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We are in the midst of a global crisis of care. How do we get out of it? The Care Manifesto puts care at the heart of the debates of our current crisis: from intimate care--childcare, healthcare, elder care--to care for the natural world. We live in a world where carelessness reigns, but it does not have to be this way. The Care Manifesto puts forth a vision for a truly cari We are in the midst of a global crisis of care. How do we get out of it? The Care Manifesto puts care at the heart of the debates of our current crisis: from intimate care--childcare, healthcare, elder care--to care for the natural world. We live in a world where carelessness reigns, but it does not have to be this way. The Care Manifesto puts forth a vision for a truly caring world. The authors want to reimagine the role of care in our everyday lives, making it the organising principle in every dimension and at every scale of life. We are all dependent on each other, and only by nurturing these interdependencies can we cultivate a world in which each and every one of us can not only live but thrive. The Care Manifesto demands that we must put care at the heart of the state and the economy. A caring government must promote collective joy, not the satisfaction of individual desire. This means the transformation of how we organise work through co-operatives, localism and nationalisation. It proposes the expansion of our understanding of kinship for a more 'promiscuous care'. It calls for caring places through the reclamation of public space, to make a more convivial city. It sets out an agenda for the environment, most urgent of all, putting care at the centre of our relationship to the natural world.


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We are in the midst of a global crisis of care. How do we get out of it? The Care Manifesto puts care at the heart of the debates of our current crisis: from intimate care--childcare, healthcare, elder care--to care for the natural world. We live in a world where carelessness reigns, but it does not have to be this way. The Care Manifesto puts forth a vision for a truly cari We are in the midst of a global crisis of care. How do we get out of it? The Care Manifesto puts care at the heart of the debates of our current crisis: from intimate care--childcare, healthcare, elder care--to care for the natural world. We live in a world where carelessness reigns, but it does not have to be this way. The Care Manifesto puts forth a vision for a truly caring world. The authors want to reimagine the role of care in our everyday lives, making it the organising principle in every dimension and at every scale of life. We are all dependent on each other, and only by nurturing these interdependencies can we cultivate a world in which each and every one of us can not only live but thrive. The Care Manifesto demands that we must put care at the heart of the state and the economy. A caring government must promote collective joy, not the satisfaction of individual desire. This means the transformation of how we organise work through co-operatives, localism and nationalisation. It proposes the expansion of our understanding of kinship for a more 'promiscuous care'. It calls for caring places through the reclamation of public space, to make a more convivial city. It sets out an agenda for the environment, most urgent of all, putting care at the centre of our relationship to the natural world.

30 review for The Care Manifesto: The Politics of Interdependence

  1. 5 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Real Rating: 3.75* of five, rounded up because it makes me wistful I RECEIVED A DRC OF THIS TITLE FROM THE PUBLISHER VIA EDELWEISS+. THANK YOU. The contributors outline theoretical bases for extending the concept of care, starting with feminist thinker Joan Tronto's formulation of types of care. First there is caring for, the step-one state of all care, the delivering care from one person to another. Next comes caring about, the empathetic connection that leads us to extend our hand to others, oft Real Rating: 3.75* of five, rounded up because it makes me wistful I RECEIVED A DRC OF THIS TITLE FROM THE PUBLISHER VIA EDELWEISS+. THANK YOU. The contributors outline theoretical bases for extending the concept of care, starting with feminist thinker Joan Tronto's formulation of types of care. First there is caring for, the step-one state of all care, the delivering care from one person to another. Next comes caring about, the empathetic connection that leads us to extend our hand to others, often strangers to us. And caring with, the hardest stage of care that Tronto identifies...the urge to act, to make one's ideas and suggestions work in the wider world, for example the people who join Greenpeace or Doctors Without Borders. The contributors use this ingenious and simple system of ideas about caring to offer some blissfully utopian suggestions for enabling "promiscuous care," which sounds a lot racier than it is. I hoped for something louche; I got the idea that a truly well-run planet would be promiscuously cared for, about, and with because the Collective urges on us a paradigm shift into drawing no distinctions between the needy and caring. Animals, ecosystems, all are in need of care; souls and minds and bodies, no matter whose or what's bodies and souls we're talking about, should be able to expect care. Simply for existing. If that does not make your heart swell and your eyes leak a bit, you're dead inside. The whole review is on Expendable Mudge Muses Aloud.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kate Page

