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Do Better: Spiritual Activism for Fighting and Healing from White Supremacy

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“Using a voice that is both passionate and compassionate, Ricketts instructs where necessary and soothes when needed—but never flinches from the urgency of the mission at hand. . . . This is a book we all need.” —Elizabeth Gilbert, New York Times bestselling author of Eat Pray Love Thought leader, racial justice educator, and sought-after spiritual activist Rachel Ricketts o “Using a voice that is both passionate and compassionate, Ricketts instructs where necessary and soothes when needed—but never flinches from the urgency of the mission at hand. . . . This is a book we all need.” —Elizabeth Gilbert, New York Times bestselling author of Eat Pray Love Thought leader, racial justice educator, and sought-after spiritual activist Rachel Ricketts offers mindful and practical steps for all humans to dismantle white supremacy on a personal and collective level. Heart-centered and spirit-based practices are the missing but vital piece to achieving racial justice. Do Better is a revolutionary offering that addresses anti-racism from a comprehensive, intersectional, and spiritually-aligned perspective. This actionable guidebook illustrates how to engage in the heart-centered and mindfulness-based practices that racial justice educator and healer Rachel Ricketts has developed to fight white supremacy from the inside out, in our personal lives and communities alike. It is a loving and assertive call to do the deep—and often uncomfortable—inner work that precipitates much-needed external and global change. Radical racial justice includes daily, intentional, and informed action. It demands addressing the emotional violence we have perpetuated on ourselves and others (most notably toward Black and Indigenous women and femmes), both as individuals and as a society. Do Better provides the missing pieces to manifest practicable, sustainable solutions such as identifying where we most get stuck, mitigating the harm we inflict on others, and mending our hearts from our most painful race and gender-based experiences, plus much more. This inspirational and eye-opening handbook is filled with carefully curated soulcare activities for getting into our bodies and better withstanding the grief, rage, and conflicting emotions that naturally arise when we fight against injustice. Culturally informed, secular spiritual exercises, such as guided meditations, transformative breathwork, and journaling prompt unpack our privilege, and take up the ongoing fight against oppression, while transforming our own lives along the way.


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“Using a voice that is both passionate and compassionate, Ricketts instructs where necessary and soothes when needed—but never flinches from the urgency of the mission at hand. . . . This is a book we all need.” —Elizabeth Gilbert, New York Times bestselling author of Eat Pray Love Thought leader, racial justice educator, and sought-after spiritual activist Rachel Ricketts o “Using a voice that is both passionate and compassionate, Ricketts instructs where necessary and soothes when needed—but never flinches from the urgency of the mission at hand. . . . This is a book we all need.” —Elizabeth Gilbert, New York Times bestselling author of Eat Pray Love Thought leader, racial justice educator, and sought-after spiritual activist Rachel Ricketts offers mindful and practical steps for all humans to dismantle white supremacy on a personal and collective level. Heart-centered and spirit-based practices are the missing but vital piece to achieving racial justice. Do Better is a revolutionary offering that addresses anti-racism from a comprehensive, intersectional, and spiritually-aligned perspective. This actionable guidebook illustrates how to engage in the heart-centered and mindfulness-based practices that racial justice educator and healer Rachel Ricketts has developed to fight white supremacy from the inside out, in our personal lives and communities alike. It is a loving and assertive call to do the deep—and often uncomfortable—inner work that precipitates much-needed external and global change. Radical racial justice includes daily, intentional, and informed action. It demands addressing the emotional violence we have perpetuated on ourselves and others (most notably toward Black and Indigenous women and femmes), both as individuals and as a society. Do Better provides the missing pieces to manifest practicable, sustainable solutions such as identifying where we most get stuck, mitigating the harm we inflict on others, and mending our hearts from our most painful race and gender-based experiences, plus much more. This inspirational and eye-opening handbook is filled with carefully curated soulcare activities for getting into our bodies and better withstanding the grief, rage, and conflicting emotions that naturally arise when we fight against injustice. Culturally informed, secular spiritual exercises, such as guided meditations, transformative breathwork, and journaling prompt unpack our privilege, and take up the ongoing fight against oppression, while transforming our own lives along the way.

