance, for me personally. There was just too much other stuff. I liked a lot of the subplots but I felt they existed at the expense of the main love story. A bummer, because it started of strong and ended pretty well too.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hoolia

    This was a fine, chaste, low-stakes Regency romance. Not particularly my cup of tea, which I probably should have guessed by the cover, but that's my fault, not the author's. The thing is, if no one is on the verge of death, prison, or orgasm, I can't bring myself to care about historical romance, so this was a bit of a snoozefest for me. This was a fine, chaste, low-stakes Regency romance. Not particularly my cup of tea, which I probably should have guessed by the cover, but that's my fault, not the author's. The thing is, if no one is on the verge of death, prison, or orgasm, I can't bring myself to care about historical romance, so this was a bit of a snoozefest for me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I had mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, it felt a little too modern for the Regency era. On the other, the problems The Letter causes are (at times) funny. There is a lot of nodding to Jane Austen (at one point, literally mentioning her books), which made this reader feel as though the entire book had been written almost winking at the audience... but almost. Not really. And that fine line is what cost points, because it felt as though the author couldn't quite make up her mind. eARC pr I had mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, it felt a little too modern for the Regency era. On the other, the problems The Letter causes are (at times) funny. There is a lot of nodding to Jane Austen (at one point, literally mentioning her books), which made this reader feel as though the entire book had been written almost winking at the audience... but almost. Not really. And that fine line is what cost points, because it felt as though the author couldn't quite make up her mind. eARC provided by publisher via Edelweiss.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    Although Allain's previous book, "Mr. Malcolm's List", was a bit of a let-down for me, the summary of "Miss Lattimore's Letter" convinced me to give it a try. I can't say that it is my favorite historical romance, as it is a bit simplistic and overly dramatic at times, but I enjoyed it much more than I was expecting to. It is fairly short and fast-paced, and while some plot points felt a bit outlandish at times (Miss Lattimore's instant popularity as a result of one letter, for example), it was Although Allain's previous book, "Mr. Malcolm's List", was a bit of a let-down for me, the summary of "Miss Lattimore's Letter" convinced me to give it a try. I can't say that it is my favorite historical romance, as it is a bit simplistic and overly dramatic at times, but I enjoyed it much more than I was expecting to. It is fairly short and fast-paced, and while some plot points felt a bit outlandish at times (Miss Lattimore's instant popularity as a result of one letter, for example), it was overall very entertaining. Because of it's length and how easy it is to read, it's a fun, quick story for when you're in the mood for something that won't be overly taxing emotionally, but still gives the drama and romance you'd expect in a Regency plot. Thank you to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Rupe

    2.5 stars- rounding down. I had some major issues with this book. Find out why at smittenbybooks.com closer to release date.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Holly (bibliophiles_bookstagram)

    This book had all the feels of the Bridgerton Netflix series: young ladies bidding for the hands of rich gentlemen, letters being written to reveal the secret love that should happen, drama over the wrong match or stolen suitor, and unexpected romances blooming! This was such a quick and easy read. I loved the characters and once again have a crush on Sir Edmund Winslow!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    A clean, fluff romance. I would have liked more character development, especially for Sir Edmund, but it was a light read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ⓐlleskelle - That ranting lady ッ

    I NEED THIS BAD.

  21. 4 out of 5

    ☽ Rhiannon ✭ Mistwalker ☾

    This is what I imagine people mean when they say “traditional Regency romance.” All very proper, no angst, not much drama, subtle humor. I enjoyed it quite a bit considering I abhor love triangles and had a hard time forgiving (view spoiler)[ the Sophie’s uncertainty regarding Mr. Maitland, who is clearly a douchebag. And she never even really calls him out about how he utterly betrayed her and made her a pariah; it barely even comes up in the conversation where he proposes! I could not BELIEVE This is what I imagine people mean when they say “traditional Regency romance.” All very proper, no angst, not much drama, subtle humor. I enjoyed it quite a bit considering I abhor love triangles and had a hard time forgiving (view spoiler)[ the Sophie’s uncertainty regarding Mr. Maitland, who is clearly a douchebag. And she never even really calls him out about how he utterly betrayed her and made her a pariah; it barely even comes up in the conversation where he proposes! I could not BELIEVE she let him court her. (hide spoiler)] So, it had a spinster, and there was almost some insecurity, but not much in the way of the angst I love. But even still, I liked it and enjoyed it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Teneisha (Teesbookjourney)

