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Turning of Days: Lessons from Nature, Season, and Spirit

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Return to creation. Encounter the Creator. From the beginning, Scripture tells of a God who created the heavens and earth. It tells how he made the sea and land, the rosebud and beetle. But what might the heavens and earth tell us were we to listen to them? What wonders might the birds and flowers share? What might we discover of order, chaos, beauty, and unabashed grace? Tu Return to creation. Encounter the Creator. From the beginning, Scripture tells of a God who created the heavens and earth. It tells how he made the sea and land, the rosebud and beetle. But what might the heavens and earth tell us were we to listen to them? What wonders might the birds and flowers share? What might we discover of order, chaos, beauty, and unabashed grace? Turning of Days beckons you to a world of tree frogs and peach blossoms, mountain springs and dark winter nights—all in search of nature’s God. All in harmony with Scripture. Join Hannah Anderson, the author of Humble Roots, as she journeys through the four seasons searching out the spiritual and theological truths woven deep within the natural world. This collection of devotional essays and illustrations will feed your soul, guiding you into a life of observation and awe, a life that sees His glory everywhere.


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Return to creation. Encounter the Creator. From the beginning, Scripture tells of a God who created the heavens and earth. It tells how he made the sea and land, the rosebud and beetle. But what might the heavens and earth tell us were we to listen to them? What wonders might the birds and flowers share? What might we discover of order, chaos, beauty, and unabashed grace? Tu Return to creation. Encounter the Creator. From the beginning, Scripture tells of a God who created the heavens and earth. It tells how he made the sea and land, the rosebud and beetle. But what might the heavens and earth tell us were we to listen to them? What wonders might the birds and flowers share? What might we discover of order, chaos, beauty, and unabashed grace? Turning of Days beckons you to a world of tree frogs and peach blossoms, mountain springs and dark winter nights—all in search of nature’s God. All in harmony with Scripture. Join Hannah Anderson, the author of Humble Roots, as she journeys through the four seasons searching out the spiritual and theological truths woven deep within the natural world. This collection of devotional essays and illustrations will feed your soul, guiding you into a life of observation and awe, a life that sees His glory everywhere.

30 review for Turning of Days: Lessons from Nature, Season, and Spirit

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Hannah Anderson is a gifted writer and in Turning of Days she writes with her usual beauty and grace as she leads her readers through the four seasons and the divine truths each reveal. I was both encouraged and challenged but mostly I was moved to awe before the God who has made all things great and small to reflect His glory. I loved this book and highly recommend it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Savage

    Thomas Henry Huxley wrote, “To a person uninstructed in natural history, his country or seaside stroll is a walk through a gallery filled with wonderful works of art nine-tenths of which have their faces turned to the wall.” An all too true statement about most of us, excepting children whose innate curiosity beckons them to run around to peer into the artworks’ faces. Fortunately for the rest of us, Hannah Anderson and her husband Nathan, illustrator of her new book, Turning of Days: Lessons fr Thomas Henry Huxley wrote, “To a person uninstructed in natural history, his country or seaside stroll is a walk through a gallery filled with wonderful works of art nine-tenths of which have their faces turned to the wall.” An all too true statement about most of us, excepting children whose innate curiosity beckons them to run around to peer into the artworks’ faces. Fortunately for the rest of us, Hannah Anderson and her husband Nathan, illustrator of her new book, Turning of Days: Lessons from Nature, Season, and Spirit, stand in the gap between nature and nature’s God pointing us to both. They offer seasonal lessons of what it looks like to turn our faces to the works of goodness, beauty and truth in nature given to us by our Creator and reveal more about Him and ourselves than we are aware. This collection of essays of her observations of nature and theological connections is ordered around the seasons. You will learn about spring peepers, pruning, and hawks’ migration habits. You will read of God’s providence, memento mori, and kronos, the fulfillment of time. You will see detail illustrations showing the same attentiveness. In an online conversation with Hannah, she writes that she and Nathan have “shared a particular disposition or awareness of [the] natural world.” I share this disposition due in large part to spending much of my childhood exploring the woodlands, creeks, and streams that bordered my home and to a church that offered me a chance to read and learn much of the Bible. The connections come somewhat naturally when you watch a hawk soaring over an open field and then read in Scripture about “rising up on eagles wings”. Fortunately for us throughout the book she models for us how to learn more about what we see and to read the Bible with those observations in mind. In a final essay she gives suggestions how to place our ourselves, so our attention is directed to observe nature well. We will not learn this disposition if we will not place ourselves as creature among creation willing to submit to its teaching. I received a copy of the book for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bitsy Briones

    I had the privilege to be a part of Hannah Anderson’s launch team for Turning of Days this month, and I will tell you, this book is precious. I had a month to read it, but simultaneously wanted to read the entire thing immediately, and read it in little nibbles so I could savor it. Hannah‘s writing in this book reads like a journal entry - detailed and sentimental and wise. I so appreciated Hannah’s thoroughness in considering which scripture verses to pair with each chapter. I found myself ofte I had the privilege to be a part of Hannah Anderson’s launch team for Turning of Days this month, and I will tell you, this book is precious. I had a month to read it, but simultaneously wanted to read the entire thing immediately, and read it in little nibbles so I could savor it. Hannah‘s writing in this book reads like a journal entry - detailed and sentimental and wise. I so appreciated Hannah’s thoroughness in considering which scripture verses to pair with each chapter. I found myself often tearing up while reading the passages she so carefully chose. This book guides you through the seasons of the year, and how one interacts with the seasons, particularly in Hannah’s neck of the woods. As she dives into creatures, plants, natural event, and the habits of people, her writing creatively and gently presents opportunities to reflect on one’s relationship with the world and its Creator. Her love for the Lord is so evident in her writing, and she does a wonderful job guiding her readers back to Him at every turn. Thank you to moody publishers for the copy of this book!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Puy

