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Fibbed

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A magical middle-grade graphic novel about a girl who doesn’t lie but no one believes, and who winds up tangled in the web of a trickster spider of Ghanaian lore, Ananse. Everyone says that the wild stories Nana tells are big fibs. But she always tells the truth, as ridiculous as it sounds to hear about the troupe of circus squirrels stealing her teacher’s toupee. When an A magical middle-grade graphic novel about a girl who doesn’t lie but no one believes, and who winds up tangled in the web of a trickster spider of Ghanaian lore, Ananse. Everyone says that the wild stories Nana tells are big fibs. But she always tells the truth, as ridiculous as it sounds to hear about the troupe of circus squirrels stealing her teacher’s toupee. When another outlandish explanation lands her in hot water again, her parents announce that Nana will be spending the summer with her grandmother in Ghana. She isn’t happy to be missing the summer camp she’s looked forward to all year, or to be living with family that she barely knows, in a country where she can’t really speak the native language. But all her worries get a whole lot bigger—literally—when she comes face-to-face with Ananse, the trickster spider of legend. Nana soon discovers that the forest around the village is a place of magic watched over by Ananse. But a group of greedy contractors are draining the magic from the land, intent on selling the wishes for their own gain. Nana must join forces with her cousin Tiwaa, new friend Akwesi, and Ananse himself to save the magic from those who are out to steal it before the magic—and the forest—are gone for good.


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A magical middle-grade graphic novel about a girl who doesn’t lie but no one believes, and who winds up tangled in the web of a trickster spider of Ghanaian lore, Ananse. Everyone says that the wild stories Nana tells are big fibs. But she always tells the truth, as ridiculous as it sounds to hear about the troupe of circus squirrels stealing her teacher’s toupee. When an A magical middle-grade graphic novel about a girl who doesn’t lie but no one believes, and who winds up tangled in the web of a trickster spider of Ghanaian lore, Ananse. Everyone says that the wild stories Nana tells are big fibs. But she always tells the truth, as ridiculous as it sounds to hear about the troupe of circus squirrels stealing her teacher’s toupee. When another outlandish explanation lands her in hot water again, her parents announce that Nana will be spending the summer with her grandmother in Ghana. She isn’t happy to be missing the summer camp she’s looked forward to all year, or to be living with family that she barely knows, in a country where she can’t really speak the native language. But all her worries get a whole lot bigger—literally—when she comes face-to-face with Ananse, the trickster spider of legend. Nana soon discovers that the forest around the village is a place of magic watched over by Ananse. But a group of greedy contractors are draining the magic from the land, intent on selling the wishes for their own gain. Nana must join forces with her cousin Tiwaa, new friend Akwesi, and Ananse himself to save the magic from those who are out to steal it before the magic—and the forest—are gone for good.

30 review for Fibbed

  1. 4 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the author. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Fibbed is multi-layered. I began by immediately loving how when Nana gets to Ghana, she feels this dsiconnect. How she doesn't speak Twi and while she is aware of her heritage, there's this gap. Talk about relatable diaspora feels. At the same time, Fibbed features Nana who no one believes. My heart broke for her especially as she keeps being called a liar! Drawing on Ghanian lore, Fi (Disclaimer: I received this book from the author. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Fibbed is multi-layered. I began by immediately loving how when Nana gets to Ghana, she feels this dsiconnect. How she doesn't speak Twi and while she is aware of her heritage, there's this gap. Talk about relatable diaspora feels. At the same time, Fibbed features Nana who no one believes. My heart broke for her especially as she keeps being called a liar! Drawing on Ghanian lore, Fibbed then turns into an action story. See what I mean about it being multi-faceted? full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Agyemang

    As my debut middle grade graphic novel, the story in Fibbed is so close to my heart. It’s about a young girl reconnecting with her family and her culture. It’s about discovering your voice and learning from the past. But most of all, it’s about searching for the truth, and finding instead, the power that comes in believing; in others, in ourselves, and in the intangible. I’m so, so proud to have written and illustrated every little piece of this book and I’m so grateful to everyone who chooses t As my debut middle grade graphic novel, the story in Fibbed is so close to my heart. It’s about a young girl reconnecting with her family and her culture. It’s about discovering your voice and learning from the past. But most of all, it’s about searching for the truth, and finding instead, the power that comes in believing; in others, in ourselves, and in the intangible. I’m so, so proud to have written and illustrated every little piece of this book and I’m so grateful to everyone who chooses to pick it up. Thank you so much for taking the time to read Fibbed. I hope Nana’s story sparked your imagination, and brought some joy and fun into your day <3 -Elizabeth Agyemang

