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Calder has been declared Imperial Steward, the official successor to the Emperor. He leads the Empire from the throne, just as he has always wanted. In their tombs, the Great Elders stir. The crack in the sky becomes more alarming by the day, so Calder and his loyal Imperialist Guilds seek a truce with their Independent opponents. Both sides know the Elders are the true enemy Calder has been declared Imperial Steward, the official successor to the Emperor. He leads the Empire from the throne, just as he has always wanted. In their tombs, the Great Elders stir. The crack in the sky becomes more alarming by the day, so Calder and his loyal Imperialist Guilds seek a truce with their Independent opponents. Both sides know the Elders are the true enemy, but that does not make peace easy. Blood has been spilled already, trust is hard to come by, and the Guild Heads under Calder see him as little more than a figurehead. For civilization to survive, Calder must take the lead and prove himself to allies and enemies alike. But he is faced with an ancient Guild of spies and assassins led by the one woman who most wants him dead: Shera of the Gardeners. In the shadows, a woman plots to prolong a war. On the seas, a man works to end it.


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Calder has been declared Imperial Steward, the official successor to the Emperor. He leads the Empire from the throne, just as he has always wanted. In their tombs, the Great Elders stir. The crack in the sky becomes more alarming by the day, so Calder and his loyal Imperialist Guilds seek a truce with their Independent opponents. Both sides know the Elders are the true enemy Calder has been declared Imperial Steward, the official successor to the Emperor. He leads the Empire from the throne, just as he has always wanted. In their tombs, the Great Elders stir. The crack in the sky becomes more alarming by the day, so Calder and his loyal Imperialist Guilds seek a truce with their Independent opponents. Both sides know the Elders are the true enemy, but that does not make peace easy. Blood has been spilled already, trust is hard to come by, and the Guild Heads under Calder see him as little more than a figurehead. For civilization to survive, Calder must take the lead and prove himself to allies and enemies alike. But he is faced with an ancient Guild of spies and assassins led by the one woman who most wants him dead: Shera of the Gardeners. In the shadows, a woman plots to prolong a war. On the seas, a man works to end it.

30 review for Of Kings and Killers

  1. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    We're all locked in the same burning house. It benefits no one to fight while the flames rise. - Baldezar Kern The flames in the Aurelian Empire burn high and hot as the Civil War between the Imperialist and Independent Guilds rages on. All the while the Great Elders led by Kellerac plot and hold a crack in the sky wide open. Humanity needs all their defenders, but they're too busy with the semantics of what the Empire should be going forward. I believed from the beginning that The Elder Empir We're all locked in the same burning house. It benefits no one to fight while the flames rise. - Baldezar Kern The flames in the Aurelian Empire burn high and hot as the Civil War between the Imperialist and Independent Guilds rages on. All the while the Great Elders led by Kellerac plot and hold a crack in the sky wide open. Humanity needs all their defenders, but they're too busy with the semantics of what the Empire should be going forward. I believed from the beginning that The Elder Empire had a grand story to be told. I've really enjoyed all of Will Wight's stories except for The Elder Empire, but I've finally enjoyed a book in the series with Of Kings and Killers. My interest was peeked with one little quote towards the end of Of Dawn and Darkness. (view spoiler)[ "I found allies in the void, but enemies too. I was not surprised. There are enemies everywhere. But strangest of all were those that were neither hostile nor friendly: the guardians in white." - The Unknown Wanderer, from Observations of the Unknown Wanderer (Held in the Blackwatch archives) (hide spoiler)] . This single quote made everything occuring much more significant and that was just the beginning. From the beginning I've found the Sea Side ie Calder's crew the more interesting bunch to read about. Shera and her friends are fearsome, but somewhat strange and dull. Calder and his friends had all the aspects of a family. For all Calder's faults, he loves his crew and he'd do whatever he can for them. They prove time and time again that they'd do the same for him. Calder is an interesting yet flawed protagonist just like his crew. The story also did an excellent job cementing Izaria Woodsman's importance to the crew through flashbacks. In many ways it was as though he was still around even after the events in book 1. The Great Elders are terror incarnate and I feel like it was glazed over too often rather than emphasized until Of Kings and Killers. The reader gets a good look at the hell scape the characters are trapped within. Another quote somehow eloquently hit like a ton of bricks, (view spoiler)[ "Who are those who watch beyond the borders of our world? And why do they not save us?" - The Emperor (hide spoiler)] . It's amazing what two sentences with the proper context can accomplish. I know Will Wight took a few years off between book 2 and 3, but he really brought a strong conclusion to The Elder Empire series with Of Kings and Killers. All the while leaving the door cracked to revisit the world, should he so wish.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Bryan