30 review for Do Better: Spiritual Activism for Fighting and Healing from White Supremacy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    The reviews of this book to date have either hailed this as The Book that everyone needs to read right this second, or they've griped about Ricketts' use of curse words, so allow me to hopefully add a more nuanced review. Ricketts uses a combination of personal stories, statistics, necessarily harsh truths about the state of the world, and guided exercises (journaling and meditation) to help the reader gain better insights both into the extent of structural and institutional racism and the extent The reviews of this book to date have either hailed this as The Book that everyone needs to read right this second, or they've griped about Ricketts' use of curse words, so allow me to hopefully add a more nuanced review. Ricketts uses a combination of personal stories, statistics, necessarily harsh truths about the state of the world, and guided exercises (journaling and meditation) to help the reader gain better insights both into the extent of structural and institutional racism and the extent of their own interconnection with said structures. She frequently uses the term "oppressed oppressor" to point out the ways that an individual can experience both privilege and marginalization due to their many intersecting identities, and over and over again points to queer and trans Black and Indigeneous women and femmes as the people who have the most wisdom to share about dismantling our current structures. She shares powerful stories that highlight the comprehensive toll that our oppressive systems can take on an individual person and makes it crystal clear why we (particularly white people) shouldn't try to tone down others' anger about their experiences or tell them the "right" way to make change. All of that content comes after the first quarter of the book, which is going to be a barrier to a lot of people, and not just in the usual "learning about racism is hard for white people and their feelings are going to be hurt by the author not pulling any punches." At the end of that first quarter I was still being told to prepare myself for "the journey you're about to take" — that entire first section was basically just using really strong language to emphasize how hard the rest of the book was going to be for me. It's unclear to me who Ricketts envisions her audience to be, someone who needs terms like "pansexual" defined in a glossary but who won't blink at the use of "AF" and "Periodt." It's also not clear why there is a glossary, as anytime Ricketts uses a word with even a hint more nuance than you'd get from a dictionary definition, she includes her definition of the word in the text itself. But because the words in the glossary are noted with an asterisk the first time they're used, the beginning of the book — with asterisks, abbreviations, plus signs, Gen Z slang, and conversational sentence fragments — was genuinely difficult for my brain to process. Thankfully, I pressed on, and Ricketts settled into some longer, more comprehensive thoughts that I could follow more easily. However, for all of Ricketts' focus on terminology, I had a hard time following some of her choices, which weren't explained in detail. For example, she uses "humxn" instead of "human" (even to the point of editing quotations from other people, like MLK, to update this terminology), but she rejects "womxn" because of the implication that "woman/women" doesn't already include trans women, but then she turns around and uses "women+" (or sometimes "women and femmes") without really explaining why that's different. Then she uses "woman+" and "women+" in contexts it doesn't even make sense in, like talking about a single person (who presumably just has one gender identity and doesn't need an umbrella term) or when talking about pregnancy, rather than actually being trans-inclusive and just talking about pregnant people (or "folx," as she would say). She also conflates gender and sexual orientation more than once, such as saying that heterosexual people are inherently transphobic in the way that white people are racist and non-disabled people are ableist, effectively erasing the heterosexual trans people out there. I'm all for using the most inclusive language, but if you're going to ask your reader to adapt to a bunch of unfamiliar spellings for the sake of being uber-inclusive, it would help to provide some more context and then use your terms consistently and inclusively. I also struggle with someone going above and beyond to demonstrate their inclusiveness and then including some controversial takes without explanation or nuance. For example, while I don't fault her choice to help her mother take her own life after the immense suffering her mother suffered at the hands of the medical establishment, I was surprised by her choice to use the term "suicide" and by her very clear (and ableist) statement that it's better to die than live with chronic pain. She also unapologetically says that Latinx people are not people of color (unless they're Afro-Latinx, etc.), that they are white, not white-passing, and that as such they have just as much white privilege and complicity in white supremacy as any other white person. Which is, to put it mildly, a very strong take to just put out there and not spend any more time on. She also has harsh things to say about people who appropriate practices like yoga and meditation without a deep connection to the communities they come from, but it's unclear how her own practice of these — and indeed, inclusion in the book of many meditative exercises — is OK because she includes a sentence telling you to "give thanks to the ancient Indian elders who cultivated this potent practice" at the end. I think Ricketts does an absolutely excellent job laying out the existing problems through statistics and stories, and I think she is skilled in leading an individual reader through introspective exercises to help them reflect and feel equipped to take on the challenge of working for racial justice. She provides some helpful breakdowns of ways that white people should and should not use their voice/privilege (like, calling out other white people for their racism is great, while getting paid to educate white people on racism in place of Black, Indigenous, and other people of color is not great). She also does (in my limited opinion) a great job writing for an audience of diverse races. For these reasons, I think there's a lot of value to get out of this book — again, if you can get past the very long sections at the front that tee up the content of the rest of the book. However, I don't think Ricketts does a particularly good job of spelling out what it looks like to actually work for racial justice, except for a couple of examples in specific contexts (e.g., when in a position of power at work). She has tons of rhetoric about tearing down / uprooting the entire system of white supremacist heteropatriarchy and why small fixes aren't going to solve the problem, but it's not clear what destroying an entire social system actually looks like in practice, and I don't think Ricketts has the answer, which can make her fire-and-brimstone rhetoric feel empty as times. She says, "White folx cannot love, donate, vote, volunteer, post, or read their way out of racism. Ending oppression, of any form, demands much more." But it's not clear what that "much more" is, and why — given her common refrain throughout the book of who should be leading the charge — donating to, voting for, reading, posting about, and volunteering for the movements of "queer and trans Black and Indigenous women+" aren't the right next steps. I'm honestly a little hesitant to post this review because I feel like Ricketts has set up a dichotomy whereby if you have any criticisms at all of this book, it's because your heart is hardened by white supremacy and you're not open to learning about the realities of racism in your own life, or because the book wasn't catered enough to your "white gaze." Who knows, maybe she's right. But I've read a lot of books in this vein and I feel like I have a pretty good measure of how they each compare in terms of actionability, clarity, consistency, and inclusiveness, and this one, to me, is just middle of the road.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Allison Krulik

    Interesting read! Thank you to the publisher for a free copy, I enjoyed it!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kaytee Cobb

    Fucking incredible. Light a fire under your ass and read this. Also, note that the language used here is reflective of the text. You'll be okay. Fucking incredible. Light a fire under your ass and read this. Also, note that the language used here is reflective of the text. You'll be okay.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    *I received this book from NetGalley in return for a honest review* This book is both easy to read and extremely challenging, Rachel has a way of writing that draws you in and makes you think about the world in a way differently than you have been. Through a whole variety of topics the author delves deep into the ways that White Supremacy infiltrates every part of life and how to address these issues from a rounded and spiritual approach. Each chapter ends with concrete and practical steps to tak *I received this book from NetGalley in return for a honest review* This book is both easy to read and extremely challenging, Rachel has a way of writing that draws you in and makes you think about the world in a way differently than you have been. Through a whole variety of topics the author delves deep into the ways that White Supremacy infiltrates every part of life and how to address these issues from a rounded and spiritual approach. Each chapter ends with concrete and practical steps to take and where we are not doing enough. This book is challenging, personal, and deep and is a book that everyone should read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bookish Boshemian