    Hannah Anderson's reflective thoughts on the changing of seasons invite us to pause and consider the care and intent of the Creator. Whether one is in the country, suburbs, or city, one cannot avoid the transitions of the year and the God who set them in order. Her delightful meditations encourage readers to investigate the nature around them with fresh eyes for a loving Maker. Each passage is beautifully illustrated with hand drawn images by her gifted husband, and accompanied by Bible readings Hannah Anderson's reflective thoughts on the changing of seasons invite us to pause and consider the care and intent of the Creator. Whether one is in the country, suburbs, or city, one cannot avoid the transitions of the year and the God who set them in order. Her delightful meditations encourage readers to investigate the nature around them with fresh eyes for a loving Maker. Each passage is beautifully illustrated with hand drawn images by her gifted husband, and accompanied by Bible readings for further study and devotion. This book would make an excellent devotional throughout the year, reading each section following the Turning of Days from Spring through Winter.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Persis

    This is book of essays that invite the reader to "consider the lilies" and all the ways creation can teach us about God. The reflections are thoughtful, wise, and inviting like the author's previous books. However, this volume has the addition of delicate and detailed illustrations by her husband. Although the book can be read straight through, I think these essays would be best read in the context of their season and savored slowly. I thoroughly enjoyed "Turning off Days" and gladly recommend i This is book of essays that invite the reader to "consider the lilies" and all the ways creation can teach us about God. The reflections are thoughtful, wise, and inviting like the author's previous books. However, this volume has the addition of delicate and detailed illustrations by her husband. Although the book can be read straight through, I think these essays would be best read in the context of their season and savored slowly. I thoroughly enjoyed "Turning off Days" and gladly recommend it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Molli Irene

    This book is an absolute must have! I say must have rather than must read because I will definitely be reading it more than once. This is a book that will be treasured throughout the seasons and throughout the years. This beautiful series of essays encouraged me to think deeply and establish strong roots while, at the same time, reminding me that life is brief, expectations should be held loosely, and it is good to flow with the wind. This collection is more of an experience than it is a book. I This book is an absolute must have! I say must have rather than must read because I will definitely be reading it more than once. This is a book that will be treasured throughout the seasons and throughout the years. This beautiful series of essays encouraged me to think deeply and establish strong roots while, at the same time, reminding me that life is brief, expectations should be held loosely, and it is good to flow with the wind. This collection is more of an experience than it is a book. It is truly the most beautiful connection of nature, season, and Spirit, and I couldn't appreciate it more!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Traci Rhoades

    The author and illustrator show such great respect for the earth around them. Each story brought back my own memories and gave me a longing to get outside and make more. I loved the tie-in to scripture throughout. Well done!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy Morgan

    This collection of essays reflects on how nature reveals God to us. As somebody who studies natural revelation, I so appreciate HA pointing us again to the places we naturally encounter God. This book is probably rightly read as a devotional, and is so perfect for these complicated times.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cassidy Purdy

    Turning of Days by Hannah Anderson⁣ ⁣ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⁣ ⁣ This book is a compilation of essays and devotionals written by Hannah Anderson about nature and the seasons. These short chapters pointed me to Christ and the hope of the Gospel.⁣ ⁣ Here’s a couple excerpts I enjoyed:⁣ ⁣ “One day I too will be laid into the ground, to be reformed and remade. I will join those who have already returned to earth, whose bones give life to the periwinkle and juniper. With them, my body will be down in corruption, and Turning of Days by Hannah Anderson⁣ ⁣ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⁣ ⁣ This book is a compilation of essays and devotionals written by Hannah Anderson about nature and the seasons. These short chapters pointed me to Christ and the hope of the Gospel.⁣ ⁣ Here’s a couple excerpts I enjoyed:⁣ ⁣ “One day I too will be laid into the ground, to be reformed and remade. I will join those who have already returned to earth, whose bones give life to the periwinkle and juniper. With them, my body will be down in corruption, and with them, I will wait. I will wait through winter’s night. I will wait for spring and resurrection. I will wait until the Gardener comes to turn His soil over and bring us to life again.” Page 119-120⁣ ⁣ “The Lord of creation owns both the light and the darkness. He is Lord of both summer and winter, of good times and bad. To Him, day and night are alike. He has no circadian rhythm. ⁣ ⁣ The One who rules over the darkness can’t be overruled by yours. ⁣ ⁣ Instead, he can enter into your night and be unshaken. He can make it ‘his covering, his canopy around him’ and be completely unharmed. So that while you wait for the days to lengthen, while you wait for the seasons to turn, while you wait for the dawn, the Lord of both light and dark can meet you there. Earth’s longest night cannot hide you from His care. Earth’s longest night cannot separate you from His love. Earth’s longest night is light to Him.” Pg. 127-128

