website statistics Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture

Availability: Ready to download

The phrase dude food likely brings to mind a range of images: burgers stacked impossibly high with an assortment of toppings that were themselves once considered a meal; crazed sports fans demolishing plates of radioactively hot wings; barbecued or bacon-wrapped . . . anything. But there is much more to the phenomenon of dude food than what's on the plate. Emily J. H. Cont The phrase dude food likely brings to mind a range of images: burgers stacked impossibly high with an assortment of toppings that were themselves once considered a meal; crazed sports fans demolishing plates of radioactively hot wings; barbecued or bacon-wrapped . . . anything. But there is much more to the phenomenon of dude food than what's on the plate. Emily J. H. Contois's provocative book begins with the dude himself--a man who retains a degree of masculine privilege but doesn't meet traditional standards of economic and social success or manly self-control. In the Great Recession's aftermath, dude masculinity collided with food producers and marketers desperate to find new customers. The result was a wave of new diet sodas and yogurts marketed with dude-friendly stereotypes, a transformation of food media, and weight loss programs just for guys. In a work brimming with fresh insights about contemporary American food media and culture, Contois shows how the gendered world of food production and consumption has influenced the way we eat and how food itself is central to the contest over our identities.


Compare

The phrase dude food likely brings to mind a range of images: burgers stacked impossibly high with an assortment of toppings that were themselves once considered a meal; crazed sports fans demolishing plates of radioactively hot wings; barbecued or bacon-wrapped . . . anything. But there is much more to the phenomenon of dude food than what's on the plate. Emily J. H. Cont The phrase dude food likely brings to mind a range of images: burgers stacked impossibly high with an assortment of toppings that were themselves once considered a meal; crazed sports fans demolishing plates of radioactively hot wings; barbecued or bacon-wrapped . . . anything. But there is much more to the phenomenon of dude food than what's on the plate. Emily J. H. Contois's provocative book begins with the dude himself--a man who retains a degree of masculine privilege but doesn't meet traditional standards of economic and social success or manly self-control. In the Great Recession's aftermath, dude masculinity collided with food producers and marketers desperate to find new customers. The result was a wave of new diet sodas and yogurts marketed with dude-friendly stereotypes, a transformation of food media, and weight loss programs just for guys. In a work brimming with fresh insights about contemporary American food media and culture, Contois shows how the gendered world of food production and consumption has influenced the way we eat and how food itself is central to the contest over our identities.

30 review for Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    Like reading a really long research paper about Guy Fieri.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Shuherk

    Quick hitting and very interesting. Weakest point is that this could’ve been longer and the dynamics of dudes being two categories (the mindless, lazy, uncaring types vs the macho, aggressively masculine types) could’ve been more fleshed out. But each chapter is fascinating and would be a very good book to read with a friend because the book lends itself to discussions. 4.5

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bernard Lavallée

    I really liked this academic essay on the links between food and gender. Each chapter explores a different angle: cookbooks for "dudes", gendered food marketing or the diet industry. My least favorite chapter was the one on Guy Fieri, used as an example of the "dude chef", maybe because I am not familiar with this man. I particularly enjoyed the diet chapter when she compares two Weight Watchers ads, one for man and one for woman. It was fascinating! I really liked this academic essay on the links between food and gender. Each chapter explores a different angle: cookbooks for "dudes", gendered food marketing or the diet industry. My least favorite chapter was the one on Guy Fieri, used as an example of the "dude chef", maybe because I am not familiar with this man. I particularly enjoyed the diet chapter when she compares two Weight Watchers ads, one for man and one for woman. It was fascinating!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Annie Sell

    7/10

  5. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This was an interesting analysis on food advertising and gender. The writing style is a bit dry as it reads like a research paper. My biggest takeaway was the ick factor in how much advertising affects behavior. Coke Zero sales dramatically increase due to changing the can's color from silver to black. It is very disconcerting how susceptible we are to various forms of messaging. This was an interesting analysis on food advertising and gender. The writing style is a bit dry as it reads like a research paper. My biggest takeaway was the ick factor in how much advertising affects behavior. Coke Zero sales dramatically increase due to changing the can's color from silver to black. It is very disconcerting how susceptible we are to various forms of messaging.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mikey Will

