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Irish Gold

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Bestselling novelist Andrew M. Greeley outdoes his previous triumphs with Irish Gold, a contemporary, fresh and exciting novel of suspense and love. Nuala Anne McGrail, a student at Dublin's Trinity College, is beautiful the way a Celtic goddess is beautiful - not that Dermot Michael Coyne of Chicago has ever seen one of those in his twenty-five years - unless you count hi Bestselling novelist Andrew M. Greeley outdoes his previous triumphs with Irish Gold, a contemporary, fresh and exciting novel of suspense and love. Nuala Anne McGrail, a student at Dublin's Trinity College, is beautiful the way a Celtic goddess is beautiful - not that Dermot Michael Coyne of Chicago has ever seen one of those in his twenty-five years - unless you count his grandmother Nell, who left Ireland during the Troubles with her husband Liam O'Riada, and who would never tell why they left. Somebody else remembers, though - or why is Dermot set upon by thugs?


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Bestselling novelist Andrew M. Greeley outdoes his previous triumphs with Irish Gold, a contemporary, fresh and exciting novel of suspense and love. Nuala Anne McGrail, a student at Dublin's Trinity College, is beautiful the way a Celtic goddess is beautiful - not that Dermot Michael Coyne of Chicago has ever seen one of those in his twenty-five years - unless you count hi Bestselling novelist Andrew M. Greeley outdoes his previous triumphs with Irish Gold, a contemporary, fresh and exciting novel of suspense and love. Nuala Anne McGrail, a student at Dublin's Trinity College, is beautiful the way a Celtic goddess is beautiful - not that Dermot Michael Coyne of Chicago has ever seen one of those in his twenty-five years - unless you count his grandmother Nell, who left Ireland during the Troubles with her husband Liam O'Riada, and who would never tell why they left. Somebody else remembers, though - or why is Dermot set upon by thugs?

30 review for Irish Gold

  1. 5 out of 5

    Junkie for the Written Word

    Sure, and didn’t I start out not liking this book at all, at all? And didn’t I just say to meself, “If this writer uses ‘scatology’ or ‘shy child’ again I’m going to lose me mind?” And wasn’t it me who thought, “This Dermot Michael and this Nuala Anne, aren’t they just the focking eejits and I might be about bashing his brains in with a poker and stuffing her face with rags to slow the gobshite were they truly alive, alive.” Wasn’t the Irish history lesson in the beginning a bit drier than those Sure, and didn’t I start out not liking this book at all, at all? And didn’t I just say to meself, “If this writer uses ‘scatology’ or ‘shy child’ again I’m going to lose me mind?” And wasn’t it me who thought, “This Dermot Michael and this Nuala Anne, aren’t they just the focking eejits and I might be about bashing his brains in with a poker and stuffing her face with rags to slow the gobshite were they truly alive, alive.” Wasn’t the Irish history lesson in the beginning a bit drier than those foreign sands in Egypt and the story just as limp as a eunuchs member? I’ll admit it to the writer himself, himself it was. And I swear by Brigid, Patrick, and Columcile weren’t the two of them just neat and fancy? Her a virgin and looking like a Celtic Goddess and him a great big fockingrichyank amadon who doesn’t want to take advantage of her as he’s all of 5 years her senior. Bollocks, isn't it. Does the pope shite in Rome? Now the story of Nell Pat and Liam Tomas, that’s where the real interest lies. A beautiful tale that had me overlooking the writer, himself switching narrators every focking second as if he hasn’t taken a basic course in creative writing. And wasn’t the Irish feel of it just fascinating and the immersion in the vernacular just as enthralling? C'mere now, wasn't my great great gran a Russell, herself off the boat, and me own sweet little one Grace Anne with the red and the green. Didn’t I just say they were? Errr… what I mean to say is, this book is solidly in the “so-so” category.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Echo