    𝗔𝗻𝘆𝗼𝗻𝗲 𝗴𝗶𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗮 𝗹𝗼𝘄 𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗮 𝗳𝗲𝘄 𝗰𝘂𝗿𝘀𝗲 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗱𝘀 𝗜 𝗳𝗲𝗲𝗹 𝗶𝘀 𝗷𝘂𝘀𝘁 𝘀𝗰𝗮𝗽𝗲𝗴𝗼𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴, 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗯𝗼𝗼𝗸 𝗶𝘀 𝗳𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗲𝗱 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗶𝗻𝗳𝗼𝗿𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗳𝗮𝗰𝘁𝘀 𝗺𝗮𝗻𝘆 𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝗳𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝗳𝗮𝗰𝗲 𝗼𝗿 𝗱𝗼𝗻’𝘁 𝘄𝗶𝘀𝗵 𝘁𝗼 𝗵𝗲𝗮𝗿. 𝗦𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝘂𝗿𝘀𝗲𝘀 𝗵𝗲𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿𝗲 𝗯𝘂𝘁 𝗶𝘁 𝗼𝗻𝗹𝘆 𝘁𝗮𝗸𝗲𝘀 𝗮𝘄𝗮𝘆 𝗳𝗿𝗼𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗺𝗲𝗮𝘁 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗯𝗼𝗼𝗸 𝗶𝗳 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗮𝗹𝗹𝗼𝘄 𝗶𝘁 𝘁𝗼 𝗮𝗻𝗱 (𝗺𝗼𝘀𝘁 𝗹𝗶𝗸𝗲𝗹𝘆) 𝘀𝘂𝗰𝗰𝘂𝗺𝗯 𝘁𝗼 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗳𝗿𝗮𝗴𝗶𝗹𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗰𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝗳𝗲𝗲𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗳𝗼𝗿𝘁𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗻 𝗯𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗔𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗰𝗶𝘀𝘁. I’ll lead with: folks dont get to decide to if they are an ally or not. It is up to the community you are trying to ali 𝗔𝗻𝘆𝗼𝗻𝗲 𝗴𝗶𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗮 𝗹𝗼𝘄 𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗮 𝗳𝗲𝘄 𝗰𝘂𝗿𝘀𝗲 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗱𝘀 𝗜 𝗳𝗲𝗲𝗹 𝗶𝘀 𝗷𝘂𝘀𝘁 𝘀𝗰𝗮𝗽𝗲𝗴𝗼𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴, 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗯𝗼𝗼𝗸 𝗶𝘀 𝗳𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗲𝗱 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗶𝗻𝗳𝗼𝗿𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗳𝗮𝗰𝘁𝘀 𝗺𝗮𝗻𝘆 𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝗳𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝗳𝗮𝗰𝗲 𝗼𝗿 𝗱𝗼𝗻’𝘁 𝘄𝗶𝘀𝗵 𝘁𝗼 𝗵𝗲𝗮𝗿. 𝗦𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝘂𝗿𝘀𝗲𝘀 𝗵𝗲𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿𝗲 𝗯𝘂𝘁 𝗶𝘁 𝗼𝗻𝗹𝘆 𝘁𝗮𝗸𝗲𝘀 𝗮𝘄𝗮𝘆 𝗳𝗿𝗼𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗺𝗲𝗮𝘁 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗯𝗼𝗼𝗸 𝗶𝗳 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗮𝗹𝗹𝗼𝘄 𝗶𝘁 𝘁𝗼 𝗮𝗻𝗱 (𝗺𝗼𝘀𝘁 𝗹𝗶𝗸𝗲𝗹𝘆) 𝘀𝘂𝗰𝗰𝘂𝗺𝗯 𝘁𝗼 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗳𝗿𝗮𝗴𝗶𝗹𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗰𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝗳𝗲𝗲𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗳𝗼𝗿𝘁𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗻 𝗯𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗔𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗰𝗶𝘀𝘁. I’ll lead with: folks dont get to decide to if they are an ally or not. It is up to the community you are trying to align yourself in allyship to decide. It’s decided by your actions because intent alone can still breed violence & perpetuate the very system you are thinking you are standing up against. If you truly aren’t performative - you’ll muster your way through this no matter how hard it is, because this book is trivial compared to 400+ plus of system oppression others have been forced to live under. This is the book to read after all the Antiracist book stacks have been read. Its also a hard read for anyone outside of the black community because this is the mirror that makes folks uncomfy - she explains how you are part of the issue no matter how you have convinced yourself that you aren’t. This is REAL soul work; as Rachel describes the first step to dissembling the system is for people to look inward, and for many to stop assuming white supremacy is a stain they aren’t connected to. She makes it very clear and explains how no person outside of the black community can say they aren’t. Do Better explains every crevice and root of supremacy AND how to truly combat them, refutes with facts all these off the wall rebuttals often made by folks who prefer deflecting, detaching or gaslighting; and validates the righteous rage of black people. She walks us through that rage, explain how it effects our health on all fronts (whether you think it does or not); breaks down the cycle of oppressed oppressor-ship and how to break it. She ALSO breaks down how mixed races individuals , white passing individuals, and POC also perpetuate this system. I LOVE the soul checks after each chapter, the journal prompts that walk you through the triggering parts, the ancestral meditations she integrated. Rachel doesn’t cut cards, but also acknowledges Antiracist work is hard work; and it’s internal before it could ever be external . This is also great for black readers interested in processing the trauma experienced due to systemic supremacy and whom wish to navigate white spaces better; especially without coddling the fragility of those around them (which she explains perpetuates the problem as well; she even breaks down that if you think you navigate them well you still subconsciously increase survival instinct in these spaces).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Turner

    I would actually give this book 3.5/5.0. This book on anti-racism will be a tough read for white women because, frankly, it is filled with many hard truths that we need to hear. Ricketts patiently explains what is required for a lifelong practice in allyship while also describing her lived experience as a queer Black woman. She did not have to do any of these things. However, in doing so, she has opened her readers eyes to the struggles faced by those oppressed by the global white supremacist ord I would actually give this book 3.5/5.0. This book on anti-racism will be a tough read for white women because, frankly, it is filled with many hard truths that we need to hear. Ricketts patiently explains what is required for a lifelong practice in allyship while also describing her lived experience as a queer Black woman. She did not have to do any of these things. However, in doing so, she has opened her readers eyes to the struggles faced by those oppressed by the global white supremacist order. I really loved her call on readers to focus on inner work. She is right, we all have inner biases that we need to work on. I felt deeply connected to these calls for journalling out the needs and emotions of our inner child. However, I can see this being a sticking point for some readers that don’t identify as spiritual. Nonetheless, I also really appreciated her recognition of the needs to overhaul our political and economic orders to really achieve equity. Ricketts tells some hard truths in this book. But, as a consequence, readers are left with eyes opened and a way forward at the end.