    Loved this sweet romance. Sophie is such a sweet young lady who already knew her path. she was overlooked in society and now a guide for her cousin. Sophie and Edward circle each other for a while in this book but she is convinced that she is going to be a spinster. Sophie is dubbed the cupid of her time and her aunt is riding on her popularity. An old flame appears out of the blue and she has to deal with the unwanted attention, new and old feelings coming back to life. I loved the banter and s Loved this sweet romance. Sophie is such a sweet young lady who already knew her path. she was overlooked in society and now a guide for her cousin. Sophie and Edward circle each other for a while in this book but she is convinced that she is going to be a spinster. Sophie is dubbed the cupid of her time and her aunt is riding on her popularity. An old flame appears out of the blue and she has to deal with the unwanted attention, new and old feelings coming back to life. I loved the banter and sweetness between Sophie and Edward. Sophie is a level headed persona and that is portrayed in this book

  23. 5 out of 5

    LowBrowReader

    This was a disappointment mainly because I had read couple of really positive reviews and went in with The Expectations. Always a mistake. It wasn't bad as such, just very bland. I don't know why I was anticipating humour and sparkly writing. There were certainly attempts at it but they fell flat. POV was very one-sided, I never connected with the Main Male because he was mostly only viewed through the heroine's eyes and she found him confusing and hot-and-cold so he kept just irritating me. I lost This was a disappointment mainly because I had read couple of really positive reviews and went in with The Expectations. Always a mistake. It wasn't bad as such, just very bland. I don't know why I was anticipating humour and sparkly writing. There were certainly attempts at it but they fell flat. POV was very one-sided, I never connected with the Main Male because he was mostly only viewed through the heroine's eyes and she found him confusing and hot-and-cold so he kept just irritating me. I lost a count of how many times I just wanted to sit them down, bash their heads together and order them to TALK. The premise, the whole letter and matchmaking thing, is very-very thin and doesn't really make sense. The author is on one side trying to keep things period-authentic, on other hand the unmarried heroine can write to a strange unmarried men, can receive letters from a man who is not engaged to her, can refuse a dance without sitting out the rest of the evening and so on. I wouldn't mind that in a wallpaper-historical if the tone was different but to strictly adhere to some conventions and behavioral norms and conveniently dismiss some others - that just made me itchy. The further I read, the stronger was the urge to skim and I did give in eventually. I don't even know how to describe this novel. It is too blasé to be heart-felt and emotionally satisfying and too dull to be light and witty.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    First sentence: It had been many years since Sophronia Lattimore had used her fan as a means of flirtatious communication. As a poor relation of eight and twenty, she was now too firmly ensconced amongst the chaperones to try to attract a gentleman's attention, but if one had noticed the frantic waving of her fan he could have no doubt of the message it was sending: Sophie was desperately overheated. Premise/plot: Sophie Lattimore, our heroine, overhears a private conversation in the gardens and First sentence: It had been many years since Sophronia Lattimore had used her fan as a means of flirtatious communication. As a poor relation of eight and twenty, she was now too firmly ensconced amongst the chaperones to try to attract a gentleman's attention, but if one had noticed the frantic waving of her fan he could have no doubt of the message it was sending: Sophie was desperately overheated. Premise/plot: Sophie Lattimore, our heroine, overhears a private conversation in the gardens and writes an anonymous letter. Two matches come of it, her anonymity is lost, and Sophie finds herself enjoying a moment or two of popularity. Sophie has been "blessed" (though sometimes she feels cursed) with a second opportunity to find a love of her own. But finding one's true love isn't all that easy--all that glitters is not gold. This Regency romance is set in London and Bath. There's a small cast of characters--readers follow their adventures and misadventures with "love." Notably, Sophie herself is being wooed by a former lover, Mr. Maitland, and a new one, Sir Edmund Winslow. Her cousin, Cecilia, is being wooed by a Mr. Hartwell and a Lord Courtney. My thoughts: I may not have loved Mr. Malcolm's List, but I definitely loved Miss Lattimore's Letter. It remains a premise-driven romance. Sophie unintentionally becomes a matchmaker for the ton, and she's clueless as to how to proceed. (What does she know of matters of the heart?) While it might be easy to want to compare Miss Lattimore with Jane Austen's Emma, the two are not all that similar. Emma is an arrogant brat who feels herself better and worthier than anyone/everyone of her acquaintance. Sophie is a (mostly) sensible heroine. In fact, I got more Sense and Sensibility vibes than Emma ones. I enjoyed the varied romances of these couples. I think it would make a delightful film. The cover of this one doesn't scream Regency Romance. I'm not sure it screams out historical at all. Perhaps that's why it got misfiled as "adult fiction" instead of "historical fiction" when I was randomizing my reads for July! I won't complain about it in general for a romance novel. Romance novels can have absolutely horrid covers. Is it clean? Mostly. I'd say PG or PG-13. There are kisses. A handful of kisses. It's far from smutty. I think my favorite part of the novel was reading Sir Edmund's letter to Miss Lattimore!!!! It reminded me of Darcy's letter to Lizzie! I also thought it was a nice play on the title.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    ***Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*** I have read many Regency romances, even ones with a matchmaker involved. I found this one to be only decent and not amazing. The writing was fine, though the way the story was arranged seemed a little off to me. The point of view would change abruptly and it was very inconsistent. I enjoyed the read anyways.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Minna