    I may not put Andrew M. Greeley at the top of my list of favorite authors if I don't have one of his books in my hand, but I always remember why I love his books so much when I'm actually reading one. They're very charming, and they make me want to walk around talking in Irish slang and saying things like, "Go along with ye," and "And aren't you a terrible gobshite altogether?". (I've only read the Nuala Anne books so far.) I had the added bonus of reading this book on a plane back from the west I may not put Andrew M. Greeley at the top of my list of favorite authors if I don't have one of his books in my hand, but I always remember why I love his books so much when I'm actually reading one. They're very charming, and they make me want to walk around talking in Irish slang and saying things like, "Go along with ye," and "And aren't you a terrible gobshite altogether?". (I've only read the Nuala Anne books so far.) I had the added bonus of reading this book on a plane back from the west of Ireland, where I had just visited many of the locations mentioned in the book, which just makes it that much better. Nuala Anne, the Irish main character who "sees" bits and pieces of events from the past and feels she must solve the mystery surrounding them, is absolutely charming, and Dermot Michael, her American suiter, is quite loveable as well. The story is fun, though those who don't enjoy history might get bored in some of Greeley's books during parts where Dermot writes Nuala long historical accounts to help her puzzle out the mystery she's trying to solve. (Personally, I love them, even in later books when the mysteries are in Chicago instead of Ireland.) I'll probably only review this book, but I love all of the Nuala Anne novels. I just think they're grand altogether. And wouldn't you be a terrible eejit not to read them as well?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I am reluctantly drawn to this series. This is the first in the series and I’m only getting this first book after reading a few others. As the series goes on, Greeley’s worship of the Irish and the representation of God’s love in a man and woman’s relationship (thinly veiled as the sexual relationship), gets a bit cloying and bit too much at times. It was these recollections and feelings that made me almost want to skip this book and I wondered why I decided to request it from the library to rea I am reluctantly drawn to this series. This is the first in the series and I’m only getting this first book after reading a few others. As the series goes on, Greeley’s worship of the Irish and the representation of God’s love in a man and woman’s relationship (thinly veiled as the sexual relationship), gets a bit cloying and bit too much at times. It was these recollections and feelings that made me almost want to skip this book and I wondered why I decided to request it from the library to read. I think, however, that Nuala Anne McGrail has captured my interest and a bit of my heart. I think I really like her and this character is what draws me to these books. The overly sentimental love of the Irish and the fixation on the sexual bond between men and woman is present in this book, but as the first in this series, it is to a much lesser degree than the subsequent books. The story is basically told from Dermot Michael Coyne’s perspective – a young Irish American from Chicago, IL. I guess this draws me to the series, as well. I’m a born, bred and lifelong Chicagoan (though not of Irish descent). I’m familiar with the reverence and love Chicago seems to have held for the Irish, especially as I was growing up – though it has diminished over time and as the demographics of the City have changed. It doesn’t help that I married an Irish-American man, as well, so the Irish or Irish-American culture has become part of my life. In any event, this was an engrossing tale and I was absorbed from the beginning to the end. It centers about the Irish hero and legend, Michael Collins and his leadership and mysterious death in the early 1920’s, as Ireland was struggling for independent rule from Britain. An alternative, fictional resolution of Michael Collin’s death is offered in this book, and involves Dermot’s grandparents, Liam and Nell Pat (Pa and Ma) who were young lovers at the time of this turmoil in Ireland. Dermot stumbles upon Nuala, a young Trinity University student in Dublin and is entranced with her and she really leads the way and helps him solve the mysteries in this book. I know I will be weak (because it the Irish worship and sexual focus grates on me) and I will read another in this series, again. I need to learn how Nuala grows and matures. She is so interesting, to me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Holyn

    This is the first of the Nuala Anne series and Greeley is just getting warmed up. I enjoyed this novel in two layers. I finally was able to read the story of how Nuala and Dermot met and fell in love which was good - like coming full circle in getting to know a friend. The second layer I enjoyed was Greeley (fictionally) solving the murder of Michael Collins. The history included in the book and the way Greeley retold it through the eyes of Dermot's grandparents was really interesting. This was This is the first of the Nuala Anne series and Greeley is just getting warmed up. I enjoyed this novel in two layers. I finally was able to read the story of how Nuala and Dermot met and fell in love which was good - like coming full circle in getting to know a friend. The second layer I enjoyed was Greeley (fictionally) solving the murder of Michael Collins. The history included in the book and the way Greeley retold it through the eyes of Dermot's grandparents was really interesting. This was a fun and quick (I had to know what happened!) read. Other books in the Nuala Anne series are, in my opinion, better because Greeley has had time to become better acquainted with his characters and can therefore bring more depth into their personalities and relationships.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Korhnak

