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Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires: The Life of Patricia Highsmith

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'My New Year's Eve Toast: to all the devils, lusts, passions, greeds, envies, loves, hates, strange desires, enemies ghostly and real, the army of memories, with which I do battle - may they never give me peace' PATRICIA HIGHSMITH (New Year's Eve, 1947) Made famous by the great success of her psychological thrillers, The Talented Mr Ripley and Strangers on a Train, Pat 'My New Year's Eve Toast: to all the devils, lusts, passions, greeds, envies, loves, hates, strange desires, enemies ghostly and real, the army of memories, with which I do battle - may they never give me peace' PATRICIA HIGHSMITH (New Year's Eve, 1947) Made famous by the great success of her psychological thrillers, The Talented Mr Ripley and Strangers on a Train, Patricia Highsmith is lauded as one of the most influential and celebrated modern writers. However, there has never been a clear picture of the woman behind the books. The relationship between Highsmith's lesbianism, her fraught personality – by parts self-destructive and malicious – and her fiction, has been largely avoided by biographers. She was openly homosexual and wrote the seminal lesbian love story, Carol. In modern times, she would be venerated as a radical exponent of the LGBT community. However, her status as an LGBT icon is undermined by the fact that she was excessively cruel and exploitative of her friends and lovers. In this new biography, Richard Bradford brings his sharp, incisive style to one of the great and most controversial writers of the twentieth century. He considers Highsmith's bestsellers in the context of her troubled personal life; her alcoholism, licentious sex life, racism, anti-Semitism, misogyny and abundant self-loathing.


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'My New Year's Eve Toast: to all the devils, lusts, passions, greeds, envies, loves, hates, strange desires, enemies ghostly and real, the army of memories, with which I do battle - may they never give me peace' PATRICIA HIGHSMITH (New Year's Eve, 1947) Made famous by the great success of her psychological thrillers, The Talented Mr Ripley and Strangers on a Train, Pat 'My New Year's Eve Toast: to all the devils, lusts, passions, greeds, envies, loves, hates, strange desires, enemies ghostly and real, the army of memories, with which I do battle - may they never give me peace' PATRICIA HIGHSMITH (New Year's Eve, 1947) Made famous by the great success of her psychological thrillers, The Talented Mr Ripley and Strangers on a Train, Patricia Highsmith is lauded as one of the most influential and celebrated modern writers. However, there has never been a clear picture of the woman behind the books. The relationship between Highsmith's lesbianism, her fraught personality – by parts self-destructive and malicious – and her fiction, has been largely avoided by biographers. She was openly homosexual and wrote the seminal lesbian love story, Carol. In modern times, she would be venerated as a radical exponent of the LGBT community. However, her status as an LGBT icon is undermined by the fact that she was excessively cruel and exploitative of her friends and lovers. In this new biography, Richard Bradford brings his sharp, incisive style to one of the great and most controversial writers of the twentieth century. He considers Highsmith's bestsellers in the context of her troubled personal life; her alcoholism, licentious sex life, racism, anti-Semitism, misogyny and abundant self-loathing.

49 review for Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires: The Life of Patricia Highsmith