  7. 4 out of 5

    ℓ◎♥℮ т☺ яεαḓ

    I acquired this book as a Goodreads Giveaway recipient. And I feel so fortunate! First off, this book is worth 5 stars for the glossary alone. Words that I thought I understood? Not as well as I thought. This is a tough book that made me uncomfortable, but I was grateful for the discomfort. I appreciated that the author interspersed personal experience. I will read it again many times because not only is further and deeper understanding possible, but also necessary. Racism must be confronted, ins I acquired this book as a Goodreads Giveaway recipient. And I feel so fortunate! First off, this book is worth 5 stars for the glossary alone. Words that I thought I understood? Not as well as I thought. This is a tough book that made me uncomfortable, but I was grateful for the discomfort. I appreciated that the author interspersed personal experience. I will read it again many times because not only is further and deeper understanding possible, but also necessary. Racism must be confronted, inside of each one of us and out in the world. This book is necessary. I highly recommend this book to everyone, especially if you're willing to do the real spiritual work required.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kenzie Brenna

    This book is absolutely incredible. I've read quite a bit of anti-racist books and Rachel hit's home like no other. It hits you so personally and the journal prompts and meditation prompts are incredible. I found myself lost in her stories and also heavy with reflection upon my own white supremacy. Grateful that this book exists and it's absolutely imperative for people to read! This book is absolutely incredible. I've read quite a bit of anti-racist books and Rachel hit's home like no other. It hits you so personally and the journal prompts and meditation prompts are incredible. I found myself lost in her stories and also heavy with reflection upon my own white supremacy. Grateful that this book exists and it's absolutely imperative for people to read!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    I could not finish this book, the author cursed too much said words I hate.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott Phillips

    We are being deluged with books on racism, how to do better, being prodded to remember it’s more than a hashtag, and coaxed to look within. Do Better is one of the latest entries and it’s a lot of work….as it should be. For transparency, I am a middle aged privileged Canadian born white man who grew up and continues to live in a highly mixed neighbourhood. Safe to say I am now the minority race in my area which is something I quite enjoy. I thrive off different cultures but I’m in the vast majori We are being deluged with books on racism, how to do better, being prodded to remember it’s more than a hashtag, and coaxed to look within. Do Better is one of the latest entries and it’s a lot of work….as it should be. For transparency, I am a middle aged privileged Canadian born white man who grew up and continues to live in a highly mixed neighbourhood. Safe to say I am now the minority race in my area which is something I quite enjoy. I thrive off different cultures but I’m in the vast majority of people in my race/age group which is a factor in my reading books of this material as I hope to glean more ways to inform others of what I see and enjoy, pulling them into action. Ricketts has done a masterful job in doing so. I love books that present as guides and, even more so, ones that lay out projects or “to-do”’s that cause you to question if you are doing as much as you can. Again, Ricketts nails it. She is very upfront: you MUST do the exercises in order to be better. It’s a lot of work. It’s hard. It’s emotional. It’s time consuming. But so is being the person you hold privilege over. If you are unwilling to exert effort or acknowledge you need to, move on. If you are still willing to do it, and you are a meditative type, this book will be your new best friend. Each and every chapter challenges you to focus of affirmations and reflections, something I personally don’t do much of at all. Nothing in how it was presented here will make me change that, but it doesn’t take away from me pulling ideas and having mea culpa moments….I certainly did. From past discussions, readings, and real life experiences I am aware that nobody feels the pain of Black women, especially trans, queer, disabled, etc Black and Indigenous women. This is not talked about or acknowledged enough in society or the fight to do better. Ricketts talks about it here though….ad nauseum. Even if I wasn’t aware, I would be by the midway point but she keeps going back and back and back. Every. Chapter. It got to the point where I found myself audibly sighing when she did. I sighed a lot. More than needed. The glossary was another high note. She writes with a young persons vernacular, one which I picked up on but others of privilege may not. Her definitions are laid out well and could be nightstand material for some parents looking to help direct their kids. Is this the best book on how to fight white supremacy? No. It is not for the everyday reader, but it is stellar should you be into yoga mats and centering your soul & you are willing to let out a lot of emotions. Many thanks to NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for supplying a copy for review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    To be clear to start: I am white, cis, straight, woman. I admit the intro of this book made me a little skeptical, mainly because I was not expecting to see words like "humxn" and "folx," and while the glossary was useful I wish it had included some history or theory behind why those terms are inherently more inclusive. But the fact is you get used to it quickly (and like Ricketts says, Google is free, and I am more than capable of looking up more information myself!) and as soon as I started th To be clear to start: I am white, cis, straight, woman. I admit the intro of this book made me a little skeptical, mainly because I was not expecting to see words like "humxn" and "folx," and while the glossary was useful I wish it had included some history or theory behind why those terms are inherently more inclusive. But the fact is you get used to it quickly (and like Ricketts says, Google is free, and I am more than capable of looking up more information myself!) and as soon as I started the first chapter my doubts were all gone. Ricketts is very open and shares some of her most personal experiences, some of which I know had to be very painful to write about, to provide a very clear perspective on things I am never going to personally experience because of my own privileges. She supports everything with research and statistics and other experts too, so it's more than her personal experiences. It's never fun to examine your own flaws and think about times you have hurt other people by perpetuating white supremacy, but the book is useful in how it helps you get over yourself and actually improve instead of feeling guilty and calling it a day. I had some small issues - saying heterosexual people all have some form of transphobia ignores that trans people can be heterosexual, and I don't think saying "women+" instead of "womxn" addresses any of the criticisms on how "womxn" is not inclusive. (It still seems like it puts nonbinary/femme people in a "woman lite" category, and trans women are women, not some women-alt.) Then there was stuff that was just Not For Me, not any of the actual substance or prompts but I mean the suggested meditation and breathwork exercises, and I'm also not a very spiritual person. I have never been able to sit still ever, and asking me to meditate is like asking me to fly. But the actual thought exercises and prompts are useful and I benefited from them all the same, breathwork or not! I really loved the "wealth and hellness" chapter and the section on apologies, where Ricketts states "an apology without change is manipulation," which is just such a perfect and succinct analysis. At some point it seems like it became an expectation that someone must accept an apology and give forgiveness, and it was really refreshing to read pushback on that concept, and point out that that is not the point of apologizing about harm you have inflicted anyway. This book provided me with a lot of ways to be a better and more supportive friend and a better and more supportive coworker, and I saved a lot of notes to return to and practice again and again.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brinda