    Jeez Luiz I LOVE this series. I couldn't sleep last night and so I listened to both audiobooks back to back and it was such a fun time. Honestly I like really deeply thematic and thought provoking books the most. That's what all my favourites tend to have in common but Will Wight really is the poster child for the other approach. Everything he's written is just so.damn FUN while also being really sarcastic and insanely epic in fight scenes he writers between all these super high power leveled pe Jeez Luiz I LOVE this series. I couldn't sleep last night and so I listened to both audiobooks back to back and it was such a fun time. Honestly I like really deeply thematic and thought provoking books the most. That's what all my favourites tend to have in common but Will Wight really is the poster child for the other approach. Everything he's written is just so.damn FUN while also being really sarcastic and insanely epic in fight scenes he writers between all these super high power leveled people. These last two books were a super satisfying conclusion to events and I was so happy to get direct evidence of this series taking place in a Cradle equivalent to Sandy Brandy's Cosmere. I would love for any of these characters to appear with Linden in the next Cradle installation! I was recommending the series to someone the other day and I came to a realization about what the series reminds me of. Anime. This authors books all read like the best parts of those quintessential shounen style anime I grew up on like Naruto (specifically for his Cradle series), Bleach, Fairytail, One Piece, even Dragonball Z. Now to be even more specific (mind you I already consider it a mortal sin for anime lovers not to read Will Wight), the anime his books are most like has to be Hunter x Hunter. If you love that show then truly pick up this series immediately and thank me later.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Maren Johnson

    Ohhhhhhhhh SO GOOD. My only real complaint is that this beautiful series is over. RIP. My heart will not go on. But this book was a stellar combination of Calder's crew, intense Elder action, scathing failures, great sacrifices, and satisfying resolution. I wish Calder got some more appreciation. He's freaking awesome. I wish everybody in that whole Empire knew that. Also the ending was a little more open than Shera's ending, and I only wish I got more, more, more. Okay, I guess I just wish I ha Ohhhhhhhhh SO GOOD. My only real complaint is that this beautiful series is over. RIP. My heart will not go on. But this book was a stellar combination of Calder's crew, intense Elder action, scathing failures, great sacrifices, and satisfying resolution. I wish Calder got some more appreciation. He's freaking awesome. I wish everybody in that whole Empire knew that. Also the ending was a little more open than Shera's ending, and I only wish I got more, more, more. Okay, I guess I just wish I had 12 more books in this series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    LAWRENCE SHIDELER

    A great finale Some thoughts. The two-sided series comes to a close. I decided to read the “shadow” side first for each installment. I personally prefer Shera’s story, but this last installment was the best for the “Sea” side of the series. Will does a good job of balancing the stories and not going into the happily ever after zone where none of the main characters perish. There is a realism that a sand born hydra would appreciate. The last in the series has a nice tie-in to the multiverse that W A great finale Some thoughts. The two-sided series comes to a close. I decided to read the “shadow” side first for each installment. I personally prefer Shera’s story, but this last installment was the best for the “Sea” side of the series. Will does a good job of balancing the stories and not going into the happily ever after zone where none of the main characters perish. There is a realism that a sand born hydra would appreciate. The last in the series has a nice tie-in to the multiverse that Will has been creating. We can continue to hold out hope for an Avengers like cross-over story in the distant future. I’m mostly droning on because if you’ve made it this far in the series than you already know what you are getting and don’t need me to tell you. Just waiting now for my next fix from Will’s wild twisted mind.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Vignesh Narayanan VC

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. *Might contain Spoilers* Excellent book with an "Amazing" ending until I read the other OKAK book. It was like no one even knew or care about the contribution Calder made, I felt like I am reading One Punch Man climax. Even Shera, the head of the Consultants guild, the guild that is supposed to know "everything" dismisses his sacrifice of using Optasia to change back the sky as a mere rumour and none of the Regents or the Consultants checked on the condition of Optasia for five full years. I find *Might contain Spoilers* Excellent book with an "Amazing" ending until I read the other OKAK book. It was like no one even knew or care about the contribution Calder made, I felt like I am reading One Punch Man climax. Even Shera, the head of the Consultants guild, the guild that is supposed to know "everything" dismisses his sacrifice of using Optasia to change back the sky as a mere rumour and none of the Regents or the Consultants checked on the condition of Optasia for five full years. I find it extremely unlikely that the regents wouldn't have checked on Optasia after battle. If they had checked it then they would have seen that it was destroyed and a little mundane investigation would have revealed who used it last and what his condition is now. After seeing Loreli's personality I think she would've definitely cured or at least tried to cure Calder. Also the regents acted like bullies through out the book, it was so unlike them from Shera's perspective. Only Loreli withheld her prejudice and investigated anything before judging Calder. At least this is how I feel.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cmoore

