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Eagle Station

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It is with good reason that Mark Berent has consistently received this kind of praise. Berent, himself a highly decorated pilot, has seen his share of action, having served in the Air Force for more than twenty years and survived three tours of Vietnam. In his three previous novels, all a part of the continuing saga that Kirkus Reviews has called "one of the best Vietnam W It is with good reason that Mark Berent has consistently received this kind of praise. Berent, himself a highly decorated pilot, has seen his share of action, having served in the Air Force for more than twenty years and survived three tours of Vietnam. In his three previous novels, all a part of the continuing saga that Kirkus Reviews has called "one of the best Vietnam War fictional histories," Berent has demonstrated an unparalleled ability to recapture the Vietnam experience with vivid intensity. Berent's remarkable storytelling places the reader directly into the heat of the battle, dodging missiles in the sky and countering blows in hand-to-hand combat. As Tom Clancy says, "Berent is the real thing." In Eagle Station (June 8, 1992) the newest installment in his Vietnam War series, Berent puts on the heat and raises the stakes, creating his most electrifying tale of war to date. Beginning with a hair-raising cliff side helicopter rescue under heavy fire, and racing toward a climactic ground battle played out in the dark of night, engaging top secret USAF first special operations gun ships, Eagle Station is filled with adventure and acts of daring, woven into a compelling and powerful plot. United States Airforce Academy (Provisional) Lowry Air Force Base, Denver, Colorado Three Young Cadets, Kenichi Tanaka, Joe Kelly, and Manuel "Little Cat' Dominguez, all subjected to the cruel hazing of an arrogant and vengeful upperclassman, band together in a show of unity and strength. Years later, this solemn oath of brotherhood will hold them together, and be severely tested, during cataclysmic events in Vietnam. They meet to save Eagle Station at Lima Site 85 Royalty of Laos. LS85 is only 24 kilometers from the North Vietnamese border and provides crucial navigation signals to U.S. planes attacking communist North Vietnam. Russian Spetsnaz have a plan to capture a vital electronic device from the site and kill all the Americans thereby aiding Hanoi's plot to provide a big event involving the first black POW pilot. Eagle Station is the fourth of the five-book Rolling Thunder series. Next and last is Storm Flight. Use [email protected] to email Mark if you have any questions.


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It is with good reason that Mark Berent has consistently received this kind of praise. Berent, himself a highly decorated pilot, has seen his share of action, having served in the Air Force for more than twenty years and survived three tours of Vietnam. In his three previous novels, all a part of the continuing saga that Kirkus Reviews has called "one of the best Vietnam W It is with good reason that Mark Berent has consistently received this kind of praise. Berent, himself a highly decorated pilot, has seen his share of action, having served in the Air Force for more than twenty years and survived three tours of Vietnam. In his three previous novels, all a part of the continuing saga that Kirkus Reviews has called "one of the best Vietnam War fictional histories," Berent has demonstrated an unparalleled ability to recapture the Vietnam experience with vivid intensity. Berent's remarkable storytelling places the reader directly into the heat of the battle, dodging missiles in the sky and countering blows in hand-to-hand combat. As Tom Clancy says, "Berent is the real thing." In Eagle Station (June 8, 1992) the newest installment in his Vietnam War series, Berent puts on the heat and raises the stakes, creating his most electrifying tale of war to date. Beginning with a hair-raising cliff side helicopter rescue under heavy fire, and racing toward a climactic ground battle played out in the dark of night, engaging top secret USAF first special operations gun ships, Eagle Station is filled with adventure and acts of daring, woven into a compelling and powerful plot. United States Airforce Academy (Provisional) Lowry Air Force Base, Denver, Colorado Three Young Cadets, Kenichi Tanaka, Joe Kelly, and Manuel "Little Cat' Dominguez, all subjected to the cruel hazing of an arrogant and vengeful upperclassman, band together in a show of unity and strength. Years later, this solemn oath of brotherhood will hold them together, and be severely tested, during cataclysmic events in Vietnam. They meet to save Eagle Station at Lima Site 85 Royalty of Laos. LS85 is only 24 kilometers from the North Vietnamese border and provides crucial navigation signals to U.S. planes attacking communist North Vietnam. Russian Spetsnaz have a plan to capture a vital electronic device from the site and kill all the Americans thereby aiding Hanoi's plot to provide a big event involving the first black POW pilot. Eagle Station is the fourth of the five-book Rolling Thunder series. Next and last is Storm Flight. Use [email protected] to email Mark if you have any questions.