    There are a lot of good things in this, but ultimately I found it quite unsatisfactory. I agree with all of the criticisms of neo-liberalism, and with the proposals for change and what needs to be done. There were some interesting ideas, and some food for discussion and thought. I liked the section on kinship, and alternatives to the family, and found much of the content interesting. However, the overall framing around 'care' just didn't work for me. 'Care' as a description is problematic. It is r There are a lot of good things in this, but ultimately I found it quite unsatisfactory. I agree with all of the criticisms of neo-liberalism, and with the proposals for change and what needs to be done. There were some interesting ideas, and some food for discussion and thought. I liked the section on kinship, and alternatives to the family, and found much of the content interesting. However, the overall framing around 'care' just didn't work for me. 'Care' as a description is problematic. It is really difficult to use 'care' as your framework and not to sound like you are saying at some level - look, if we just all cared more we could put this right. And to create a moral higher ground peopled by middle class liberals who 'care'. So, despite the fact that I agreed with a lot of what they said, the framing put my teeth on edge. To be fair, the text is actually much more nuanced than this. But it's difficult to use 'care' as a central plank of your framework without it ending up as a moral, rather than a political, position. For me, the writers also put far too much weight on the power of collective alternative structures within capitalism to significantly change things. I agree they are part of the process, but nowhere near enough on their own. Despite these disagreements, I was really pleased to have read it, and that there are people writing and thinking and generating discussion on these issues.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Philippe

    What if we would redesign our communities and institutions to enhance reciprocity and care instead of instilling fear and competition, as is the case in our contemporary, capitalist and corona-infested world? In this compact manifesto a collective of five British social scientists offers an answer to this question. Their vision is anchored in an acknowledgment of the fundamental interdependence of human and non-human entities (see also my review of Hanne De Jaegher's Denken over liefde ). It ref What if we would redesign our communities and institutions to enhance reciprocity and care instead of instilling fear and competition, as is the case in our contemporary, capitalist and corona-infested world? In this compact manifesto a collective of five British social scientists offers an answer to this question. Their vision is anchored in an acknowledgment of the fundamental interdependence of human and non-human entities (see also my review of Hanne De Jaegher's Denken over liefde ). It reflects feminist, queer, anti-racist and eco-socialist values. The conception of care that is foregrounded goes beyond the kind of 'hands-on care' that is offered in response to developmental or medical needs (the 'caring for'). Here, care is understood as 'a social capacity and activity involving the nurturing of all that is necessary for the welfare and flourishing of life". Hence it also encompasses the emotional investment reflected in 'caring about', and the political capacity to mobilise and 'care with' others. The authors of this manifesto show an awareness of the potentially problematic character of being involved in caring relationships that unfold in a intersubjective field characterised by tensions. Caring is searching for a delicate balance between self-preservation and investment in the other. It is fundamentally co-creative (see also Annemarie Mol's The Logic of Care). Psychologically, it may expose the participants in the caring relationship to challenging emotions (Hans van Ewijk, in his Complexity and Social Work, discusses the practice of normative professionalisation as a support in handling these conflicts). In any case, in our societies today these capacities are being systematically and intentionally eroded, in order to increase dependency, anxiety, conformism and xenophobia. We are not educated and trained to nurture, but to compete and to obsess about our sense of insecurity. This is profoundly debilitating and destructive, of everything. We need another kind of society to rekindle our capacity for caring again. What does this mean? Conceptually the manifesto is structured along two dimensions: scale and mode. As regards the latter, I've already hinted at distinct modes of caring - 'for', 'about', and 'with'.  Qua scale the blueprint for a caring society unfolds across five levels, from intimate kinship relationships to care for the wider world, with communities, nation states and economies as intermediate scales. At the intersection of scales and modes we are invited to think about cultures, practices and social resources and infrastructures that engender an expansive and experimental ethos of care. In my review I'm zooming on the community level, as it seems to be the core of the whole argument. The caring capacity of communities hinges on four key infrastructures and capabilities: the capacity for mutual caring, the availability of infrastructures for sharing material and immaterial resources, of public space (where people are free to congregate without spending money) and of community wealth building mechanisms (that keep essential public services out of private hands, and make sure that financial resources are not siphoned off but continue to circulate in the community). The manifesto points out that there are plenty of working examples of these infrastructures already today. Incidentally there is no mentioning, likely deliberately so, of the Universal Basic Income as a redistribution mechanism. Not foregrounded either by the authors of the manifesto is the obvious potential of these capacities and infrastructures to link up to form a virtuous dynamic that progressively increases the communities' capacity to care. A word about the capacity for mutual caring, which is a crucial enabler at a deep cultural level. We have to break out of the constricting cocoon of the nuclear family as the dominant, almost exclusive realm of caring relationships, and imagine new modes of care (for/about/with) across difference (and that includes the non-human). These much more expansive and differentiated caring relationships are the humus for the politics of care endorsed by this manifesto. The key challenge at the level of the state and the planet is to restrict the power and reach of capitalist markets, and to rewrite the cultural and legal rules that govern their dismissal and destruction of what really makes communities tick. "Care and capitalist market logics cannot be reconciled." Care-engendering institutions have to be designed by re-regulating, re-socialising and de-marketising key areas of the economy and the public sphere. And that includes turning the tide of the rapidly advancing commoditisation of our lives via surveillance capitalism. At the transnational level the reasoning reconnects with the cultural shift toward 'everyday cosmopolitanism' with which the manifesto started. Altogether this compact publication, barely 100 pages long, provides a cogent and graspable vision of a regenerative, caring society.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zoë Siobhan

