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The Heroine's Journey: For Writers, Readers, and Fans of Pop Culture

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Tired of the hero’s journey? Frustrated that funny, romantic, and comforting stories aren’t taken seriously? Sad that the books and movies you love never seem to be critically acclaimed, even when they sell like crazy? The heroine’s journey is here to help. Multiple New York Times bestselling author Gail Carriger presents a clear concise analysis of the heroine’s journey, how Tired of the hero’s journey? Frustrated that funny, romantic, and comforting stories aren’t taken seriously? Sad that the books and movies you love never seem to be critically acclaimed, even when they sell like crazy? The heroine’s journey is here to help. Multiple New York Times bestselling author Gail Carriger presents a clear concise analysis of the heroine’s journey, how it differs from the hero’s journey, and how you can use it to improve your writing and your life. In this book you’ll learn: * How to spot the heroine’s journey in popular books, movies, and the world around you. * The source myths and basic characters, tropes, and archetypes of this narrative. * A step-by-step break down of how to successfully write this journey. What do Agatha Christie, JK Rowling, and Nora Roberts all have in common? They all write the heroine’s journey. Read this book to learn all about it. From Harry Potter to Twilight, from Wonder Woman to Star Wars, you’ll never look at pop culture the same way again. With over a dozen NYT and USA Today bestsellers, and over a million books in print, popular genre author and former archaeologist Gail Carriger brings her cheeky comedic tone and over a decade of making her living as a fiction author to this fascinating look at one of the most popular yet neglected narratives of our time. The presentation she does on this subject sells for hundreds of dollars. “I’m not sure how you can just rewire my brain to see the heroine’s journey like this and then expect me to make coherent, thought-out comments about the text when all I want to do is hold it in my twisted little grip while I shove it at people screaming like a madman and pointing at passages.” ~ Author Beta Reader Gail Carriger uses the heroine’s journey to produce bestselling, critically-acclaimed books that genre blend science fiction, cozy mystery, young adult, urban fantasy, romance, historical fiction, and alternate history. In this non-fiction book she uses her academic background and creative writing skills to bring to life the archetypes, tropes, story beats, themes, and messages inherent in the heroine’s journey. Part treatise on authorship, part feminist literary criticism, part how to write guide, Carriger uses mythology, legend, and Gothic victorian 19th century literature to explore movies, screenwriting, books, and audience desires. This is an excellent reference guide for genre fiction authors seeking to improve their craft or for readers and pop culture enthusiasts interested in understanding their own taste. It is the perfect counterpoint to The Hero with a Thousand Faces not to mention Save the Cat, Women Who Run With The Wolves, and The Breakout Novelist.


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Tired of the hero’s journey? Frustrated that funny, romantic, and comforting stories aren’t taken seriously? Sad that the books and movies you love never seem to be critically acclaimed, even when they sell like crazy? The heroine’s journey is here to help. Multiple New York Times bestselling author Gail Carriger presents a clear concise analysis of the heroine’s journey, how Tired of the hero’s journey? Frustrated that funny, romantic, and comforting stories aren’t taken seriously? Sad that the books and movies you love never seem to be critically acclaimed, even when they sell like crazy? The heroine’s journey is here to help. Multiple New York Times bestselling author Gail Carriger presents a clear concise analysis of the heroine’s journey, how it differs from the hero’s journey, and how you can use it to improve your writing and your life. In this book you’ll learn: * How to spot the heroine’s journey in popular books, movies, and the world around you. * The source myths and basic characters, tropes, and archetypes of this narrative. * A step-by-step break down of how to successfully write this journey. What do Agatha Christie, JK Rowling, and Nora Roberts all have in common? They all write the heroine’s journey. Read this book to learn all about it. From Harry Potter to Twilight, from Wonder Woman to Star Wars, you’ll never look at pop culture the same way again. With over a dozen NYT and USA Today bestsellers, and over a million books in print, popular genre author and former archaeologist Gail Carriger brings her cheeky comedic tone and over a decade of making her living as a fiction author to this fascinating look at one of the most popular yet neglected narratives of our time. The presentation she does on this subject sells for hundreds of dollars. “I’m not sure how you can just rewire my brain to see the heroine’s journey like this and then expect me to make coherent, thought-out comments about the text when all I want to do is hold it in my twisted little grip while I shove it at people screaming like a madman and pointing at passages.” ~ Author Beta Reader Gail Carriger uses the heroine’s journey to produce bestselling, critically-acclaimed books that genre blend science fiction, cozy mystery, young adult, urban fantasy, romance, historical fiction, and alternate history. In this non-fiction book she uses her academic background and creative writing skills to bring to life the archetypes, tropes, story beats, themes, and messages inherent in the heroine’s journey. Part treatise on authorship, part feminist literary criticism, part how to write guide, Carriger uses mythology, legend, and Gothic victorian 19th century literature to explore movies, screenwriting, books, and audience desires. This is an excellent reference guide for genre fiction authors seeking to improve their craft or for readers and pop culture enthusiasts interested in understanding their own taste. It is the perfect counterpoint to The Hero with a Thousand Faces not to mention Save the Cat, Women Who Run With The Wolves, and The Breakout Novelist.