30 review for Eagle Station

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Pieck

    In the fourth installment of the "Wings of War" series, we are plunged into the turmoil, confusion, frustration, and desperation of the Vietnam conflict in 1968. With familiar characters as our guides, as well as a few new ones, Berent captures the reader's interest on the first page and doesn't let go even when the book is over. The author also addresses the experiences of prisoners of war with deep empathy. Clearly, war isn't just men in two groups fighting with each other. There are plenty of In the fourth installment of the "Wings of War" series, we are plunged into the turmoil, confusion, frustration, and desperation of the Vietnam conflict in 1968. With familiar characters as our guides, as well as a few new ones, Berent captures the reader's interest on the first page and doesn't let go even when the book is over. The author also addresses the experiences of prisoners of war with deep empathy. Clearly, war isn't just men in two groups fighting with each other. There are plenty of political, cultural, and economic strings that weave themselves into the diabolical knots of modern international combat. Here we glimpse the birth of the "technological war," a war fought with machines, sometimes from thousands of miles away. Even with all the hardware, the story is undeniably about humankind, and a fierce, passionate, and sensitive heart beats at the core of this excellent book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John

    Very well written with drama and action.

  3. 5 out of 5

    JoAnn Ainsworth

    Kept me interested through all 386 small print pages.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pedro

    Fantastic!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chuck

    I picked up this book because I was looking for a war novel for some undemanding entertainment. Unfortunately this wasn't it. About the only good thing I can say about the book is that the battle at Eagle Station, which took up the last forty or fifty pages of the book was exciting. It's not that I was expecting a lot out of the book. The one-dimensional characters were what I would expect, as were the US equals good guys, VC and NVA equal the bad guys. I also wasn't expecting particularly well-w I picked up this book because I was looking for a war novel for some undemanding entertainment. Unfortunately this wasn't it. About the only good thing I can say about the book is that the battle at Eagle Station, which took up the last forty or fifty pages of the book was exciting. It's not that I was expecting a lot out of the book. The one-dimensional characters were what I would expect, as were the US equals good guys, VC and NVA equal the bad guys. I also wasn't expecting particularly well-written prose. However, I had hoped for a well-developed narrative, which this book didn't have. For example, it opens at the Air Force Academy where two first-year cadets, Dominguez and Tanaka, were mercilessly harassed by an upper classman because he saw them as foreigners. As a result, Dominguez ends up getting bounced out of the Academy. Having set it up like that one would expect that the narrative would develop around the relationships and conflicts between these men. Didn't happen. As a matter of fact, they all turn out to be secondary characters. There are numerous other flaws in the narrative that I could mention, but you get the point. As for the good guy versus bad guy dialectic. Berent takes it to ludicrous extremes. All of the American good guys are stand-up guys, and their women are their matches. The one American bad guy, the one who bullied Dominguez and Tanaka, is a despicable individual, and his wife is an alcoholic bitch. The Vietnamese enemy are vile and conniving, and Americans who are opposed to the war are unlikeable and treasonous. Not only that, but there's a character in the person of a General Whisenand who rails against Robert McNamara and LBJ for ruining the military, McNamara for introducing operations research techniques into the military, and LBJ because he refused to permit the Air Force to bomb North Vietnam back into the Stone Age. It all gets to be a bit much.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Scott Holstad