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Gourley

    A book for Backyard Naturalists and Scientists of faith. This is the book I always hoped existed but had yet to find. Writer Hannah Anderson has married descriptions of nature and it's rhythms (organized by season) with spiritual realities (including scripture references for further meditation). The outcome is restful, reflective, reorienting meditatations on the witness of the created world and our place in it. I am a Biologist and lover of nature memoirs as well as a person of faith, so for me A book for Backyard Naturalists and Scientists of faith. This is the book I always hoped existed but had yet to find. Writer Hannah Anderson has married descriptions of nature and it's rhythms (organized by season) with spiritual realities (including scripture references for further meditation). The outcome is restful, reflective, reorienting meditatations on the witness of the created world and our place in it. I am a Biologist and lover of nature memoirs as well as a person of faith, so for me, "Turning of Days" is the complete package. Two features that set this volume apart from any other nature writing or spiritual devotional I've encountered: (1) A section end of the book "Learning to Listen: A Field Guide" describes "ten principles that guide my own process of listening to nature's witness." This practical, sound list is worth it's weight in gold. (2) Nathan Anderson's illustrations add to the beauty and content of the text and also invite the reader to do some of their own careful observing. The art is simple yet dynamic and stirring. This is a book to keep on the bedside table or alongside the stacks of bird and wildflower guides littered around the house. I'll be turning to mine season after season.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dorothy Greco

    This book is incredibly beautiful and profound. Each of the four sections (spring, summer, fall, and winter) contains short essays based on Anderson's astute observations of nature. She's not simply telling us what she sees. She's helping us to see and then make connections between the natural world and the God who created it all. I read it in two days but definitely want to go back through and read each essay and the accompanying Scripture as a devotional. Her husband Nathan's sketches accompan This book is incredibly beautiful and profound. Each of the four sections (spring, summer, fall, and winter) contains short essays based on Anderson's astute observations of nature. She's not simply telling us what she sees. She's helping us to see and then make connections between the natural world and the God who created it all. I read it in two days but definitely want to go back through and read each essay and the accompanying Scripture as a devotional. Her husband Nathan's sketches accompany the text. Here's a short sample of what you can expect: "Now I wonder if the real difference between what is natural and what is supernatural is simply our ability to know it. Because if God is the God of creation, then all of nature is supernatural. If God is the God of miracles, then the supernatural is the most natural thing in the world."

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    Each book that Hannah Anderson has written has been full of biblical integrity and life giving examples and applications. I’ve read all three of her previous books and gained so much from them. Gods first revelation of Himself was through creation. In Turning of Days, Hannah Anderson makes her way through the seasons and finds God revealed in His creation. Each example has a spiritual example. Some examples that stood out stood out me were the grief and waste of a healthy tree that was cut down w Each book that Hannah Anderson has written has been full of biblical integrity and life giving examples and applications. I’ve read all three of her previous books and gained so much from them. Gods first revelation of Himself was through creation. In Turning of Days, Hannah Anderson makes her way through the seasons and finds God revealed in His creation. Each example has a spiritual example. Some examples that stood out stood out me were the grief and waste of a healthy tree that was cut down while living and the peach trees that need new growth cut off so that they could establish roots and later produce even better fruit. Other examples were the make up of dirt and it’s need to be amended to produce healthy growth. I’ve been slowly making my way through this book, and when finished, I’ll read it again. The beautiful writing and delicate illustrations are something to be savored.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Kassing

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. Each essay was like reading a mini meditation that calmed and soothed my soul. I found myself wanting to sit with each essay a little longer and would love to read through each season as the season is happening in real life. While 'Turning of Days' is very different from Hannah's other books, it was pleasant surprise. The reflections on nature and how they connect with our faith were thought provoking and have me noticing and reflecting on nature throughou I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. Each essay was like reading a mini meditation that calmed and soothed my soul. I found myself wanting to sit with each essay a little longer and would love to read through each season as the season is happening in real life. While 'Turning of Days' is very different from Hannah's other books, it was pleasant surprise. The reflections on nature and how they connect with our faith were thought provoking and have me noticing and reflecting on nature throughout my days in ways I had not prior to reading the book. This is an easy, relaxing read that leaves you wanting more!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Desiré

    Turning of Days and it’s a delightful devotional that I heartily recommend. In this unique book, Hannah Anderson wrote seven devotional readings for each of the four seasons. She helps you see God, the gospel, and beauty in all kinds of weather and elements of nature. I grow weary every winter and her insight has given me a new perspective on these dreary, cold days. I still long for Spring, but I’ve got a whole new appreciation for the unseen life stirring beneath the frosty, hard dirt now. Thi Turning of Days and it’s a delightful devotional that I heartily recommend. In this unique book, Hannah Anderson wrote seven devotional readings for each of the four seasons. She helps you see God, the gospel, and beauty in all kinds of weather and elements of nature. I grow weary every winter and her insight has given me a new perspective on these dreary, cold days. I still long for Spring, but I’ve got a whole new appreciation for the unseen life stirring beneath the frosty, hard dirt now. This would be a perfect book to get out with the start of each season and read for a week.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Kurtz