    This one disappointed me. It started off great, talking about care, and the ideology of "independence" and how caring is sidelined and undervalued. There was discussion of gender and race, not hugely in depth but this is a short manifesto so that's understandable. The book quickly moves into the authors visions and plans for a caring society, building on real life examples of mutual aid, cooperatives and so on. Things started to go a bit downhill for me with the "caring states" chapter. I am not This one disappointed me. It started off great, talking about care, and the ideology of "independence" and how caring is sidelined and undervalued. There was discussion of gender and race, not hugely in depth but this is a short manifesto so that's understandable. The book quickly moves into the authors visions and plans for a caring society, building on real life examples of mutual aid, cooperatives and so on. Things started to go a bit downhill for me with the "caring states" chapter. I am not the kind of grumpy anarchist who thinks meaningful change can't ever happen under a capitalist state - of course there are ways our lives can be improved, I love a transitional demand. But the authors have so much faith in the ability for the state to just *become* benevolent, there was no discussion of why the state is not benevolent beyond "neoliberalism", no acknowledgement of the states fundamental role in upholding the status quo and acting in the interests of capital. Furthermore there was little discussion of what it might take to force a state into making any of the concessions proposed by the manifesto, beyond presumably just voting in these changes. It was a frustrating direction for a promising book to take. Edited from ** to *** because they never actually claimed to not be social democrats I suppose.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn Entzeroth

    A quick read I would recommend to anyone feeling emotionally crushed by the systemic carelessness pervasive in our neoliberal society. Unlike most political writing I’ve read recently, this manifesto provides a vision for the future instead of solely critiquing the current systems in place. Overall I found it inspiring, but I think the authors could have made minor edits to make it more accessible to people who don’t already have an understanding of neoliberalism, capitalism, co-ops, the green n A quick read I would recommend to anyone feeling emotionally crushed by the systemic carelessness pervasive in our neoliberal society. Unlike most political writing I’ve read recently, this manifesto provides a vision for the future instead of solely critiquing the current systems in place. Overall I found it inspiring, but I think the authors could have made minor edits to make it more accessible to people who don’t already have an understanding of neoliberalism, capitalism, co-ops, the green new deal, and other political and economic concepts discussed in the book, hence 4/5 stars. Footnotes to simplify these concepts and recommend additional reading would have been helpful and made this accessible for a wider audience.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Yoshita Sood

    I really liked this except the last chapter which was somehow below average and I was zoned out almost the entire time reading it, but the rest is definitely worth it

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aparna K

    Another great read from Verso :') Even though a lot of what was proposed in here felt pretty obvious to me already, it was interesting to center the discussion around the framework of "caring infrastructures", which is essentially the varied web of social and community welfare in simpler terms. They argue that free market capitalism has shoved aside social and community welfare in favor of profits and the individual as priority (which, duh) and cite examples of how eco-socialist solutions have w Another great read from Verso :') Even though a lot of what was proposed in here felt pretty obvious to me already, it was interesting to center the discussion around the framework of "caring infrastructures", which is essentially the varied web of social and community welfare in simpler terms. They argue that free market capitalism has shoved aside social and community welfare in favor of profits and the individual as priority (which, duh) and cite examples of how eco-socialist solutions have worked in other countries and in history in general. This was written during COVID-19 (they reference it often) and points to how on-the-ground, mutual aid efforts are filling gaps where neoliberalism and capitalism fail. I appreciated the section that expanded on points Dave Graeber made in Bullshit Jobs, of how caring infrastructures "entail shorter hours in paid work to allow adequate time as well as resources for people to expand their capacity to care, whether in familial or any other caretaking settings". This hit home since I keep trying to find ways to divide my time between work and neighborhood organizing in particular. Activism doesn't pay the bills!!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Silke