30 review for The Heroine's Journey: For Writers, Readers, and Fans of Pop Culture

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    The truth is, I have never really clicked with a book on writing structure before, because their formulas have never seemed to really fit my favorite books and stories without being twisted out of plausibility. So I was skeptical when I picked this up - but then I loved it SO MUCH that I blurbed it, and this is the official blurb I sent: "The first book on writing structure that's ever truly resonated for me and made sense of the way my favorite stories work. I've thought back to this book so ma The truth is, I have never really clicked with a book on writing structure before, because their formulas have never seemed to really fit my favorite books and stories without being twisted out of plausibility. So I was skeptical when I picked this up - but then I loved it SO MUCH that I blurbed it, and this is the official blurb I sent: "The first book on writing structure that's ever truly resonated for me and made sense of the way my favorite stories work. I've thought back to this book so many times since reading it, and I know I'll be reading it again!” I can't wait for my preordered final copy to arrive for lots of re-reading!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adriana Herrera

    Possibly the best craft book I've read this year. It is a thoroughly feminist guide to writing genre fiction and really shined a light on the way I write my stories and helped me really solidify my thoughts about how I construct the romances I write. Excellent. Possibly the best craft book I've read this year. It is a thoroughly feminist guide to writing genre fiction and really shined a light on the way I write my stories and helped me really solidify my thoughts about how I construct the romances I write. Excellent.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Wolf

    I’m not a writer… so why am I reading a book about writing? Because it’s by Gail Carriger, that’s why! Gail Carriger is a favorite writer, and her books own prime shelf real estate in my personal library. I adore her characters, her plots, her world-building, her dialogue, and her silliness. (She’s also unfailingly welcoming and warm at book signings, which can’t be easy…) In any case — after reading about The Heroine’s Journey through Gail’s social media and newsletters, I was intrigued enough to I’m not a writer… so why am I reading a book about writing? Because it’s by Gail Carriger, that’s why! Gail Carriger is a favorite writer, and her books own prime shelf real estate in my personal library. I adore her characters, her plots, her world-building, her dialogue, and her silliness. (She’s also unfailingly welcoming and warm at book signings, which can’t be easy…) In any case — after reading about The Heroine’s Journey through Gail’s social media and newsletters, I was intrigued enough to want to check it out. Lo and behold, it was a fascinating read, even for a non-writer like me! In The Heroine’s Journey, Gail explains in details how a Heroine’s Journey differs from the much better-known Hero’s Journey. Surprise #1 — the heroine of a Heroine’s Journey does not have to be female! The concept of the hero and heroine, at least as Gail explains, has much more to do with the types of journeys they’re on, the obstacles they encounter, the resources they use, and their ultimate goal, than with a definition based on gender identification. Through the use of literary and pop culture references, Gail clearly identifies the key elements of a Heroine’s Journey, and explains the tropes, characters, and beats that provide the journey’s framework. She also provides excellent examples of different techniques to use to bring characters to life, get readers involved, and provide a satisfactory payoff for devoted readers. As an avid reader, and someone who loves genre fiction of all sorts, I found this book so interesting! It really helped me understand why certain types of stories and plots resonate, and taught me a lot about structure and underlying themes as part of understanding a writer’s craft and accomplishments. And as for the geek in me, I adored the fact that she used Harry Potter throughout the book to explain different facets of the Heroine’s Journey. It’s fine to provide a writerly explanation of different points, but the examples are what really brought the points to life for me. The Heroine’s Journey is a great read for anyone who enjoys learning about the craft behind the stories we love. I’ll be pushing this book into the hands of a few writer friends of mine too!

  4. 4 out of 5

    C. S.

    One of the best writing craft books I've read in a long time This is definitely one for the reference shelf of any writer, working in any genre and writing any character journey. I feel like the last frame of a galaxy brain meme because this shed so much light on why I gravitate to the books I do and a lot of the things that have gone wrong in various writing projects. Very deep, very thought provoking, but also immensely readable. Will definitely be reading again. One of the best writing craft books I've read in a long time This is definitely one for the reference shelf of any writer, working in any genre and writing any character journey. I feel like the last frame of a galaxy brain meme because this shed so much light on why I gravitate to the books I do and a lot of the things that have gone wrong in various writing projects. Very deep, very thought provoking, but also immensely readable. Will definitely be reading again.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rosalie Oaks

