website statistics The Wild Ones - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

The Wild Ones

Availability: Ready to download

From William C. Morris Finalist Nafiza Azad comes a thrilling, feminist fantasy about a group of teenage girls endowed with special powers who must band together to save the life of the boy whose magic saved them all. Meet the Wild Ones: girls who have been hurt, abandoned, and betrayed all their lives. It all began with Paheli, who was once betrayed by her mother and sold From William C. Morris Finalist Nafiza Azad comes a thrilling, feminist fantasy about a group of teenage girls endowed with special powers who must band together to save the life of the boy whose magic saved them all. Meet the Wild Ones: girls who have been hurt, abandoned, and betrayed all their lives. It all began with Paheli, who was once betrayed by her mother and sold to a man in exchange for a favor. When Paheli escapes, she runs headlong into a boy with stars in his eyes. This boy, as battered as she is, tosses Paheli a box of stars before disappearing. With the stars, Paheli gains access to the Between, a place of pure magic and mystery. Now, Paheli collects girls like herself and these Wild Ones use their magic to travel the world, helping the hopeless and saving others from the fates they suffered. Then Paheli and the Wild Ones learn that the boy who gave them the stars, Taraana, is in danger. He’s on the run from powerful forces within the world of magic. But if Taraana is no longer safe and free, neither are the Wild Ones. And that…is a fate the Wild Ones refuse to accept. Ever again.


Compare

From William C. Morris Finalist Nafiza Azad comes a thrilling, feminist fantasy about a group of teenage girls endowed with special powers who must band together to save the life of the boy whose magic saved them all. Meet the Wild Ones: girls who have been hurt, abandoned, and betrayed all their lives. It all began with Paheli, who was once betrayed by her mother and sold From William C. Morris Finalist Nafiza Azad comes a thrilling, feminist fantasy about a group of teenage girls endowed with special powers who must band together to save the life of the boy whose magic saved them all. Meet the Wild Ones: girls who have been hurt, abandoned, and betrayed all their lives. It all began with Paheli, who was once betrayed by her mother and sold to a man in exchange for a favor. When Paheli escapes, she runs headlong into a boy with stars in his eyes. This boy, as battered as she is, tosses Paheli a box of stars before disappearing. With the stars, Paheli gains access to the Between, a place of pure magic and mystery. Now, Paheli collects girls like herself and these Wild Ones use their magic to travel the world, helping the hopeless and saving others from the fates they suffered. Then Paheli and the Wild Ones learn that the boy who gave them the stars, Taraana, is in danger. He’s on the run from powerful forces within the world of magic. But if Taraana is no longer safe and free, neither are the Wild Ones. And that…is a fate the Wild Ones refuse to accept. Ever again.

30 review for The Wild Ones

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nafiza

    Dear Reader, I wrote this book for many reasons but perhaps the most prominent among them would be that sometimes you have no choice but to confront your vulnerabilities. Sometimes you have to stare at the person in the mirror no matter how much she scares you or hurts you. So I did. THE WILD ONES comes with a whole slew of content and trigger warnings so please be kind to yourself and pass on it if you need to. The story is, I confess, to an extent, an own voices one. I've been there. I have tas Dear Reader, I wrote this book for many reasons but perhaps the most prominent among them would be that sometimes you have no choice but to confront your vulnerabilities. Sometimes you have to stare at the person in the mirror no matter how much she scares you or hurts you. So I did. THE WILD ONES comes with a whole slew of content and trigger warnings so please be kind to yourself and pass on it if you need to. The story is, I confess, to an extent, an own voices one. I've been there. I have tasted the helplessness, the darkness, the frustration, and the anger. The guilt, the self-blame, the hurt. THE WILD ONES is my rallying cry for every girl out there. It wasn't your fault. You are not unworthy. You are precious. This world is yours too. I may have gotten things wrong but please understand there was no conscious malice intended. The story is true to my experiences and my experience isn't universal. The novel contains a lot of humour, a lot of sisterhood, some romance, and a whole ton of anger. It also contains hope, because how can we be human without hope? I hope you enjoy THE WILD ONES and I hope it reaches you and touches you in any way you need it to.

  2. 5 out of 5

    may ➹

    LOOK AT THIS COVER this is so gorgeous and I am so gay

  3. 4 out of 5

    Maddie (Inking & Thinking)