    I always describe Hannah Anderson's books as the best cup of coffee for your soul, and her newest release, Turning of Days, is no different. Turning of Days features short essays of Anderson's thoughts while being in and observing nature. As always, her writing is beautifully poetic and thought-provoking. She encourages the reader to slow down and take in how intricate and constant nature is by explaining what/how God reveals about himself in each season, in every stage of plant growth, and in ev I always describe Hannah Anderson's books as the best cup of coffee for your soul, and her newest release, Turning of Days, is no different. Turning of Days features short essays of Anderson's thoughts while being in and observing nature. As always, her writing is beautifully poetic and thought-provoking. She encourages the reader to slow down and take in how intricate and constant nature is by explaining what/how God reveals about himself in each season, in every stage of plant growth, and in every animal in nature. A neat feature in this book is a guide in the back on "learning to listen." I think it'll be extremely useful for those who want to be better at observing and listening in nature. *I received an advance copy of this book from Moody Publishers. No compensation was given for a review. All thoughts are my own.*

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy Fritz

    This is a beautiful book. Hannah Anderson writes like a poet and her attention to the world around her is a gift. You're going to want to read this and keep it on your coffee table. This is a beautiful book. Hannah Anderson writes like a poet and her attention to the world around her is a gift. You're going to want to read this and keep it on your coffee table.

  17. 5 out of 5

    DEIRDRE PARKER

    Turning the Days is a collection of essays written by Hannah Anderson. Hannah's words are so descriptive and poetic as she describes the interaction of the elements of creation. One of the elements being herself. This book was not a fast read for me, because I wanted to take in the visual picture of what she was describing in her book. I walk everyday with my son, and this book inspired me to look around me and take in God's creation more than I've ever done. The amazing thing is that there are Turning the Days is a collection of essays written by Hannah Anderson. Hannah's words are so descriptive and poetic as she describes the interaction of the elements of creation. One of the elements being herself. This book was not a fast read for me, because I wanted to take in the visual picture of what she was describing in her book. I walk everyday with my son, and this book inspired me to look around me and take in God's creation more than I've ever done. The amazing thing is that there are scripture verses at the end of the book to connect with her essays. They are able to always connect back to scripture what she is describing for herself to make the word come real and present to us. Even if it is on a hike. I'm grateful to Moody Publishers for the opportunity to review this title!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ema

    Excellent book, beautifully written as a compilation of essays that see nature through all 4 seasons. It has a devotional & philosophical approach, and it brings your attention not only the creation, but also its Creator. Highly recommend.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    At risk of sounding unintentionally negative, I’m going to confess I’ve come to dislike most current Christian books. So many topical manuals with bullet points, superficial storylines, and packaged take-aways. Either intentionally oversimplified to pander to the masses or forced into pre-determined conclusions or styles that test well with platforms. But alas, I love theology and reading, so my standard stacks tend to comprise of weighty theological treatises, literature, non-fiction science or At risk of sounding unintentionally negative, I’m going to confess I’ve come to dislike most current Christian books. So many topical manuals with bullet points, superficial storylines, and packaged take-aways. Either intentionally oversimplified to pander to the masses or forced into pre-determined conclusions or styles that test well with platforms. But alas, I love theology and reading, so my standard stacks tend to comprise of weighty theological treatises, literature, non-fiction science or history selections, and lots of what I’ll call “loosely” holy writings... you know, Wendell Berry, L’Engle, and always an Annie Dillard in there somewhere. ...Which is actually how I ended up with Turning of Days in my hands. While I’m not particularly active on social media, Hannah Anderson is one of the few voices I try to check in on every so often. Her words seem to rise above the fray, buoyed by wisdom and graceful insight. She referred to Annie Dillard at some point when she was working on this project, and I made a note to myself that I’d have to pick it up when it came out as my introduction to Anderson’s work. I’ll start by saying that I wish there were more Christian books like this, and more writers like Hannah Anderson. Rather than words forced through a single topic, Turning of Days hands us insight in a way that is more organic and touchable with writing that flows far more like our minds and lives do in reality. It’s no Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, but in some ways, that’s why I liked it. While Dillard questions, dismantles, and deconstructs, Anderson illuminates, builds, and and gives us places to rest. Where Dillard dizzies us with her vocabulary and dazzles us with her show of intellect, her voice at the forefront, Anderson draws us to her Maker and his creation in ways that make it so we can’t help but keep our eyes on Him. And if you know anything about Hannah, you’ll know It’s not due to a lack of skill or intelligence—I’m certain she could write her own heavy theological treatise—just something she clearly purposes to do in order to bring truth in ways that are accessible to others, without sacrificing depth or beauty. There’s a difference between condensation towards deep simplicity and oversimplification that suppresses thought. The former is often life-giving, while the latter rarely permeates our real lives. In these days of hard lines, overconfident voices, and issue after issue packaged into cut-and-dry tidbits, I’m thankful for those who remind me how slow down and learn to live in paradox. Those who remind me that while the easiest ways usually involve a lot of ‘either-or,’ the best and most faithful ways tend to look a lot more nuanced and full. I’m with Hannah as she says, “My mind whirls with all it knows and all it doesn’t. There are mysteries in this world, not just of science but of conscience. Mysteries of unity and continuity, of both wonder and groaning, of creation awaiting redemption. What might I observe were I to crouch down low and turn my eyes and tune my ears? What might I discover of pain and loss, of beauty and truth? What might I find were I to drop my shoulders, lift my head, and keep watch in this world?” While I’m currently stuck in the middle of the busy city for a temporary spell (husband goes where work sends) and away from our Virginian farmhouse we usually call home, Turning of Days prompts me to raise my gaze to the beauty and revelation that could never be confined to any geographical coordinate or vista. ⠀ I tend to believe that while revelation has not dwindled, those willing to stop and see and listen to it certainly has. This is one of those books that helps us remember how. It helps us to remember that the faithful life is so often a paradoxical one: ⠀ “The primary paradox, of course, is that God chooses to reveal Himself through both the natural world and the Holy Scriptures. He chooses to makes himself known through both the universal and the specific. He is the God of both common and particular grace.⠀ ⠀ Those accustomed to knowing God in certain ways may find it challenging to encounter Him in different ones. Perhaps you’ll ask, ‘What can nature teach me about God that scripture cannot?’ or ‘If I can meet God on a mountain top, why should I worry about a book?’ But let me suggest different questions: ‘What will you miss if you don’t encounter God in all the ways He chooses to reveal himself? What will you miss if you don’t embrace the paradox of revelation?’” (excerpt from the Intro). ⠀ This review has become long, so I’ll end here, but I think it’s important to thank writers willing to do the good and hard work of thinking deeply and allowing their words to be driven by truth with an eye on nourishment rather than merely consumption. Thankful for your voice, Hannah. Nathan, your illustrations are wonderful and personal. Next time you’re near D.C. you all will have to drop by our little farmhouse in the country for a cup of coffee, because I could really use some gardening advice ;-)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

