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Deep Kindness: A Revolutionary Guide for the Way We Think, Talk, and Act in Kindness

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Spread meaningful kindness every day with these anecdotes and actions that can help bring change to our lives, our relationships, and the world. Practicing kindness is an essential step in helping to repair a world that has grown to be more divisive, lonely, and anxious than ever. But with quotes like, “Just be kind” or, “Throw kindness around like confetti,” we’ve oversimp Spread meaningful kindness every day with these anecdotes and actions that can help bring change to our lives, our relationships, and the world. Practicing kindness is an essential step in helping to repair a world that has grown to be more divisive, lonely, and anxious than ever. But with quotes like, “Just be kind” or, “Throw kindness around like confetti,” we’ve oversimplified what it takes to actually demonstrate kindness in a world crying out for it. Deep Kindness pairs anecdotes with actions that can make real change in our own lives, the lives of others, and throughout the world. Diving into the types of kindness the world needs most today, this book takes an honest look at the gap between our belief in kindness and our ability to practice it well—and shows us how to put intention into action. Exploring everything from the empathy gap to the skill of emotional regulation, Deep Kindness is perfect for anyone who believes in a kinder world and recognizes that there is a lot of work to do before we achieve it.


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Spread meaningful kindness every day with these anecdotes and actions that can help bring change to our lives, our relationships, and the world. Practicing kindness is an essential step in helping to repair a world that has grown to be more divisive, lonely, and anxious than ever. But with quotes like, “Just be kind” or, “Throw kindness around like confetti,” we’ve oversimp Spread meaningful kindness every day with these anecdotes and actions that can help bring change to our lives, our relationships, and the world. Practicing kindness is an essential step in helping to repair a world that has grown to be more divisive, lonely, and anxious than ever. But with quotes like, “Just be kind” or, “Throw kindness around like confetti,” we’ve oversimplified what it takes to actually demonstrate kindness in a world crying out for it. Deep Kindness pairs anecdotes with actions that can make real change in our own lives, the lives of others, and throughout the world. Diving into the types of kindness the world needs most today, this book takes an honest look at the gap between our belief in kindness and our ability to practice it well—and shows us how to put intention into action. Exploring everything from the empathy gap to the skill of emotional regulation, Deep Kindness is perfect for anyone who believes in a kinder world and recognizes that there is a lot of work to do before we achieve it.

30 review for Deep Kindness: A Revolutionary Guide for the Way We Think, Talk, and Act in Kindness

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    4.5 stars. I really enjoyed this quick read. Kindness is something I'm trying really hard to cultivate in this season of my life, and this book really gave me some things to think about. I am going to try to convince some friends to read it so I have someone to talk about it with! 4.5 stars. I really enjoyed this quick read. Kindness is something I'm trying really hard to cultivate in this season of my life, and this book really gave me some things to think about. I am going to try to convince some friends to read it so I have someone to talk about it with!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Klein

    This short book is one of the best books I have read on the topic of kindness. With an easy to follow format, you could just sail through it, or linger. It talks about the difference between "Confetti Kindness" and "Deep Kindness." What is the difference between kind and nice? Why did no one stop to help Helga (read it!)? Each chapter has a short pull out quote about what kindness the world needs. There are important exercises you can do--or skip. There are breezy anecdotes, even one about his o This short book is one of the best books I have read on the topic of kindness. With an easy to follow format, you could just sail through it, or linger. It talks about the difference between "Confetti Kindness" and "Deep Kindness." What is the difference between kind and nice? Why did no one stop to help Helga (read it!)? Each chapter has a short pull out quote about what kindness the world needs. There are important exercises you can do--or skip. There are breezy anecdotes, even one about his own marriage which makes us really understand he is human. It asks one really important question. If everyone wants to be kind--or thinks they are kind, what stops us from being kind. If we can just make one little shift, just 1% in our daily habits, 45% of which are routine, then the world will be much more kind. I may use this as an adult study topic book paired with other Jewish readings on the topic.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Pole