    ⭐️ 2.5 Stars ⭐️ I wanted to enjoy this book, but it ended up falling flat for me. The premise seems very interesting, but the concept didn’t end up living to its full potential. The cover is stunning, and I loved the idea of a magical girl squad that could represent many readers who felt not represented in the YA genre. The Wild Ones is on girls and women that centers on their hard struggles in life, the strength they can find from others, and creating a loving family that they can feel supported ⭐️ 2.5 Stars ⭐️ I wanted to enjoy this book, but it ended up falling flat for me. The premise seems very interesting, but the concept didn’t end up living to its full potential. The cover is stunning, and I loved the idea of a magical girl squad that could represent many readers who felt not represented in the YA genre. The Wild Ones is on girls and women that centers on their hard struggles in life, the strength they can find from others, and creating a loving family that they can feel supported. Azad expands on how we form relationships and the horrors or beauty that can lay within them. This novel brings to center stage issues girls and women face around the world in our society. It demonstrates how we can find a community with others to face head-on the struggles that all women endure. We get to see how the survivors cope after these horrible experiences they have faced over their lifetime. One of the main problems with this book was it was so difficult to follow this book. The book switched between the first person of Paheli, the leader of the Wild Ones, and another point of view of one of the wild ones. But we are never told who the other point of view is. This made it even more confusing because it was just some mysterious Wild One we don’t know much about. There were also so many characters in this book. There were 11 girls in the Wild Ones then you have various side characters as well as Taraana. I didn’t get the chance to know who they were and what they were like as people. I don’t even remember most of the Wild One’s names except Paheli, Valentina, and Taraana. I would have liked to know about the characters, we do get these little excerpts from each Wild Ones, but for me, that isn’t enough. Either the characters should get more development or have fewer Wild Ones so we can learn more. The writing was another major problem in this book was the writing. Usually, there is only one writing style used in the book, but various writing styles were confusing to follow. There were moments where the writing style was full of so much life and written beautifully. Other times, we switch to writing, which was similar to middle-grade writing style, and it was choppy, and many things were redundant. But other times the writer did the one thing writers should avoid. Instead of showing the story through the writing, she just straight up told us what was happening. This took so much away from the story and creates a disconnect for me. A wide majority of this including telling, rather than showing, so it wasn’t like it happen once, but it happens consistently. The writing style did not match up with the more serious themes presented in the book. The worldbuilding was very weak. Most of the time, we would receive vague descriptions of places The Wild Ones would travel. In this world, there is a place called “the between,” where you can travel to any place you want through doorways. We are told that there is a Keeper of the Between. I would have liked the concept of the between expanded upon more because I didn’t “really” know what it was. I just thought of it as a place with doorways where you can travel to other locations. Not only do we have “The Between,” in this book, but we also have humans and Middle Worlders. Middle Worlders are people who can use magic. Many times in the book, they are either described, as human or not human. Honestly doesn’t give us details about them, rather, it just says, “they are Middle Worlders, but they don’t look human.” I would have liked more description and to get more backstory about them. Most of the time I found the worldbuilding to be lacking and sometimes to be very confusing. Honestly, I feel like we got more worldbuilding for the food the characters ate rather than the actual world they live in. The pacing in this book was also all over the place. The beginning was very slow, so it took me forever to get into the book. I found it to be very confusing while simultaneously being very boring. The book doesn’t begin to pick up until towards the middle, but even then, it’s still painstaking slow and still contains scenes that slow the plot down. It isn’t until about the last 100 pages, the book beginnings to pick up, and starts to go at a zooming pace. I would prefer for it to keep a faster pace throughout rather than having a super slow beginning and fly-by ending. Overall, this book fell flat for me and ended up being a major disappointment. I had high hopes for this book, and it ended up not reaching most of them. TW: Misogyny, child endangerment, human trafficking, abuse, rape (mention), bullying, grief, blood, violence, and victim’s guilt Thank you to NetGalley for providing me an ARC of The Wild Ones in exchange for an honest review! Check out this review on my blog: https://inkingandthinking.wordpress.c...

  4. 5 out of 5

    -`ˏ Galaxi Faerie ˎ´˗

    -`ˏ 4 stars ˎ´˗ “We have the temerity to be not just women, but women of color. Women with melanin in our skin and voices in our throats. Voices that will not be vanquished. Not now, not ever. We will not be silenced.” Storyline: -`ˏ 10/10 ˎ´˗ Whores. Enabling men to conquer their bodies as an ultimate prize during a conquest. Scurrying around from bed to bed giving disregard to the countless broken hearts laid by a path of deceitful pleasure. Paheli’s mother was a whore. A profession she does not -`ˏ 4 stars ˎ´˗ “We have the temerity to be not just women, but women of color. Women with melanin in our skin and voices in our throats. Voices that will not be vanquished. Not now, not ever. We will not be silenced.” Storyline: -`ˏ 10/10 ˎ´˗ Whores. Enabling men to conquer their bodies as an ultimate prize during a conquest. Scurrying around from bed to bed giving disregard to the countless broken hearts laid by a path of deceitful pleasure. Paheli’s mother was a whore. A profession she does not wish to follow. Paheli yearns for a better life, but all hope was shattered when her mother attempted to sell her to a man in exchange for a favor. Lost in disbelief, running without a destination, she comes across Taraana-a starry eye boy who handed her a box. . full of stars? Paheli was unaware that this would be the moment that would change her life and many other girls she encounters. *Then the story turns into semi-badass magical girls fighting to protect Taraana from dangerous villains wanting to destroy him for his powers. Um Yes! Characters: -`ˏ 8/10 ˎ´˗ The Wild Ones: Paheli, Widad, Daraja, Kamboja, Areum, Talei, Valentina, Etsuko, Sevda, Ghufran, and Ligaya. Sounds kind of overwhelming, doesn't it? I thought that initially, however, they move as one but they each have their own distinctive voice and characteristic. We obtain small glimpses of their past life in the “Book of Memories”, we learn of their origins and what led them to become part of the Wild Ones. Then there’s Taraana, why is he so freaking precious?! He's been through some difficult battles on his own and he just releases all your nurturing feelings, wanting to protect him at all costs. Atmosphere: -`ˏ 8/10 ˎ´˗ The development of the world was interesting. We travel through doors from the human world to “the Between” a place of pure magic and creatures known as “middle worlders” that can take the form of humans. The magical elements were carefully crafted. One of the Wild One’s powers involved the use of their voices, the symbolism, absolutely amazing. Now for the hard part. . The author did not act in a restraining manner. There are a lot of topics involved that may be unpleasant for some people to read. Trigger warnings: misogyny, child endangerment, abandonment, abduction, human trafficking, prostitution, abuse (physical, mental, emotional, verbal, sexual), rape(mention), infidelity, bullying(mention), suicide(mention), death(mention), grief, victim’s guilt, blood & violence. Language: -`ˏ 8/10 ˎ´˗ The style of writing is flowery and elliptical and may not be to everyone’s liking, but that’s what makes it great. It's a means to turn your past feelings of helplessness, frustration, and anger into something so strong and beautiful. Enjoyment: -`ˏ 10/10 ˎ´˗ I may have cried once. .twice. .perhaps 12 times, but the story is not filled with sadness. The commentary among the girls was cute and entertaining. No matter where they go, their priority is food first (I connect with them on a spiritual level for their love of mangos). The romance was a mild but a nice addition. Overall, this is not just a group of girls struggling with their own demons or trying to save the situation. This is a sisterhood, together they are braver than they can believe and stronger than they appear. I valued every aspect of this story. e-Arc provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. -`ˏ Thank You ˎ´˗