    I’m so excited about this book – I don’t think it is an understatement to say that it could transform some writers’ careers. Here Carriger outlines a different approach to novels, one that embraces comfort, connection, and joy as important beats to a story – something which I’ve always believed but haven’t really seen articulated. And she goes further to argue that this alternative narrative is wildly popular, if only we would have the wit to see it. I completely agree. These are the kind of boo I’m so excited about this book – I don’t think it is an understatement to say that it could transform some writers’ careers. Here Carriger outlines a different approach to novels, one that embraces comfort, connection, and joy as important beats to a story – something which I’ve always believed but haven’t really seen articulated. And she goes further to argue that this alternative narrative is wildly popular, if only we would have the wit to see it. I completely agree. These are the kind of books that I like, and the ones I have striven to write: groups of quirky characters forming their own team/family, lots of humour, sense of connection, scenes of delight, and a denouement that involves everyone (not just the protagonist pitted alone against a villain). I’m so glad to now understand I was unconsciously seeking and writing the heroine’s journey! Carriger writes with her characteristic intelligence, warmth, and humour, and delves into fascinating topics such as gothic literature tropes and how they underlie the heroine’s journey; the history of romance novels (and how and why they are denigrated); and our culture’s glorification of the hero’s journey at the expense of the heroine’s. I especially liked the detour into tips on writing humour, and the appeal of the Byronic hero – so much gold in this book! Even if you are not a writer, but just an avid consumer of literature, you will find this an eye-opening take on what can make a novel sing. Read it now! It might change your writing life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Annika

    It's been a while since a craft book has made me excited to write. I had so many epiphanies about my own work while reading this for which I will forever be grateful to Ms. Carriger. It's been a while since a craft book has made me excited to write. I had so many epiphanies about my own work while reading this for which I will forever be grateful to Ms. Carriger.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Gazdecki

    I really enjoyed this book. I had never heard of the heroine’s journey and this book laid it out in interesting and easy to understand ways. It also has practical advice for using the heroine’s journey in your own writing, where one sees examples of the heroine’s journey in modern fiction, and why much of it is dismissed by critics (and adored by fans). Would absolutely recommend and I’ll be reading the whole thing again soon and I’m sure many times in the years to come.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Babb

    Gail Carriger's The Heroine's Journey is delightful to read both in her analysis of the differences between the classic Hero's Journey and the Heroine's Journey and in her explanation of why we don't recognize the Heroine Journey as a classic form. Carriger writes both for reader/viewer/listeners as well as for writers to recognize the different "chassis" of story building. She clearly delineates the concept of the gendered narrative as men, women, and non-binary beings can be either heroes or h Gail Carriger's The Heroine's Journey is delightful to read both in her analysis of the differences between the classic Hero's Journey and the Heroine's Journey and in her explanation of why we don't recognize the Heroine Journey as a classic form. Carriger writes both for reader/viewer/listeners as well as for writers to recognize the different "chassis" of story building. She clearly delineates the concept of the gendered narrative as men, women, and non-binary beings can be either heroes or heroines, depending on how they define and approach their goals. She provides excellent examples of each from popular books and movies, as well as literary references in a very readable (may I say a bit snarky) style, much as she does in her novels. The reference page is a hoot. I find her explanation helpful on my own work-in-progress as a heroine's journey, and in recognizing the structures of stories as I binge-watch streaming media. For example, I've been watching the 60s TV western "The Virginian," about a nameless trail boss/ranch foreman, played by James Drury, whose first aim is always to get people work out differences, to keep peace, to protect his boss, employees, and cattle, and to avoid bloodshed. I see The Virginian on a Heroine's Journey despite his being a cis white het male, because he always tries networking, delegating by skills, and communication to solve the problems. When his efforts don't work, he is sometimes forced to kill in self-defense a toxic, tragic hero-wannabe--even a few friends who just won't listen to him. Due to the requirements of the genre (serial love interests), he also never gets the girl, but always sends her on her way to better things by her own choice, or he buries her. But he always goes back to his "family" in the bunkhouse, the big house, and the town. Not all the episodes follow this pattern, but many of the ones that feature the Virginian do. If you write, READ THIS BOOK. If you watch as much TV as I do, READ THIS BOOK, and you'll never see stories the same way.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kandice