    This book found me via an IG Live between the author and Austin Channing Brown that can be found on the @austinchanning IG page. The conversation was about Robin DiAngelo taking up space in the anti-racist speaker/workshop/author realms, but it’s so much more. Please go find it. I have made many of the same points to my white friends, and hoped more would have the conversation with me after watching it themselves—but no dice. I know that not every DEI consultant agrees with the position Austin C This book found me via an IG Live between the author and Austin Channing Brown that can be found on the @austinchanning IG page. The conversation was about Robin DiAngelo taking up space in the anti-racist speaker/workshop/author realms, but it’s so much more. Please go find it. I have made many of the same points to my white friends, and hoped more would have the conversation with me after watching it themselves—but no dice. I know that not every DEI consultant agrees with the position Austin Channing Brown and Rachel Ricketts took on Robin DiAngelo, and I agree that both sides of the conversation are valuable. But now, for the book. It is extremely rare for me to read anything I’m not being tested on or not prepping for a book talk, and use a highlighter, a notebook, and page flags. Nearly never. But I know that the wisdom and genuine care for humanity that Rachel Rickets writes down for us is something I’m going to refer back to over and over again. Of all of the anti-racist books I’ve read, I’ve always found a need for someone to point out that inner work is required. That a white person has to be able to own up to past harms they’ve inflicted or instances where they could have acted and didn’t. I felt like anti-racism work couldn’t really begin until a white person looked deeply at the racism they were instilled with as a child, and what that looks like now when surrounded by other white adults. This book goes beyond all that I was missing from other anti-racism books. (And that’s not a criticism of other anti-racism authors. No one is obligated to write the thing I’m looking for. It’s just something I agreed that Robin DiAngelo should have picked up on before she became a best selling author. If you’re looking for a white anti-racism author that is more introspective of her own deficiencies, try Debby Irving’s Waking Up White—but only after you’ve read Black, Asian, Latinx, Hispanic, Trans, and Indigenous authors who have all written it down for you already.) This book, published at the near one-year mark of the global COVID pandemic is part reality check and part vibe check. It made me breathe easier and more consciously. It made me remember to drink water, and check on my friends to make sure they were drinking water too. It’s going to make me a better friend and accomplice for years to come.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    This book is so important, and I really do think everyone (especially cis white women) needs to read it. It is full of valuable information, and Rachel gives you achievable actions and ideas on how to utilize your privilege and power to amplify BIPOC+ voices and issues in an appropriate way. This work is so nuanced, and like she says -- your work is not done when you "finish" the book. I am still sitting with some of the things that came up for me while reading this, as I absolutely was triggere This book is so important, and I really do think everyone (especially cis white women) needs to read it. It is full of valuable information, and Rachel gives you achievable actions and ideas on how to utilize your privilege and power to amplify BIPOC+ voices and issues in an appropriate way. This work is so nuanced, and like she says -- your work is not done when you "finish" the book. I am still sitting with some of the things that came up for me while reading this, as I absolutely was triggered and even disassociated in a few parts. (Luckily I am aware enough of my mental health responses that I could take care of myself, but she also offers great guidance on how to do this, as well. That is one thing I loved about this book - how it approaches antiracism work through a spiritual lens.) The way Rachel approaches this book is full of truth and reflecting hard mirrors back at us, the reader. She is not soft or walking on eggshells in this book; she is blunt and honest. I love it. She offers enough personal tidbits and stories that it feels like we are sitting across a table having coffee together, but not too much that it is the central part of the book. I really enjoyed the way she combined personal narrative with helpful definitions and actionable items. The biggest takeaway, for me, was that I could actually FEEL her emotions through the pages. When she was angry, I was feeling it. When she was sad, I was feeling it. Her writing is full of emotion and spirit, and it lifted easily off the page and into my heart. Oftentimes reading this, you can feel disheartened and like this work is so overwhelming, what is the point? But like Rachel said, "I am nothing without hope." This book also offers a lot of hope. I think it is recommended reading for everyone, but only pick up if you are truly -- and I mean truly -- ready to face some hard truths, take on the work, and do. better.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bethan