  5. 4 out of 5

    janhavi ✰

    Check out this review and others on my blog! We have the temerity to be not just women, but women of color. Women with melanin in our skins and voices in our throats. Voices that will not be vanquished. Not now, not ever. We will not be silenced. The story follows Paheli, an Indian character who was sold by her mother in exchange for a favor. After she ran away, broken and hurt, she bumped into Taraana, who tossed her a box of magic stars before vanishing. Paheli then gathered girls like her who Check out this review and others on my blog! We have the temerity to be not just women, but women of color. Women with melanin in our skins and voices in our throats. Voices that will not be vanquished. Not now, not ever. We will not be silenced. The story follows Paheli, an Indian character who was sold by her mother in exchange for a favor. After she ran away, broken and hurt, she bumped into Taraana, who tossed her a box of magic stars before vanishing. Paheli then gathered girls like her who were betrayed and abused, and together with the magic stars they help others who have lost hope and save them from misery. Azad painted this story in a rich, whimsical writing style that left me starry-eyed (haha pun haha). The writing made up a huge part of the story, with it’s lilting style showcasing how much each Wild One went through before Paheli found them. The writing fills the plot with emotions, which made me sniffle and smile. The plot was pretty slow for the first 20-25% of the book which had me a little irritated. After that it picked up pace though, and things were quite exciting after that! The scenes were action-packed and thrilling, but sadly the magic descriptions weren’t up to par. We just get told that the Wild Ones’ screams destroy the middle-worlders but the those scenes were limply described and I feel they could have been better done. The world building seems quite complex but also kind of vague at first, with the Between getting most of the attention. However, it all unfurls nicely and we get to know even small things about it’s working. However, the most important aspect of this book is the story itself. It tells us that no one is bound to the fate that the world asks them. It tells us that your suffering does not define you and you always have it in you to rise above the pain. The Wild Ones look out for each other always and have a very close bond!! They are everything you would ask from the found family trope: banter, teasing and fierce protectiveness of each other!! And not to forget, they love food. A lot. Everywhere they go, no matter how important the task at hand is, they always eat first and Paheli is the true leader in this matter. If I had to use one word to describe Paheli, it’d be MANGO 🥭 seriously, the girl’s first love in all realms are mangoes and I honestly love how obsessed she was with everything mango. Embrace this anger. Let it fuel your everydays. Defy everyone who tells you you can’t. Be wild. One issue I had with The Wild Ones was this: the chapters are told in two perspectives; one is of Paheli, the other is another Wild One who is not specified, which confused me so much. I had a hard time distinguishing characters and their voices, and only Paheli and Valentina seemed to have real personalities. ALSO I didn’t really get why there had to be SO MANY of Wild Ones, I feel like it would have worked with 4-7 of them which would have given them at least adequate page time instead of mentions here and there. It would have allowed some character growth too, and made them distinguishable. However, my biggest issue lies in the climax, which was a bit of a let-down. There was a lot of build up to the final fight and honestly, I was expecting more from it. It got over so quickly and left me feeling underwhelmed. Overall: Beautiful prose, but the characters or plot did not work out for me. Would recommend if you want a feminist fantasy!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Thanks to the publisher for providing an eARC of The Wild Ones in exchange for an honest review. I wanted to love this book with my whole being and while I did still love the core plot, themes, and a lot of the narration (particularly the Memories sections), I am either far too dumb for this book or the narration is really really disorienting. The Wild Ones uses a lot of really flowery, poetic narration frequently juxtaposed by (often childish) fourth wall breaks and humour that I can see working Thanks to the publisher for providing an eARC of The Wild Ones in exchange for an honest review. I wanted to love this book with my whole being and while I did still love the core plot, themes, and a lot of the narration (particularly the Memories sections), I am either far too dumb for this book or the narration is really really disorienting. The Wild Ones uses a lot of really flowery, poetic narration frequently juxtaposed by (often childish) fourth wall breaks and humour that I can see working to create really unique character voices but to me, constantly shifting between the two was really disorienting. I also had a lot of trouble figuring out who's head we were in since the book shifts from Paheli to someone clearly outside of her (I'm assuming another one of the girls) in a way that I think is intentionally supposed to be vague to signify how connected all of The Wild Ones are, but it just really didn't work for me. Sections here are absolutely stunning, but I was so consistently perplexed that I don't think I'd be able to reread it over and over again like I wish I could with books this poetic. I want to stress that I really did like it which is why I gave it a fairly good rating, but because of the parts I liked, the parts I didn't bothered me all the more.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fanna