    The best part of this book is the Irish lingo and way of speaking. I loved the sing-song melody of the Irish way of speaking. The downside to this book is that the mystery was a bit too complicated, too many extra people and agendas. The other thing that I just couldn't get past, and why I won't be reading more in this series . . . . Dermot (one of the main characters) is constantly thinking about Nuala's (the other main character) breasts, and it gets to be way too much. I don't mind a little o The best part of this book is the Irish lingo and way of speaking. I loved the sing-song melody of the Irish way of speaking. The downside to this book is that the mystery was a bit too complicated, too many extra people and agendas. The other thing that I just couldn't get past, and why I won't be reading more in this series . . . . Dermot (one of the main characters) is constantly thinking about Nuala's (the other main character) breasts, and it gets to be way too much. I don't mind a little of that, but this was constant throughout the book. Plus, the book was written by a priest! I just couldn't get over the yuck factor of an elderly priest thinking about boobs quite so much, it was a bit obsessive!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brent M

    Andrew Greeley launches the Nuala McGrail series with a delightful story of Dermot meeting Nuala, the west Ireland beauty in Dublin that is a student at Trinity College? While trying to find why his grandparents left Ireland never to return, he employs Nuala to translate his grams diary. There are those that don't want the truth to become known. Dermot is deliberate, while Nuala quickly starts to put the puzzle together. They become smitten with each other but personalities cause difficulties. W Andrew Greeley launches the Nuala McGrail series with a delightful story of Dermot meeting Nuala, the west Ireland beauty in Dublin that is a student at Trinity College? While trying to find why his grandparents left Ireland never to return, he employs Nuala to translate his grams diary. There are those that don't want the truth to become known. Dermot is deliberate, while Nuala quickly starts to put the puzzle together. They become smitten with each other but personalities cause difficulties. Working around a mugging and other attempts to deter them from finding the truth Greeley leads the reader on a tour of the Irish Troubles. He lays groundwork for future tales.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joy Gerbode

    This book is difficult for me to rate. Both the mystery, and the romance, seem to be hidden behind so much Irish history I couldn't absorb it all ... and it is not so much historical fiction, as it is historical speculation, for so much of this is not genuine Irish history. (at least not recorded so ... I guess it MIGHT have happened this way). There is a lot to ponder, and I think it is rather well written. I, however, found it a bit tedious and not a favorite. This book is difficult for me to rate. Both the mystery, and the romance, seem to be hidden behind so much Irish history I couldn't absorb it all ... and it is not so much historical fiction, as it is historical speculation, for so much of this is not genuine Irish history. (at least not recorded so ... I guess it MIGHT have happened this way). There is a lot to ponder, and I think it is rather well written. I, however, found it a bit tedious and not a favorite.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    This is possibly the most poorly edited book I've ever read, which distracted from it for me. That said, a couple of the storylines kept me reading. The history of The Troubles - and the country's history in general - is so very complicated I don't think I'll ever understand it, so that part of this book was difficult for me to follow and keep track of who was on which side. Still, it was an interesting weaving together of historical data and fiction. This is possibly the most poorly edited book I've ever read, which distracted from it for me. That said, a couple of the storylines kept me reading. The history of The Troubles - and the country's history in general - is so very complicated I don't think I'll ever understand it, so that part of this book was difficult for me to follow and keep track of who was on which side. Still, it was an interesting weaving together of historical data and fiction.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Linda S.

    This was a re-read as I had first read this back when it first came out in 1994 and I enjoyed it now just as I enjoyed it then. I like the playful banter between Dermot and Nuala and how the author talks about places in Ireland and Irish history, which I can Google now to learn more. Now on to book 2....

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kaili

    I felt like this book was kind of slow. There was too much of the characters sitting down and talking about history. There are more creative ways to include that in the story. I also would have liked for the references to Irish history to make at least some sense to people not from Ireland. Other than that, the characters were good and the plot was good.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary Brown

    I enjoyed this book. The interaction of the two main characters is funny and interesting. However, it's easy to get confused about all the people and action of the Troubles surrounding the story. This book did not leave me breathless and amazed about Ireland as did Trinity by Leon Uris, but it was fun to read. I enjoyed this book. The interaction of the two main characters is funny and interesting. However, it's easy to get confused about all the people and action of the Troubles surrounding the story. This book did not leave me breathless and amazed about Ireland as did Trinity by Leon Uris, but it was fun to read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael Parish

    Heavy on the history for my romantic tastes. I felt the author was redundant and his telling of the history of the troubles. But he did pull it all together in the end and the romance made it all worth it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mike Glaser