    This will hold a place of honor on my shelf next to Stephen King's On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. Never mind that it must be a mental shelf since I only have an ebook of this title, but this may be one of the most helpful, illuminating and enlightening books about writing I have ever read. Carriger explains what I search for in books in a way that makes me question myself for not seeing this before. Of course women can be on a hero's journey. Of course men can be on a heroine's journey! It's This will hold a place of honor on my shelf next to Stephen King's On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. Never mind that it must be a mental shelf since I only have an ebook of this title, but this may be one of the most helpful, illuminating and enlightening books about writing I have ever read. Carriger explains what I search for in books in a way that makes me question myself for not seeing this before. Of course women can be on a hero's journey. Of course men can be on a heroine's journey! It's the qualities of the journey itself that label it, not the sex of the person on the journey. The fact that Carriger also, quite easily, erases gender and sex from the classification made me feel vindicated in my opinions. I've felt this! I always thought I must be mistaken, but Carriger shows me I was not. A hero's journey is isolating and ends with a personal boon, while a heroine's journey requires a team and a boon to benefit so many more than just the heroine herself. While On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft is about the actual craft of getting down to doing the thing, this book helps the reader identify what they are looking for and reading. This book helps a reader to make informed decisions regarding their entertainment and to recognize what they are hungry for. Carriger does not attempt to prove either the Hero or Heroine's journey as better than the other, but instead to show us there is a place for both. It's just best, that we as readers/watchers, know what it is that we are reading/watching, so we can more easily find what we want.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Bunnell

    One of my favorite writing craft books, I enjoyed reading about the long history of the Heroine's Journey story beats, themes, and goals. I liked the comparison of the myths of Demeter, Inanna, and Isis, as well as showing the path through pop culture books, including Twilight and Harry Potter. Why would anyone want a journey of a solo journey that ends up with the protagonist alone and sad when you could read a story that seeks community, compromise, and comfort? One of my favorite writing craft books, I enjoyed reading about the long history of the Heroine's Journey story beats, themes, and goals. I liked the comparison of the myths of Demeter, Inanna, and Isis, as well as showing the path through pop culture books, including Twilight and Harry Potter. Why would anyone want a journey of a solo journey that ends up with the protagonist alone and sad when you could read a story that seeks community, compromise, and comfort?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dez Schwartz

    One of my most anticipated reads this year and Gail did not disappoint. She does an excellent job of defining the Heroine's Journey, providing classic and modern examples, and giving authors a strong heading in where to take their own stories next using this model. I'm glad I bought a physical edition because I will proudly display this one on my shelf and I know I'll reference it regularly. I highly recommend this book if you're a writer or just love literary analysis. One of my most anticipated reads this year and Gail did not disappoint. She does an excellent job of defining the Heroine's Journey, providing classic and modern examples, and giving authors a strong heading in where to take their own stories next using this model. I'm glad I bought a physical edition because I will proudly display this one on my shelf and I know I'll reference it regularly. I highly recommend this book if you're a writer or just love literary analysis.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex Khlopenko

    Must read for all authors, new and experienced

  13. 4 out of 5

    Willow Thomson

    I’m a writer but first of all, a reader. I am always searching for books that celebrate the more feminine principles of cooperation, community and compromise. In my preferred genre of science fiction, these books can be hard to find and such a joy to discover! I knew on an intuitive level what I was looking for in my reading and writing but now I have a name for it. It was fun to see how well my story lines fit into this structure without my being aware of it. Thank you so much for an eye openin I’m a writer but first of all, a reader. I am always searching for books that celebrate the more feminine principles of cooperation, community and compromise. In my preferred genre of science fiction, these books can be hard to find and such a joy to discover! I knew on an intuitive level what I was looking for in my reading and writing but now I have a name for it. It was fun to see how well my story lines fit into this structure without my being aware of it. Thank you so much for an eye opening book. Here’s to more heroine’s journey stories, especially in science fiction!