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    "But who could like her?" I don't know why I wanted to read this biography. Perhaps because Patricia Highsmith was lesbian, or perhaps because she was so repugnant that it gave me a guilty pleasure to read about her. To figuratively peek behind the curtain, staring in horror.  There was very little to like about her. She was virulently racist and antisemitic. She was a nymphomaniac who cheated on all of her partners. She was full of self loathing that she transferred onto others.  She loved her ca "But who could like her?" I don't know why I wanted to read this biography. Perhaps because Patricia Highsmith was lesbian, or perhaps because she was so repugnant that it gave me a guilty pleasure to read about her. To figuratively peek behind the curtain, staring in horror.  There was very little to like about her. She was virulently racist and antisemitic. She was a nymphomaniac who cheated on all of her partners. She was full of self loathing that she transferred onto others.  She loved her cat more than humans and yet she often forgot to feed it and took delight in putting it in a sack and swinging it around so it could "enjoy" being "drunk".  She drank from morning to night. She was sadistic and masochistic. She admired snails so much that she often carried a hundred of them and a head of lettuce in her purse. At least once she took them out and put them on the table in the middle of a dinner party, announcing they were her "companions for the evening". She thought we should feed miscarried and aborted fetuses to our pet cats and dogs.  Patricia Highsmith was far from a likable person. She was presumably mentally ill and her drinking was an attempt at self-medication. As loathsome as she was, she no doubt suffered.  And yet it's not easy to feel pity for this woman. Her one redeeming quality was her writing genius. In spite, or perhaps because, of her mental illness, Ms. Highsmith wrote several bestselling novels, her characters reflecting her tortured and troubled soul.  I found this biography vastly interesting though at times it was a bit of a mess. Especially in the beginning, it jumped around so much I didn't know where we were. The author tended to go off on tangents that were difficult to follow.  My other complaint about this book is that I could just see the author sneering at Patricia Highsmith, full of loathing.  When I mentioned this to my partner, she said, "Yes, but who could like her?" True. But one doesn't expect a biographer's personal feelings to come through so resolutely and I found it distasteful. He also gave his own analysis on her and several times I felt he missed the mark. He was too literal. For instance, when her mother complained bitterly about her treatment of her, Patricia told her diary, "My mother is the type who fires a shotgun and then wonders why some of the birds are killed, others wounded, and the rest scared". To which the author remarked, "There is no record of Mary having ever used a shotgun ....". I think it's apparent that she didn't intend to say her mother had ever used a shotgun. She was a writer and she often wrote in metaphor and analogies. It matters not that her mother never shot a gun. This says to me that her mother would do horrible things and then wonder why people were hurt or stayed away from her.  Whether or not this assessment applied to her mother or was simply a reflection of herself, I cannot say. But I found it odd that the author liked to disparagingly analyze Ms. Highsmith's words - and seemingly hit so far from the mark. It felt at times like he wrote the book just so he could get out his feelings of contempt for her. He would both praise and disparage her writing. It comes across that he admires her but hates that he does.  I'm wavering between 3 and 4 stars and think I'll go with 4 because of how interesting the book is and because I learned a lot about Patricia Highsmith. It would have been nice to learn more about her childhood, to understand better why she was the way she was. However, there simply might not be much known or available about her early years.  The author might have perplexed me with how often his distaste came through, and made my eyes roll when his analyses seemed so far off, but I'm still glad I read the book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    My, what a character Highsmith was! Deceptive, manipulative, an alcoholic, someone who went from affair to affair conducted with both breathtaking cruelty (leaving one lover, who had overdosed, alone while expecting her to die) and also a kind of self-loathing masochism, whose opinions ranged from horrific racism and and anti-Semitism (she openly described herself as a 'Jew-hater') to writing a bold novel about a lesbian love affair in McCarthy-era USA. At times, we can't help but warm to this w My, what a character Highsmith was! Deceptive, manipulative, an alcoholic, someone who went from affair to affair conducted with both breathtaking cruelty (leaving one lover, who had overdosed, alone while expecting her to die) and also a kind of self-loathing masochism, whose opinions ranged from horrific racism and and anti-Semitism (she openly described herself as a 'Jew-hater') to writing a bold novel about a lesbian love affair in McCarthy-era USA. At times, we can't help but warm to this wildly eccentric character (keeping snails in her huge handbag where they lived on a head of lettuce - and letting them loose on the table at a posh dinner party!); at others we have to revile her hateful statements about Jews, especially, but also Latinos and Blacks. A veritable conundrum of a personality, then - who also happened to write the fascinatingly subversive Ripley books. Bradford's biography is ideal for anyone coming to Highsmith's life for the first time as it's brisk and pacy. I have to say, though, that I found it a bit one-note: it's built on the thesis that Highsmith channeled aspects of her own awkward, unbalanced personality into her books, filled as they are with fantasies of murder, switched identities, stalking and violence. This point alongside her serial affairs makes up the body of the book, with fairly detailed summaries of the novels themselves - if you haven't read them, then be aware that this is packed with spoilers. Bradford occasionally quotes from Highsmith's journals and also uses material from Andrew Wilson's biography, Beautiful Shadow: A Life of Patricia Highsmith. It's notable that there's no need for references at the end so this isn't an academic biography or really dealing with any new material. Importantly, though, it pushes the reader to go back to Highsmith's novels again, never a bad thing. There are a few places where the writing gets confused and ungrammatical ('Highsmith was so transfixed with Marijane that she postponed her trip to Europe, with whom she would be accompanied by her mother') but, to be fair, I was reading an ARC so hopefully these infelicities will be smoothed out. Having read an earlier biography, I didn't find anything new here and found myself skimming somewhat but I'd expect anyone new to Highsmith's life to find this both entertaining and informative. Thanks to Bloomsbury for an ARC via NetGalley