    The heavens are declaring, but are we paying attention? Psalm 19:1-4 The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork. 2 Day to day pours out speech, and night to night reveals knowledge. 3 There is no speech, nor are there words, whose voice is not heard. 4 Their voice goes out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. In them he has set a tent for the sun, This new book will point you to the Lord and His creation. It is also a timely read for the The heavens are declaring, but are we paying attention? Psalm 19:1-4 The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork. 2 Day to day pours out speech, and night to night reveals knowledge. 3 There is no speech, nor are there words, whose voice is not heard. 4 Their voice goes out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. In them he has set a tent for the sun, This new book will point you to the Lord and His creation. It is also a timely read for the start of spring season, Turning of Days ~ Lessons from Nature, Season, and Spirit by Hannah Anderson This is a book about God of both nature and Scripture. “Learning from nature and Scripture both will reveal who God is, we must learn to let His truth shape our days and years here on earth”, as Hannah says, “seeing wonder and fear, beauty and honor, visible and invisible.” This is not the first book of Hannah Anderson’s I have read, so when it was offered up for review, I knew it would be a worthwhile based on her other books. Each season has several chapters which include short observations/essays to reflect on nature’s testimony, while pointing out truth’s from God’s Word, questions to make you ponder, and sketches of nature. It reads almost poetic in a way, you will want to slow down and do your own reflects from what is around you. Here are a few highlights from the book I made: ~ It’s hard to walk this way, hunched over and closed in on yourself… It is hard to see what you’re supposed to see. It’s hard to see what the world is meant to teach you when you’re balled up into yourself and all your attention is given to resisting the elements. ~ There are mysteries in this world, not just of science but of conscience. Mysteries of unity and continuity, of both wonder and groaning, of creation awaiting redemption. ~ God reveals Himself and His will. He doesn’t shout His plans from the mountains as much as He repeats them over and over in law, quiet songs that only make sense to those who know the significance of them. ~ The same ground that is blessed is also cursed. ~ In our search for safety means that we’re not searching for goodness. ~ A heart that hopes for goodness will plant and prune and wait and pray. ~ So the seasons teach us to believe in a future we cannot yet see, but the unpredictability of the seasons teaches us to trust the One who will bring it to pass. ~ What if letting Him act sometimes means staying and choosing to stay in the uncertainty? The end of the book ends with a learning to Listen – Field Guide, ten principals to guide you in your own process of listening to nature’s witness.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Swritebol

    What a privilege to be a part of the launch team for Hannah Anderson's new book, Turning of Days. Hannah has faithfully used her gift of writing to minister to so many, always remaining faithful to scripture and challenging us to dive deeper in our faith. I have read all of her other books and was unsure of what to expect with Turning of Days, as it is a collection of essays rather than following the format of her other books. And what I knew would be a good book, because it was by Hannah Anders What a privilege to be a part of the launch team for Hannah Anderson's new book, Turning of Days. Hannah has faithfully used her gift of writing to minister to so many, always remaining faithful to scripture and challenging us to dive deeper in our faith. I have read all of her other books and was unsure of what to expect with Turning of Days, as it is a collection of essays rather than following the format of her other books. And what I knew would be a good book, because it was by Hannah Anderson, turned out to be the life-giving breath I needed in this season we are in on the heals of 2020, COVID, political chaos, and division in our country. My weary soul needed to be taken back to nature and our creator and find rest and comfort in the truth of who he is and all he has done, is doing and will do, all viewed through the lens of his creation. It is no accident that this book was released when it was, when we are all needed that reminder that the Lord of ALL creation hasn't left us! Hannah does an excellent job of taking us through a journey of the seasons and her own experiences with God's creation, all pointing us to the truth of a very big God who is in every detail of our lives and continually calling us back to him. For the launch team, I was asked to read this book in a month and for that I did, but I have to tell you this is a book you will want to savor. These essays are to be read and pondered and thought about, not something to rush. They are relatable, even if you don't consider yourself a nature person. If you have found your heart weary from all that this life has given, longing for a more intimate and closer view of the Lord and his deep love for you, this is a book that will breathe life to your soul. It was life-giving to me. It will be a book I will go back and read and savor and ponder in the days to come. It will be a book that will be gifted to my friends and family because I am confident it will be a breath of life for them as well! I couldn't recommend this book more! The illustrations, done by Hannah's husband, Nathan Anderson, are beautiful and compliment every section of the book in amazing ways! This book is one that is beautiful from cover to cover and the written word will be a gift to your soul! It definitely captured mine from the first essay and I can't wait to go back and re-read it in a slower pace!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Viola