    This book was surprisingly a slow starter... if you've been following the trilogies... you'll know what happened in the last 2 books and you'd have been all psyched up for this book, expecting a big splash! Ooopsie boo boo! 🤣 In of Dawn and Darkness, Calder Marten is in the possession of the emperor's crown! And he's ready to step into the vacuum left in the wake of this great entity... But, the Guilds, aren't in agreement over this convenient solution... and the Consultant's Guild is absolutely This book was surprisingly a slow starter... if you've been following the trilogies... you'll know what happened in the last 2 books and you'd have been all psyched up for this book, expecting a big splash! Ooopsie boo boo! 🤣 In of Dawn and Darkness, Calder Marten is in the possession of the emperor's crown! And he's ready to step into the vacuum left in the wake of this great entity... But, the Guilds, aren't in agreement over this convenient solution... and the Consultant's Guild is absolutely opposed to it, believing no one person should have that much power, because "absolute power corrupts absolutely! So really, I shouldn't have been at all surprised that Will Wight would have to give the action a backseat while he built up all the Political machinations that were happening. Only then could he could push the pedal to the metal... And WOW, he ended up with a fantastic book and a great story ARC! I really haven't mentioned in any of my other reviews of the Elder God series, just how much I've enjoyed the magic system! In this series if, you imbue your intent on a inanimate object, it can be awakened ie: a weapon that will actually want to kill! A makers tools; a hammer for instance, might rebel if it thinks that hammering a nail into a door is dumb, even missing on purpose! LOL! The few books I've run into previously with "aware objects" had been in Nina Kiriki Hoffman's, Matt Black books, and David Brin's, The Practice Effect... and I've got to say, I loved them too! The narration by Travis Baldree is as always, simply great (He's a favorite of mine)! But now I can hardly wait to listen to Emily Woo Zeller (another favorite) narrate the 6th and final story of the two side-by-side trilogies, Shera's story! She's an assassin, and leader the Consultant's Guild!!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joey Ohannesian

    Wow. A fantastic ending to a great trilogy. It is really evident that Wight has taken everything he’s learned from the fantastic Cradle series and put it to work in the third iteration of this series. Books one and two came both came out in 2015, so it’s been a solid five years since he’s added to this series. He’s published seven books since then in his Cradle series and has finally returned to finish the parallel trilogy that is Elder Empire. The pacing is absolutely crazy, pedal on the gas the Wow. A fantastic ending to a great trilogy. It is really evident that Wight has taken everything he’s learned from the fantastic Cradle series and put it to work in the third iteration of this series. Books one and two came both came out in 2015, so it’s been a solid five years since he’s added to this series. He’s published seven books since then in his Cradle series and has finally returned to finish the parallel trilogy that is Elder Empire. The pacing is absolutely crazy, pedal on the gas the whole time. This book absolutely destroyed my sleep over to two days that I read it because I couldn’t find a good place to stop. I. Just. Had. To. Keep. Going. This is the same issue I had with Cradle after Unsouled. Wight’s writing style is ruthless in that after he finishes his first draft, he goes back and essentially purges any scenes that don’t move the story forward in anyway. He’s gotten better and better at doing this as he’s written more books, and all of that practice has paid off to close this trilogy at breakneck speed. The characters are endearing and seeing how they’ve grown together over the series and end their journey together is bittersweet. Overall, if you like Wight’s Cradle series or enjoy Pirates of the Caribbean, you’ll likely enjoy this series. I’d recommend starting with the Of Shadows side, then switch to the Of Sea side.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Scott Hitchcock

    All three books 4*'s. Looking forward to the companion series and seeing the view from shadow. All three books 4*'s. Looking forward to the companion series and seeing the view from shadow.