  14. 4 out of 5

    H.B. Reneau

    "A heroine not only asks for help, she is good at it. She learns how to ask the right people, and to embrace both them and their advice. For a heroine, asking for help is not a weakness, it is profoundly empowering. There is no shame in storytellers employing either narrative. There is shame when an entire culture of storytellers and critics values one narrative over the other." *** First, an admission: I don't read many writing/storytelling books. I know, I know, the craft! How will I improve my "A heroine not only asks for help, she is good at it. She learns how to ask the right people, and to embrace both them and their advice. For a heroine, asking for help is not a weakness, it is profoundly empowering. There is no shame in storytellers employing either narrative. There is shame when an entire culture of storytellers and critics values one narrative over the other." *** First, an admission: I don't read many writing/storytelling books. I know, I know, the craft! How will I improve my craft? The truth is, the format's never really worked for me. I'd rather read a hundred articles or blog posts and be able to bounce between topics and succinct explanations than sit down and read a writing book cover to cover. Well, this book just might be enough to change my mind. After reading this book, I'm honestly embarrassed to say that even after years of writing and reading about story structure and the Hero's Journey, I'd never heard of the Heroine's Journey. Here is a an in depth and yet still concise description of what the Heroine's Journey is, how it compare's to the Hero's journey, and why our culture seems to prefer one while shoveling out the big bucks for the other (hint: it's not the Hero's Journey). And clarify something that Carriger makes abundantly clear early on: the journey you're on has absolutely nothing to do with your gender! What defines a Hero's vs a Heroine's journey can be grossly simplified to how victory is defined and the sacrifices the hero/heroine must make to achieve it. While the Hero's Journey requires isolation and sacrifice of the thing they hold most dear to defeat the big bad, the Heroine's Journey relies on coalition building and compromise to achieve the end result. And you know what? That's a story that deserves to be told. I can honestly say that this book has changed not only how I write, but how I view the pieces of popular culture around me. I finally understand why I've often struggled to make characters do what they were "supposed" to do - I was trying to for them on the wrong journey! Not all stories require isolation, individual accomplishment, and "going it alone." Intuitively, I knew this (it's how I live my own life after all) but for some reason I thought a "good story" required those things. Why? Because like most of our society, I've had it hammered into my head that that's just what a hero does. No more, my friends. I now feel like I have the structure to tell a different story and the confidence to know that it can still be a killer story. While this is definitely not just a book for writers and entails insights and case studies that would interest anyone who enjoys popular culture, for this writer at least it's been a game changer and I can't recommend it more.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    Gail Carriger has gone ahead and written another fascinating novel, however, this time around there's a bit of a twist. The Heroine's Journey: For Writers, Readers, and Fans of Pop Culture is a more informative read, yet one you're not going to want to miss out on. The Heroine's Journey is a novel that explores exactly that – starting with an explanation of what it is, how to identify it. And most importantly, discusses how she writes about the Heroine's Journey. If you're a fan of any of her s Gail Carriger has gone ahead and written another fascinating novel, however, this time around there's a bit of a twist. The Heroine's Journey: For Writers, Readers, and Fans of Pop Culture is a more informative read, yet one you're not going to want to miss out on. The Heroine's Journey is a novel that explores exactly that – starting with an explanation of what it is, how to identify it. And most importantly, discusses how she writes about the Heroine's Journey. If you're a fan of any of her series, then the odds are good that you already have an idea of exactly what we're talking about here. It also probably means that you'll be more inclined to read it, as you know full well the level of humor that will be written in to the pages. “Don’t worry, more (considerably less flippant) definitions of both of these are yet to come.” The Heroine's Journey is an absolutely fascinating read, one that is rich with examples, explanations, and that classic Gail Carriger humor. Her cheek helps to tone down some of the harsher points, and overall she really does succeed in making this a fun read. Honestly, I know that this novel is at least partially written and marketed for authors, but I really think that it is worth a read for everyone out there. The perspective is an important one, and on more than one occasion something just clicked in my head thanks to something she said. It's also undoubtedly a perfect reference novel as well, as Gail Carriger really did pack it full of information (again, it's wrapped up in her humor, so it doesn't feel overwhelming or dry in the least). Check out more reviews over at Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks

  16. 4 out of 5

    David Allenson

    Delightful, thought provoking, and well written. It's my personal opinion that the point of this type of non-fiction is not to convince the reader of a set of propositions but to get the reader to start thinking about patterns and trends. The author does a great job analysing the ways that our society thinks about gender, sex, individualism, and community influences which stories are considered important and which are considered frivolous. The author talks about two large modes of story telling; o Delightful, thought provoking, and well written. It's my personal opinion that the point of this type of non-fiction is not to convince the reader of a set of propositions but to get the reader to start thinking about patterns and trends. The author does a great job analysing the ways that our society thinks about gender, sex, individualism, and community influences which stories are considered important and which are considered frivolous. The author talks about two large modes of story telling; one an individual's rise to power and the other an individual centering community. (One of my quibbles is that I think there are other basic types of stories - but I recognize that those are outside the scope of this book.) I did lead me to an understanding of why so many people tend to hate some of the movies I really rather like. This is a book like Margaret Atwood's "Survival, A Thematic Guide to Canadian Literature" I expect to be using as an analytic tool for years to come.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    A really excellent primer on a narrative structure that's familiar to romance readers, but has gotten short shrift (and not even a name before this!) in comparison to Joseph Campbell's The Hero's Journey--because patriarchy. Carriger is very, very careful to stress that a heroine does not have to be biologically female (nor does a hero have to be male) and uses examples to show this. And she takes serious aim at the misogyny and patriarchy that prioritizes the hero's journey and diminishes the h A really excellent primer on a narrative structure that's familiar to romance readers, but has gotten short shrift (and not even a name before this!) in comparison to Joseph Campbell's The Hero's Journey--because patriarchy. Carriger is very, very careful to stress that a heroine does not have to be biologically female (nor does a hero have to be male) and uses examples to show this. And she takes serious aim at the misogyny and patriarchy that prioritizes the hero's journey and diminishes the heroine's journey faces, but gives heroine's journey writers ways to protect their narrative. While this isn't a writing how-to book, I would definitely recommend it to romance writers to understand the theoretical underpinnings of the romance structure, which is virtually always a heroine's journey.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Akemi Maniwa