    Found the first book in the series and enjoyed it. It was good to get the backstory on the characters and find out how they came to be. Plus it helped me to add some spots to see on our next trip to Ireland.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    I usually like Greeley’s writing, but this one had a little too many lectures and too many repeats. How many times does the reader need to be reminded that Irish women are smarter than men who are “eejits”. Pretty good plot

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vickie Garner

    Ir was a well written story and the monologue was very clever. You will never be able to figure the historical plot as it has so many complications and characters. The only draw back for me was it was about 2/3 romance.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    very slow starting out got little better.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beatrice M

    read awhile ago loved it

  18. 4 out of 5

    Diana Moesinger

    I was uncomfortable with the scatalogical words used in first chapter. Just couldn't continue. Really do young ladies honestly talk like that in Ireland? I was uncomfortable with the scatalogical words used in first chapter. Just couldn't continue. Really do young ladies honestly talk like that in Ireland?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lois A., McGuire

    Fabulous yarn Excellent story combined with the history of Ireland. Plenty of twists and turns to keep you guessing. The romance was indispensable to the story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Madelyn

    An interesting book with a lot of historical speculation. I learned a lot about Irish History. I look forward to reading the next book in the series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sherry D'ambrosio

    Typical Greeley

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bridgette Redman

    The stories of our lives not only make us who we are but they often compel us to do things which will change who we will become. In Father Andrew Greeley’s Irish Gold, the stories of the past prove to be life changing for the descendants of long-ago heroes. Greeley introduces us to Dermot Coyne and Nuala Anne McGrail. The former is an 25-year-old Irish-American dilettante who is in Ireland looking for inspiration and researching his grandparents’ past. Nuala is a 19-year-old student who mesmeriz The stories of our lives not only make us who we are but they often compel us to do things which will change who we will become. In Father Andrew Greeley’s Irish Gold, the stories of the past prove to be life changing for the descendants of long-ago heroes. Greeley introduces us to Dermot Coyne and Nuala Anne McGrail. The former is an 25-year-old Irish-American dilettante who is in Ireland looking for inspiration and researching his grandparents’ past. Nuala is a 19-year-old student who mesmerizes Dermot and soon joins him on his quest as she helps to translate his grandmother’s diaries. The quest soon becomes dangerous as Dermot is bullied by both the Irish police and some thugs who attack him in an attempt to dissuade him from finding out what happened decades earlier during the Irish “Troubles.” Irish Gold is part romance, part mystery, and part historical novel. Greeley combines all those elements in a way that makes it difficult to too easily cram the book into any one niche. Our hero is certainly obsessed with romance and the book has many of the standard romance formulas—a couple that falls in love, a barrier to that love (in this case, her age), and the eventual declaration of mutual affection. But it isn’t simply a romance and it never gets overly heated. While Dermot indulges in many sexual fantasies, they are never realized and the two remain chaste as the final page finishes. Indeed, by the end of the book, the two aren’t even officially together, though we have every reason to expect that they will eventually get hitched. As might be expected from an author who is also a Roman Catholic priest, there is a fair smattering of religion and mysticism. Greely never becomes dogmatic and his characters are far from traditionally devout, but they do all have a love for their Catholic roots and treat the Church with a great deal of affection. Dermot and Nuala are highly likable characters in this novel and everyone is well-drawn. Nuala is the Celtic goddess who is passionate, intelligent, talented, and as strong a woman as one could want in a novel. Dermot is self-effacing, cognizant of his own flaws and uncertainty. Even though he later casts himself as Nuala’s protector, the reader is always aware that he is the vulnerable one in need of protecting. This 500-page novel is a quick read in part because it is enchanting. Greeley intersperses sufficient suspense to keep the pages moving and we’re eager both to figure out what happened to Grandmother Nell in the 1920s and to find out whether Nuala and Dermot are ever going to end up together. Greeley also switches quite effectively between points of view. Dermot narrates most of the tale, but he yields the stage occasionally to his grandmother and, infrequently, Nuala. The translations of his grandmother’s diaries drive us toward the ultimate climax even as events in the modern setting of the book heat up. Another