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been to write a biography about such a vile person. Patricia Highsmith had few redeeming qualities and is not someone I would care to meet during the light of day much less at the dead of night. At one point she kept snails on lettuce leaves in her handbag. That is moving from the eccentric into the outright bizarre. Name a prejudice and she embraced it not to neglect mentioning she was an accomplished liar. A pathological mess? Definitely. Nonetheless, I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been to write a biography about such a vile person. Patricia Highsmith had few redeeming qualities and is not someone I would care to meet during the light of day much less at the dead of night. At one point she kept snails on lettuce leaves in her handbag. That is moving from the eccentric into the outright bizarre. Name a prejudice and she embraced it not to neglect mentioning she was an accomplished liar. A pathological mess? Definitely. Nonetheless, she did famously write The Talented Mr. Ripley and Strangers on a Train. This biography successfully takes a look a Highsmith’s work within the context of her life.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nigeyb

    I was attraced to Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires: The Life of Patricia Highsmith having read and really enjoyed Strangers on a Train and The Talented Mr. Ripley. I knew very little about Patricia Highsmith and was quite surprised to discover how unusual she was. Actually that's quite the understatement as she was self mythologising, dishonest, heartless, predatory, racist and virulently anti-semitic, possibly insane, and obsessed by snails. This all makes her a fascinating subject for a biogra I was attraced to Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires: The Life of Patricia Highsmith having read and really enjoyed Strangers on a Train and The Talented Mr. Ripley. I knew very little about Patricia Highsmith and was quite surprised to discover how unusual she was. Actually that's quite the understatement as she was self mythologising, dishonest, heartless, predatory, racist and virulently anti-semitic, possibly insane, and obsessed by snails. This all makes her a fascinating subject for a biography. What creates even more interest and intrigue is how her life formed the basis for her fiction. As Richard Bradford states, her success as a crime writer was based on her career as an emotional vandal. Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires: The Life of Patricia Highsmith is a poor advert for Highsmith the person, and indeed for Highsmith the writer, however it is a jaw dropping glimpse behind the curtain of her bizarre and frightening world. 4/5 'My New Year's Eve Toast: to all the devils, lusts, passions, greeds, envies, loves, hates, strange desires, enemies ghostly and real, the army of memories, with which I do battle - may they never give me peace' PATRICIA HIGHSMITH (New Year's Eve, 1947) Made famous by the great success of her psychological thrillers, The Talented Mr Ripley and Strangers on a Train, Patricia Highsmith is lauded as one of the most influential and celebrated modern writers. However, there has never been a clear picture of the woman behind the books. The relationship between Highsmith's lesbianism, her fraught personality – by parts self-destructive and malicious – and her fiction, has been largely avoided by biographers. She was openly homosexual and wrote the seminal lesbian love story, Carol. In modern times, she would be venerated as a radical exponent of the LGBT community. However, her status as an LGBT icon is undermined by the fact that she was excessively cruel and exploitative of her friends and lovers. In this new biography, Richard Bradford brings his sharp, incisive style to one of the great and most controversial writers of the twentieth century. He considers Highsmith's bestsellers in the context of her troubled personal life; her alcoholism, licentious sex life, racism, anti-Semitism, misogyny and abundant self-loathing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    J Earl

    Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires: The Life of Patricia Highsmith by Richard Bradford is a fascinating yet frustrating read. The cause of the frustration is more because of the subject than the biographer. Bradford does a tremendous amount of research and, probably most important, works back and forth between various sources trying to piece together some kind of story that will be fairly complete and accurate. Part of the problem is that Highsmith, for what seems to be a mixture of intention and Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires: The Life of Patricia Highsmith by Richard Bradford is a fascinating yet frustrating read. The cause of the frustration is more because of the subject than the biographer. Bradford does a tremendous amount of research and, probably most important, works back and forth between various sources trying to piece together some kind of story that will be fairly complete and accurate. Part of the problem is that Highsmith, for what seems to be a mixture of intention and simply a strange view of the world, made her diaries and letters as much of a puzzle as some of her stories but without the resolution you expect from a story. To be a fan of Highsmith's is immediately problematic. Her fiction, for the most part, is worthy of praise. But we have a hard time completely separating being a fan of a writer's work from being a fan of the writer. If one makes that distinction then many people will be a fan of her writing only, which would likely have been fine with her. I don't think Bradford overstepped when he made comparisons between Highsmith and her characters, especially Ripley. Unlike the Kirkus reviewer (and the reviewer on the site here who cribbed that review) I don't think calling her a predator is too far-fetched. One doesn't have to even break the law to be a predator. She did, by her own admission, target and plan relationships that would be disruptive to her target's life and other relationships then, also with planning, inflict mental and emotional pain on them. The targeting is, in other words, treating them as prey, which by definition makes her predatory. Reading this was different from most biographies I've read. Namely, in most, the biographer makes decisions on what seems most likely and presents that, with a few places where insurmountable conflicts make such a determination too hard and the biographer shares that dilemma. This is almost dilemma after dilemma. Contradictions between documents, interviews with her and acquaintances, as well as what can be independently verified. There are times when it even appears she added to older entries specifically to make her story that much more convoluted. Bradford shares these difficulties with us, which makes this very much a collaborative book. As readers, we are free to interpret the conflicting evidence in a different manner than he does. I recommend this to readers who like Highsmith's books as well as readers who enjoy problematic public figures. To say it is hard to like who she was is an understatement, but I think we have enough information to feel something, if not positive, at least empathetic about her. I always have a hard time with those hypothetical "who would you invite to a dinner" questions, but I no longer have a problem with at least one name for the "who would you NOT invite to a dinner" question. Reviewed from a copy made available by the publisher via NetGalley.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Heather Fineisen

    A troubled and unlikable subject Highsmith was a racist anti-Semite according to her diaries. A promiscuous lesbian, she had.troubled relationships hurt by her alcoholism. No question that.some of.her writing is.daring and dark. The author points out that many of her diary entries could not be substantiated by other sources including many of her hookups and places visited. Without sources, the biography seems speculative at best. Copy provided by the publisher and NetGalley

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robin Price

    Richard Bradford seems to choose to write biographies of literary figures he doesn't particularly like: last year Ernest Hemingway, and now Patricia Highsmith. Perhaps this leads to a more honest approach than if he were truly a fan? This book is at its best when Bradford looks at Highsmith's literary output and its possible inspiration. It's at its worst when Highsmith is caught in yet another failed sexual relationship. Patricia Highsmith's own mother called her a perennial liar, a sadist and a Richard Bradford seems to choose to write biographies of literary figures he doesn't particularly like: last year Ernest Hemingway, and now Patricia Highsmith. Perhaps this leads to a more honest approach than if he were truly a fan? This book is at its best when Bradford looks at Highsmith's literary output and its possible inspiration. It's at its worst when Highsmith is caught in yet another failed sexual relationship. Patricia Highsmith's own mother called her a perennial liar, a sadist and a sexual pervert. As a life long fan I will always remember Patricia for her extraordinary body of work, including Strangers On A Train, The Price Of Salt and The Talented Mr Ripley.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Hogmire