  9. 4 out of 5

    William

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The final work in the Elder Empire: Sea Series is a very mixed bag. Will Wight takes some major risks, chiefly connecting this setting to his larger Cradle setting. The Lovecraftian Elders are just Class 1 Fiends and their unknowable plans, they just want to get off planet. While I appreciate the desire to connect his works to larger setting, a common enough pursuit of fantasy authors, I cant help but feel the move diminishes the work the author put into the setting and it's mysteries. The Regent The final work in the Elder Empire: Sea Series is a very mixed bag. Will Wight takes some major risks, chiefly connecting this setting to his larger Cradle setting. The Lovecraftian Elders are just Class 1 Fiends and their unknowable plans, they just want to get off planet. While I appreciate the desire to connect his works to larger setting, a common enough pursuit of fantasy authors, I cant help but feel the move diminishes the work the author put into the setting and it's mysteries. The Regents coming into the picture essentially sink any hope for Calder and his faction. Shera and her allies were already ridiculously powerful and with the Remnants, one of which is said to equal to the Emperor's ability in combat firmly establish Calder as the underdog in the first half of the book. The character's in the opposing series give him little chance and seem to hate him unconditionally. Most of their political problems could have been solved with good listening skills. In fact Calder is such an underdog that he get's stabbed to a death by Shera with little difficulty and disposed of as an afterthought. The author's choices in the first half of the book were not to my taste and if you were waiting to see Calder get any validation from anyone don't hold your breath. I'll wait and see if Shera or any more of Shera's actions seem more understandable from her own point of view in the companion book. The second half of the book dealing with the main character's confrontation with the Elders is much more satisfying. Notably Calder's relationship to the old Emperor and his wife are fully explored. In addition we get to see more of Calder's always entertaining crew. Calder gets a few moments to shine. His final confrontation with his wife, now an avatar of an Elder is heartbreaking. His coming to terms with the Emperor is also interesting and the reveal that Calder's favourite philosopher is just one of his pseudonyms, is also a fun and surprisingly cutting reveal. To put a cap on this half of the series. It was a fun series with a frustrating elements. If I had to do it again I'd probably still read it. However, I don't think I'll ever choose to read it a second time. TL:DR - Exciting book with some risky and not entirely satisfactory decisions.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mana

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. If you don't want to see a moment of triumph in the main plot until the end of the book. If you want to see every plan of the main character and the character's on his side fail, fail, and fail again. Then you've come to the right book. I slogged through just so I can write this review. Will Wight's excellent writing style is also what pushed me through, but good god, the plot is just depression and frustration incarnate. If you don't want to see a moment of triumph in the main plot until the end of the book. If you want to see every plan of the main character and the character's on his side fail, fail, and fail again. Then you've come to the right book. I slogged through just so I can write this review. Will Wight's excellent writing style is also what pushed me through, but good god, the plot is just depression and frustration incarnate.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sundeep