    This book unravels the role of food and diet marketing in the establishment and perpetuation of gendered stereotypes in food; particularly, the perceived femininity of yogurt & diet soda. The loss of the male market share due to gender contamination of diet foods is not lost on food manufacturers. Concerted manufacturing and marketing campaigns—often doubling down on gendered stereotypes—have attempted to recast these products into male-acceptable versions. One example: Dr. Pepper Ten with its " This book unravels the role of food and diet marketing in the establishment and perpetuation of gendered stereotypes in food; particularly, the perceived femininity of yogurt & diet soda. The loss of the male market share due to gender contamination of diet foods is not lost on food manufacturers. Concerted manufacturing and marketing campaigns—often doubling down on gendered stereotypes—have attempted to recast these products into male-acceptable versions. One example: Dr. Pepper Ten with its "10 Bold Calories" which was explicitly marketed as "not for women." Industries deployment of the "dude" (slacker) archetype for marketing was the most helpful in bridging the taboo'd threshold of food and masculinity. The "dude" abides, with a non-committal, nonchalance. He is engaged, albeit impartially and ironically, with food and cooking. The "dude" is known for *his* penchant for "dude foods" which are defined as “comfort foods, but with an edge of competitive destruction." It is greasy, spicy, meat-heavy dishes that surpass culinary formality and express masculinity: hot dogs, hamburgers, hot wings. It is not only cuisine réputée of dude chef extraordinaire Guy Fieri but it's his ascent to FoodTV stardom and the responsive and transformative male viewership growth. The uninvested, irony of the "dude" allows for engagement with feminine diet foods (yogurt, diet soda, etc.,) through permissive (albeit still hegemonic) masculinity. Industry marketing can even push the paradox of "diet foods" and calorie-laden, fat-laden "dude foods" into the sphere of irreverent irony (characteristic of the slacker). This latter oxymoronic blending is notably a marketing style specialized in the highly gendered approaches towards attracting men to weight loss programs such as Weight Watchers, Nutrisystem and Jenny Craig. This was a great read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    For people interested in this fascinating topic, I highly recommend this interview with the author: https://christyharrison.com/foodpsych... The book covers a lot of thought-provoking territory, but I didn't enjoy the research paper style of writing as much as I enjoyed listening to the author talk about it. She kept returning to the same ideas to tie everything together, which started feeling repetitive. (Be prepared to read the phrase "hegemonic masculinity" about a bajillion times.) She's rais For people interested in this fascinating topic, I highly recommend this interview with the author: https://christyharrison.com/foodpsych... The book covers a lot of thought-provoking territory, but I didn't enjoy the research paper style of writing as much as I enjoyed listening to the author talk about it. She kept returning to the same ideas to tie everything together, which started feeling repetitive. (Be prepared to read the phrase "hegemonic masculinity" about a bajillion times.) She's raising important points, though, and her passion for the subject shines through.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    Writing style (highly academic, mostly a research paper) isn't what I like in nonfiction, but if you're cool with it, the subject matter is fascinating. An entire chapter (of only 4) on Guy Fieri! And dudes who won't drink diet coke or eat yogurt because they are lady foods! It's exasperating. Writing style (highly academic, mostly a research paper) isn't what I like in nonfiction, but if you're cool with it, the subject matter is fascinating. An entire chapter (of only 4) on Guy Fieri! And dudes who won't drink diet coke or eat yogurt because they are lady foods! It's exasperating.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    One of the best books I've read in ages — 10/10 recommend for anyone interested in the intersections between gender, media, food, and diets/diet culture. As a genderqueer person in eating disorder recovery and working in nutrition & food media, this field of inquiry is absolutely my jam. The book wonderfully unpacked the way that cisgender, heterosexual, white, middle-class masculinity reflects and is reinforced by food marketing & media. I realize that this book (importantly) centered on "the du One of the best books I've read in ages — 10/10 recommend for anyone interested in the intersections between gender, media, food, and diets/diet culture. As a genderqueer person in eating disorder recovery and working in nutrition & food media, this field of inquiry is absolutely my jam. The book wonderfully unpacked the way that cisgender, heterosexual, white, middle-class masculinity reflects and is reinforced by food marketing & media. I realize that this book (importantly) centered on "the dude" and the type of masculinity he represents, but I saw room for more discussion on transgender masculinities. For example, how do trans men relate to dude masculinity in food marketing and diet messaging? How are they included/excluded in men's-only weight-loss spaces? How do food media-enforced ideals of masculine bodies come into play for trans men as they, too, navigate shifting cultural messages about how male bodies should look and how male-identified people should act? What about nonbinary and transmasculine folks? Trans people are more likely to experience poverty, food insecurity, and eating disorders than cis people — does that play a role in trans folks' relationships to gender, power, and food messaging? Dr. Contois did mention trans and nonbinary folks multiple times in the book, which is great, but I would have loved more research into this area. Now that I reread this paragraph, though, I wonder if what I'm looking for is actually a whole additional book. 😂 Regardless, "Diners, Dudes & Diets" is excellent, and I think everyone could benefit from reading it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly LeBlanc