    This was a very interesting book about a narrative structure that I did not know that much about before reading the book, but a narrative structure that I absolutely love, even though I was unaware of the name and format of the structure. The narrative structure I'm speaking of is the titular Heroine's Journey. In this book Carriger does an excellent job of describing what the Heroine's Journey is, how it compares with the Hero's Journey, and breaking down the narrative beats of both and how the This was a very interesting book about a narrative structure that I did not know that much about before reading the book, but a narrative structure that I absolutely love, even though I was unaware of the name and format of the structure. The narrative structure I'm speaking of is the titular Heroine's Journey. In this book Carriger does an excellent job of describing what the Heroine's Journey is, how it compares with the Hero's Journey, and breaking down the narrative beats of both and how they are portrayed in mythology and pop culture. The book is aimed towards writers, but I feel much of this knowledge can be useful for other creatives and storytellers as well. In fact, I dabble in making rpgs and had vague thoughts about making a Heroine's Journey rpg, until I realized that any rpg that ends with a found family party is actually a Heroine's Journey.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    A very interesting premise. Ms Carriger looks at The Heroine's Journey (as opposed to The Hero's Journey put forth by Joseph Campbell) in a very accessible book aimed at writers, but useful for readers as well. It definitely helped me define why I like some books more than others. (I think it might be interesting to use some of the points when my Science Fiction/Fantasy book group starts meeting again.) The only reason I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 was that I felt that sometimes she repeats her A very interesting premise. Ms Carriger looks at The Heroine's Journey (as opposed to The Hero's Journey put forth by Joseph Campbell) in a very accessible book aimed at writers, but useful for readers as well. It definitely helped me define why I like some books more than others. (I think it might be interesting to use some of the points when my Science Fiction/Fantasy book group starts meeting again.) The only reason I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 was that I felt that sometimes she repeats her points more than is necessary.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lokien

    What a fascinating journey turn around! The only reason I didn't give this book five stars was because I simply found it a little repetitive. But how fascinating, to realize everything I loved about books was all about the heroin's journey. Thank you so much for social wonderful highlight. What a fascinating journey turn around! The only reason I didn't give this book five stars was because I simply found it a little repetitive. But how fascinating, to realize everything I loved about books was all about the heroin's journey. Thank you so much for social wonderful highlight.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ðébora

    I was expecting better. She doesn't give an in-depth analysis of any of the beats in an Heroine's Journey. I recommend Kim Hudson's "The Virgin's Promise" instead. At least for me, it was uncanny how resonating it was. I was expecting better. She doesn't give an in-depth analysis of any of the beats in an Heroine's Journey. I recommend Kim Hudson's "The Virgin's Promise" instead. At least for me, it was uncanny how resonating it was.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emily Wemily

    4.0 This was an interesting read. I've seen and read plenty of 'heroine' storylines, but I've never once known that's what they were. Garriger explores what a heroine-plot is, especially in contrast to the hero-plot, and why it's so effective for some readers. She goes through the tactics and archetypes (and tropes!) that make this storyline come to life and explains why many readers bother reading the heroine story anyway - comfort! Her writing style here was very casual. It reminded me of Meg C 4.0 This was an interesting read. I've seen and read plenty of 'heroine' storylines, but I've never once known that's what they were. Garriger explores what a heroine-plot is, especially in contrast to the hero-plot, and why it's so effective for some readers. She goes through the tactics and archetypes (and tropes!) that make this storyline come to life and explains why many readers bother reading the heroine story anyway - comfort! Her writing style here was very casual. It reminded me of Meg Cabot (definitely a heroine writer) and was quite endearing by the end of the book. A nod to her acknowledgement that we need to reevaluate what 'strong' means, if we think that asking for help is a sign of weakness. Another nod to her for stating how hard it can be to be taken seriously when you say you write fiction for a living, especially in non-writer circles. Also, if you're interested in understanding what makes Gothic literature so alluring, there are some good points in here about that. Overall, a solid book! Easy to read! Would recommend :)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vetz

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A delightful read! I'm so glad Gail wrote this. I'm not an author, but loved how I could self reflect personally on how this framework is manifested in past and present media. I really enjoyed the "beat" of the book, and perspective of how the heroine journey is different and necessary. I loved how the story of the heroine, is different than the hero and encourages connection, harmony, and success for everyone. Parts I really enjoyed were the analysis of heroine journey seen in folklore/historic A delightful read! I'm so glad Gail wrote this. I'm not an author, but loved how I could self reflect personally on how this framework is manifested in past and present media. I really enjoyed the "beat" of the book, and perspective of how the heroine journey is different and necessary. I loved how the story of the heroine, is different than the hero and encourages connection, harmony, and success for everyone. Parts I really enjoyed were the analysis of heroine journey seen in folklore/historical literature, how framing out a story will help endear the read to the story, and all of Gail's wit and humor in telling a nonfiction story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Spiffybumble