    December 17, 2020: THAT STUNNING COVER OMG

  8. 4 out of 5

    Siavahda

    I don’t like writing negative reviews. I tend not to; I mark a book as DNF or read and then just…keep silent about it. Maybe I put a sentence or two about it in my monthly wrap-up posts, but that’s all. But I really, really hate this book. And I hate that I hate it. I’ve been looking forward to this book breathlessly, ever since the publishing deal was announced. It’s magical queer girls of colour!!! With stars and magic diamonds and sparkly clothes! It’s everything I could ask for! When I was app I don’t like writing negative reviews. I tend not to; I mark a book as DNF or read and then just…keep silent about it. Maybe I put a sentence or two about it in my monthly wrap-up posts, but that’s all. But I really, really hate this book. And I hate that I hate it. I’ve been looking forward to this book breathlessly, ever since the publishing deal was announced. It’s magical queer girls of colour!!! With stars and magic diamonds and sparkly clothes! It’s everything I could ask for! When I was approved for an arc, I ran into the study to tell my husband the good news, I was so excited and ecstatic. Today, I can’t decide whether I want to cry or scream. There’s nothing wrong with the premise/concept, the plot, or the characters. I didn’t finish the book, but the issues I saw dealt with were not mishandled. It’s nothing like that. It’s just that the writing is abominably bad. This is confusing for a number of reasons, not least of which is that this is not Azad’s debut, and that book, The Candle and the Flame, had perfectly pleasant prose. I didn’t enjoy the book, but not because it was bad; it and I just weren’t a good fit. Whereas The Wild Ones is just…so bad. The first 50 pages are telling, telling, telling. Nothing is shown to the reader; it’s a never-ending lecture about the Wild Ones and the Between and non-humans and all the rest of it. One loooong info-dump. The writing is blunt and choppy; there are attempts at pretty description, but it’s cringingly clunky, with sentences like this sweet, milky treats that taste a little like heaven if the place was a flavor. An editor should have cut the last six words of that sentence and it would have been fine. Look sweet, milky treats that taste a little like heaven. Done. Much better! The book is written in first-person; unfortunately, aside from brief excerpts from ‘the book of memories’ which are titled with a character’s name, half the time it’s not at all clear whose head we’re in. Sometimes it’s Paheli, but then in the next chapter someone else seems to be talking – because they’re referring to Paheli in third-person now – but there’s nothing to tell you who the narration has switched to. Whoever they are, they speak like very young, bratty children I glare at Valentina and pretend I have all the answers. I am really good at pretending, in case you’re wondering. A few lines later, “We’ll find out more about this person later. All right?” stinky Valentina says, trying to make up for putting her foot in everyone’s mouth earlier. ‘Stinky Valentina’? What are you, five??? This from a character who has supposedly lived for over 70 years? Read the rest at Every Book a Doorway!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    1) First of all... drooling over this cover. 2) Second of all... drooling over this blurb. You can never have too many queer witches is what I say. 3) This is SO giving me When We Were Magic, by Sarah Gailey, vibes! And thats the best compliment ever haha... I LOVED that book! CANNOT WAITTTTTTTTT

  10. 4 out of 5

    Trisha (semi-hiatus)

    Blog Review (Tour): https://trishadoeseverythingbutstudy2... Thank you to the author, publisher, Turn the Page Tours and Netgalley for providing me a copy of this book! I really enjoyed reading this book, even though there were a few things I wasn’t completely onboard with. Let’s start with things I loved. I absolutely loved the writing; it was a really good mix of whimsy and lemon ;) I really enjoyed making notes for this one, though I was always trying to tell myself, cut down the quotes, we’e no Blog Review (Tour): https://trishadoeseverythingbutstudy2... Thank you to the author, publisher, Turn the Page Tours and Netgalley for providing me a copy of this book! I really enjoyed reading this book, even though there were a few things I wasn’t completely onboard with. Let’s start with things I loved. I absolutely loved the writing; it was a really good mix of whimsy and lemon ;) I really enjoyed making notes for this one, though I was always trying to tell myself, cut down the quotes, we’e not trying to commit copyright infringement....even the quotes in this post, though they seem quite a lot, are less than half of my original notes (which you can see in my status updates, I’ll link them with the quotes). I loved the relatability of the writing, and it really sucked me into the plot, even though by itself the plot isn’t much (we’ll get to that in a moment). My biggest source for irritation in this was definitely the way I couldn’t make images of all of the characters in my head. Around halfway through, I realised I only really know what Paheli looks like, I have no idea what the other characters look like. Then I went down the spiral of looking for side thoughts that might relate to features, and found the complete cover jacket on twitter and tried to correlate each character to their image in the cover, and mostly failed. I’m still going to search for others, but just for anyone interested, I’ve included my notes for this endeavour at the end of this post! (later I ended up contacting the tour organiser, and they were very nice and shared Nafiza's recent tweet with me (linked below)) Another thing I didn’t completely enjoy was the way this ended. Without going into too many spoilers, I felt that the ending was a) pretty out of character for Taraana, and b) slightly hypocritical? Like yeah, I see the appeal of it, but I do wish there was a way to fix stuff without becoming the bad guys yourself. But, since the book focuses on not pulling any punches, I can live with the Wild Ones being more morally grey than typical characters. I really loved the found family trope in this, it was, I think, the highlight of this book. I wish there were more POVs than Paheli’s and the slightly confusing general-consciousness-of-the-Wild-Ones POV. I also wish that there had either been lesser characters, or more time spent on every character, because of the 10-11 main characters in this, I can only remember say 5 as characters. The rest I just remember as ideas or names, they have no substance to them. Of the ones I do, Ligaya, Valentina, Areum, and Ghufran were my favourites. I do wish there was lesser time spent on the romance; I went into this book not expecting a romance, and so when there was a side (or main, depending on where you look at it from) romance, I wasn’t really happy with it. Especially when because there was already so much going on, especially with the number of characters, we couldn’t really focus on the romance as much as it deserved to be focused on, resulting in a slightly instalove romance and no particular basis for it (in my opinion). I did come to like it by the end, but definitely not as much as I should have. I wish the romance had either been cut out, or some of the Wild Ones. I would have been really happy with just the platonic relationships of the main cast. The world building was amazing, I have never felt as much of a craving to travel and go to new places as I have in this pandemic, and so when this book took me to so many different corners of the world, including my own (or whereabouts) in Lucknow, it really fulfilled that craving! And the way the magical was superimposed upon the real world made it even better! I usually gravitate more towards alternate worlds for fantasy than I do towards magical realism, but this is one of the good magical realism ones out there. On the whole, an amazing read in terms of escapism, but maybe not that much from a story and character point of view. I would recommend it to anyone that enjoys magical realism, found family, a whole lot of fluff, diverse cast and settings, focus on struggles of women around the world, amazing writing, and would not mind plot and romance that doesn’t completely make sense but is enjoyable all the same. So, these were my guesses for who's who on the cover, or at least my notes, I ended up getting 5 of 11 (if counting all, even those not on the cover) and 5 of 9 if counting those on cover. I was still not that sure about Daraja and Etsuko, but the other three I was sure of. The ones with a ✔️ and a ❌ are those in which I was partially right. Image from Nafiza Azad's twitter here Paheli-largest, pink hair ✔️ Areum: Blue hair- Seoul ✔️ Kamboja (1st from right)-Jakarta, short hair? ❌ ✔️ Ligaya- cebu phillipines first from left? second from right?(not on cover) ❌ Daraja -benin city (west africa) turban? rightmost? third from right? ✔️ Widad- lahore third from left? (not on cover) ❌ Talei -suva fiji dark skin probably ❌ ✔️ Sevda -marmaris turkey ❌ Ghufran -veil baghdad second from left ✔️ Etsuko -kyoto leftmost? ✔️ Valentina -from paris trans? lesbian? silver hair? dark skin rightmost? ❌ ✔️

