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Eye of the Dragon

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In a tavern in Fang, a mysterious stranger offers YOU the chance to find the Golden Dragon, perhaps the most valuable treasure in all Allansia. But it is hidden in a labryinth beneath Darkwood Forest and is guarded by the most violent creatures and deadly traps. Ages 8+.


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In a tavern in Fang, a mysterious stranger offers YOU the chance to find the Golden Dragon, perhaps the most valuable treasure in all Allansia. But it is hidden in a labryinth beneath Darkwood Forest and is guarded by the most violent creatures and deadly traps. Ages 8+.

30 review for Eye of the Dragon

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    Back to Basics 18 February 2021 Seriously, I cannot believe how easy this gamebook was, though it might have something to do with aiming for a younger audience. Like, I managed to complete it without having to go to a solution site (well, okay, I missed the eye, which is pretty important, but I’ll get to that). In a way, it reminded me of the earlier books, the ones that I remember pouring over when I was a kid. Mind you, that isn’t all that surprising considering that this one was written by Ian Back to Basics 18 February 2021 Seriously, I cannot believe how easy this gamebook was, though it might have something to do with aiming for a younger audience. Like, I managed to complete it without having to go to a solution site (well, okay, I missed the eye, which is pretty important, but I’ll get to that). In a way, it reminded me of the earlier books, the ones that I remember pouring over when I was a kid. Mind you, that isn’t all that surprising considering that this one was written by Ian Livingstone himself, and it certainly shows it because, well, there was so much of Warlock of Firetop Mountain in this book that it was not funny. Well, being his style, you sort of have a quick tour of a number of places that you have visited before. Like, you start off Fang and are about to go into Deathtrap Dungeon when you are approached by some dude who wants you to go and steal this golden dragon that is worth a lot of money. You agree, and to make sure you return he poisons you. So, you head off, and discover that the dungeon is in the Forest of Doom, and to get there you walk past Firetop Mountain. So yeah, there is a bit of reminiscence here. Another thing that stood out is that you meet a companion, and he actually stays alive. Seriously, this guy hung around until the end of the book. Now that is something different because as I mentioned in another review, your companions tend to die off, and die off pretty fast. Not this guy, which I have to admit is pretty cool. In fact, I suspect that you can’t complete the adventure without picking him up. Then again, I’m one of those guys that stick my head into every door I come across, so finding him wasn’t an issue. The problem with this book is that there are an awful lot of items, and pretty much most of them are useless. As such, you end up forgetting that you happen to have something, which was the case with me. I won’t say what, but it was pretty important, but because I tend to leave no stone unturned, I would have found it, and it would have helped me complete the game. Oh, and there are keys in this one as well, but then again it wouldn’t be a Fighting Fantasy adventure without keys with numbers on them (though technically you could complete it without all of them, you have need an awful lot of luck). However, that is the only hidden numbers that you have to worry about in this book. Sure, Livingstone could have put numbers on all of his items, but I suspect that he wanted this one to be easier, and to also remind us of what the earlier gamebooks were like. Yeah, this was fun, easy, but fun. Honestly, with a lot of the others that I had read, I’m pretty glad to have come back to something like this.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

    If the truth is to be known, these books are fun at first. Sadly, however, they quickly grow old. If you have experienced one of these kinds of books you have experienced them all. Whilst the stories differ, the effect they have upon a person is the same across the board. You have fun for a while and then they are put aside. It is okay to pick up one or two throughout your life but I would not recommend going out of your way to buy them en masse. As for which one(s) you pick up… well, that is a c If the truth is to be known, these books are fun at first. Sadly, however, they quickly grow old. If you have experienced one of these kinds of books you have experienced them all. Whilst the stories differ, the effect they have upon a person is the same across the board. You have fun for a while and then they are put aside. It is okay to pick up one or two throughout your life but I would not recommend going out of your way to buy them en masse. As for which one(s) you pick up… well, that is a choice only you can make.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Geoff Stratton