    The Heroine’s Journey: For Writers, Readers, and Fans of Pop Culture: 8/10 By: Gail Carriger This was the type of book that was incredibly exciting to me and me alone. I took it to my friends and wanted to talk about how there was a rebuttal to the Hero’s Journey now and how it made so much more sense and was emblematic of a shift towards appreciating all gendered narratives and allowing for strong women and kind men… and most of the time my friends nodded politely and quickly changed the topic. Th The Heroine’s Journey: For Writers, Readers, and Fans of Pop Culture: 8/10 By: Gail Carriger This was the type of book that was incredibly exciting to me and me alone. I took it to my friends and wanted to talk about how there was a rebuttal to the Hero’s Journey now and how it made so much more sense and was emblematic of a shift towards appreciating all gendered narratives and allowing for strong women and kind men… and most of the time my friends nodded politely and quickly changed the topic. This book is written for a very specific audience, and that’s okay! I for one loved it, but even I didn’t get all of the key pop references thrown about. Dangerous Liaisons? Had barely heard of it. Battlestar Galactica? I know about it from The Office I guess. Thankfully, the only essential reading you need to understand this book is Harry Potter and Twilight, which I think most people are familiar with but I feel like a more than cursory knowledge of those two properties is important. The rest of the examples are either explained or are just there for flavor. That being said though, I could see there being a slight issue of expectations for prospective readers. This book, in my experience, is one for writers who are also readers and fans of pop culture, not for writers, readers, and fans of pop culture. The book is very heavy-handedly writer-centric, excellently so, but I’m not sure if I would recommend it to the casual or even die-hard fan if they themselves don’t have intentions of writing. If you are a writer, a reader, and a fan of pop culture though, I can’t see much that you won’t like about this book! It reads more like a memoir than a textbook which makes it very digestible, there are plenty of examples to back up Ms. Carriger’s points, and there’s plenty of inspiration to take and sprint with to your next novel. There’s an underlying tension of the Hero’s Journey being considered lesser than the Heroine’s (not by society but by the author), but that’s to be expected given the material and Carriger does get around to saying multiple times that it’s okay to like one journey over the other or to like both or to like something in between. I wish there were more examples of how the Heroine’s Journey applied to epic fantasy (my particular genre of interest) and how to setup reader expectations towards a hero’s or a heroine’s journey (which she briefly touched on in reference to the gothic tropes) but I think the point of the book is that it’s not the answers, it's all the questions. Ms. Carriger is trying to start the conversation around the Heroine’s Journey and now it’s my job to take it and apply it to my own theories and questions. I want to know so many things now! How does Avatar the Last Airbender apply as a Heroine’s Journey? Does Mistborn count because of the vast array of side characters, or not because of the isolated moments of power? Can I write a Heroine’s Journey that still uses violence and overcoming power as its main goal or does that just not work? I want to know!! This book was fun to read and it got me thinking, talking, and writing. Can you really ask for anything else from a nonfiction book?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emma Rose Ribbons

    Well, that was amazing. Incredibly essential. This book told me, exactly, why I love the fiction I love so much and inspired me to not only seek out more of it, but maybe more purposely follow a heroine's journey of my own. This is brilliant. Gail Carriger, who is probably my favourite author currently writing, tells us exactly what the heroine's journey is and why there's a very good reason a lot of us are attracted to comforting, fun stories about main characters who have lots of friends, value Well, that was amazing. Incredibly essential. This book told me, exactly, why I love the fiction I love so much and inspired me to not only seek out more of it, but maybe more purposely follow a heroine's journey of my own. This is brilliant. Gail Carriger, who is probably my favourite author currently writing, tells us exactly what the heroine's journey is and why there's a very good reason a lot of us are attracted to comforting, fun stories about main characters who have lots of friends, value family and connection and team work, seek compromise and safety and belonging above revenge and victory and why, inevitably, these stories are dismissed as unimportant by most of the people making decisions. This is incredibly readable. I was a little apprehensive about picking up a book of literary criticism ten years after leaving university but this is Gail - it's fun, it's very compelling, easy to follow, and most of all, it's a call to action, really. Several parts made me really emotional (all those about all the ways Harry Potter is marvellous, but also about how Gail's books create a community by meeting our expectations each and every time and how you can do it, too). This is excellent. If you read and thoroughly enjoy genre fiction specifically, this is really for you. One of those 'oh, I didn't realise this was who I was but this makes so much sense' books. A revelation, in short.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katina French