    I was constantly hoping the authors would go deeper into some proposals, but this is after all a manifesto. A bittersweet experience, since it provides examples of how things could be different but also highlights the tremendous work we still have to do to redefine how we relate to one another. I really liked it, and hope to read some of the related works on how we can move towards a more caring existence.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Charlott

    We often know what we are against (police violence, racism, capitalism, you name it) but how often to we pause and really think about the version of society we are working towards to. I thought about these things when I read The Care Collective’s “The Care Manifesto. The Politics of Independence”. The form and idea of a manifesto are usually not what I am drawn to but I did love this one. The Care Manifesto asks one question: How could our lives/ our politics/ our societies look like if we centr We often know what we are against (police violence, racism, capitalism, you name it) but how often to we pause and really think about the version of society we are working towards to. I thought about these things when I read The Care Collective’s “The Care Manifesto. The Politics of Independence”. The form and idea of a manifesto are usually not what I am drawn to but I did love this one. The Care Manifesto asks one question: How could our lives/ our politics/ our societies look like if we centred “care”. The collective works with a quite broad understanding of “care” but while such wide definitions other times are unhelpful, here it functions perfectly as a unifying but complex focus and starting point. In brief chapters, the book looks at different levels: politics, kinships, communities, states, economics, world. What I loved most about the book is that it combines broad ideas on what needs to change to centre care with examples of how people already practice/d certain aspects. They draw from a big fundus of projects, laws, discussions, activist movements etc to illustrate their points and this helps so much to start imaging such a future – and even present! right now! - in the concrete.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jazzy J Morris

    The Care Manifesto critiques the "careless" model of neoliberal capitalist social, political, and economic organization in favor of an approach centered on the essential interdependence of people everywhere. The author argue that caring for, caring about, and caring with one another can serve as the foundation for reimagining healthy sustainable relationships in politics, kinship, communities, states, economies, and the wider natural world. Their perspective relies on the premise that a more pro The Care Manifesto critiques the "careless" model of neoliberal capitalist social, political, and economic organization in favor of an approach centered on the essential interdependence of people everywhere. The author argue that caring for, caring about, and caring with one another can serve as the foundation for reimagining healthy sustainable relationships in politics, kinship, communities, states, economies, and the wider natural world. Their perspective relies on the premise that a more promiscuous, convivial spirit of empathetic solidarity can and should be scaffolded by critical material analyses and collective actions. In particular, the authors explore how community features related to mutual support, public spaces, shared resources and local democracy both highlight the failures of neoliberalism and provide potential sectors to focus organized action in a pursuit of a more caring world. The book is valuable not because it contributes any new ideas to the intersectional, eco-socialist imagination, but because it synthesizes the endemic problems of capitalism within the framework of a care-based vocabulary. What readers gain is a fairly readable, actionable analysis of the systems and ideologies that so effectively control and alienate us. I found it fun and exciting to read, and I feel more prepared than ever to critique capitalist hegemony in ways that extend beyond facile academic arguments.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Symone Thomas