    I didn't even make it to the first 100 pages. It was dull. Boring. Bland. I've read plenty of Vietnam books that were gripping, immediately, engaging, enthralling. This was none of that. There was one short piece of action, but not much else. Additionally, the book opens with two first-year Air Force Academy cadets, Dominguez and Tanaka, who are mercilessly harassed/hazed by an upper classman just cause he's a dick. You think these guys are going to be the primary protagonists when the plot shif I didn't even make it to the first 100 pages. It was dull. Boring. Bland. I've read plenty of Vietnam books that were gripping, immediately, engaging, enthralling. This was none of that. There was one short piece of action, but not much else. Additionally, the book opens with two first-year Air Force Academy cadets, Dominguez and Tanaka, who are mercilessly harassed/hazed by an upper classman just cause he's a dick. You think these guys are going to be the primary protagonists when the plot shifts to Vietnam several years later, but it seems to turn out that they're merely secondary characters. So why lead off the book with them? It's confusing. Maybe it's just cause I'm not an Air Force guy. Maybe it's cause I'm more of a grunt on the ground guy, or even a Special Forces guy. The grunts have to survive in hostile territory in fear and terror 24/7 while the Air Force guys fly an hour or so, drop a few bombs, fly back and have cocktails. Big damn deal. I guess I'm jaded because I know the Air Force is important, especially these days, but I find more to enjoy reading an infantryman's book than an Air Force man's book, I guess. Whatever the case, I wasn't impressed with the writing, with the plotting, with the set up, with none of it and, especially as I didn't finish it, I'm afraid I can't recommend it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David Norris

    This 4th installment of the series continues in realistic excellence. That may be boring for some. Real war told well should be enough excitement. This story does that very well. I admit there are less fighter jets going zoom-zoom and bang-bang, You have to remember the war was on the ground where most of the people are. I continue love following these characters and have already started reading book 5. I bet I will be wishing for a book 6 when it is done.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ed Schmidt

    The 4th installment of the Rolling Thunder series, a historical fiction book about war and politics in the Vietnam era. This episode follows Court and Wolf as well as some new characters as they attempt to defend a radar sight in Laos, on the border of North Vietnam. It also looks in on the treatment of Major "Flak" Apple, POW. The 4th installment of the Rolling Thunder series, a historical fiction book about war and politics in the Vietnam era. This episode follows Court and Wolf as well as some new characters as they attempt to defend a radar sight in Laos, on the border of North Vietnam. It also looks in on the treatment of Major "Flak" Apple, POW.

  9. 5 out of 5

    James Morrissey

    Excellent book another great job by a man who lived the life and didn't get the respect he deserved when he got home. Thank You Mark and all who served in vietnam(sorry I still can not capitalize that name) Excellent book another great job by a man who lived the life and didn't get the respect he deserved when he got home. Thank You Mark and all who served in vietnam(sorry I still can not capitalize that name)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nhdad

    Read the Berent series many years ago, but remember enjoying them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    William B.

    A Bit Disappointing In Mark Brent's first three books all of the characters were believable but not in this one. The Powers couple, particularly her, were a distraction. A Bit Disappointing In Mark Brent's first three books all of the characters were believable but not in this one. The Powers couple, particularly her, were a distraction.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gary Barrentine

    Very good, fast moving and eye-opening.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    excellent war story and post war look at the stupid politics of LBJ

  14. 5 out of 5

    MR M J SMITH

  15. 4 out of 5

    John Paterson

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Jackson IV

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aser Tolentino

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  19. 4 out of 5

    Scott Weeks

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lila Sells

  21. 4 out of 5

    ROSS

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ed Cramer

  23. 4 out of 5

    CaptainEd

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sally Mickel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael J Cannon

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ken Robinson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Davis

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  29. 5 out of 5

    Fredrik Henriksson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dan Deitz

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