    Firstly, anyone upset by the language used in this book (which isn’t even excessive?!) and has given a 1-2* review or not even finished the book needs to reassess their choice. I imagine (and judging by those reviews) it’s mainly us white people who have been triggered by the book and it’s direct approach on how we all are racist (because we are) don’t like being told that so have tried to scapegoat a way out. This book is so much more than a few curse words and the fact that you’ve all given up Firstly, anyone upset by the language used in this book (which isn’t even excessive?!) and has given a 1-2* review or not even finished the book needs to reassess their choice. I imagine (and judging by those reviews) it’s mainly us white people who have been triggered by the book and it’s direct approach on how we all are racist (because we are) don’t like being told that so have tried to scapegoat a way out. This book is so much more than a few curse words and the fact that you’ve all given up because of that or down-rated it because of that is abhorrent and only further perpetuating white supremacy. Grit your teeth and move passed it because the message of this book needs to be engrained in us. This is a crucial read, one that every white person should read, digest, share and then act on (myself included as a white cis woman). Rachel writes from a personal perspective backed up by cold hard facts, so all these people saying ‘no not me’ or ‘I wouldn’t’ etc etc, the facts are there people also stop questioning BIPOCs lived experiences. For the people that received this book for free, go and buy a copy. There are plenty of books that aren’t as relevant and as needed as this book to get for free, please spend your money and support the author financially for her work. For work that shouldn’t be needed but because we can’t seem to get our shit together we’ve had to ask a black woman+ to literally spell it out for us, to relive painful memories to try and get us white people to understand basic humanity. And if you did receive for free and all you can say is ‘great book, thanks to bla bla for a free copy’ you’re lazy as fuck. I’ll wrap it up by saying this isn’t a book we should read once (by we I mean white people) we need to read this, do the work, re-read, re-adjust and keep moving, as Rachel said this is life-long work for us white people. Our slates are not wiped clean because we read a couple of books one time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Do Better was not what I expected. A couple of chapters in, I was ready to abandon reading, and though there are things I did not like I am glad that I finished it. I did learn. I did not like Ricketts' use of words (folx, humxn, Periodt, frequent expletives) though I can understand her reasons for doing so, and she would likely call me out for my comment. I am glad that she included a Glossary in the back as there were some terms unfamiliar to me. Ricketts wrote as if she was talking and I think Do Better was not what I expected. A couple of chapters in, I was ready to abandon reading, and though there are things I did not like I am glad that I finished it. I did learn. I did not like Ricketts' use of words (folx, humxn, Periodt, frequent expletives) though I can understand her reasons for doing so, and she would likely call me out for my comment. I am glad that she included a Glossary in the back as there were some terms unfamiliar to me. Ricketts wrote as if she was talking and I think that a published book should be more formal. I also thought that she stereotyped races and women to an extent. I did appreciate her personal life stories, and while I did not always understand her perspective, I could empathize with her feelings of mistreatment. Some of the author's points were things that had never occurred to me and I am glad to gain that insight. Other points I could identify with, though I am different from Ricketts. Ricketts is dismissive of Robin DiAngelo, author of White Fragility, without mentioning her by name. Interestingly, I rated both books the same and found that neither gave me all of what I wanted from reading them. The spirtuality aspect of the book was very different than I expected. Ricketts' concept of spirituality seems to be rooted is self-care, breathing. She is critical of Christianity/Catholicism. (I agree with some of her criticism.) Although I skimmed some parts of the book (too much repetition), I do think I learned from Ricketts' point of view. Perhaps, though, she could have better expressed her perspectives in a series of articles or talks (and maybe she has; I don't know) instead of book form. "One of the many privileges afforded to white people by white supremacy is the ability to simply be who they are without preconceived negative stereotypes regarding intellect, ability, class, criminal history, language, origin, or otherwise thrust upon them strictly due to the color of their skin." (7)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Committing to racial justice doesn’t make you a hero or heroine; “committing to racial justice makes you a humxn.” My motivation to Do Better is Mark 11:15, “Upon entering Jerusalem Jesus went directly into the temple area and drove away all the merchants who were buying and selling their goods. He overturned the tables of the money changers and the stands of those selling doves. And he said to them, ‘My dwelling place will be known as a house of prayer, but you have made it into a hangout for t Committing to racial justice doesn’t make you a hero or heroine; “committing to racial justice makes you a humxn.” My motivation to Do Better is Mark 11:15, “Upon entering Jerusalem Jesus went directly into the temple area and drove away all the merchants who were buying and selling their goods. He overturned the tables of the money changers and the stands of those selling doves. And he said to them, ‘My dwelling place will be known as a house of prayer, but you have made it into a hangout for thieves!’ Then the blind and the crippled came into the temple courts, and Jesus healed them all. And the children circled around him shouting out, ‘Blessings and praises to the Son of David!’” I love that this act takes place in the context of the temple. One of the distinguishing marks of Rachel Ricketts’ Do Better is in the subtitle: spiritual activism for fighting and healing from white supremacy. Inequity is iniquity, and, like Drake, Jesus was upset! Jesus understood that “capitalism is part and parcel of white supremacy,” and by His example calls us to overturn the table of white supremacy and invite the marginalized to the table of humanity. And while “Anger has and continues to be at the forefront of many leading social justice revolutions,” I also love that Jesus includes the kids. “White supremacy is undoubtedly a systemic issue, but it starts in the hearts and minds of men+, women+, and children+.” As a white woman+ and educator, I have a particular responsibility to address and divest my white supremacist attitudes. We are all teachers, we are all students, and we are all mirrors. “My well-being is intrinsically tied to the well-being of others, so I will undertake actions that help me be...healthy, even when it’s hard....Our collective well-being depends on it.”

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jess Byiers

    This is a very excellent book for white folx looking to educate or deepen their learning in anti-racism and social justice work. It offers the perspective of looking in and starting with yourself and your emotional thoughts and feelings towards anti-racism and working outwards to better support yourself in the work to support others. This is the first (for me) that I have seen this perspective offered and I believe it to be a truly beneficial and effective one. I've been doing this work for awhil This is a very excellent book for white folx looking to educate or deepen their learning in anti-racism and social justice work. It offers the perspective of looking in and starting with yourself and your emotional thoughts and feelings towards anti-racism and working outwards to better support yourself in the work to support others. This is the first (for me) that I have seen this perspective offered and I believe it to be a truly beneficial and effective one. I've been doing this work for awhile now, so not a lot of the concepts or ideas in this book were new me, however, I do feel it deepened my understanding and let me look at these ideas from another angle that I am very grateful for. Whether you are new to this work or not, I think this book is worth your time and energy. I give it 4 stars because as much as she tried to include and support all those most marginalized, she not only left out SW'rs but aliented them further by making the job out to be a bad and horrible thing someone would have to do in a throw away sentance near the end. And for the reviews who said they stopped because of the language. Well they're just racist and part of the problem. As she literally quoted in this book '...As cultural critic Sydette Harry tweeted "why do I have to watch my language for fear of alienating allies, when they can watch us die without fear of anything?"...'