    Yet again, Will has done a great job of telling the story from the other side and keep a few surprises to boot. Bloopers were fantastic, wish they get added to earlier books too. I definitely hope there will be short stories to fill the details that were left unsaid in these books. The ending has opened up a few discussions about connections related to Willverse and I look forward to re-reading these books.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    Overall Rating: 4.5 Trilogy Rating: 4.75 Closure: 5 Characters: 5 World-building: 5 And this half of the tandem trilogies draws to a close. A wonderful, wonderful close. This series is one I have held out hope for for a long time. It’s quick and simple, but the cool factor is stellar, and it has incredibly likable characters, with a story that’s a lot of fun and a world that feels very original, and not at all common for fantasy. I don’t know that this trilogy will break my top 5 favorites, but depen Overall Rating: 4.5 Trilogy Rating: 4.75 Closure: 5 Characters: 5 World-building: 5 And this half of the tandem trilogies draws to a close. A wonderful, wonderful close. This series is one I have held out hope for for a long time. It’s quick and simple, but the cool factor is stellar, and it has incredibly likable characters, with a story that’s a lot of fun and a world that feels very original, and not at all common for fantasy. I don’t know that this trilogy will break my top 5 favorites, but depending on how the shadow side wraps up, the full 6 book series just might, but it will definitely break into my top 10. This review is going to get just a little longer, because I’m going to discuss some full series compliments and criticisms. Let’s start with the fact that this is the last book in a trilogy, the first thing on everyone’s mind is “Does it kill the rest of the series?” To that, I give a resounding no. I don’t necessarily want to say it’s the best of the three, but it puts the story to bed just as well as the first one created it; the issue is that it’s just hard to top the awe in the first one as we learned all about this fantasy world and these colorful characters. Yes in book 3 we’re still learning about the characters (Foster in particular gets a great flashback) and world, but even with some great reveals, it just doesn’t match the same state of wonder as getting to know all these aspects for the first time. That said, one spot where this book really killed it was in how everything leading up to it mattered in the end. While maybe some could have been rearranged, I can’t think of any scenes that could have just been skipped. Where book 2 really felt like it was being carried by Urzaia and Foster at points, this one is back to the original in the sense that it’s truly carried by Calder for nearly the whole thing. With the way the plot has gone up until the end of the second book, everyone else really needed to take a back seat, and they play their supporting roles very well, but Calder really shines in this one. We also get a lot of Bliss and Cheska (audiobooked, don’t know her spelling), who are two of my favorite characters from the series as a whole. I honestly hope that Wight continues writing in this universe just because they would make such excellent leads. In a cast that is very entertaining, if a bit one-note, these two really shine as intriguing, rounded characters, on the same level as the Regents (who also deserve their own books). I believe I’ve complimented the world-building of this series in every review, and this one is no different, we learn even more of the inner workings of the world, and they continue to be even more intriguing. I expect I’ll be returning to that sentiment very soon with the review of Of Killers and Kings as well. So let’s talk some full trilogy stuff. I would say the weakest point of the Sea trilogy is probably the pacing. Book 1 is a fairly self-contained story, and it doesn’t suffer from this as badly, but book two has issues with the format and its necessity, and while this volume brings the series to a great close, there’s a point around the climax where it really feels a bit rushed. These books are quick enough that I’ve actually been listening twice in some instances before reviewing, just because listening at work can take more of my attention off the book than I realize, but around the 2-3 hours remaining mark of both listens, there was a bit of whiplash. On the first listen I was willing to put the blame on myself, but in seeing it repeated on the second listen, gotta say this feels like a shortcoming of the book itself. It’s not uncommon for final books to be a decent bit longer than the others in the series (to the point that they sometimes become multiple books in and of themselves), and I’ve got to say, I think this book could have very easily been another fifty pages or so. On the flip side, the strongest point has got to be the side characters, Urzaia, Cheska, and Bliss in particular. While only a few feel like really complex characters, Wight has been able to veer off trope just slightly enough to make the characters that aren’t exactly three-dimensional into characters that are incredibly fun to read and easy to sympathize with, which I don’t think is an easy task. In a lot of books I find myself only able to remember POV characters and maybe one or two others especially well. This whole trilogy is roughly the same size as Mistborn: The Final Empire, and I know Calder’s group way better than Kelsier and Vinn’s. I would excitedly recommend this series to any fantasy fan that enjoys popcorn reads.

  13. 4 out of 5

    OldBird

    I have such mixed feelings about this. Yes, we get the build up, the big battles, the closure on Calder's story but... It still feels like only half a story. I wasn't left satisfied by all those dangling threads, and that niggling sensation that some of them may be addressed in the companion series but equally may not be. Also knowing the ending and then having to re-read the whole timeline from the beginning? It was a bit disheartening. I think this is where the two series, one story concept re I have such mixed feelings about this. Yes, we get the build up, the big battles, the closure on Calder's story but... It still feels like only half a story. I wasn't left satisfied by all those dangling threads, and that niggling sensation that some of them may be addressed in the companion series but equally may not be. Also knowing the ending and then having to re-read the whole timeline from the beginning? It was a bit disheartening. I think this is where the two series, one story concept really fell flat for me. I longed for it to be told more like Trudi Canavan's Thief's Magic, where the two stories occurring at the same time but in very different places were told alongside each other. There were a few times where events in Calder's adventures lent themselves to being natural break-points, and I wish I had skipped over to Shera's narrative. It's no fun when you feel you're missing something big, and to some extent this instalment felt shallow because of it. When major events, say the introduction to or the death of a very important character (view spoiler)[(meeting Loreli happens at the beginning of Shera's book, but she just pops up fully formed here as if we've already read it - I hadn't, assuming it came afterwards, because, well, chronologically Shera's Part 3 timeline does. And the "oh, actually Etsyr's still alive, shoulda mentioned that" thing? The faceless person -wonder who that is? - taken over by an Elder, whoops he's defeated, on to the next thing? Meh) (hide spoiler)] , happen off-screen it's very anticlimactic. I just knew "ah, that will be explained in Of Killers and Kings". Or at least, I hope it will be. I also got confused by the writing during some of the earlier action sequences. I re-read them a few times before giving up trying to work out who was doing what and when, and skimmed a fair portion. It could just be me, but I didn't find it very clear. The big battles at the end were much better in that respect, but still felt lacking in that events were only half-told. And lastly, a whinge no one will care much about unless you actively look for romance in these kinds of books but... Jyrine. I can't believe she and Calder were any more than good friends. Like, super-close maybe. Calder's idea of romantic leanings shown in flashback are slightly creepy possessive ones rather than emotional, and Jerri herself only ever tells us straight out she "loved" him. It's all very... boy to spend all that time and effort explaining an intricate magic system (which is amazing, this isn't to bash the world-building) so that I believe it, but to only ever tell rather than show an emotional connection. (view spoiler)[How she's dispatched by him in the end also just made me side eye at the idea of them ever having been romantically involved. It just didn't ring true. I'd have believed they were a marriage of convenience, if only to stop Calder's mistrustful crew mates from chucking her off the ship. I wanted her to have been using him and faking it, or being his friend and telling him "sham marriage? Sure. Don't get any bedroom ideas though!" because she was such a tough and driven character and that would just have reinforced that without. (hide spoiler)] They had zero chemistry and it bothered me. Sorry. Whinging aside, was it worth it? Yes. The story is a bloomin' marvel of epic fantasy with a dark tinge. I loved the writing. I came to really appreciate the characters, and the flashbacks gave so much more insight into them. I only wish the story had been told in it's entirety here. I will read Shera's finale, because I want to know why she and others did what they did, but it feels like a missed opportunity in story telling not to have these two concurrent narratives told in the same volume.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Neviot