    This weekend we will be turning the clocks ahead as we enter Daylight Savings Time. It means it will get darker later giving us more daylight longer. It also seems to be the sign spring is coming and along with it, signs of new growth and hope abound. In her new book, Turning of Days, Hannah Anderson brings us lessons from Nature, Season, and Spirit. This book could not have come at a better time as I begin to notice the change of seasons slowly beginning here in New England. Each season contains This weekend we will be turning the clocks ahead as we enter Daylight Savings Time. It means it will get darker later giving us more daylight longer. It also seems to be the sign spring is coming and along with it, signs of new growth and hope abound. In her new book, Turning of Days, Hannah Anderson brings us lessons from Nature, Season, and Spirit. This book could not have come at a better time as I begin to notice the change of seasons slowly beginning here in New England. Each season contains seven essays in which the author brings to life her observations in nature and the spiritual applications which they brought to mind. She brings God into focus through all kinds of weather, vegetation, and creatures. Perhaps as I am eagerly waiting for spring and see signs of its arrival, I especially enjoyed her thoughts on this season. She herself notes that “spring is a strange mix of hope and persistence.” “Whenever I’m tempted to doubt God’s providence, whenever I’m tempted to think that I somehow missed the life I was supposed to have, when the hard times come and the pain bears down, I remember spring peepers. And I think of how God reveals Himself and His will. He doesn’t shout His plans from the mountains so much as He repeats them over and over in low, quiet songs that only make sense to those who know the significance of them. Like spring in Appalachia, His plans unfold in gentle, persistent ways – sometimes two steps forward and one back – but always in rhythm and always in time … I think of how we all plan our steps, but God cuts the path.” (from page 23) All our steps going in the path God has cut out for us. This means everything which occurs in our lives is meant to shape and mold us, ultimately leading to our growth. His path becoming our plan for our good and for His glory. “The mind of man plans his way, But the Lord directs his steps.” (Proverbs 16:9, NASB) The book is beautiful in word and sketches, bringing encouragement and comfort from God’s beauty in the world around us. Every page, every season will bring reminders of God’s faithfulness to His children. *I was provided a copy of this book by Moody Publishers. All opinions are honest and my own.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    This is a collection of essays that reflects on how nature displays God's glory. The author's premise is that God has revealed himself through the Bible and also through his created world, so that if we fail to look closely at nature, we fail to see God in one of the ways he has revealed himself. The essays are grouped into four categories, for each season. I've really enjoyed the author's previous books but the way this book is structured in its essay format is different to her other books. It t This is a collection of essays that reflects on how nature displays God's glory. The author's premise is that God has revealed himself through the Bible and also through his created world, so that if we fail to look closely at nature, we fail to see God in one of the ways he has revealed himself. The essays are grouped into four categories, for each season. I've really enjoyed the author's previous books but the way this book is structured in its essay format is different to her other books. It took me a couple of essays to adjust to the structure but as I read through I began to appreciate how well the format did work. I read the book straight through this first time but it is ideal for dipping in and out of, giving time to reflect on it. I found each and every essay to be insightful and thought-provoking - I mulled over some of the essays for days. A couple even made me cry. The illustrations (by the author's husband) are accompany the words beautifully. I also learned new things (I'm British, I had no idea what a 'spring peeper' was). And even though the book focuses on nature in Virginia, where the author lives, and I live in a region and country that is incredibly different from what she describes (and don't even have a garden currently), I still felt the book was incredibly relevant. Turning of Days will have a permanent place on my bookshelf and I can see myself coming back to it again and again. It's encouraged me to spend more time outside and to learn more about the natural world, and to work to inspire that love of nature in my children. It's reminded me to stop and look more closely at nature. It's helping me grow in my knowledge and love of God and of the world he created. Disclaimer - I received a free advance copy of this book. I was not obliged in any way to write a positive review. My review is my honest opinion (and I've actually already bought a copy of the book for someone else).