    A quick read at only 100 pages, The Care Manifesto recognizes the areas that care is lacking in Western society and current global norms, at various levels of scale from the family unit and communities, to state and global. Scarcity due to neoliberal policies creates a paranoid and selfish mindset at the individual level in which it is harder to imagine caring for anyone beyond your own family or "people like us", which in turn stokes racism and xenophobia. Further, caring professions and care i A quick read at only 100 pages, The Care Manifesto recognizes the areas that care is lacking in Western society and current global norms, at various levels of scale from the family unit and communities, to state and global. Scarcity due to neoliberal policies creates a paranoid and selfish mindset at the individual level in which it is harder to imagine caring for anyone beyond your own family or "people like us", which in turn stokes racism and xenophobia. Further, caring professions and care itself has long been delegated to a low level of value and respect in our society, often associated with or assigned to women, particularly BIPOC, making it more difficult to do some of the most essential work of a society. The Care Manifesto asserts that bringing the concept of care into a respected position for all and BY all, in the form of "promiscuous" care, will reinforce itself by providing security at the family or kin level which will lead to more capacity for care and engagement at the community level and beyond, with resources and emphasis provided by the state itself. It uses examples of cooperatives and grassroots organizing, notably the massive community care efforts in Greece after their financial collapse post forced neo-liberal makeover. It also draws largely from the template of indigenous kinship- which recognizes and respects a personal relationship with all living things including one's environment. This provides a useful angle for debate against bootstrap theory and the "welfare state creating dependency". The Care Collective asserts that the nature of humanity and all life is INTERDEPENDENT, and that dependency and autonomy are in fact two sides of the same coin, referencing studies and assertions from disabled communities. The pandemic is a particularly effectice time to alert others to the uncaring nature of capitalism and to our interconnectedness. The sooner that we can recognize and embrace our inherent dependence on one another, the sooner we can use it to our advantage to create a society that prioritizes flourishing, stability, and as a result, autonomy. "What didn't you do to bury me But you forgot that I was a seed!"

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Westle

    This is a brilliant book, the title sums up the general tenet of the book. The focus on feminist, anti-racist and queer notions of family and care outside of a neo-liberal framework importantly focus on how we must need to rethink care on a personal, family, societal and international basis. By reposition care as a collective act, rather than and individual one, the manifesto makes an important contribution. As someone who’s work is centered on notions of care and community there are so many thi This is a brilliant book, the title sums up the general tenet of the book. The focus on feminist, anti-racist and queer notions of family and care outside of a neo-liberal framework importantly focus on how we must need to rethink care on a personal, family, societal and international basis. By reposition care as a collective act, rather than and individual one, the manifesto makes an important contribution. As someone who’s work is centered on notions of care and community there are so many things that both validated the ways I practice, but will also push me to consider new approaches. “Over the past few decades, ideas of social welfare and community had been brushed aside for individualised notions of resilience, wellness and self-improvement, promoted through a ballooning ‘self-care’ industry which relegated care to something we are supposed to buy for ourselves on a personal basis.” As we emerge from the pandemic there is space to advocate for better ways of caring and valuing the care work. I certainly recommend this book as essential reading, it’s accessible, easy to read and combines theory, history and social practice in lovely ways. We have a unique chance to reframe communities and care in ways that are reciprocal, sustaining and nurturing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Goose

    This text is an essential one in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak, and the ruptures and fissures found in an uncaring neoliberal structure following the breakdowns of its markets and usual systems of being. Whilst there are many reviewers who would argue that the use of the word care instillas a moral perspective (if we all cared more our problems would be solved) I feel that this is an unconsidered approach to a concept, which is at its route, not about individuals care about something, but This text is an essential one in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak, and the ruptures and fissures found in an uncaring neoliberal structure following the breakdowns of its markets and usual systems of being. Whilst there are many reviewers who would argue that the use of the word care instillas a moral perspective (if we all cared more our problems would be solved) I feel that this is an unconsidered approach to a concept, which is at its route, not about individuals care about something, but groups caring for each other. The care manifesto disavows the individual, and rather points at the lines of interdependency that keep us all afloat. No man is an island, no one is without the need for care. The rapidly expanding viewpoint, from the micro unit of kin, to the macro of the global, draws no lines between those who are in need (whether it be a plant or a person) each is in need of care, and the burden of that care should be placed on the shoulders of the state as opposed to those of the individual. I left off a star bc of the simple fact that the nuance of this care giving felt somewhat unexplored, but otherwise a ripper. Buy it, make ur friends read it, make ur enemies read it. Sharing is, as they say, caring.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Leonie Nicks

    Not one for persuading anyone who doesn't already have a left-wing bent. Fierce language and hyperbole that at times gets my scientific evidence brain grumbling. However, really liked the communication of the idea fo recognising our interdependence and I agree is something that has become viscerally obvious in the context of a pandemic. I liked that the book focused primarily on solutions. It was very macro-economic in its approach and so the solutions often didn't feel very tangible. There was Not one for persuading anyone who doesn't already have a left-wing bent. Fierce language and hyperbole that at times gets my scientific evidence brain grumbling. However, really liked the communication of the idea fo recognising our interdependence and I agree is something that has become viscerally obvious in the context of a pandemic. I liked that the book focused primarily on solutions. It was very macro-economic in its approach and so the solutions often didn't feel very tangible. There was a slightly disheartening moment where when championing all these self-organised examples that sprung up in Greece, the numbers involved were tiny and made me worry about the reality of scaling some of these ideas. I also liked that the book challenged the narrative that all care is either privatised or done by the nuclear family - something that we've not really tried to tackled in our work (for various reasons), but wonder if there is a way to do it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    L.