    Deep Kindness by Houston Kraft gets at the heart of what it means to practice kindness in a truly meaningful and life-altering way. We have all seen, or perhaps even shared, the inspirational but oversimplified idea of spreading kindness like confetti. Here, the author encourages us to dig deeper, and to put in the work of making a meaningful difference by introducing the habit of kindness to our everyday lives. After all, kindness truly is our most important resource, and must be tended and nur Deep Kindness by Houston Kraft gets at the heart of what it means to practice kindness in a truly meaningful and life-altering way. We have all seen, or perhaps even shared, the inspirational but oversimplified idea of spreading kindness like confetti. Here, the author encourages us to dig deeper, and to put in the work of making a meaningful difference by introducing the habit of kindness to our everyday lives. After all, kindness truly is our most important resource, and must be tended and nurtured as such. This is an inspiring read that will certainly motivate you to make a change, large or small, in the spreading of kindness throughout a world that is so desperately in need. 4.5 stars Many thanks to NetGalley and Tiller Press for the opportunity to read this ARC.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I'm working my way slowly through this one but I can already tell that this is a book I'll need to re-read. and re-read again with sticky notes. Update: DNF I'm working my way slowly through this one but I can already tell that this is a book I'll need to re-read. and re-read again with sticky notes. Update: DNF

  5. 4 out of 5

    J

    I truly believe there is the seed of a great book here. Unfortunately, the author's day job as a motivational speaker is coming through too loud and clear. The chapters are choppily short and interspered with the kinds of inspirational stories and pithy statistics motivational speakers rely on for their speeches. Every chapter is three-five pages long, so it feels like the author is going to build to a larger idea and ... stops just short. I wish the author had joined forces with someone trained I truly believe there is the seed of a great book here. Unfortunately, the author's day job as a motivational speaker is coming through too loud and clear. The chapters are choppily short and interspered with the kinds of inspirational stories and pithy statistics motivational speakers rely on for their speeches. Every chapter is three-five pages long, so it feels like the author is going to build to a larger idea and ... stops just short. I wish the author had joined forces with someone trained in the art of narrative nonfiction. Or taken some time to take a course in narrative nonfiction. This book jerks you wildly between memoir to self-help to social sciences without taking enough time to create a unifying thread. At this point, the book feels more like a collection of blog posts or lectures. Just in case the author reads here, please spend some time developing metaphors that are not related to the gym or physical fitness. Many thanks to the Tiller Press for the free copy won in a Goodreads Giveaway.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I like the concept of his book, but at a certain point I felt that it was repetitive and too self-help-y for my liking without exploring the topic in greater depth; felt like 50% of the book was his reflections on why we should strive for kindness instead of just niceness (which, yes, was already covered in the first chapter). It would have been fine for a podcast or even 2 chapters of a book, but not a whole book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Travis Standley

    I found this book to be an honest effort to discuss kindness and what kindness is. I appreciated the work done to get below the surface of kindness and define and categorize it. And what kindness is to one is not kindness to another. I’m glad it gives ode to the daily small and deliberate acts - deliberate being the key word there - that, overtime can have huge impacts. The author was honest about his own failures in kindness and relationships. I highly connected with the chapters on the insecur I found this book to be an honest effort to discuss kindness and what kindness is. I appreciated the work done to get below the surface of kindness and define and categorize it. And what kindness is to one is not kindness to another. I’m glad it gives ode to the daily small and deliberate acts - deliberate being the key word there - that, overtime can have huge impacts. The author was honest about his own failures in kindness and relationships. I highly connected with the chapters on the insecurities and fears that inhibit kindness along with all the other human stuff that can get in the way: being busy, out of balance, without purpose, bad health, lack of sleep, etc. Finally, I love the nod to the competencies of kindness. So much of life is not knowing what to do or being equipped with the right skills. We can learn kindness and must mentor each other. This book has made a mark on me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Austris Cirulnieks