charming factor in Irish Gold is the way the characters speak. Greeley doesn’t subject us to a phonetic spelling of each accent, but he does capture the melody of the Irish language and uses Irish constructions to reinforce the book’s setting. Irish Gold kicks off a series that includes Irish Lace, Irish Whisky, Irish Mist, and Irish Eyes. Unfortunately, the strengths of Irish Gold make me less forgiving of the flaws in Irish Eyes than when I first read that book many years ago. For now that I’ve met Nuala and find her likable, I’m less than pleased with the person that she becomes later in the series. In fact, I wish now that I had never read Irish Eyes. Nuala goes from being intelligent, rational, and capable to petty and overly supernatural. Yes, there are elements of mysticism in Irish Gold, and Dermot frequently tells us that Nuala is a witch. However, the supernatural elements do not dominate the plot nor do they overly affect the final outcome the way they did in Irish Eyes. Irish Gold is also far more effective than the later book in making the history interesting and engaging. He introduces a historical mystery and while the speculative ending is a bit far-fetched, it is an intriguing theory well-worth writing a novel around. He brings historical characters to life and bids us care about them the way his protagonists do. Overall, Irish Gold is a charming, suspenseful mystery that is educational in a subtle manner. I may someday pick up the second book in the series just to see how Nuala and Dermot manage to get together, but I’ll stop long before making it back to Irish Eyes, in which Nuala has lost her spunk and appeal.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    A series read. Interesting location, interesting people, terrific story. Location: Ireland with extended family in USA. Interesting people: Irish Catholic family story including grandparents, parents, children. Story: a bit of history, a bit of family, a bit of love.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    I must say that I enjoy the Nula Anne Mysteries. I can also say that I DO always remember why I love this series of his books so much when I'm actually reading one. They're very charming, and they make me want to walk around talking in Irish slang and saying things like, "Go along with ye," and "And aren't you a terrible gobshite altogether?. Though I may not put all of Andrew M. Greeley at the top of my list of favorite authors I love Nula Anne and Dermot. Nuala Anne, the Irish main character w I must say that I enjoy the Nula Anne Mysteries. I can also say that I DO always remember why I love this series of his books so much when I'm actually reading one. They're very charming, and they make me want to walk around talking in Irish slang and saying things like, "Go along with ye," and "And aren't you a terrible gobshite altogether?. Though I may not put all of Andrew M. Greeley at the top of my list of favorite authors I love Nula Anne and Dermot. Nuala Anne, the Irish main character who is faye and is able to "see" segments of an event from the past feels she must solve the mystery surrounding them, is absolutely charming, and Dermot Michael, her American suiter,(the Watson to Nula's Holmes) is a loveable teddy-bear with such wit and humor. The story is fun, though those who don't enjoy history might get bored in some of Greeley's books during parts where Dermot writes Nuala long historical accounts to help her think through the mystery being solved. (Personally, I love them, even in later books when the mysteries are in Chicago instead of Ireland.) I do have to admit that I was TOTALLY surprized at the smut that a man of the cloth was able to put into writing. I love all of the Nuala Anne novels. I just think they're grand altogether. And wouldn't you be a terrible eejit not to read them as well?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    My new favourite Irish historical fiction author, this time adding romance to the mix. Yes, Irish-American priest and sociologist Father Andrew Greeley is truly a master of the human heart. Much less dry than Edward Rutherford and lots less filler, so not a chore to get through. Also, takes place in this era; dealt mostly with the Troubles. I have learned lots about my Irish history. His writing actually reminds me of Susan Conant's. Intellectual and warm, yet truly a wonderful bit of escapism f My new favourite Irish historical fiction author, this time adding romance to the mix. Yes, Irish-American priest and sociologist Father Andrew Greeley is truly a master of the human heart. Much less dry than Edward Rutherford and lots less filler, so not a chore to get through. Also, takes place in this era; dealt mostly with the Troubles. I have learned lots about my Irish history. His writing actually reminds me of Susan Conant's. Intellectual and warm, yet truly a wonderful bit of escapism for my me times! I also did love the Irish grace at the meal: Bail na gcúig arán agus an dá iasc, A roinn Dia ar an gcúig mhíle duine, Rath ón Rí a rinne an roinn Go dtige ar ár gcuid is as ár gcomhroinn. The blessing of the 5 loaves & 2 fishes that God shared with the 5000, the bounty of the King who made the sharing come upon our food and all who share it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paigersoccerfan