    First published in Wizard Books' 2000s reboot of the Fighting Fantasy series -- which did introduce some excellent work, by Jonathan Green -- Eye of the Dragon rehashes the same old characters, the same old settings, and the same old battles from Forest of Doom, Temple of Terror, Crypt of the Sorcerer, and Port of Peril. By this point, Ian Livingstone had come to resemble the gamebook version of James Patterson or Peter Lerangis: he likely doesn't write or read the material that bears his name, First published in Wizard Books' 2000s reboot of the Fighting Fantasy series -- which did introduce some excellent work, by Jonathan Green -- Eye of the Dragon rehashes the same old characters, the same old settings, and the same old battles from Forest of Doom, Temple of Terror, Crypt of the Sorcerer, and Port of Peril. By this point, Ian Livingstone had come to resemble the gamebook version of James Patterson or Peter Lerangis: he likely doesn't write or read the material that bears his name, he doesn't care if you read it either, and it doesn't matter. This stuff is written to formula, and if you've seen one you've seen them all. In Eye of the Dragon, you're a "seasoned" adventurer who bovinely agrees to drink a slow-acting poison because if you don't some guy you met in a bar won't reveal the location of a priceless artifact and split the cash with you. (Seems legit.) You see, beneath a humble woodcutter's hut in Darkwood Forest, there's a sprawling labyrinth full of evil wizards, good wizards, predatory monsters, gruff but altruistic dwarves, scheming dark elves, demons, ghosts, humble merchants, and treasure of unimaginable value. And not only does it all apparently cohabit happily in a dungeon, the good and bad guys both somehow manage to avoid killing themselves with the countless traps, poisons, interdimensional portals, and magic artifacts that some unknown sadist has left lying around. Yes, this is generic D&D dungeon hell from 1982, and the encounters are all of the same vintage: you use the mirror to reflect the medusa's gaze, you use the silver dagger to kill the vampire, you fall in the spiked pit trap and die, the unidentified potion that smells of "bitter almonds" is cyanide, on and on. Even the ending sequence is little changed from The Warlock of Firetop Mountain, published almost 25 years before. I get that Fighting Fantasy titles are primarily intended for a younger reading audience, but that hasn't stopped the better books in the series from introducing more mature characters and themes. Who decided that books for kids have to be stupid?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tazio Bettin

    Disclaimer: I only bought this book because it was part of a bundle. I knew I wasn't up for anything good when I discovered that Ian Livingstone wrote it. Yet I gave it a chance anyways. I regretted it immediately. Ian Livingstone is the worst writer of gamebooks I have ever had the displeasure to encounter. Let me get this straight. You start with a silly premise: a stranger dares you to find this rare gem he couldn't find and makes you drink a slow-acting poison so that you need to come back to Disclaimer: I only bought this book because it was part of a bundle. I knew I wasn't up for anything good when I discovered that Ian Livingstone wrote it. Yet I gave it a chance anyways. I regretted it immediately. Ian Livingstone is the worst writer of gamebooks I have ever had the displeasure to encounter. Let me get this straight. You start with a silly premise: a stranger dares you to find this rare gem he couldn't find and makes you drink a slow-acting poison so that you need to come back to him for the antidote, and you do it of your own will. That alone is quite stupid. But the game becomes worse immediately after you start. You find yourself in a forest and enter a woodcutter's hut. Under the hut there is a mix of an underground market and a dungeon. It's basically a corridor where you find doors you can open if you want. The first is the atelier of a painter, the second is a general store, the third is a room with an idol that is a trap, and the fourth is a torture room. Yes, under the woodcutter's hut. As you can see, nothing makes any sense. I wonder how Livingstone writes his books. He probably doesn't give half a turd about creating situations that make the slightest sense. His characters are dull as mud, and cardboard-thin. The situations aren't any better and the choices you face are completely random. Using your brain to solve them is perfectly useless. And Livingstone is tremendously consistent in this. His other books aren't any better with the sole exception of Deathtrap Dungeon and Trial of Champions. Where at least the randomness of the dungeon makes some sense. I'll keep staying away from his books, and I don't think I'll give him any further chance because I have better things to do.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Royee Chan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Awesome!!!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tenley Frederick

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sothea Chhum

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Snyder

  12. 5 out of 5

    William Pugsley

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ruaidhri

  14. 4 out of 5

    James Coulson

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ken Randall

  16. 5 out of 5

    Adam Di Filippe

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nathaniel

  18. 4 out of 5

    Atanas Koutrev

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ekel Adolf

  20. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Green

  21. 4 out of 5

    Yvett Krilek

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lariboisière

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Kenton

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  27. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lim

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Conrad

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vivienne

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hiphop Clown

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