  11. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Marie

    New favorite book. I don’t even have the words to describe just how deeply I adored this gorgeous, magical, healing story!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This book was so beautiful. Alternating between stream-of-consciousness and a plot-based narrative, The Wild Ones is the story of girls of color refusing to conform to the fate the world demands of them, and instead choosing to be their own people. What I loved the most about this book is this: Communities of color tend to be more collectivist rather than individualist, and the Wild Ones - girls who are rescued by magic from atrocities like rape, human trafficking, child marriage, prostitution, a This book was so beautiful. Alternating between stream-of-consciousness and a plot-based narrative, The Wild Ones is the story of girls of color refusing to conform to the fate the world demands of them, and instead choosing to be their own people. What I loved the most about this book is this: Communities of color tend to be more collectivist rather than individualist, and the Wild Ones - girls who are rescued by magic from atrocities like rape, human trafficking, child marriage, prostitution, and the like - reject the notion that their worth is inherently tied to what they can offer to their families in terms of money and other material wealth. And yet, they remain true to the idea of a community anyway by standing together and for each other - but in the way that standing together is meant to be. Healthy, happy, whole, and willing to listen. I can't recommend this book enough. If you have a young WOC in your life, get this book for her. If you are a young WOC, pick this book up. If you're a WOC but no longer exactly a spring chicken, pick up this book, read it, rejoice in the fact that you're not alone.

  13. 5 out of 5

    kayla

    THIS COVER omg it's so beautiful THIS COVER omg it's so beautiful

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sakina (aforestofbooks)

    How do I write a review for a book that captured the pain, betrayal, and anger I feel on an everyday basis? How do I come up with words to express how much this book means to me? I love this book so much it hurts. The writing style is breathtaking. I am in awe at Nafiza’s talent. I truly believe there is no one out there in the world who could have written this story as well as she did. The words, the imagery, the emotion…I could feel the anger and the pain through the page. It made me feel alive How do I write a review for a book that captured the pain, betrayal, and anger I feel on an everyday basis? How do I come up with words to express how much this book means to me? I love this book so much it hurts. The writing style is breathtaking. I am in awe at Nafiza’s talent. I truly believe there is no one out there in the world who could have written this story as well as she did. The words, the imagery, the emotion…I could feel the anger and the pain through the page. It made me feel alive. It gave me hope. It put words to all the thoughts that have whirled around in my head for years. I love the mix of Paheli’s POV and the other Wild Ones. It didn’t bother me that we couldn’t tell who’s perspective the chapter was from. It fit with the story. These girls, their stories are so similar, yet so different. They are each their own individual, yet they’ve bonded because of the trauma and betrayal they’ve experienced. And I think having the book written like this was very unique, but also perfect for the story Nafiza was trying to tell. Paheli’s POV was fun. That’s the best way I can describe it. And I think the reason I liked it so much was because her inner narrative fits so much with my own. It fits with her as a character too. We see how the trauma Paheli has gone through hasn’t disappeared completely. Trauma never completely does. You learn to move on, soften it a bit, squish it into a small ball and surround it with happier memories. But it never disappears completely. And we see that so well in her relationships with Taraana, Eulalie, and the other girls. Ngl I almost cried when (view spoiler)[Paheli tells Eulalie that she does love her (hide spoiler)] , she just has trouble expressing her emotions because she’s constantly on alert for betrayal. When she is separated from the others, her first thought is “what if they realize they don’t need me/what if they don’t love me.” And even with Taraana…the relationship is kind of instalove, but also not. You guys know how picky I am when it comes to romance, but this was done so well. It didn’t feel rushed, and Paheli’s hesitancy and fears made complete sense with her past. I really appreciated how much time we got to spend with Paheli and Taraana as they get to know each other. I loved how they actually communicated (even if it took some pushing from Taraana lol), because that’s the one thing I find lacking in a lot of books with romance. The romance definitely didn’t overtake the plot and even when it was the centre of a scene, it didn’t make me cringe or feel awkward. I really liked the two of them together. My favourite part of this book, besides for everything else I’ve mentioned, was seeing so many different cities and experiencing the culture and food. I read this book while on vacation in Italy, and I could actually imagine Paheli and her girls wandering the streets of Rome, wearing flowy dresses in the sweltering heat, and eating gelato. For a lot of us, I think this book can be a perfect escape from our current world and allow us to travel to other cities and countries in our minds, since it’s still not easy to travel right now. Another thing I’ll mention…I love me a “weak, scared” male love interest. How rare is it to see this in books? The men are always brave and strong, nothing ever terrifies them or if it does they don’t show it. The women are always described as more emotional and scared and weak. But in this book we have a lovely switch in gender portrayal. The Wild Ones are strong, they are undefeatable. The very cry that is expected from a woman cowering in fear can be used in defence. And maybe it is the trauma and hard lives that have made them this way, but isn’t that the way of male characters too? Aren’t they also brave and rash and angry because of their past? So why can’t women be shaped by their past also? This book ajakskdkd is just so empowering. If you’re a woman or identify as a woman, this book will make you feel seen, it will give you hope and strength to get you through whatever you’re going through. It will make you angry, but in a good way. The last lines of this book sum up everything so well. ”Embrace this anger. Let if fuel your everydays. Defy everyone who tells you that you can’t. Be wild.” Also sharing this one because I love it so much: ”Some days we are so sad, we want to drown the world. Some days we are so angry, we want to set it on fire.” Overall, 5/5 stars. I need to buy this book immediately.