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. An epic, neatly wrapped conclusion. Well-written and thoroughly enjoyable. I very much appreciated the glimmers of Cradle and the larger universe, the insights into Ozriel's character; meeting all the Regents at last; the return of Urzaia for one flashback ("Once, when he pushed his Vessel to the limit, he had managed to catch a cannonball. That had been a good day."); Bliss' long-awaited revenge; the idea of Reading transcending Language; the crew banding together to save their Captain. My one An epic, neatly wrapped conclusion. Well-written and thoroughly enjoyable. I very much appreciated the glimmers of Cradle and the larger universe, the insights into Ozriel's character; meeting all the Regents at last; the return of Urzaia for one flashback ("Once, when he pushed his Vessel to the limit, he had managed to catch a cannonball. That had been a good day."); Bliss' long-awaited revenge; the idea of Reading transcending Language; the crew banding together to save their Captain. My one qualm, as always in the Calder narratives, is Calder himself. I am pleased to see him coming to some self-awareness at the end and recognizing his own blind arrogance, but it did not make any more enjoyable the experience of reading through his vainglorious, at times thoughtless perspective. I still do not understand his relationship with Jerri (it beggars belief that he was so blind about his closest companion, especially as a Reader, and Jerri's character is uncomfortably one-dimensional in her reverence for the Great Elders), but I recognize the emotional heft of their final confrontation. I'm looking forward to reading the final book in the series, and in particular Shera's confrontation with Nakothi...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rohin Surath

    I just.... Speechless. I'm speechless. And not in a good way. I left this book. Midway. I dropped it to reread another series. I actually left it. Midway. I can't even comprehend what this means. This is the first book this year which I've actually dropped. Which I actually can't read. I know those who make their living reading books drop books every other day, but I'm not some super-rich dude who reads for a living. So when I say I dropped Elder Empire, I'm basically saying that its unreadable. The I just.... Speechless. I'm speechless. And not in a good way. I left this book. Midway. I dropped it to reread another series. I actually left it. Midway. I can't even comprehend what this means. This is the first book this year which I've actually dropped. Which I actually can't read. I know those who make their living reading books drop books every other day, but I'm not some super-rich dude who reads for a living. So when I say I dropped Elder Empire, I'm basically saying that its unreadable. There is no action. There is relentless capitalizing. There is terrible plot-foreshadowing. There is death which doesn't matter; failures which are uninteresting, and a victory I know is coming which I can't be bothered to read because Will Wight's Kings and Killers is unreadable. Maybe one day I'l pick it up and skim through the rest. Till then, Elder Empire is now dead to me. Because I. Can't. Read. It. I'm speechless.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brandon A.