    Thanks to Bloomsbury for an advance galley of this title, which came out in the US in print on Jan 19, 2021-- Patricia Highsmith's debut novel "Strangers on a Train" isn't a particular favorite of mine, but it's a book with a passage I'll never forget: the horribly visceral scene of Bruno murdering Miriam. So I was pretty disturbed to learn, from Richard Bradford's critical biography "Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires," that the strangulation description is quite similar to writing in Highsmith's Thanks to Bloomsbury for an advance galley of this title, which came out in the US in print on Jan 19, 2021-- Patricia Highsmith's debut novel "Strangers on a Train" isn't a particular favorite of mine, but it's a book with a passage I'll never forget: the horribly visceral scene of Bruno murdering Miriam. So I was pretty disturbed to learn, from Richard Bradford's critical biography "Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires," that the strangulation description is quite similar to writing in Highsmith's own diary, where she often conflated feelings of obsessive love...with a desire to murder. Highsmith is most known as the author of "The Talented Mr. Ripley," as well as for her open lesbianism and prodigious drinking habits. But Highsmith was also a heinous anti-Semite, a vociferous racist, a stalker, and a cruel and manipulative romantic partner. She habitually lied about everything--to the point that it's impossible to trust the accuracy of her own private diaries, which mention multiple people who no one else ever met. At one point, she saw a lover take an overdose of pills and alcohol, and then just left the apartment--apparently not caring if the woman died (surprise: she didn't). In other words, Highsmith was an awful person. Which begs the question: why write a biography of her (besides the timely fact that this year is the 100th anniversary of her birth)? "Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires" is a consistently compelling quick read, which follows Highsmith's story fairly linearly from birth to death--chronicling all the books written and bridges burned along the way. Bradford's main project seems to be a type of biographical literary criticism, where he connects psychological and emotional aspects of Highsmith's personal life with the themes explored in her published works. Much of this analysis comes off as accurate: Highsmith obviously pulled from her life to write fiction, and she had a particular connection with Ripley (obsessively returning to the places where the book is based, justifying his behavior, etc), but other links seem like a stretch. Bradford frequently condemns Highsmith's penchant for self-diagnosis and her interest in quack doctors, but he certainly does a lot of psychologizing of his own. I'd be lying if I said I didn't enjoy reading this book overall, and some of the anecdotes are incredibly amusing (i.e. imagining Highsmith challenging Chester Himes to an epic drinking contest at Yaddo, and then getting the teetotaling Flannery O'Connor drunk), but the bad stuff about Highsmith really tempers any appreciation. Particularly the fact that she only supported the Palestinian liberation cause because she was so anti-Semitic. I think that's the thing I won't forget from this book, and it leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Patricia Highsmith was not a nice person. Period. Full stop. No one, absolutely no one, will argue against that fact. She was erratic, crude, obnoxious, cruel, both sadistic and masochistic, and mentally unstable. The general consensus among those who knew her is that had Highsmith not been a successful writer she would have probably been institutionalized. If any of what you just read offends you in the least, then you should not read this book. In Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires the author ( Patricia Highsmith was not a nice person. Period. Full stop. No one, absolutely no one, will argue against that fact. She was erratic, crude, obnoxious, cruel, both sadistic and masochistic, and mentally unstable. The general consensus among those who knew her is that had Highsmith not been a successful writer she would have probably been institutionalized. If any of what you just read offends you in the least, then you should not read this book. In Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires the author (Richard Bradford) does an admirable job of examining the correlation between Highsmith's personal life and demons with those of the fictional characters she created. The real life events and relationships that influenced and inspired her work and, in some cases, the way her fiction served as a kind of "revenge" mechanism for Highsmith. A fantasy reality that sometimes became embedded with the actual one. The author offers critical assessments of Highsmith's most well-known works with examinations into how her life circumstances enhanced and hindered her endeavors. A lot of speculation as to motivations and thought processes. The author also looks deeper into Highsmith's diaries and notebooks with an eye towards determining fact from fiction and whether she was aware of how much "fantasy" she was documenting as reality (Conclussion? Yes and no, it's complicated). While this book is an unvarnished look at a disturbed (and often disturbing) individual whose great talent was nearly eclipsed by her deviant tendencies the content is never presented in a salacious or sensationalist manner. I have never read any other biographies on Highsmith (at least two are referenced as source material for this book) so I can't speculate as to how this one might compare to previous ones. In the end the reader is given an overview of Highsmith's life and work that will, at the very least, give some insight into the writer and her creations. Not sure I would recommend it to the casual fan but I found it quite interesting. This is adult stuff. R-rated. Sexual content, adult language, disturbing imagery. Not for the easily offended. ***I received a free digital copy of this title through NetGalley.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    Patricia Highsmith was by all accounts a horrible person, who was beset with Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires. Patricia was a drunk racist anti-Semite. She drank from morning to night. She stated that “black men become physically ill if they did not have sex many times a month” and were too “feckless and stupid to realize that unprotected intercourse led to pregnancy”. And that was in 1992–not the 1800s. Patricia berated her beloved Nazis for only killing half the Jews on earth instead of all of Patricia Highsmith was by all accounts a horrible person, who was beset with Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires. Patricia was a drunk racist anti-Semite. She drank from morning to night. She stated that “black men become physically ill if they did not have sex many times a month” and were too “feckless and stupid to realize that unprotected intercourse led to pregnancy”. And that was in 1992–not the 1800s. Patricia berated her beloved Nazis for only killing half the Jews on earth instead of all of them. She thought Israel should be abolished and its lands returned to the Palestine’s. Yet she had long-term affairs with three Jewish women. However, Patricia did have some great novels within her. The Talented Mr. Ripley series and Strangers on a Train being the most famous examples. She was tight with her money and died with an estate of more than three million dollars. So, despite her demons, she was successful in her art. Devils, Lusts and Strange Desires is a well-researched biography about a woman who hid her demons from the public view. My issue with the book is the beginning is a slow slog through Patricia’s youth. However, once that part is over, the pacing picks up considerably. There is no argument that Patricia was a unique woman. So if that intrigues you, pick up this book. 3 stars. Thanks to Bloomsbury USA and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I've read a bunch of Highsmith's fiction and now I know how she was so adept at creating such abhorrent, sociopathic, conniving characters - she, herself, was an abhorrent, sociopathic, conniving (antisemitic, racist, abusive) human being. The book reads like a very long academic paper, but I was certainly never bored. I've read a bunch of Highsmith's fiction and now I know how she was so adept at creating such abhorrent, sociopathic, conniving characters - she, herself, was an abhorrent, sociopathic, conniving (antisemitic, racist, abusive) human being. The book reads like a very long academic paper, but I was certainly never bored.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ray Sinclair