  15. 5 out of 5

    ivy♡

    the COVER OMG I'M READY the COVER OMG I'M READY

  16. 5 out of 5

    prutha

    THAT COVER THOO

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca | Velvet Opus

    A feminist fantasy with a stunning cover that releases two days before I turn 30?? Happy birthday to me! 😍

  18. 4 out of 5

    jocelyn

    i am SPEECHLESS after seeing this dust jacket. FEAST YOUR EYES! i am SPEECHLESS after seeing this dust jacket. FEAST YOUR EYES!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Perez

    Update: 6/3/21 I reached out to the author on twitter because I wanted to know who was who on the front and back covers. She was kind enough to respond! FRONT Paheli is the pink-haired girl Valentina is the girl with the braid and yellow flower Areum is the blue-haired girl Talei is the girl with red hibiscus BACK (I can't get in the image on GR, just go look it up) Etsuko is the dark-brown-haired one at the far left Ghufran is the one with purple hijab Kamboja is the one with short hair Sevda is the one Update: 6/3/21 I reached out to the author on twitter because I wanted to know who was who on the front and back covers. She was kind enough to respond! FRONT Paheli is the pink-haired girl Valentina is the girl with the braid and yellow flower Areum is the blue-haired girl Talei is the girl with red hibiscus BACK (I can't get in the image on GR, just go look it up) Etsuko is the dark-brown-haired one at the far left Ghufran is the one with purple hijab Kamboja is the one with short hair Sevda is the one with ash/grey -colored hair And Daraja is the one with the head covering Thanks, Nafiza!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Her Bookish Obsession

    TRIGGER/CONTENT WARNING(S): Sexual and physical violence, depicted discussions of depression and suicide The Wild Ones focuses on the hardships that girls and women face in life, the strength they can find in others, and the importance of building a caring family in which they can feel supported. Azad goes into greater detail about how humans build relationships and the horrors and beauty that may be found inside them. This novel puts the challenges that girls and women experience around the world TRIGGER/CONTENT WARNING(S): Sexual and physical violence, depicted discussions of depression and suicide The Wild Ones focuses on the hardships that girls and women face in life, the strength they can find in others, and the importance of building a caring family in which they can feel supported. Azad goes into greater detail about how humans build relationships and the horrors and beauty that may be found inside them. This novel puts the challenges that girls and women experience around the world in our culture front and center. It highlights how we can come together as a community to address the challenges that all women face. We get to observe how the survivors deal with the traumas they’ve had throughout their lives. Paheli is an Indian figure who was sold by her mother in exchange for a favour in the book. After she fled, broken and injured, she ran upon Taraana, who gave her a box of magical stars before disappearing. Paheli collected other betrayed and abused females, and together with the magical stars, they helped those who had lost hope and saved them from pain. The writing was an important component of the plot, with its melodic tone highlighting how much each Wild One had to go through before Paheli discovered them. The writing elicited both sniffles and smiles as it infused the plot with emotions. For the first 20-25 percent of the book, the plot moved at a snail’s pace, which irked me. However, things increased up up after that, and things were rather exciting! The scenes were exciting and action-packed, but the magical descriptions were lacking. The middle-worlds are destroyed by the Wild Ones’ screams, yet those moments were limply depicted, and I believe they could have been done better. An issue I had with The Wild Ones was that the chapters are recounted from two perspectives; one is Paheli’s, and the other is an unnamed Wild One, which perplexed me much. Only Paheli and Valentina seemed to have true personalities, and I had trouble differentiating characters and their voices. I didn’t really get why there had to be SO MANY of Wild Ones, I feel like it would have worked with 4-7 of them which would have given them at least adequate page time instead of mentions here and there. It would have also allowed for character development and differentiation. Although the idea appears to be intriguing, the premise did not live up to its full potential. The cover is gorgeous, and I adored the concept of a magical girl team that might represent many readers who feel underrepresented in the YA genre. Recommended if you’re looking for a powerful feminist fantasy. Check out my review and more on my blog: https://herbookishobsession.wordpress...