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lauren DuPrez

    Turning of Days: Lessons From Nature, Science, and Spirit is the latest title by Hannah Anderson. This book is different from her previous three titles in that it reads like more of a journal. Anderson does an excellent job of sharing her observations from nature with readers and uses those observations to point them to God. The chapters in the book are short yet hope-filled. Although I don’t have as much gardening and outdoor experience, I also tend to look for ways that nature points to the re Turning of Days: Lessons From Nature, Science, and Spirit is the latest title by Hannah Anderson. This book is different from her previous three titles in that it reads like more of a journal. Anderson does an excellent job of sharing her observations from nature with readers and uses those observations to point them to God. The chapters in the book are short yet hope-filled. Although I don’t have as much gardening and outdoor experience, I also tend to look for ways that nature points to the reality that God exists and He’s created everything. I really enjoyed reading Hannah’s observations, particularly a few from the winter section. One of my favorites is, “The writer to the Hebrews describes faith this way: ‘Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see.’ And so it is with the seasons. It’s only because we have past seasons that we believe in future ones; it’s only because we have seen certain patterns that we act in certain ways. We plant a seed because we believe it will grow, and we harvest because we believe winter will come. So the seasons teach us to believe in a future season we cannot yet see, but the unpredictability of the seasons teaches us to trust the One who will bring it to pass,” (pgs. 40-41). The pages of Turning of Days feature Anderson’s wisdom accompanied by lovely artwork from her husband, Nathan. The book’s chapters are divided into four sections, one section for each season of the year. The chapters conclude with Scripture references for readers to look up as they desire to learn more about what Hannah shares in each chapter. Overall, I really enjoyed Turning of Days and eagerly anticipate reading more by Anderson in the future. I received Turning of Days compliments of Moody Publishers in exchange for my honest review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Prairie Sky Book Reviews

    Every book I’ve read by Hannah Anderson is like a retreat for the soul, a space where I can be quiet, calm, and contemplative. “Turning of Days: Lessons from Nature, Season, and Spirit” was released by Moody Publishers and is a bit different from her usual books, mainly because, as Hannah herself explains, it is “a collection of devotional essays (rather than in my typical book-length form) because I want to invite you to slow down and reflect on nature’s testimony.” It is organized by the four Every book I’ve read by Hannah Anderson is like a retreat for the soul, a space where I can be quiet, calm, and contemplative. “Turning of Days: Lessons from Nature, Season, and Spirit” was released by Moody Publishers and is a bit different from her usual books, mainly because, as Hannah herself explains, it is “a collection of devotional essays (rather than in my typical book-length form) because I want to invite you to slow down and reflect on nature’s testimony.” It is organized by the four seasons, and includes beautifully simple sketches and illustrations completed by Hannah’s husband Nathan. As soon as I opened the pages and began reading this lovely, visually-appealing book, I felt a peacefulness and the invitation to slow down for awhile, and just ‘be’. Each chapter includes a thoughtful anecdote from nature, and ties into daily life and the joy and struggle of living in this beautiful, broken world. Quotes from Scripture and verses for further reference are also a part of each chapter. In my opinion, “Turning of Days” is a perfect book to pick up once in awhile, and read a chapter or two from the season (of life or of the year) that you are currently in. Although you could sit down and read it from cover to cover, I think that does not allow for the contemplation and application intended by the author (and illustrator). So, if you are ready for a peaceful retreat into nature and Scripture from the wisdom of Hannah Anderson, I definitely recommend this lovely book. And if you purchase one for yourself, perhaps you could grab another for a friend or family member, because it would make the perfect gift as well. I received this book courtesy of Moody Publishers in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are my own.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Cottrell

    I’m going to be totally honest—I loved Hannah’s other books so much (especially Humble Roots) that I was nervous that I wouldn’t like Turning of Days as much because it was so different in format from the others. But that was an absolutely unnecessary worry. This book is stunning. It is one you want to slow down and savor. It’s hard to describe in words, honestly, because to tell you that it’s a series of essays weaving together spiritual observations with observations of the natural world, Hanna I’m going to be totally honest—I loved Hannah’s other books so much (especially Humble Roots) that I was nervous that I wouldn’t like Turning of Days as much because it was so different in format from the others. But that was an absolutely unnecessary worry. This book is stunning. It is one you want to slow down and savor. It’s hard to describe in words, honestly, because to tell you that it’s a series of essays weaving together spiritual observations with observations of the natural world, Hannah’s personal stories, and Scripture just really doesn’t do it justice. It sounds a bit flat and technical and this book is neither. Between Hannah’s writing and the illustrations by her husband Nathan, it is immersive, complex, and a joy to read. I told a friend last week that for those of us who are fans of Hannah’s other books, this book is almost a prequel of sorts—a glimpse into her spiritual formation and the things that have shaped and formed her thinking and work. And, a lens through which the work of God in the world and in us is illuminated. I was genuinely sad when I finished reading this book, which is not something I experience often with non-fiction books or devotional literature. But I know I’ll pick this book up again and again, through the years and seasons, and be reminded over and over of the goodness of God and His Creation, and the promise of redemption. Do you want to love God more? Do you want to love His world more? Do you want to see yourself more rightly? Pick up this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michele Morin

    This collection of essays by Hannah Anderson fulfills the old theater adage: Leave them wanting more! With exquisite prose, she chronicles her own Turning of Days, one season at a time, taking note of creation and meandering between description and application. My plan is to keep the book on my night stand this year for a leisurely re-read in season. Delicate hand drawings and well-chosen scripture verses support each essay, and so does Anderson’s world view, which has been shaped by eternal trut This collection of essays by Hannah Anderson fulfills the old theater adage: Leave them wanting more! With exquisite prose, she chronicles her own Turning of Days, one season at a time, taking note of creation and meandering between description and application. My plan is to keep the book on my night stand this year for a leisurely re-read in season. Delicate hand drawings and well-chosen scripture verses support each essay, and so does Anderson’s world view, which has been shaped by eternal truth and by her close association with the land, family, and community. Because I am also a gardener and a woman subject to the variances and vicissitudes of nature, I found myself nodding in agreement, page after page, celebrating the ways and means of God and lamenting the fact that once the harvest begins, the weeding comes to a screeching halt. One thing is certain: reading “Summer” in February proved to be so tantalizing, I scurried to gather my seed catalogs and start making plans, knowing full well that my days of planting, weeding, and tending were still an excruciating three months away! Fortunately, Hannah has also given me something to ponder while I wait: This is what you do in winter: you plan for spring. This is what you do when the earth lies dark: you plan for dawn. This is what you do when death seems to reign: you plan for resurrection.” Many thanks to Moody Publishers for providing access to these books to facilitate my reviews which are, of course, offered freely and with honesty.