    I had the pleasure to meet Houston back in 2019. Right away when he mentioned the book, I was waiting impatiently for it. And boy did I enjoy the book. The expectations were high and they definitely fulfilled. Truly spot on deep-dive on kindness, practical examples and Huston's life stories that made whole reading experience way more immersive. Best book I've read in a long while. I had the pleasure to meet Houston back in 2019. Right away when he mentioned the book, I was waiting impatiently for it. And boy did I enjoy the book. The expectations were high and they definitely fulfilled. Truly spot on deep-dive on kindness, practical examples and Huston's life stories that made whole reading experience way more immersive. Best book I've read in a long while.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Margaret

    3.5 I wanted a bit more depth from this book; I guess I will expect more depth from myself instead! There are definitely many gems and practical ideas. I won't forget the story of Helga and already shared it with Cassidy. I am all for deeper kindness. "meaningful kindness is generated from the hard work of meaningful connection." 3.5 I wanted a bit more depth from this book; I guess I will expect more depth from myself instead! There are definitely many gems and practical ideas. I won't forget the story of Helga and already shared it with Cassidy. I am all for deeper kindness. "meaningful kindness is generated from the hard work of meaningful connection."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Makatsaria

    The central theme of this book is to spur readers to make permanent life changes - increasing kindness in their daily lives. This idea is solid, one I personally believe is critical to remedying the social problems we face so often these days.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Miglė Šimukonytė

    A heartwarming and thought provoking read. Wouldn't go as far as calling it life changing but it is a beautiful reminder to truly be kind. Loved the exercises included in the book. Definitely considering rereading it some time in the future. A heartwarming and thought provoking read. Wouldn't go as far as calling it life changing but it is a beautiful reminder to truly be kind. Loved the exercises included in the book. Definitely considering rereading it some time in the future.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Layla Platt

    On audio* The first thing I have to say about this book is if you are like me, very touchy feely and can cry at just about everything, do not read/listen to it in public. Such heartwarming and heartbreaking stories. Really opened my eyes to the theory around deep kindness instead of confetti kindness.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    Practical, great activity examples and relatable

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christie Bane

    Most of this book was excellent. It was a 5-star read for me until I got to the end where he started talking about specific practices you could do to be more kind, and almost all of them seemed exceedingly ridiculous. Like, if I did those things, my family and the people around me would think I was annoying and inappropriate, not kind. The rest of the book, though, was full of useful reflections on the reasons why we’re not as kind as we could be, and how to get better at it. I don’t think anyon Most of this book was excellent. It was a 5-star read for me until I got to the end where he started talking about specific practices you could do to be more kind, and almost all of them seemed exceedingly ridiculous. Like, if I did those things, my family and the people around me would think I was annoying and inappropriate, not kind. The rest of the book, though, was full of useful reflections on the reasons why we’re not as kind as we could be, and how to get better at it. I don’t think anyone can deny that the world needs kindness now more than ever, and I can’t imagine anyone reading this book and not being inspired to think of others and acting to help them more often. MOST of the book is not shallow and silly, just the end of it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anneliese Marie