    Amazing Ending I love Will Wights books. This is the book I'm going to be the most critical of, so hang on to your hats: I feel like there could have been more detail in certain parts of both books. At the end of the series, I feel like there are gaps in my information. SPOILERS*** What happened to O? Did he just pack up and leave? Are the "dead" Elders gone for good or are they still alive in some form? I know those might be questions for future books, but I really want this ending to be cleaner, e Amazing Ending I love Will Wights books. This is the book I'm going to be the most critical of, so hang on to your hats: I feel like there could have been more detail in certain parts of both books. At the end of the series, I feel like there are gaps in my information. SPOILERS*** What happened to O? Did he just pack up and leave? Are the "dead" Elders gone for good or are they still alive in some form? I know those might be questions for future books, but I really want this ending to be cleaner, even if we're destined to see more books. I just don't want to wait years for really minor questions. Other than that, I thought both books were superb, and I highly recommend them to anyone. Utterly captivating, and it's amazing to see how much better of a writer Will becomes with each book. That intent on his keyboard must be growing strong.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jaipal

    Book 3 (a) of the series feels more like a self contained novel than the previous novels. This book tries to give cohesion to the entire series but it feels like it was tacked on. Perhaps the author thought about it from the very start but the execution just felt a bit off. It was required though otherwise the ending would have been unbelievable. That said, I still enjoyed the novel...if you can say enjoying when Calder Marten tried his best and was foiled at all stages except the very end. It w Book 3 (a) of the series feels more like a self contained novel than the previous novels. This book tries to give cohesion to the entire series but it feels like it was tacked on. Perhaps the author thought about it from the very start but the execution just felt a bit off. It was required though otherwise the ending would have been unbelievable. That said, I still enjoyed the novel...if you can say enjoying when Calder Marten tried his best and was foiled at all stages except the very end. It was a rollercoaster of a book, going up then comes crashing down before going up again for Calder. I wished he got the recognition he deserved but guess not. Definitely a must read for those who follow the series. If not, start with the first book. It's a good series to get into. I hope the author visits this world in the future.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    I read this before Kings and Killers, and loved the sudden insight into the wider world which was given in this book - I think this book may have more outer-world insights (marginally), and the other book 3 may have more historic world insights. The fact that both sides of the series give different views of the same world whilst also both stand almost alone is pretty impressive, and almost worth a re-read just to see how things go. Sometimes it feels a little like some stories were forced a bit t I read this before Kings and Killers, and loved the sudden insight into the wider world which was given in this book - I think this book may have more outer-world insights (marginally), and the other book 3 may have more historic world insights. The fact that both sides of the series give different views of the same world whilst also both stand almost alone is pretty impressive, and almost worth a re-read just to see how things go. Sometimes it feels a little like some stories were forced a bit to make sure it fits in with the other half, but in the main they both read as normal stories. I did enjoy the ending but had to go back and re-visit after reading the other end of the series to make sure I understood it all. I think all-in-all the other half makes slightly more sense to read first, but there isn't much in it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Walker

    Great end to the series The Elder Empire series has always been a distant third for me behind the Traveler's Gate and Cradle books. But these last books in the series were quite good. The Cradleverse easter eggs/tie ins were cool. I've never minded the flash back chapter approach to explain more of the story, though some readers may not like that device. It was nice to see more of the backstory for the characters and the overall world. I mostly preferred Calder's story viewpoint, but again both boo Great end to the series The Elder Empire series has always been a distant third for me behind the Traveler's Gate and Cradle books. But these last books in the series were quite good. The Cradleverse easter eggs/tie ins were cool. I've never minded the flash back chapter approach to explain more of the story, though some readers may not like that device. It was nice to see more of the backstory for the characters and the overall world. I mostly preferred Calder's story viewpoint, but again both books were really good this time around. Shera seemed more understandable/relatable and not a mindless assassin, killing machine. There are very few authors like Will Wight where I can say I've thoroughly enjoyed most, if not all, of their books/series. Keep up the good work!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    Despite this being parallel stories with many of the same events, there is still a enjoyable amount of original adventures inbetween the clashes with Shera of the Shadow trilogy. I'd put the Captain into the secondary character role from the first two books but this final story gives him a deeper personality than with foolish boy he was previously. His experiences while he was thought to be dead changes his outlook. An excellent 6 book series and a must to read sea and shadow together. Imaginative Despite this being parallel stories with many of the same events, there is still a enjoyable amount of original adventures inbetween the clashes with Shera of the Shadow trilogy. I'd put the Captain into the secondary character role from the first two books but this final story gives him a deeper personality than with foolish boy he was previously. His experiences while he was thought to be dead changes his outlook. An excellent 6 book series and a must to read sea and shadow together. Imaginative world building, great monsters and a good deal of human double-dealing and back stabbing. They're also a conferable length that can be finished in few days.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Remington Crawford

    Amazing Will Wight is one of the reasons I keep paying for Kindle Unlimited. What I thought were going to be a series of silly books to keep my mind off other things turned into spellbinding novels of complex magics and strange worlds that have kept up far too late on far too many nights. I'm sorry to see that these two latest installments end the trilogies I rest easy that the stories are told and ended well. I'm tickled by the tie-in to the Cradle series (one of my top book series). Will, keep Amazing Will Wight is one of the reasons I keep paying for Kindle Unlimited. What I thought were going to be a series of silly books to keep my mind off other things turned into spellbinding novels of complex magics and strange worlds that have kept up far too late on far too many nights. I'm sorry to see that these two latest installments end the trilogies I rest easy that the stories are told and ended well. I'm tickled by the tie-in to the Cradle series (one of my top book series). Will, keep up the amazing work.