    If you only know the Hero's Journey, you're only seeing half the story. A writing craft book that helped me understand the narrative framework most of the books I write (and the books I enjoy most) are built on. Offers a complementary (and competing) ideology of what can define strength, success, and growth which not only our literature, but our culture, sorely needs to see represented, celebrated and valued. I could have used a bit more detail on archetypes and tropes, but that's a complaint of If you only know the Hero's Journey, you're only seeing half the story. A writing craft book that helped me understand the narrative framework most of the books I write (and the books I enjoy most) are built on. Offers a complementary (and competing) ideology of what can define strength, success, and growth which not only our literature, but our culture, sorely needs to see represented, celebrated and valued. I could have used a bit more detail on archetypes and tropes, but that's a complaint of not getting enough of something I really liked. It did feel a little repetitive towards the end. But it's easily well worth the price, and a resource I'll probably return to over time. One small quibble: I felt like it missed the most obvious, ubiquitous example of a Heroine's Journey in pop culture: The Wizard of Oz. Dorothy leaves home (her seat of power/identity as a cherished child) because her family (Toto) is threatened, but going it alone puts her in danger. She spends the whole book/movie gathering allies and information to get home and reunite with her family. She cannot succeed without asking for and receiving help. The only acts of violence she commits are accidental (she wasn't in control of the house, and the water was meant to protect Scarecrow, not hurt the Witch). The ending is her sharing the glory and rewards of her efforts to free Oz with her friends before returning home. Having never read the Twilight books or seen the movies, I kind of felt like at least one more well-known primary example would have been nice. But I guess between Harry Potter & Twilight, that probably does cover a lot of western pop culture consumers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I cannot rave about this book enough! It perfectly describes why I love the stories I do. It's all about reading/listening/watching for comfort and connection...and I definitely got those feelings from this book, something rare for me with non-fiction. Reading about the bones and structure and parts of stories fed my geeky soul and made me think. Reading that comfort and connection are valid objectives from partaking in stories made me feel validated and seen. This is a gem for reading addicts - I cannot rave about this book enough! It perfectly describes why I love the stories I do. It's all about reading/listening/watching for comfort and connection...and I definitely got those feelings from this book, something rare for me with non-fiction. Reading about the bones and structure and parts of stories fed my geeky soul and made me think. Reading that comfort and connection are valid objectives from partaking in stories made me feel validated and seen. This is a gem for reading addicts - go, read, and enjoy!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Leelo

    I know what I like. I could give you a list of all my favorite books but before reading this, I couldn’t voice exactly what I found so compelling about the books I love. I could tell you their plot and what I love about the protagonists but pattern recognition has never been my strongest suit (as all my math teachers could have told you). ENTER Heroine’s Journey. I truly feel like a veil has been lifted from my eyes. I now understand why I like the books I do and why sometimes I feel betrayed or I know what I like. I could give you a list of all my favorite books but before reading this, I couldn’t voice exactly what I found so compelling about the books I love. I could tell you their plot and what I love about the protagonists but pattern recognition has never been my strongest suit (as all my math teachers could have told you). ENTER Heroine’s Journey. I truly feel like a veil has been lifted from my eyes. I now understand why I like the books I do and why sometimes I feel betrayed or left unsatisfied by some books when I have loved Book X they did. Although this is primarily a book to help writers with their craft, I think it’s beneficial for even laypeople as you will understand your own reading needs/wants better.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Felecia

    Informative book on the Heroine's Journey that is presented in easy to digest bits. The writing is effervescent. I highly recommend this to anyone who is writerly. Informative book on the Heroine's Journey that is presented in easy to digest bits. The writing is effervescent. I highly recommend this to anyone who is writerly.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Galloway

    I found this a delightful read, even though it covers some important topics. Carriger's authorial voice -- even when writing nonfiction, apparently! -- is a delight. This definitely made me look differently at the media I enjoy. Yes, I do enjoy some hero tales, but apparently I mostly love heroine's journeys. (though the words are gendered, Carriger points out that it doesn't actually dictate gender of the protagonist so it's not necessarily as obvious which journey you prefer if you don't know I found this a delightful read, even though it covers some important topics. Carriger's authorial voice -- even when writing nonfiction, apparently! -- is a delight. This definitely made me look differently at the media I enjoy. Yes, I do enjoy some hero tales, but apparently I mostly love heroine's journeys. (though the words are gendered, Carriger points out that it doesn't actually dictate gender of the protagonist so it's not necessarily as obvious which journey you prefer if you don't know the differences of the journeys) At any rate, I'm feeling pretty inspired after reading this. I read the ebook because I didn't want to wait, but I think I need to pick up a physical copy for better reference use...

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