    While the author's personal anecdotes can be a bit self-indulgent at times, the journaling prompts and exercises suggested in the last 25% of the book are valuable and the distinction he makes between shallow, feel-good-headline friendly Confetti Kindness and Deep Kindness is a valuable one that bears contemplation. I'm looking forward to using some of the exercises to work on being kinder. While the author's personal anecdotes can be a bit self-indulgent at times, the journaling prompts and exercises suggested in the last 25% of the book are valuable and the distinction he makes between shallow, feel-good-headline friendly Confetti Kindness and Deep Kindness is a valuable one that bears contemplation. I'm looking forward to using some of the exercises to work on being kinder.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    A transformative idea. This book will change the world.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Deep Kindness by Houston Kraft is a bit like the dessert table at a large family holiday gathering. Many sweets, more than any one person could digest. Many are useful, but there not a lot of continuity in the order of thoughts of the book, and you can’t make a meal out of dessert - although we all have tried at one time or another in our lives. Im eating my third ‘small piece of pie’ on the day and am not at a ‘large family gathering’ for an excuse. 😳😆😆 Buried in the middle of the book, a rather Deep Kindness by Houston Kraft is a bit like the dessert table at a large family holiday gathering. Many sweets, more than any one person could digest. Many are useful, but there not a lot of continuity in the order of thoughts of the book, and you can’t make a meal out of dessert - although we all have tried at one time or another in our lives. Im eating my third ‘small piece of pie’ on the day and am not at a ‘large family gathering’ for an excuse. 😳😆😆 Buried in the middle of the book, a rather significant mea culpa for his failed marriage. This section didn’t add to the book - almost had me stop reading it. When the preacher still has a giant sin ongoing - kind of hard to want to metaphorically keep showing up for the sermons. Some of the side dishes in the book: “The American Psychological Association reveals that The average student of today has as much anxiety as the average psychiatric patient from the 1950s. ” “Personality is what we wear to the gym, character is how hard we work out” “Akrasia Greek term occasionally is described as a lack of self-control or the state of acting against one's better judgment.” “If you’re not consciously or unconsciously accessing your own hurt - you will walk by helga in the airport” Helga was a woman who sat crying for nearly two hours and no one stopped to help. "if you put music on in front of little kids they will all dance." He writes further " how is it possible that someone that talked about love for his career could be quite inept at it in his own life.?" The answer is perhaps Kraft is trying to cathartically help others be more kind, to heal some seriously deep wounds and insecurities he still holds on to. “kindness is proactive and doesn't have strings attached.” "sometimes risking connection is risking reliving hurt" Kraft suggests that to exercise specificity in kindness, let someone know how they helped you : 1/ be braver 2/pushes me to believe in myself 3/ the person who enjoys dancing in the rain 4/ best hugger 5/ the person who first introduced me to kindness 6/ the person who makes the world a better place 7/ the person who i share inside jokes with " if we don't acknowledge the mess, our feet are stuck in the mud" He suggests that we should do an assessment in our lives and know what gets in the way of kindness. Throughout the book, Houston Kraft quotes Brene Brown. I would argue it very likely that the way Austin Kraft felt in junior high and high school is similar to the way Brene Brown felt at those developmental times in their respective lives, and it wasn’t good. Kraft utilized more than one Brene Brown example of teen behavior - the dancing dorky kid the most obvious one. It normal for perhaps to utilize understanding of pain - empathy - to know how to teach others kindness. I think Austin Kraft is probably good at speaking for an hour to middle and high school students- I don’t think that for him has translated into a cohesive book. His outline seems random. Near the end of the book, he reports that brene brown says the person who exhibits the most kindness has the best boundaries. Not sure I agree with this but do believe it perhaps a place that both he and Brown again similar. They both are indeed afraid to actually get close. In young medical education, say the third year, some medical students can be extremely gifted at diagnosis , yet at that point in the career lack the ability to move towards complete understanding of treatments- from humanism to medicinal offering and therapy . This also where the book Deep Kindness comes up short. There also a phrase in medical humanities - physician heal thyself. Luke 4:23 Jesus mentioned this idiom. Austin is still healing - and perhaps it’s trying to help teens become more kind to each other. I have no doubt that he would be an outstanding speaker - although his work not really original- until his own healing more profound - the book perhaps will remain a set of good quotes , but lack a order and continuity for change.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    I recently finished Deep Kindness by Houston Kraft and I loved it! It was around the beginning of the pandemic when I discovered Houston and his organization, CharacterStrong. The pandemic really exposed this deep need for empathy, kindness, and compassion in my community and in the world, but ultimately in myself. To be frank, I don’t consider myself a naturally compassionate or empathetic person. However, I was rattled by the reality of living in a world where even the most basic humane acts w I recently finished Deep Kindness by Houston Kraft and I loved it! It was around the beginning of the pandemic when I discovered Houston and his organization, CharacterStrong. The pandemic really exposed this deep need for empathy, kindness, and compassion in my community and in the world, but ultimately in myself. To be frank, I don’t consider myself a naturally compassionate or empathetic person. However, I was rattled by the reality of living in a world where even the most basic humane acts wasn’t normal. I knew that if I wanted to live in a world that is more compassionate, kind, and empathetic, then that started with me. And that is really what Houston presents in his book, Deep Kindness. He defines Deep Kindness as “the kind of Kindness that overcomes selfishness and fear…generosity that expects nothing in return…a commitment to consist, thoughtful action that is not dependent on circumstance or convenience.” He shines a light on the things that stunt us from showing this type of Kindness, but also gives us practical ways to remove those barriers and challenge ourselves to make Deep Kindness a reality. Plus, this book is a short and sweet read, clocking in at 160 pages! If this sounds like a book you need (whether personally or to go through in a small group), I highly encourage you to go full send in committing to the added prompts and exercises. After all, what’s the point in reading about Kindness if we don’t take the time to practice it?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jen (bookscoffeedogs)