  28. 5 out of 5

    T.

    From Jeffrey Bilbro: 'Earlier this year, Hannah and Nathan Anderson created a beautiful book titled Turning of Days: Lessons from Nature, Season, and Spirit.” It’s full of attentive wisdom. As I wrote in my blurb for it: “This series of rich meditations teaches us how we might see God’s hand in his bewildering, beautiful, marvelous, tragic creation. Hannah Anderson’s reflections exemplify how someone steeped in the biblical revelation learns to read the natural revelation, finding these two books From Jeffrey Bilbro: 'Earlier this year, Hannah and Nathan Anderson created a beautiful book titled Turning of Days: Lessons from Nature, Season, and Spirit.” It’s full of attentive wisdom. As I wrote in my blurb for it: “This series of rich meditations teaches us how we might see God’s hand in his bewildering, beautiful, marvelous, tragic creation. Hannah Anderson’s reflections exemplify how someone steeped in the biblical revelation learns to read the natural revelation, finding these two books to be mutually illuminating. Her well-wrought prose and Nathan Anderson’s delicate illustrations invite us follow Christ’s command to consider the lilies—and the spring peepers, the dirt, the fern, the cicadas, the hawk, the roadkill, the seed. This book is a trustworthy guide to the vital work of attending to God’s presence in our places.” Here’s a taste from her reflections on those late spring frosts that threaten the early-budding plants: “If I’m honest, it’s far too easy to become a cynic in the name of realism; too easy to give up hope because this is the way it is and what will be will be and the sooner you make peace with reality, the better. But then I think, if we were actually realists, we’d acknowledge that sometimes our justified fears don’t materialize. If we were actually realists, we’d know that some years, the blooms come and the killing frosts don’t. We’d know that some nights you go to sleep in the certain knowledge that all is lost only to awaken to trees that make it safely through.”'

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Sauskojus

    Evangelicalish women's writing is a weird and often fraught place for me, and really Hannah is about the only human left in that world that I still follow. As someone who's dug deep into small, rural, local-church ministry, she has a really unique and prophetic perspective on what the church (and not just women in the church) might need to hear, both in her 3 previously published books and on Twitter. So, I've been looking forward to reading this book for ages. My favorite thing about this book Evangelicalish women's writing is a weird and often fraught place for me, and really Hannah is about the only human left in that world that I still follow. As someone who's dug deep into small, rural, local-church ministry, she has a really unique and prophetic perspective on what the church (and not just women in the church) might need to hear, both in her 3 previously published books and on Twitter. So, I've been looking forward to reading this book for ages. My favorite thing about this book is just that I'm even more convinced that I would like to be friends with Hannah. She's invested in really knowing, and noticing, and caring for, and planting and eating in her particular local place in Appalachia, and so it's a joy for me to hear bird and plant names that I've seen around here in East TN too. The art in this book is gorgeous, and I'm looking forward to coming back to individual meditations at the appropriate seasonal times of the year and spending some more time with them. I read a lot in this genre of "spiritual nature/food writing," and I don't think this book is quite a Pilgrim at Tinker Creek or Animal, Vegetable, Mineral. It's good, but a lot of the ideas (for example on winter as a time for resting, being fallow, sabbathing) aren't new to me. But, you know, that's maybe also the beauty of this book? I hope that this book might introduce some people to a new way of being attentive to nature and to their spiritual lives, and that's surely work worth doing.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katherin

    To be honest, I had not heard of Hannah Anderson until a friend asked if I would like to be part of the launch team for Turning of Days. I received an advanced copy of the book in exchange for an honest review. The book is divided into sections to imitate the seasons of the year. In each section there are seven-the biblical number symbolizing completeness and perfection particularly with reference to creation- devotions which are followed by scriptural references for further ponderings. I began i To be honest, I had not heard of Hannah Anderson until a friend asked if I would like to be part of the launch team for Turning of Days. I received an advanced copy of the book in exchange for an honest review. The book is divided into sections to imitate the seasons of the year. In each section there are seven-the biblical number symbolizing completeness and perfection particularly with reference to creation- devotions which are followed by scriptural references for further ponderings. I began in "Winter" which seemed an appropriate section to begin with since that is our current season and progressed through the other seasons in order. I was pleasantly surprised to discover that this book was more than just another devotional book. It is a window into the connection between the secular and the sacred. I found myself nodding in agreement with many of the things that the author describes and feeling reassured by that mutual understanding. The artwork is lovely and complements the words that describe Hannah's and Nathan's relationship with the world around them. Take time to read this newest book by Hannah Anderson. Then take time to appreciate your corner of the world as Hannah and Nathan Anderson have theirs. I am going to check out her other books!

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