    Read this book in a reading group with a couple of friends. It verbalizes the things that we've thought but couldn't put into words. It's about building a better world and preventing climate disaster by starting from the premise of caring for other people. Its central premise is that we should rebuild our relationships, our state, our laws, our economy, and our world on a principle that care is the most important thing. To do that, we will have to build businesses democratically as cooperatives, Read this book in a reading group with a couple of friends. It verbalizes the things that we've thought but couldn't put into words. It's about building a better world and preventing climate disaster by starting from the premise of caring for other people. Its central premise is that we should rebuild our relationships, our state, our laws, our economy, and our world on a principle that care is the most important thing. To do that, we will have to build businesses democratically as cooperatives, we will have to reopen public spaces and community gardens, we will have to tax the mega-rich and create universal access to healthcare, and we must always prioritize democratic participation of the people in all of these processes. I'm going to keep this book by my side and come back to it from time to time.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jonas Green

    I’m torn between reading it for what it is, a simplification of complex matters and considerations, and reading all the shortcomings of the argument. It’s a manifesto, a brief argument for a new world order, and as such it should crystallise fault lines and highlight the utopian possibilities of the idea presented. But I also expect more from this collective of amazing thinkers. It reads a bit like a journalist student’s argument for a cause, leaving objectivity demands behind, which is fine, it I’m torn between reading it for what it is, a simplification of complex matters and considerations, and reading all the shortcomings of the argument. It’s a manifesto, a brief argument for a new world order, and as such it should crystallise fault lines and highlight the utopian possibilities of the idea presented. But I also expect more from this collective of amazing thinkers. It reads a bit like a journalist student’s argument for a cause, leaving objectivity demands behind, which is fine, it’s a part of the genre. But I do expect more about the problematics of care, the history of global care and the intertwinings between care and colonialism, care and disenfranchisement of the cared for. Issues that the proposed world order of care would presumably reignite if not guarded against? Still a very interesting read and some great arguments in there.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Consul

    In my early 20's I started to learn about the nuance of love as a verb and not a feeling. I learned that as an action word, you could (and should) "do love" but it's not really something you can chase. This lens of seeing love as something we do, suggests each of us has the responsibility to 'do' more love for the people around us. It would be crazy not to right? Reading The Care Manifesto was like attaching a car battery to that part of my beliefs. In a crisp and dense overview, the manifesto im In my early 20's I started to learn about the nuance of love as a verb and not a feeling. I learned that as an action word, you could (and should) "do love" but it's not really something you can chase. This lens of seeing love as something we do, suggests each of us has the responsibility to 'do' more love for the people around us. It would be crazy not to right? Reading The Care Manifesto was like attaching a car battery to that part of my beliefs. In a crisp and dense overview, the manifesto imagines what politics, families, communities, and economies would look like if we prioritised care work and saw love as something worth investing our time and energy into. Some days it makes me frustrated how long it took for me to find my way to this information. But hey, I suppose we all need to start somewhere.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Vague & sketchy manifesto that seems well-intentioned but quite limited in its ability to encompass scale & abstraction, full of paeans to localism, co-ops, affect, & extended kinship. Its calls to rethink the welfare state as a caring state seem more likely to provide the rhetoric & spirit for a post-COVID round of austere cuts to national social programs than to motivate any substantial or specific state action toward our global crises of climate, public health, & economic inequality. *Feminism Vague & sketchy manifesto that seems well-intentioned but quite limited in its ability to encompass scale & abstraction, full of paeans to localism, co-ops, affect, & extended kinship. Its calls to rethink the welfare state as a caring state seem more likely to provide the rhetoric & spirit for a post-COVID round of austere cuts to national social programs than to motivate any substantial or specific state action toward our global crises of climate, public health, & economic inequality. *Feminism for the 99%* & *Fortunes of Feminism* are much better social reproduction theory polemics. Blakeley's *Corona Crash* is a more stronger presentist pamphlet looking at the 'rona crisis & political economy w/ attn. to social reproduction w/o neglect or marginalization of other production.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joe Wilcock