    Definitely a few a-ha moments for me in here and much to digest slowly over the next few days. Confetti kindness, love the term and agree with the author, “kindness, spread that poop around” tshirts don’t necessarily make the world a better place to be in. But I have to say I always smile if someone buys my coffee ahead of me and spread that on behind in the line so I do think little things CAN make someone’s day, especially as a reminder that we are all in this crazy world together, might as we Definitely a few a-ha moments for me in here and much to digest slowly over the next few days. Confetti kindness, love the term and agree with the author, “kindness, spread that poop around” tshirts don’t necessarily make the world a better place to be in. But I have to say I always smile if someone buys my coffee ahead of me and spread that on behind in the line so I do think little things CAN make someone’s day, especially as a reminder that we are all in this crazy world together, might as well make the best of it. What can we each do, in our time available, to just be deeply kind? This book does leave me with lots to think about. The ideas at the end of the book actually feel a little ‘confetti’ to me and over simplified on the basis of his what he is writing, but I still think the theme of the book is pretty spot on. We need some kindness, and not just the please and thank you kind, but really the kind where you look around and see what needs doing and show up to do just that, even when it is scary and out of your comfort zone. Even just in your own home, street, neighborhood, city, state, country, or world.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Justin Nelson

    We had the opportunity to hear Kraft speak virtually at our online State Student Leadership Conference this past Spring, where he highlighted specific parts of the message in this book. That did help bolster certain parts for me more than if I was reading this without some of that context for sure. There were many parts of this, many moments and turns of phrase, that were very impactful and sparked some reflection. I annotated many sections that will work well in Student Council bonding/reflecti We had the opportunity to hear Kraft speak virtually at our online State Student Leadership Conference this past Spring, where he highlighted specific parts of the message in this book. That did help bolster certain parts for me more than if I was reading this without some of that context for sure. There were many parts of this, many moments and turns of phrase, that were very impactful and sparked some reflection. I annotated many sections that will work well in Student Council bonding/reflection activities. I like Kraft's message of working hard to develop Deep Kindness, the types of actions and beliefs that are long-lasting and intrinsic over random acts of kindness (which he does support, too, but encourages us to dig deeper and more consistently.) These types of books often have a "cheese factor" that I have a hard time pushing through, moments of storytelling when I pause and question the validity. That's more of a "me" thing, and to his credit, Kraft didn't inspire that too much in me with this one. If you're looking for a quick, engaging, and often light reflective piece, this is worth checking out.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    4.5/5 Stars! Another great reading experience! I really appreciate how the author gives examples for his teachings, and small exercises and journal prompts so that we can later practice them ourselves. The fact that the author gives a set of steps on how to practice kindness is really helpful as well, because there is nothing worse than ready a self-help book with great theories that doesn't apply or is hard to apply in daily life. The author's perspective on kindness was really eye opening, and I 4.5/5 Stars! Another great reading experience! I really appreciate how the author gives examples for his teachings, and small exercises and journal prompts so that we can later practice them ourselves. The fact that the author gives a set of steps on how to practice kindness is really helpful as well, because there is nothing worse than ready a self-help book with great theories that doesn't apply or is hard to apply in daily life. The author's perspective on kindness was really eye opening, and I have to admit I never thought that a 160p book would actually manage to affect me on such a personal level, but it did. A great thought provoking and lifestyle changing book to start your year!