    Thank you to NetGalley, Berkley Publishing, and the author for the opportunity to read an ARC of this title. An honest review was requested but not required. I enjoyed this much more than Mr. Malcolm's list. I remember being more or less (mostly more) irked by Mr. Malcolm throughout that entire book, but I'm happy to report that Miss Lattimore's Letter is full of characters to root for. I do recall thinking numerous times throughout reading this book that it was a modernized version of a Georgette Thank you to NetGalley, Berkley Publishing, and the author for the opportunity to read an ARC of this title. An honest review was requested but not required. I enjoyed this much more than Mr. Malcolm's list. I remember being more or less (mostly more) irked by Mr. Malcolm throughout that entire book, but I'm happy to report that Miss Lattimore's Letter is full of characters to root for. I do recall thinking numerous times throughout reading this book that it was a modernized version of a Georgette Heyer. The romance is strictly PG (maybe PG-13 if you're strict), with some light humor and realistic characters; overall a witty and (mostly) period-correct comedy of manners. While some of the sentiments feel more modern, their execution is very period-appropriate. Women were forced to make choices for their entire lives based on very little knowledge of their potential partners, and were all too easily accused of being "fast" if they gave an inch more encouragement or a touch wider smile than they "ought". This book really gave the reader an opportunity to experience what a nerve-wracking decision it was. Lady Fitzwalter (sp?) got lucky, but did Mrs. Beswick? and Cecilia and Sophie were tied up in knots of indecision throughout. Imagine, making a choice at age 18 of who you would like to spend the rest of your life with...? What I really liked about this book was that many of the characters mature immensely over the course of the novel. Not only Cecilia, who learns the value of a good character, and Sophie, who learns what -or should I say whom - she really wants, but Mrs. Foster (Cecilia's mother) is enlightened first on Sophie's history and then on how she has wronged Sophie as a family member. She owns up to her mistakes and is supportive going forward which was a real treat. A lot of times the side characters in romance novels are treated as throwaway characters who serve a slight function of pushing the romantic leads towards each other and then fade away. Not here; Mrs. Foster was given her own subplot, however minor it may have been. I would have appreciated hearing what happened to Emily, but I suppose in the context (and by Sophie's own admission) their friendship was destined to fade away. This book was a significant improvement for me over Mr. Malcolm's list, and I would look forward to reading what Ms. Allain comes up with next.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hanh