  21. 5 out of 5

    — nova

    THE COVER !!!!! i need it

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nae

    Empowering, daring, caring. This book is a little triggering and quite touching. To give you a taste, the ending is powerful and don't worry this isn't a spoiler. "Aren't you angry, sister? At being treated the we are? At having to pick up the pieces of what remains after the world is through with us? At being silenced and abused? At being denied our dignity, our bodies, our voices, and our right to justice? Aren't you angry? Embrace this anger. Let it fuel your every days. Defy everyone who tell Empowering, daring, caring. This book is a little triggering and quite touching. To give you a taste, the ending is powerful and don't worry this isn't a spoiler. "Aren't you angry, sister? At being treated the we are? At having to pick up the pieces of what remains after the world is through with us? At being silenced and abused? At being denied our dignity, our bodies, our voices, and our right to justice? Aren't you angry? Embrace this anger. Let it fuel your every days. Defy everyone who tells you that you can't. Be wild."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Starr ❇✌❇

    I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: implied rape & assault, mentions of torture, abuse, suicide, kidnap & sale of children, forced pregnancy, mentioned genital mutilation, mentioned murder of a child, drowning 4.5 Long ago, a broken girl was tossed a box of stars. She and the girls she collected throughout time are The Wild Ones. Traveling in the Between, rescuing those willing to be rescued, they do not think much of their origins. Until, that is, the boy with the stars in his eyes, the same I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: implied rape & assault, mentions of torture, abuse, suicide, kidnap & sale of children, forced pregnancy, mentioned genital mutilation, mentioned murder of a child, drowning 4.5 Long ago, a broken girl was tossed a box of stars. She and the girls she collected throughout time are The Wild Ones. Traveling in the Between, rescuing those willing to be rescued, they do not think much of their origins. Until, that is, the boy with the stars in his eyes, the same as the stars now in their palms, reappears, and begs for help. This is a lush and yet rage-filled book, and I do not know what to say except that it needs to be read. The writing within this book is so poetic, so willing to embrace, and yet ready to scream. There is a dream-like quality that never goes away, yet a stark look at all the things that can befall women. I wish, so much, that I could quote this book right now, because I honestly want to quote every single part of it, but, alas I am not currently allowed. The magic in this story is wonderful in its subtlety. Following only The Wild Ones, you get hints of what else is in the world, just enough to color what you expect and what you know of where you are, but the magic you actual see used is focused on survival and revenge. With the deserts and the whimsy the girls enjoy, you see the ways they allow themselves to be treated- especially when looked at what they bring to the world itself. I love the balance, the call and response. Take the good, destroy the bad. Accept what you deserve, and if anyone tries to take it, or tell you you deserve pain, fight without hesitation. This book is filled with trauma, and that makes it heavy, but the way that that trauma is dealt with is so good. I love the way Paheli's PTSD is integrated into the story, and the different reactions each of the girls have, and I love, most of all, that this book does not downplay any of that, or the incidents themselves. Too often do we get a 'turn the other cheek" narrative, or a "to live well is the best revenge" idea. While these characters are living for themselves already, we are still allowed the catharsis of revenge and things put right. The sisterhood within this book is also so wonderful. This found family meets girl gang is more often than not a "we", and I love the way they move through the world together as a protective unit, and the way they support each other even past rescue. The idea of a bunch of immortal girls sticking together and looking out for those in need is actually incredibly comforting. I didn't expect a romance in this book, and was worried at the sight of one, but it's a romance that I actually think is written and handled well. I like Taraana a lot as a character, and the connection between him and Paheli is one that makes sense within context and I think grows well on the page. While never becoming the main focus, I think the romance is cute and adds to the story. The only issues I had with this book is that I wanted more. The vast cast of characters kept me from getting to know them as individuals for the most part, and I wanted more distinction and more depth for them. Giving those short chapters invoking mysterious origins for each only made m want it, and details on their origins and memories in general, even more! I want more background, I want more answers on the past, I want to know all about The Wild Ones. But this book is very focused on the present tense, and Paheli is clearly the main character, so it's not surprising how things land. I loved reading this book. As full of rage and power as it is soft and magical, this is a story like nothing I've ever read before.

  24. 4 out of 5

    violet✦

    I've only read the short story All The Colors of Goodbye among Nafiza Azad's works, and if that was enough to make me rock back and forth in bed as tears blurred my vision in the middle of the night I can't fathom what kind of an effect this book will have on me I've only read the short story All The Colors of Goodbye among Nafiza Azad's works, and if that was enough to make me rock back and forth in bed as tears blurred my vision in the middle of the night I can't fathom what kind of an effect this book will have on me

  25. 4 out of 5

    2TReads

    3.5 stars The Wild Ones is a narrative centering girls and women in all their expressions and complexities; the horrors that they face and the strength that they can find to carry on and band together, creating a loving, supportive, and protective found family. Azad has used historical settings, food, and friendship to connect us all while weaving this fantastical and magical world. What I also enjoyed and appreciated is her portrayal of the particular magic that exists and permeates a specific ci 3.5 stars The Wild Ones is a narrative centering girls and women in all their expressions and complexities; the horrors that they face and the strength that they can find to carry on and band together, creating a loving, supportive, and protective found family. Azad has used historical settings, food, and friendship to connect us all while weaving this fantastical and magical world. What I also enjoyed and appreciated is her portrayal of the particular magic that exists and permeates a specific city. She draws upon the complex intricacies of girlhood and womanhood to explore how we come into our femininity or lack thereof; how we form relationships, platonic and romantic; how we grow within the confines or freedom of said relationships; and the beauty, cruelty or futility that can reside within them as well. She tells a story of what makes us leave the place where we should be safest and most loved: home. But as with all things magical, there are persons who wish to harness and steal what is special to twist to their evil intentions and it is here that the Wild Ones must truly count on their bond and trust to face what is hunting them. The choice to switch between memory, first person narration, and a conversational style of prose really aided in engaging and capturing the reader's attention. But what really made me enjoy this read, besides the strong bond of sisterhood, is the love our MC has for mangoes and food in general. This book had me salivating. Every new city was a new experience with the food of that region, and I loved it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    ikram

    HELLO????? Can we appreciate the cover?????