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Author Houston Kraft isn't a fan of what he calls "confetti kindness", that is, the type of kindness that plays out in random acts and encouraging sayings, such as "Throw kindness around like confetti". Not that there's anything wrong with this, he says, but the world needs more. His arguments are convincing, but, as a big fan of confetti kindness, I think we should be encouraging people to do what they can do, where they can do it, even if it falls short of the "deep kindness" Kraft advocates. Author Houston Kraft isn't a fan of what he calls "confetti kindness", that is, the type of kindness that plays out in random acts and encouraging sayings, such as "Throw kindness around like confetti". Not that there's anything wrong with this, he says, but the world needs more. His arguments are convincing, but, as a big fan of confetti kindness, I think we should be encouraging people to do what they can do, where they can do it, even if it falls short of the "deep kindness" Kraft advocates. This book seems to dismissive of the small acts, which are all some people are able to give. Thank you to NetGalley for the opportunity to preview this book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Want to move from "confetti kindness" to a deeper, more meaningful kindness? Read/listen to this book. Houston provides meaningful of examples of the difference between confetti and deep kindness, and practical ways to make the shift in your life. He tells stories that are humorous, touching, and occasionally gut wrenching. He speaks openly and honestly about his experience of showing kindness--both when he has succeeded and when he has let himself and others down. I'll be placing this book unde Want to move from "confetti kindness" to a deeper, more meaningful kindness? Read/listen to this book. Houston provides meaningful of examples of the difference between confetti and deep kindness, and practical ways to make the shift in your life. He tells stories that are humorous, touching, and occasionally gut wrenching. He speaks openly and honestly about his experience of showing kindness--both when he has succeeded and when he has let himself and others down. I'll be placing this book under many Christmas trees this year!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mikayla

    My new favorite book! I'm buying copies for everyone I know. I read this book in one sitting because I could not put it down. I haven't been able to fully articulate how incredible it is (probably still can't). I laughed and I cried more than once as I was reading. There were so many parts that cut right into my heart and were exactly what I needed to hear right now. Thank you for putting your story into the world and sharing your gifts of storytelling + articulating things that the world needs My new favorite book! I'm buying copies for everyone I know. I read this book in one sitting because I could not put it down. I haven't been able to fully articulate how incredible it is (probably still can't). I laughed and I cried more than once as I was reading. There were so many parts that cut right into my heart and were exactly what I needed to hear right now. Thank you for putting your story into the world and sharing your gifts of storytelling + articulating things that the world needs to hear so beautifully. I love it so much!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Esteban Jorge

    This book is truly a life-changer. Like the author writes, kindness is a word used so much that sometimes it feels like its lost all its meaning. This book completely changed the way I think about kindness - it inspired me to become kinder and to become self-aware in the way that I show up for myself and others. It's really easy to read - with a mix of stories, research and theory, and even some diagrams. It's storytelling that shifts the way we view the world around us. I'm buying this book for This book is truly a life-changer. Like the author writes, kindness is a word used so much that sometimes it feels like its lost all its meaning. This book completely changed the way I think about kindness - it inspired me to become kinder and to become self-aware in the way that I show up for myself and others. It's really easy to read - with a mix of stories, research and theory, and even some diagrams. It's storytelling that shifts the way we view the world around us. I'm buying this book for so many people in my life!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristina Stone