    Thought this was an incredibly interesting little book, packed full of ideas on a broad scale and hopeful and revolutionary enough to sit up and take notice. The idea of promiscuous care is an intriguing one and the descriptions of the ground level care giving and sharing in the early chapters filled me with hope for a future in which the collective takes on an importance again. I felt a little uneasy at perhaps the shoe-horning slightly of the green new deal, which I'm all on board with, but it Thought this was an incredibly interesting little book, packed full of ideas on a broad scale and hopeful and revolutionary enough to sit up and take notice. The idea of promiscuous care is an intriguing one and the descriptions of the ground level care giving and sharing in the early chapters filled me with hope for a future in which the collective takes on an importance again. I felt a little uneasy at perhaps the shoe-horning slightly of the green new deal, which I'm all on board with, but it felt a little forced in. However it does logically led up to it in a way. Awesome stuff here though

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    I don’t disagree with what this short piece had to say, it was solid, but it could have done with being written in a slightly more accessible way. At times it was a bit dense, stacking -isms one on top of the other, my brain zoned out halfway through a paragraph a few times (it’s 2020, my concentration isn’t in its prime), and I imagine this could be especially confusing for anyone not already at least a bit familiar with a lot of the concepts discussed. Just a little extra context here and ther I don’t disagree with what this short piece had to say, it was solid, but it could have done with being written in a slightly more accessible way. At times it was a bit dense, stacking -isms one on top of the other, my brain zoned out halfway through a paragraph a few times (it’s 2020, my concentration isn’t in its prime), and I imagine this could be especially confusing for anyone not already at least a bit familiar with a lot of the concepts discussed. Just a little extra context here and there to add some breathing space wouldn’t have hurt.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cass

    While it absolutely feels trite to say that all the problems in our world would go away if we all just ~cared a little more~, there's certainly a truth to it. I really think this book delas with the concept of "care" in a way that is nuanced, intersectional, and timely. There's a lot to unpack with the idea of adding a bit more care into our politics, our kinships, and our communities, but this serves as a good introduction to both the politics of interdependence and the feminist, queer, and eco While it absolutely feels trite to say that all the problems in our world would go away if we all just ~cared a little more~, there's certainly a truth to it. I really think this book delas with the concept of "care" in a way that is nuanced, intersectional, and timely. There's a lot to unpack with the idea of adding a bit more care into our politics, our kinships, and our communities, but this serves as a good introduction to both the politics of interdependence and the feminist, queer, and eco-socialist theories that could serve as its foundation.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brendon.goodmurphy

    While I'm entirely on board with the ideas and theory in this book - that is, building a caring society at all levels (from kinship to economic) - I wanted the authors to go into greater depth with both their ideas and examples. The book stayed too high-level and general for me, and had a very strong tone of academic theory (a bit jargon-y). The Further Reading list at the end is very helpful for exploring certain topics in greater depth. Overall, a nice if vague introduction to some very import While I'm entirely on board with the ideas and theory in this book - that is, building a caring society at all levels (from kinship to economic) - I wanted the authors to go into greater depth with both their ideas and examples. The book stayed too high-level and general for me, and had a very strong tone of academic theory (a bit jargon-y). The Further Reading list at the end is very helpful for exploring certain topics in greater depth. Overall, a nice if vague introduction to some very important and timely ideas and policies.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Logan Hoffman-Smith

    Meh, I wasn't into the over-reliance on nation-states and financial capital re: building Care Economy in Chapter 3. The writers also seemed really into reforming current government structures which was at odds with them previously stating they'd like to decolonize land, etc., and I felt like their coverage of topics like race, settlers, and reparations were reductive. Meh. I was also skeptical of the fact that 4/5 members of the collective were either white or white-passing and didn't think ther Meh, I wasn't into the over-reliance on nation-states and financial capital re: building Care Economy in Chapter 3. The writers also seemed really into reforming current government structures which was at odds with them previously stating they'd like to decolonize land, etc., and I felt like their coverage of topics like race, settlers, and reparations were reductive. Meh. I was also skeptical of the fact that 4/5 members of the collective were either white or white-passing and didn't think there was something weird about that before writing this book. Meh.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