  27. 4 out of 5

    nihaarika

    3.75 stars rounded off to 4 The Wild Ones is a story with utterly gorgeous and lyrical writing and a stunning concept. Nafiza Azad’s stunning prose pulled me right in from the beginning. For the most part, I did enjoy this book. The Wild Ones is the story of a group of girls (the same name as the title), all of whom have suffered in some way. They have been betrayed, tortured, tormented and/or abused. And once the Wild Ones finds the girls, they are blessed to carry stars in their palms. They gai 3.75 stars rounded off to 4 The Wild Ones is a story with utterly gorgeous and lyrical writing and a stunning concept. Nafiza Azad’s stunning prose pulled me right in from the beginning. For the most part, I did enjoy this book. The Wild Ones is the story of a group of girls (the same name as the title), all of whom have suffered in some way. They have been betrayed, tortured, tormented and/or abused. And once the Wild Ones finds the girls, they are blessed to carry stars in their palms. They gain magic and become truly powerful. The magic system was complex, a little difficult to understand at first, but by the time you get into the book, it gets explained in its own way and through the beautiful prose. This book can be described as beautiful and unique with its storytelling style. I did enjoy this kind of style, but not as much as I thought I would. My qualms lie in this; the chapters are told in two alternating perspectives; one is of Paheli, the other is another Wild One, who is not specified. I wish it was specified though; because I was having a hard time distinguishing between the character voices of Paheli and this unspecified Wild One. The plot was also a little slow at the beginning, but things picked up around the 20% mark and after that the book was pretty fast paced. Another thing I did not really enjoy was how the book ended. There was a lot of build up to a certain event, and when the event took place, it got over a little too quickly. I would have liked to see more of that scene, since it was one of the most action packed moments of the book. The Wild Ones feels like an experimental novel; it’s a story told in a style that might not be enjoyable to a lot of people but I certainly loved the style. But this story is something, I feel, everybody needs to read. It makes you feel; it makes you think about heavy topics and it makes your heart ache for the girls who go through so much pain. The Wild Ones, in some ways, is a story that I needed. It’s a fantasy but it’s grounded so much in reality, that it doesn’t even feel like a fantasy by the time you finish the book. All in all, I think what I want to end by saying is; thank you to Nafiza Azad for writing this. This is one of those stories that will stay in my mind for a long time.

  28. 4 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: rape The Wild Ones is lyrical, magical, and stunning. The writing is exquisite and there were so many sentences that just stopped me while reading. Celebrating friendship and support, it's a book that isn't afraid of showing the pain because it's a piece of their journey. While this feels a bit more experimental - with passages like memories and more stream of consciousness - A (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: rape The Wild Ones is lyrical, magical, and stunning. The writing is exquisite and there were so many sentences that just stopped me while reading. Celebrating friendship and support, it's a book that isn't afraid of showing the pain because it's a piece of their journey. While this feels a bit more experimental - with passages like memories and more stream of consciousness - Azad weaves a journey of resistance and love. The beginning feels like a slow unfurling of atmosphere and vibes and then all of a sudden there's this switch and the action builds on this foundation. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nicole| Booklover.zzz | Zamudio-Román

    3.8 stars Loved the unique premise. Loved the cover. Loved the writing. Loved the diversity. I wish the story had been told in less POVs. Some were far less developed than others, therefore falling flat with those characters in the end. I think we could have had more world building and characterization but the page count go to it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    The Litt Librarian

    Check the full review over at The Litt Librarian! https://thelittlibrarian.wixsite.com/... I tried to hold off on posting my review, but tours are demanding these days aren't they? Anywho, The Wild Ones by Nafiza Azad is … different. I'm still trying to process all that I've read. It wasn't a hard read, but it wasn't easy either. We're introduced to 11 POVs throughout the fantasy. That's right! There are 11 POVs, all telling the same record. But at least it's a continuation with barely any interrup Check the full review over at The Litt Librarian! https://thelittlibrarian.wixsite.com/... I tried to hold off on posting my review, but tours are demanding these days aren't they? Anywho, The Wild Ones by Nafiza Azad is … different. I'm still trying to process all that I've read. It wasn't a hard read, but it wasn't easy either. We're introduced to 11 POVs throughout the fantasy. That's right! There are 11 POVs, all telling the same record. But at least it's a continuation with barely any interruption with side thoughts and missions. It took me a while, but how we're acquainted with each girl was essentially a page break of a journal entry hinting towards why they became a Wild One before diving back into the story. With the premise of a "Wild One," I would at least thought we would have seen more tragic stories or at least the group trying to save other girls who were at their wit's end. Instead, we go on an Anthony Bourdain world food tour with them while trying to protect the boy who inadvertently gave them this newfound power to be a Wild One. It's not what I expected from the synopsis. Once we got to the heart of the story, it made me realize how much fluff I had to trudge through to get here. It's basically a girl and a boy who aren't good with expressing emotions due to trauma, slowly falling for each other as they try to save their world and themselves from doom. The story's execution didn't sit well with me, and there were way too many POVs and narrative switching. I understand the feminism message Azad placed all over the book about protecting women and their rights, but it was all too much. If we could take out all the flowery notes, the poetry, and the coterie of women, we might have had a decent story.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...