  22. 5 out of 5

    William Moses Jr.

    4.5 stars. This book wasn't as good as Of Killers and Kings. I suppose it's because I knew the end results of certain events, and the new revelations in this book were ok but didn't quite make up for the pre-existing knowledge of what happened from the other series of books. Also, I suppose that deep down, I was rooting for Shera and cared more for her than for Calder. Overall, this dual series of books was great and definitely worth reading. Good stuff. 4.5 stars. This book wasn't as good as Of Killers and Kings. I suppose it's because I knew the end results of certain events, and the new revelations in this book were ok but didn't quite make up for the pre-existing knowledge of what happened from the other series of books. Also, I suppose that deep down, I was rooting for Shera and cared more for her than for Calder. Overall, this dual series of books was great and definitely worth reading. Good stuff.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alex Salgren

    After a strong series up to this point. I found myself feeling a little down. This last book, I believe, did not have the same exciting climax that the campanion book "Of Killers and Kings" had. Even though the story is the sameish. I applaud the idea of different approach and using different narrators for each series. Caulder character felt lesser as in the previous two series he was present not so much here. Thus it was not a deep or as compelling. After a strong series up to this point. I found myself feeling a little down. This last book, I believe, did not have the same exciting climax that the campanion book "Of Killers and Kings" had. Even though the story is the sameish. I applaud the idea of different approach and using different narrators for each series. Caulder character felt lesser as in the previous two series he was present not so much here. Thus it was not a deep or as compelling.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peter Beers

    Five stars! (Spoiler alert) Another great book by will! Fun and exciting and more than a little surprised by the crossover into the cradle world. I absolutely love how will keeps his story moving, never getting lost in character introspection, and most importantly, I never feel like I’m reading filler.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Max

    It's surprising, I generally liked the Killers half of the series more but I think I enjoyed Of Kings more than Of Killers. This is a great book that's well-paced and a satisfying conclusion to Calder's overall arc. It also contains some interesting easter eggs for people reading all of Wight's works. Would definitely recommend if you're looking for some fast-paced fun fantasy It's surprising, I generally liked the Killers half of the series more but I think I enjoyed Of Kings more than Of Killers. This is a great book that's well-paced and a satisfying conclusion to Calder's overall arc. It also contains some interesting easter eggs for people reading all of Wight's works. Would definitely recommend if you're looking for some fast-paced fun fantasy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anonymous_User1315

    3.5 stars. I really love Will Wight's worlds but this book left me a bit disappointed. I wanted to see this trilogy able to stand on its own two feet. Instead, it feels more like a Cradle side novel. As such, I would not fault somebody who has not read the Cradle series finding this book confusing and unfulfilling with the deus ex machina, giving a lower rating. 3.5 stars. I really love Will Wight's worlds but this book left me a bit disappointed. I wanted to see this trilogy able to stand on its own two feet. Instead, it feels more like a Cradle side novel. As such, I would not fault somebody who has not read the Cradle series finding this book confusing and unfulfilling with the deus ex machina, giving a lower rating.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Higinio Calderon Jr

    More! I know that this story might be over, but I would like to learn more. It would be awesome to read about the events that created the guilds, the “first elder war” , and more history of the Emperor and Regents. Will Wight creates such wonderful worlds that volumes could be written in any of them. And I’d read them all

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marc Tsufis

    Truly enjoyable reads The first three books of the series deal with a familiar story of salvation from Elders, malevolent and self absorbed exiles to the world of man. Normal protagonists and their human antitheses. The second trilogy is the same storyline, but switches the roles of the characters. A refreshing and thoughtful change from the norm. Thank you, Will Wight

  29. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Bittersweet end to an amazing series These books are just so good. The author has the unique ability to get you emotionally invested into all these wonderful characters. The only bad thing about this series was it had to end.

  30. 4 out of 5

    CK

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Calder recovers from near death. Participates in final battle. Uses throne to close rifts in sky (only real significant thing achieved). Additional backstory on Foster provided. Book feels less important than companion Of Killers and Kings but still enjoyable.

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