    I had known about "Mr. Malcolm's List," the regency romance that inspired the color-conscious short film that is now going to be a feature film, so once I saw this book by the same author was being published by Berkley, I rushed to read both. While "Mr. Malcolm's List" was very brief and somewhat farcical (author Suzanne Allain, who is also writing the screenplay will probably add more scenes) "Miss Lattimore's Letter" is a much fuller story, but still an easy, breezy read. After Sophie Lattimore I had known about "Mr. Malcolm's List," the regency romance that inspired the color-conscious short film that is now going to be a feature film, so once I saw this book by the same author was being published by Berkley, I rushed to read both. While "Mr. Malcolm's List" was very brief and somewhat farcical (author Suzanne Allain, who is also writing the screenplay will probably add more scenes) "Miss Lattimore's Letter" is a much fuller story, but still an easy, breezy read. After Sophie Lattimore comes upon some intel, she writes a letter to a gentleman to inform him why he's about to propose to the wrong woman. When it gets out that Sophie had a hand in directing him to a much happier fate, Sophie is in demand, especially by a certain attractive Sir Edmund Winslow. Naturally Sophie becomes attracted to the very man she's trying to help, while an old flame reenters the picture, making this chaperone who was on the shelf suddenly one leg of a very confusing love triangle – if she can figure out if the men reciprocate her feelings. I can understand why Allain's work has attracted so much attention. Both "Mr. Malcolm" and "Miss Lattimore" have strong and fun premises that establish a narrative tension right away. And even though she has a modern and arch sense of humor and voice, the bulk of the story is still firmly in the Jane Austen camp in that it's relatively clean – there's some light necking only. Safe for my mom to read! The characterizations aren't terribly deep though. I do feel I got to know Sophie a bit more than I did Selina in "Mr. Malcolm" but I did find myself a bit frustrated by how the action was often dictated by other people - you know, those "love to hate them" meddlers, seemingly selfish relatives and villains you just want to push in front of a fast-moving four-in-hand. Also, I was disappointed because I expected there to be a LOT more of Sophie having to consult for other couples. The main love story didn't do all that much for me either. I think maybe some better chemistry interactions would be in order (although I do think the dialogue was better in this book than in "Malcolm.") Allain does pretty well with the world-building in Regency London, and we also get a nice jaunt to Bath! Overall, this was a light and fun read but didn't really make that much of an impression on me. Would I watch a movie version of this though? Yes! I think an onscreen adaptation would add a vitality that this is missing. Review based on an ARC courtesy of Berkley Publishing and Netgalley

  28. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I'm used to heroines dreaming of Mr. Darcy, so it was fun to see the tables turned and a hero seeking an Elizabeth Bennet. This one is strong not only in Austen references but also in the feel of the storytelling. While many regency romances are on some level inspired by Jane Austen's works, this one matches her tone beautifully. Our protagonist, Sophie, earns a reputation in society as a matchmaker after writing a fateful letter. Thrust into the limelight after a decade of assumed spinsterhood, I'm used to heroines dreaming of Mr. Darcy, so it was fun to see the tables turned and a hero seeking an Elizabeth Bennet. This one is strong not only in Austen references but also in the feel of the storytelling. While many regency romances are on some level inspired by Jane Austen's works, this one matches her tone beautifully. Our protagonist, Sophie, earns a reputation in society as a matchmaker after writing a fateful letter. Thrust into the limelight after a decade of assumed spinsterhood, Sophie finds herself receiving attentions from not one, but two, attractive gentlemen. I did become stressed by Sophie's love triangle, although it wasn't a true one in the sense that there was a correct choice on one hand and a red herring on the other. Despite this glaringly obvious choice as an outsider, Sophie is understandably locked up in too many emotions to make a quick and painless choice. I appreciated this more lifelike portrayal of everything we consider and worry over in choosing our life partner rather than a romanticized view of getting swept up with no doubts (not that that experience isn't valid, too). I think I needed more time after all the indecision to get on board with the characters' various matches, however. The family journey was more poignant for me than any of the many romantic plots woven through the book. Sophie's relationships with her aunt and cousin at the beginning are amicable at best and distant at worst. Seeing their views of each other evolve and their new understandings lay groundwork for stronger bonds was truly special. The dry humor and occasional lampooning of various side characters was my favorite part of the book. I especially admired the way the author didn't focus on one or two POVs as is common in many romances but rather flitted about to give us the impressions of the moods and thoughts of many characters. It dovetailed well with the humor. If you like a regency that can give you that good Austen feeling and enjoy a romance with a full cast of characters, ranging from ridiculous to endearing, this one might be for you. Thanks to Berkley Romance and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book, out 8/10.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Len