  18. 5 out of 5

    a u d r e y ♥

    This book is just what is needed in our country and our world right now. It took ages for me to read because this book is rough. But it's hard in all the right places. Racial justice is not easy. And checking my privilege on every page was, and continues to be, an eye opening experience. As Rachel says in her book, "the truth is that white supremacy isn't really going to change unless and until white and white-passing folx are also willing to do better." I can't say that I would recommend this bo This book is just what is needed in our country and our world right now. It took ages for me to read because this book is rough. But it's hard in all the right places. Racial justice is not easy. And checking my privilege on every page was, and continues to be, an eye opening experience. As Rachel says in her book, "the truth is that white supremacy isn't really going to change unless and until white and white-passing folx are also willing to do better." I can't say that I would recommend this book to everyone. Because this book requires active work. Every moment of every day. It requires deep connection to yourself past, present, and future to be able to understand how I am at creating, perpetuating, and benefiting from white supremacy. And if that isn't hard to swallow than I'm not sure what is. But the thing is, I'm way to late to this party. But it's better to be late then to not show up at all. It's time for all of us to ACT IN allyship, not simply proclaim loudly that we are allies (which as Rachel points out, we cannot do) and get our shit together. If you are willing to do the work. To fight racial justice. To create a world where healing is the priority than Do Better is for you, and any white woman out there reading this review thinking you might be exempt from this. You aren't.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay O’Connor

    “When we are unable to face our shadow self or tolerate the full spectrum of our humxn emotions or the emotions of others, then we are ill-equipped to authentically engage in anti-racism.” “White supremacy is one of the greatest forms of collective social trauma in the world. ...our healing will be the revolution. Racism is an inside job. Because we cannot heal what we refuse to reveal.” “The practice of spirituality then becomes the practice of learning how to tap into our interconnectedness, fac “When we are unable to face our shadow self or tolerate the full spectrum of our humxn emotions or the emotions of others, then we are ill-equipped to authentically engage in anti-racism.” “White supremacy is one of the greatest forms of collective social trauma in the world. ...our healing will be the revolution. Racism is an inside job. Because we cannot heal what we refuse to reveal.” “The practice of spirituality then becomes the practice of learning how to tap into our interconnectedness, face our inner shadows, and transform our pain into personal and collective change.” This book is challenging, insightful, and important! I read it for book club and was grateful to discuss every few chapters because it is a lot to unpack. The glossary alone is worth the read. It is unlike any antiracism book I have read before in how it focuses on the inner work needed to dismantle white supremacy. Each chapter ends with a powerful exercise (such as a journal prompt or guided meditation). The author explains important concepts such as internalized oppression, spiritual bypassing, and intersectional spirituality. I also appreciated the practical help in chapters such as “Acting in Allyship,” and “How to Better Support Black Women+.” This is one to return to again and again, both to read and to revisit the exercises. The writing is straightforward and challenging (Ricketts says the book is “primarily to, though not for, white women+”), but it still manages to be hopeful and encouraging to those on the journey of dismantling white supremacy. I highly recommend this one, especially for those who have done some prior reading on antiracism.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    It feels dishonest to say I "completed" this book, because I don't think I could ever truly be able to make that claim. This book is CHALLENGING; Ricketts writes forcefully and with a wealth of knowledge and history that I will never be able to begin to absorb or process. Having said that, I must make it clear that what she has done with this book, while being incredibly tough to read, is nothing short of remarkable. Tackling various life encounters of herself, her mother, and others in her ance It feels dishonest to say I "completed" this book, because I don't think I could ever truly be able to make that claim. This book is CHALLENGING; Ricketts writes forcefully and with a wealth of knowledge and history that I will never be able to begin to absorb or process. Having said that, I must make it clear that what she has done with this book, while being incredibly tough to read, is nothing short of remarkable. Tackling various life encounters of herself, her mother, and others in her ancestry, sharing how those traumas have had physiological effects on those ancestors that have been passed down and still live within her own body, explaining ways she has learned to battle against the damage those traumas have continued to cause, giving countless examples of specific ways in which people all across the human spectrum can use their positions for good--and the specific ways in which different groups should NOT be behaving--well, it's an exhausting read. One that I can't imagine carrying around in my own head and heart, much less trying to express to anyone else. yet Ricketts does just that. This book was yet another reminder that, when it comes to racial justice and healing, my work will never be completed and will always have so much room for improvement.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brianna Miller

    Do Better is an important, insightful read. Not only did it draw attention to all of the ways that white supremacy plays out (including ways you may not have previously considered), but it actually provided action steps that can be taken to fight for racial justice. As a white, cisgender woman, I've been trying to learn more about racism and white supremacy, including looking within to determine what I could be doing better. Because this book involves a lot of inward work and soul searching, I th Do Better is an important, insightful read. Not only did it draw attention to all of the ways that white supremacy plays out (including ways you may not have previously considered), but it actually provided action steps that can be taken to fight for racial justice. As a white, cisgender woman, I've been trying to learn more about racism and white supremacy, including looking within to determine what I could be doing better. Because this book involves a lot of inward work and soul searching, I think it's a great way to get in tune with where you are currently at and then take the action steps to start improving. I've read multiple books about racism and white supremacy and feel that this has been the best in terms of giving me actual spelled out steps in terms of what I can do. It can be very easy to get lost in the research and reading about these subjects without taking action - but this book URGES you to take action throughout, as well as once you've finished reading. This book has many journaling prompts, questions to ask yourself, and meditations weaved throughout. I think it's ideal to own the physical book so that you can take your time with the journaling prompts and to put in the work. It'll also be great to have to reference back to, as being an anti-racist is an every day, lifelong commitment.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    White supremacy is the common, status quo, globally held, and often unconscious belief that white people, and thus white ideas, beliefs, actions, and ideologies, are in some way superior to non-whites. It is the conscious and unconscious collective, institutional, and systematic belief that white people are and deserve better than other races, are rightfully entitled to hold the global majority of power, privilege, and all the benefits that go with them, and earned such power and privilege in a White supremacy is the common, status quo, globally held, and often unconscious belief that white people, and thus white ideas, beliefs, actions, and ideologies, are in some way superior to non-whites. It is the conscious and unconscious collective, institutional, and systematic belief that white people are and deserve better than other races, are rightfully entitled to hold the global majority of power, privilege, and all the benefits that go with them, and earned such power and privilege in a manner that did not take advantage, abuse, and oppress Black, Indigenous, and People of Color in order to do so. Indifference and minimisation( not all white people) are the beginnings of White Supremacy. There are white people and people who happen to be white. People who happen to be white appreciate their privilege yet actively work to shift the power imbalance and create opportunities for the oppressed.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angie Vanschoick