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve Tetreault

    What it’s about: Nana is often accused of lying, to the point that she gets in trouble at school for saying it was circus squirrels that stole the principal's toupee. Nana's family decide to send her to visit family for the summer, so Nana is sent to Ghana. Once there, Nana finds it difficult to fit in, particularly with her cousin who seems to take an instant dislike to her. But Nana's grandmother is kind and patient, even when Nana messes up. It's Grandmother who teaches Nana about the magic t What it’s about: Nana is often accused of lying, to the point that she gets in trouble at school for saying it was circus squirrels that stole the principal's toupee. Nana's family decide to send her to visit family for the summer, so Nana is sent to Ghana. Once there, Nana finds it difficult to fit in, particularly with her cousin who seems to take an instant dislike to her. But Nana's grandmother is kind and patient, even when Nana messes up. It's Grandmother who teaches Nana about the magic tree in their back yard. When Nana stumbles on a mining operation in the sacred woods, she's confused - especially when they seem to be mining the area's magic. Nana teams up with her cousin, a friend, and the trickster Anansi to try to end the mining operation and restore magic to the area. What I thought: This book was a bit confusing. It seems to play fast and loose with the idea of magic - it might exist, or it might just be part of the stories being told. Anansi might be a magical trickster spider being, or he might not be. While the story was sort of interesting despite being a bit confusing, the art did not work for me. The layouts were a little consuming to me. Speech bubbles pushed through panels in ways that made it difficult to follow some parts of the conversation in places. Additionally, my ARC of this book wouldn't let me increase the image sizes, so there were places the details were difficult to make out. I like that the story is trying to create a metaphor for how colonial powers undermined and of destroyed cultures in Africa. It's a bit heavy-handed; I feel like with a little massaging, it could have pulled off the trick a bit better, but it's creating a point of comparison for later discussion. But the story takes too long to get there. I suppose Agyemang is trying to build a bridge for readers between America and Ghana - there are some culture elements that get brought up and explained. I guess one could argue that it's laying the groundwork for the characters and setting, but it's a long way to get to the "good stuff". There's also sort of an allusion to climate change - the magic mining operation is being done by a giant machine, and it's causing the local plants to die. This one seems like it could use a little beefing up - it's a bit thin, if it's not just something I'm putting on the story myself. Why I chose those shelves: Trigger, bullying, violence: The miners kidnap and threaten Nana and her friends; issue, political, racism, sociology: This story is a thinly veiled (threadbare) allegory for the plundering of resources by colonial powers - the head bad guy is a blond haired, blue eyed man; Black: Almost all the characters are Black, and the story mostly takes place in Ghana; mythology: There are several digressions into African myths, particularly regarding Anansi; fantasy, supernatural, magic: The story seems to go back and forth as to whether what is going on is "really" happening, but the mining of magic is treated like an actual "thing", which adds to the confusion - there is even a scene where the magic seems to actually work (in a very genie-of-the-lamp-tricking-people-with-interpretation-of-the-wish kind of way); coming of age: Nana is treated as an immature liar, and she tries to overcome that reputation; climate change: mining the magic of the forest is killing the plant life in the area. Why I rated it like I did: This story has potential, but I feel like it could use a bit more editing to reach more of that potential.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    Five out of five stars! It was a fun and dynamic read about the power of storytelling and believing in yourself even when others doubt you. I loved seeing Ghana and its rich beauty through Nana’s eyes as she visits for the first time and becomes immersed in her culture and her family traditions. It was so rewarding to see Nana finally come into her skin and take what she had learned from her grandmother’s story and her experiences, on how to make people listen to her. I hope to see more of Nana Five out of five stars! It was a fun and dynamic read about the power of storytelling and believing in yourself even when others doubt you. I loved seeing Ghana and its rich beauty through Nana’s eyes as she visits for the first time and becomes immersed in her culture and her family traditions. It was so rewarding to see Nana finally come into her skin and take what she had learned from her grandmother’s story and her experiences, on how to make people listen to her. I hope to see more of Nana and her friends in the future.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    This story was so clunky that I had a hard time enjoying it. Nothing seemed to flow, and at the end it didn't seem like everything had really been explained or wrapped up satisfactorily, almost as if it had been storyboarded, but the transitions and magical world building weren't solidified..This was a really good premise with a strong comment on colonialism and the ravaging of Africa's resources and people, but I can't say I liked it. This story was so clunky that I had a hard time enjoying it. Nothing seemed to flow, and at the end it didn't seem like everything had really been explained or wrapped up satisfactorily, almost as if it had been storyboarded, but the transitions and magical world building weren't solidified..This was a really good premise with a strong comment on colonialism and the ravaging of Africa's resources and people, but I can't say I liked it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aurora

    Got through 3 chapters before giving up. The art is so amateurish that I’m surprised this got published by a major house. Also couldn’t stand everyone not believing her when the things she was talking about were right there. Sure, “Circus squirrels took the bread” sounds outlandish, but when you can look out the window and literally see them wearing little circus outfits, like… why are you still all “there she goes! telling tall tales again!”??

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachelle

    This has quickly become one of my favorite Ananse stories. I love how layered the lessons were. It was great seeing Nana have that experience of visiting Ghana on her own and learning about her culture. The friendship she built with her cousin and Akwesi was sweet. This is such a perfect read for kids!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Stephens

    I rarely love graphic novels, but this was a winner! Very engaging story, fun Ananse stories weaved (ha!) in, and a great lesson about storytelling.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tam I

    Read an ARC. The story had little flow. The characters were all flat and two dimensional. I Wass not a fan of the art work- half the reason I read graphic novels.

  11. 5 out of 5

    D.T. Henderson

    3.5

  12. 5 out of 5

    Terry J. Benton-Walker

    This was such a cute and fun story. I’m grateful to have experienced it!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    3.5 stars.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ronda Canary

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

  16. 4 out of 5

    Celeste Knudsen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  18. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mireille

  20. 4 out of 5

    Temah

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maryjeanne DiPalermo

  22. 4 out of 5

    R.Q. Woodward

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shannon O'Leary

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kris Cram

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maya

  27. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Savage

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Briggs

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kat Ryan

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