    I finished this book last night. I throughly enjoyed it! This book is the first in a series. I read the 4th book first, called Irish Mist, and liked it, so was glad to find out it was a series. I have since bought the first and second books. The books are written in the first person, the narrator being a 25 year old handsome, catholic, Irish-American, who is visiting Ireland, in search of answers to some family secrets. I don't want to say much more about the plot, except that I find the author' I finished this book last night. I throughly enjoyed it! This book is the first in a series. I read the 4th book first, called Irish Mist, and liked it, so was glad to find out it was a series. I have since bought the first and second books. The books are written in the first person, the narrator being a 25 year old handsome, catholic, Irish-American, who is visiting Ireland, in search of answers to some family secrets. I don't want to say much more about the plot, except that I find the author's style charming and am enjoying all the Irish idioms. I find myself wanting to say things like "tis", and "grand" and "meself". I loved the ending! It left me wanting to start the second book, Irish Lace, asap.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is one of the most ridiculous things I've ever come across. Both in a fun spy movie way and in a couple of ways that made me want to throw up. 1. It completely bastardizes Irish history to make Winston Churchill responsible for Michael Collin's death and pretty much every other element of Irish turmoil. 2. It is offensively anti-Protestant to an almost disturbing degree. 3. It is partly a romance novel, but it was written by a priest so the main couple never has sex (they might later i This book is one of the most ridiculous things I've ever come across. Both in a fun spy movie way and in a couple of ways that made me want to throw up. 1. It completely bastardizes Irish history to make Winston Churchill responsible for Michael Collin's death and pretty much every other element of Irish turmoil. 2. It is offensively anti-Protestant to an almost disturbing degree. 3. It is partly a romance novel, but it was written by a priest so the main couple never has sex (they might later in the series) but the couple in flashback does and it's a little ridiculous how many references there are to the main character's boobs.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    I read quite a few Andrew Greeley books in the 80's and then one day, I was just done with him. To be fair, he wasn't the only prolific author I tired of: James Michener, Irving Stone & then later Steven King also come to mind. Anyhow, I felt like after a 25 year break, maybe I would enjoy Andrew Greeley again, but it turns out I'm still over him. The main thing I'm over is the obsession with repressed sexuality that only comes with being celibate or a teenager. His books feel like a case of arre I read quite a few Andrew Greeley books in the 80's and then one day, I was just done with him. To be fair, he wasn't the only prolific author I tired of: James Michener, Irving Stone & then later Steven King also come to mind. Anyhow, I felt like after a 25 year break, maybe I would enjoy Andrew Greeley again, but it turns out I'm still over him. The main thing I'm over is the obsession with repressed sexuality that only comes with being celibate or a teenager. His books feel like a case of arrested development. On the other hand, I learned a lot about "The Troubles" and the origins of the violence between the Catholics & the Protestants in Ireland, so I am adding a star for that

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tam's Literary Adventures

    I was disappointed in this book. I enjoy mysteries and Irish culture so was hoping this would be a perfect combination. The mystery didn't really hook me until chapter 21 and I found the protagonist annoying. His constant references to Nuala as a "shy child" were frequent and condescending despite his explanation for his use of the phrase and reference to himself as a shy child. I think his history was suppose to explain his patronizing tendencies, but it didn't work for me. I am guessing that t I was disappointed in this book. I enjoy mysteries and Irish culture so was hoping this would be a perfect combination. The mystery didn't really hook me until chapter 21 and I found the protagonist annoying. His constant references to Nuala as a "shy child" were frequent and condescending despite his explanation for his use of the phrase and reference to himself as a shy child. I think his history was suppose to explain his patronizing tendencies, but it didn't work for me. I am guessing that this is something that was corrected in future books since the series appears to be quite popular. It is doubtful I will give it another chance.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Terrie Lynn Gelman

    Honestly.....I didn't like it and didn't finish it. I don't why I keep attempting to read "love story" type books. I simply do not like them at all.....none......not at all. I gave this one a shot. Thought it might be a bit different because it talks about some history will be used in the stories. Then it starts out with the guy an gal stuff. I know....it is probably darn good if I would stick with it....but alas, I am not. The sad part? I have most of the rest of the books of this series becaus Honestly.....I didn't like it and didn't finish it. I don't why I keep attempting to read "love story" type books. I simply do not like them at all.....none......not at all. I gave this one a shot. Thought it might be a bit different because it talks about some history will be used in the stories. Then it starts out with the guy an gal stuff. I know....it is probably darn good if I would stick with it....but alas, I am not. The sad part? I have most of the rest of the books of this series because our library had them on the shelf to be bought....and I bought them. On to the next book.

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