    Really love the idea of promiscuous care, and how interdependency not only relates to human relationships but also to our relationship with the planet. Provides a lot of hope with many examples of the restructuring of (economic and social) policy can have a positive effect on how we can provide and attain care not only among humans but also for the planet - and this should start with addressing our colonial and imperial histories. The only issue I have is that it can get a bit repetitive at poin Really love the idea of promiscuous care, and how interdependency not only relates to human relationships but also to our relationship with the planet. Provides a lot of hope with many examples of the restructuring of (economic and social) policy can have a positive effect on how we can provide and attain care not only among humans but also for the planet - and this should start with addressing our colonial and imperial histories. The only issue I have is that it can get a bit repetitive at points, but otherwise it’s a really great manifesto for change.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katie Lehwald

    Interesting and relevant, but I felt it could have been copy-edited further and supported by additional examples and statistics. I generally love Verso Books, but the overuse of already tired phrases (eg. "a politics of ____" / "the _____ economy" / "the infrastructure of ____") is starting to come across as empty and lazy. Also, nearly every page includes a dig at neoliberalism - I don't disagree with the criticism, but at a certain point it becomes redundant. I would prefer to focus on how to Interesting and relevant, but I felt it could have been copy-edited further and supported by additional examples and statistics. I generally love Verso Books, but the overuse of already tired phrases (eg. "a politics of ____" / "the _____ economy" / "the infrastructure of ____") is starting to come across as empty and lazy. Also, nearly every page includes a dig at neoliberalism - I don't disagree with the criticism, but at a certain point it becomes redundant. I would prefer to focus on how to move forward.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    A quick hour long read: a manifesto about our interdependencies, or as stated by the Collective, "a queer—feminist—anti-racist—eco-socialist political vision of 'universal care.'" Nothing new or groundbreaking, but a call-to-arms to care for literally everyone and everything; or else there will soon be nothing and no one to care for. Draws from many contemporary theoretical thinkers, activists, and political figures. A quick hour long read: a manifesto about our interdependencies, or as stated by the Collective, "a queer—feminist—anti-racist—eco-socialist political vision of 'universal care.'" Nothing new or groundbreaking, but a call-to-arms to care for literally everyone and everything; or else there will soon be nothing and no one to care for. Draws from many contemporary theoretical thinkers, activists, and political figures.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kyra

    A quick and comprehensive read that highlights the importance of a care-based society + a guidebook on how to achieve such goals. Extremely holistic and multi-faceted, the Care Manifesto considers numerous elements of our current society to reimagine in a succinct, just, and insightful way. Somehow makes such a wide-encompassing idea seem realistically achievable. Recommend if you have a few hours to kill and want something short, sweet, and compelling. Gets a bit redundant for such a short book A quick and comprehensive read that highlights the importance of a care-based society + a guidebook on how to achieve such goals. Extremely holistic and multi-faceted, the Care Manifesto considers numerous elements of our current society to reimagine in a succinct, just, and insightful way. Somehow makes such a wide-encompassing idea seem realistically achievable. Recommend if you have a few hours to kill and want something short, sweet, and compelling. Gets a bit redundant for such a short book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    What would happen if we put care at the very centre of life? The pandemic has brought to light the impact of forty years of neoliberal (careless) policies around the world. This manifesto shows the links between the rise of authoritarian movements, the increase of mental and physical health issues around the globe and the climate change; but also suggests solutions as the promotion of "promiscuous care" towards humans and the environment to create a more equal and sustainable society. What would happen if we put care at the very centre of life? The pandemic has brought to light the impact of forty years of neoliberal (careless) policies around the world. This manifesto shows the links between the rise of authoritarian movements, the increase of mental and physical health issues around the globe and the climate change; but also suggests solutions as the promotion of "promiscuous care" towards humans and the environment to create a more equal and sustainable society.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Frantz

    Despite being a short book, it covers a sweeping range of topics from local to global concerns. I can't help but summarize the content as a discussion of deliberate, humane engagement at all levels of life. I expect to be reflecting on this book into the new year and will certainly refer back to it to read more of the sources in the bibliography. Despite being a short book, it covers a sweeping range of topics from local to global concerns. I can't help but summarize the content as a discussion of deliberate, humane engagement at all levels of life. I expect to be reflecting on this book into the new year and will certainly refer back to it to read more of the sources in the bibliography.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hal Lowen

    I really recommend this book if you're interested in mutual aid or general anarchism! It's really well written, informative and doesn't have excessively academic or hard to understand language. I would have liked more ideas of what caring could look like independent of the state but I still enjoyed it. I really recommend this book if you're interested in mutual aid or general anarchism! It's really well written, informative and doesn't have excessively academic or hard to understand language. I would have liked more ideas of what caring could look like independent of the state but I still enjoyed it.

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