    Too gossipy and too reliant on Highsmith’s diaries with too few other sources, e.g., what did Alfred Hitchcock have to say about her?!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kaelea Ann

  14. 5 out of 5

    L Gordon McDowell

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marisa

  16. 4 out of 5

    Frederic

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lissa

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vicky Cave

  19. 4 out of 5

    Silvia

  20. 4 out of 5

    James

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emily Crow

  22. 4 out of 5

    Roger Harris

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael Mcguire

  24. 4 out of 5

    Frank Peschier

  25. 4 out of 5

    John Dimoia

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amie's Book Reviews

  27. 4 out of 5

    我是💚

  28. 5 out of 5

    ColumbusReads

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Walker

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Centorcelli

  31. 5 out of 5

    Lou

  32. 4 out of 5

    Ari

  33. 4 out of 5

    Ruby

  34. 4 out of 5

    Cheri

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jasmin

  36. 4 out of 5

    D

  37. 5 out of 5

    BrokenTune

  38. 5 out of 5

    PorshaJo

  39. 5 out of 5

    Zade

  40. 4 out of 5

    David

  41. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

  42. 4 out of 5

    Serena Beaumont

  43. 4 out of 5

    Tia

  44. 5 out of 5

    Michael Faris

  45. 5 out of 5

    Jean-Luke

  46. 5 out of 5

    Beatrice

  47. 4 out of 5

    Hanneke

  48. 4 out of 5

    Laura Cooper

  49. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

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