    Although I am a definite fan of regency romance novels, just like Mr. Malcolm's List, this one falls short. Although there are many likable characters the ties that bound the couples were rather thin. We have 5 couples by the end, but it would have been more satisfying to build up the relationships a bit more than to give them all the Disney-effect. Due to the short length, there were definitely threads dropped that didn't fully flesh out. Regardless, it was cute. But I swear I have read a regen Although I am a definite fan of regency romance novels, just like Mr. Malcolm's List, this one falls short. Although there are many likable characters the ties that bound the couples were rather thin. We have 5 couples by the end, but it would have been more satisfying to build up the relationships a bit more than to give them all the Disney-effect. Due to the short length, there were definitely threads dropped that didn't fully flesh out. Regardless, it was cute. But I swear I have read a regency romance with Sophie and Cecilia somewhere and it threw me off at first. What happened: (view spoiler)[ Sophronia Lattimore is our MC. Having been somewhat jilted at the age of 18 by a Mr. Maitland when he decided to marry for money, Sophie is now 28 and pretty much a decided spinster. She witnesses a man giving attention and all but decided on marriage to one woman but Sophie sees that a better match for him is just out of his line of sight. Sophie decides to write him a letter telling him of this potential missed opportunity and he decides to follow the letter's advice and marry the subtle girl who loves him and who he believed thought of him as a brother instead of the flashy girl who wasn't truly interested. The author of the letter is eventually known of Sophie receives a lot of attention for it, including that of Edmund who wants her to help him find a wife. Although this is a ruse to get close to her without her expecting a proposal from him, since that happened before and ended in a bad situation for him. All comes right in the end. Sophie turns down Mr. Maitland who is honestly a rake and flirts with anything in a skirt. The truth about Edmund's intention is made known and they become engaged. All the rest of the couples get them happily ever after as well. (hide spoiler)]

  30. 5 out of 5

    Topaz_Reads

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have a special love for regency romances and have read many over the years. The proper decorum that must be adhered to, the subtle glances and touches that lead to a melding of hearts, and the anticipation of the first kiss and eventual declaration of feelings all make for story perfection in my opinion. This book has many nods to Austen and its setting of Bath makes it stand out from most others that choose London or the English countryside. The main character, the spinster wallflower Sophie I have a special love for regency romances and have read many over the years. The proper decorum that must be adhered to, the subtle glances and touches that lead to a melding of hearts, and the anticipation of the first kiss and eventual declaration of feelings all make for story perfection in my opinion. This book has many nods to Austen and its setting of Bath makes it stand out from most others that choose London or the English countryside. The main character, the spinster wallflower Sophie (Sophronia), inadvertently overhears a conversation that inspires her to write an anonymous letter to the season's most eligible bachelor to warn him off of his current attraction (who's affection leans towards another) and gently pushes him towards a shy, but loving choice. When it's discovered that Sophie is the author, she begins to be celebrated as a matchmaker and is courted when she'd otherwise been ignored. What I liked about this book was the wide cast of characters, the attention to detail in the settings, and especially the heartfelt moments where characters had a revelation of their erroneous behavior and admitted it - esp. the letter from Sir Edmund to Sophie that was so reminiscent of Darcy's letter to Elizabeth. What left me less enchanted was the weird acceptance of Sophie's ex as a love interest (I'm not a fan of love triangles and this seemed particularly unnecessary), the quick introduction and subsequent exit of Emily (who honestly deserved better treatment by all, imho), and the strange shifting of points of view that were a bit too brief to settle into. I enjoyed Allain's "Mr. Malcolm's List" and while this book didn't have the same relationship building between the love interests, it was an enjoyable read. 📖 Read via Ebook - 4⭐

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