    You know those hypothetical questions, “What five people, living or historical, would you invite to dinner?” Houston Kraft is one of my five. I heard him speak a few years ago and it revolutionized how I teach. Making Kindness Normal has become the focal point of my leadership classes. “I believe in a world where we value Kindness as the most important and meaningful resource we have available to us, and we treat it with the reverence, ritual, and relentless exercise that it’s due.” Read this bo You know those hypothetical questions, “What five people, living or historical, would you invite to dinner?” Houston Kraft is one of my five. I heard him speak a few years ago and it revolutionized how I teach. Making Kindness Normal has become the focal point of my leadership classes. “I believe in a world where we value Kindness as the most important and meaningful resource we have available to us, and we treat it with the reverence, ritual, and relentless exercise that it’s due.” Read this book. Buy it for any and everyone. The world needs it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    I won this as a goodreads giveaway and I’m really glad I did! It was thought provoking, inspirational, filled with wonderful experiences and examples of deep Kindness. The book is written to be read easily, however, I found myself putting it down after reading a chapter or two to mull over what I’d just read and complete some of the exercises. For myself, the author achieved what he set out to do— help me look inside myself to find how I can best begin the journey to practicing deep Kindness on I won this as a goodreads giveaway and I’m really glad I did! It was thought provoking, inspirational, filled with wonderful experiences and examples of deep Kindness. The book is written to be read easily, however, I found myself putting it down after reading a chapter or two to mull over what I’d just read and complete some of the exercises. For myself, the author achieved what he set out to do— help me look inside myself to find how I can best begin the journey to practicing deep Kindness on a daily basis.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vedo Evantanto

    I loved the organization of the book. Self-help books, for me, tend to be “information overload” and hard to follow and recall the essential points being made. The streamlined explanation of deep kindness, what holds us back from practicing it, and how we can improve in sharing it, made for a very pleasant and memorable read. Some of the examples were a bit cliché and at times unrelated, but the main points made me pleasantly surprised. I especially enjoyed the introduction and conclusion as they I loved the organization of the book. Self-help books, for me, tend to be “information overload” and hard to follow and recall the essential points being made. The streamlined explanation of deep kindness, what holds us back from practicing it, and how we can improve in sharing it, made for a very pleasant and memorable read. Some of the examples were a bit cliché and at times unrelated, but the main points made me pleasantly surprised. I especially enjoyed the introduction and conclusion as they both included themes that were held consistent throughout the read without beind redundant.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Smith

    I wanted to read this book because of my distress about what I see happening in the world, most especially during this most difficult time of battling a world wide pandemic. It makes me feel afraid for my grandchildren and their parents trying to guide these sweet little people out into this troubled society. Right at the beginning there is the author’s interaction with Helga and her story compelled me to read every word in this book and really examine my own grasp of kindness. I came away seeing I wanted to read this book because of my distress about what I see happening in the world, most especially during this most difficult time of battling a world wide pandemic. It makes me feel afraid for my grandchildren and their parents trying to guide these sweet little people out into this troubled society. Right at the beginning there is the author’s interaction with Helga and her story compelled me to read every word in this book and really examine my own grasp of kindness. I came away seeing that we can all improve in the Kindness department!!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I find the idea that kindness is not inherent to be intriguing, but also disheartening. Systemic, decisive kindness matters, I agree, but confetti and common kindness matter deeply, too. An interesting premise and reading this book will help me think more thoroughly about the kindnesses I choose and encourage my children and students to enact, as well. Lots of conversations were started around this book, so overall, a good, worthwhile read.

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