    A needed and understandable format to learn how to be a better humxn. I checked this out from the library and ended up purchasing it in kindle format so I could constantly return to it. This is one of those books you really need to delve into, do the work, educate yourself and constantly review to become a better version of yourself. One always wishes to be able to say they are unbiased, but this book shows you that there are biases you have that you're not aware of - things that have been so co A needed and understandable format to learn how to be a better humxn. I checked this out from the library and ended up purchasing it in kindle format so I could constantly return to it. This is one of those books you really need to delve into, do the work, educate yourself and constantly review to become a better version of yourself. One always wishes to be able to say they are unbiased, but this book shows you that there are biases you have that you're not aware of - things that have been so completely and utterly ingrained into your own sense of self, that you don't know you're doing/thinking them. If you want to be better and do better, read this book! Get it from your library, buy it from an indie bookstore, but get it in some format and open it up and do the prompts - you'll be glad you did.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rick Barry

    "Do Better", A book penned TO white women+ but written FOR everyone, should be considered essential reading for anyone wishing to fight white supremacism in its multitude of forms. This book will force you to take a long, hard, but necessary look in the mirror to recognize your own privilege and how you (yes you) contribute to white supremacist society without even knowing it. As the author states (I'm paraphrasing) This isn't our first opportunity to make significant change and create an equita "Do Better", A book penned TO white women+ but written FOR everyone, should be considered essential reading for anyone wishing to fight white supremacism in its multitude of forms. This book will force you to take a long, hard, but necessary look in the mirror to recognize your own privilege and how you (yes you) contribute to white supremacist society without even knowing it. As the author states (I'm paraphrasing) This isn't our first opportunity to make significant change and create an equitable society, but it may be our last. "Slacktavism" and performative allyship aren't going to cut it any more folks. This book showed me the many ways that even someone who considers themselves a fervent antiracist can "do better". Much, much better as it turns out. It's a must-read. Now.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    Do Better is about spiritual activism and how we can all work towards dismantling white supremacy in our country—from the inside out. This book specifically addresses white women and talks about how we are part of the problem and how we can all be part of the change. Racial justice is work that everyone in our society needs to tackle. This book made me realize that white people can learn to acknowledge that white supremacy has existed in our history and still exists in our communities and in our Do Better is about spiritual activism and how we can all work towards dismantling white supremacy in our country—from the inside out. This book specifically addresses white women and talks about how we are part of the problem and how we can all be part of the change. Racial justice is work that everyone in our society needs to tackle. This book made me realize that white people can learn to acknowledge that white supremacy has existed in our history and still exists in our communities and in our whole system. This book challenges white people to do the inner work required to make real change happen. To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/rac...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I recently joined an online book club, Let's Get Lit, and this was our February read. I will admit that I delayed starting the book because I knew it was a workbook format and I know the challenges anti-racism work often brings. Though several of the writing exercises are challenging, I found them insightful. I agree that anti racism starts within and this book provides a great foundation from where to begin. At work, we are doing equity and anti racism work and it has not gone well as people fe I recently joined an online book club, Let's Get Lit, and this was our February read. I will admit that I delayed starting the book because I knew it was a workbook format and I know the challenges anti-racism work often brings. Though several of the writing exercises are challenging, I found them insightful. I agree that anti racism starts within and this book provides a great foundation from where to begin. At work, we are doing equity and anti racism work and it has not gone well as people feel forced, rushed, and judged. I'm grateful to have done this work on my own as it has provided a much needed contrast. If you are ready to take a deep dive within, this book is a powerful resource.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Brant

    This was an extremely hard but well worth it read. It will open your heart up to everything white supremacy has done for hundreds of years. I have read previous anti-racist books but I loved the way Rachel wrote about her experiences and connected to lessons on how to do better. I am familiar with many of ways to act in allyship due to past reads of other books (common ones were mentioned in both) but something about how she wrote made you think she was in your brain nailing every ideology that This was an extremely hard but well worth it read. It will open your heart up to everything white supremacy has done for hundreds of years. I have read previous anti-racist books but I loved the way Rachel wrote about her experiences and connected to lessons on how to do better. I am familiar with many of ways to act in allyship due to past reads of other books (common ones were mentioned in both) but something about how she wrote made you think she was in your brain nailing every ideology that is engraved. And that we all will f*ck up time and time again. I appreciated her journal prompts in asking the hard questions and allowing yourself to be vulnerable with white supremacy. Would recommend to anyone who really wants to “do better”.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    I thought this was a really great book, and one written to (though not for) white women. The writing was quite engaging and easy to understand, though the author doesn't mince words or pull punches when it comes to letting white women in particular know the ways in which we need to step up and do better. Which is something I very much appreciated, but I do think that was helped along by the fact that I've done a lot of reading and work in this area beforehand. Each chapter is accompanied by jour I thought this was a really great book, and one written to (though not for) white women. The writing was quite engaging and easy to understand, though the author doesn't mince words or pull punches when it comes to letting white women in particular know the ways in which we need to step up and do better. Which is something I very much appreciated, but I do think that was helped along by the fact that I've done a lot of reading and work in this area beforehand. Each chapter is accompanied by journaling exercises at the end and I though the author did a great job mixing the prose with prompts to bring it from theory to practice. Definitely a book I'd recommend for anybody, but particularly for white women.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Justine

    First off, thank you Atria Books for sending me an ARC copy of Do Better. Such a meaningful book. I love how in depth the author goes into the different ways white supremacy plays out and describes the factors of it to racism. I appreciated the journal entries in the book that allow the reader to absorb the reading and reflect. The author provides research and gives personal examples that really bring you into the reality of what's happening. This book is a great read, especially with the way the First off, thank you Atria Books for sending me an ARC copy of Do Better. Such a meaningful book. I love how in depth the author goes into the different ways white supremacy plays out and describes the factors of it to racism. I appreciated the journal entries in the book that allow the reader to absorb the reading and reflect. The author provides research and gives personal examples that really bring you into the reality of what's happening. This book is a great read, especially with the way the world is now.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Czabaranek, Esq.

    This book took me longer to get through because it is heavy and necessary with intentional work to fight white supremacy and to heal from it. I would recommend this book to anyone. I learned a lot and will continue to use the prompts in this book in my work. I will work to unearth my internalized oppression and heal from it with the help of this book. Rachel is a genius, she also includes cites and a glossary for folx to get acquainted with terms if they’re not familiar. I love love loved this.

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