    I've admired Emily Contois's thoughtful analyses since we were classmates in a graduate food anthropology course. In Diners, Dudes, and Diets, Dr. Contois explores male diet culture, gender roles, and societal change in an original, concise, and compelling narrative. This decidedly academic book brings an understudied subject ("dudes") to the forefront. I am eager to see what Dr. Contois has in store for us next. I've admired Emily Contois's thoughtful analyses since we were classmates in a graduate food anthropology course. In Diners, Dudes, and Diets, Dr. Contois explores male diet culture, gender roles, and societal change in an original, concise, and compelling narrative. This decidedly academic book brings an understudied subject ("dudes") to the forefront. I am eager to see what Dr. Contois has in store for us next.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Maisie Wrubel

    finally! this book took me forever to get through -- mostly because it's essentially an extremely long academic study on the concept of the dude in food advertising -- but it was a really fascinating read. my only problem was that it could be somewhat repetitive at times. not going to rate it just because i read it so sporadically and for honors research, and it's essentially a research paper finally! this book took me forever to get through -- mostly because it's essentially an extremely long academic study on the concept of the dude in food advertising -- but it was a really fascinating read. my only problem was that it could be somewhat repetitive at times. not going to rate it just because i read it so sporadically and for honors research, and it's essentially a research paper

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex Berman

    Much more academic than anticipated I thought this book would be much less academic than it is. That's not a bad thing! The examination of the dude and how it's inserted into all the little crevices of food culture is fascinating. This book is super interesting and it's central thesis is wellvargued even if there's no conclusion or judgement. Much more academic than anticipated I thought this book would be much less academic than it is. That's not a bad thing! The examination of the dude and how it's inserted into all the little crevices of food culture is fascinating. This book is super interesting and it's central thesis is wellvargued even if there's no conclusion or judgement.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Veronica Lozada Tucci

    This book is perfect to keep the excistential anxiety at bay during a global pandemic. It has a fun and light way of exploring gender theory, while also being smart, thought provoking and engaging. I do think she probably spent too much time on Guy Fieri.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mark Johnson

    Short, analytical, thought- provoking

  15. 5 out of 5

    Haley

    Reads like a critical media analysis book, so if that’s your thing definitely pick it up

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dagny

    The whole time i was reading this book i kept having to stop and tell people in detail about gendered yogurt marketing campaigns because it was so interesting. Maybe not to those around me though.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I recommend this book for anyone interested in food studies. Love this topic!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Diners, Dudes, and Diets was a really interesting read about masculinity, food culture, and the ways society expects us to perform gender. It definitely left me with a lot to think about in terms of my own perceptions around food. I would say this felt geared toward an expert, academic audience rather than a general one. As an interested non-expert, there were quite a few places where I found myself confused because certain concepts were discussed in a way that implied an existing familiarity wi Diners, Dudes, and Diets was a really interesting read about masculinity, food culture, and the ways society expects us to perform gender. It definitely left me with a lot to think about in terms of my own perceptions around food. I would say this felt geared toward an expert, academic audience rather than a general one. As an interested non-expert, there were quite a few places where I found myself confused because certain concepts were discussed in a way that implied an existing familiarity with them.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Arnaud

  20. 4 out of 5

    Galinson Stephanie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joey

  22. 4 out of 5

    Seamus May

  23. 5 out of 5

    Denisse

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mallory DeMille

  25. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  26. 5 out of 5

    CR

  27. 5 out of 5

    Susan Morton

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gavin Ward

  30. 4 out of 5

    Allyson

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...