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Joy at Work: Organizing Your Professional Life

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The workplace is a magnet for clutter and mess. Who hasn't felt drained by wasteful meetings, disorganized papers, endless emails, and unnecessary tasks? These are the modern-day hazards of working, and they can slowly drain the joy from work, limit our chances of career progress, and undermine our well-being. The authors offer stories, studies, and strategies to help you The workplace is a magnet for clutter and mess. Who hasn't felt drained by wasteful meetings, disorganized papers, endless emails, and unnecessary tasks? These are the modern-day hazards of working, and they can slowly drain the joy from work, limit our chances of career progress, and undermine our well-being. The authors offer stories, studies, and strategies to help you eliminate clutter and make space for work that really matters. They will help you overcome the challenges of workplace mess and enjoy the productivity, success, and happiness that comes with a tidy desk and mind.


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The workplace is a magnet for clutter and mess. Who hasn't felt drained by wasteful meetings, disorganized papers, endless emails, and unnecessary tasks? These are the modern-day hazards of working, and they can slowly drain the joy from work, limit our chances of career progress, and undermine our well-being. The authors offer stories, studies, and strategies to help you The workplace is a magnet for clutter and mess. Who hasn't felt drained by wasteful meetings, disorganized papers, endless emails, and unnecessary tasks? These are the modern-day hazards of working, and they can slowly drain the joy from work, limit our chances of career progress, and undermine our well-being. The authors offer stories, studies, and strategies to help you eliminate clutter and make space for work that really matters. They will help you overcome the challenges of workplace mess and enjoy the productivity, success, and happiness that comes with a tidy desk and mind.

30 review for Joy at Work: Organizing Your Professional Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    This book is overall just OK, and therefore disappointing. Mostly because the sections by Mari's co-author - which amounts to more than half the book - were next to useless. Sections by Marie: good. I quite enjoyed reading about her struggles with maintaining Joy as her business grew and new challenges arose, as well as when her children were little. The self-reflective parts of the book by Marie were easily the best, and also the most relevant to her students - which, I doubt, is what the author This book is overall just OK, and therefore disappointing. Mostly because the sections by Mari's co-author - which amounts to more than half the book - were next to useless. Sections by Marie: good. I quite enjoyed reading about her struggles with maintaining Joy as her business grew and new challenges arose, as well as when her children were little. The self-reflective parts of the book by Marie were easily the best, and also the most relevant to her students - which, I doubt, is what the authors intended. I loved this excerpt (towards the end): After I quit the staffing agency and went independent, for example, only four people signed up for my first seminar, and two out of those four canceled at the last minute. In the large, almost empty seminar room, I struggled to get my points across, painfully aware of my own inexperience. I felt so miserable and so sorry for the poor participants that I longed to run away and hide. This experience taught me that I lacked marketing skills. I began reading as many books as I could find on PR and business management, went to seminars, made connections by joining morning gatherings for businesspeople, and started a regular blog to get exposure. Instead of trying to attract large numbers, I started out smaller, holding seminars in community centers for groups of up to ten people in tatami-mat rooms where we sat on the floor Japanese-style. Later, I opened my own booth at wellness events. To make sure I stood out, I wore a cotton kimono known as a yukata and stuck a broad fan in my sash emblazoned with the words “Let me solve your tidying problems!” I would wander around the site dressed like this to advertise my services. Through pursuing such strategies, I gradually reached the point where I could hold monthly seminars for thirty that were filled to capacity. The number of my individual clients also began increasing. When my waiting list grew to be six months long, people began asking me to write a book about my tidying method, and that led to publishing my first book. Section by Scott: next to useless. His sections are about tidying things like your digital work, time, decisions, your network, etc. The concept of tidying meetings, for example, is good (good in the sense that meeting management, including when not to attend, etc., is an important topic, and one that I care about). However, the advice Scott provides is the dime-a-dozen, thin advice about meeting management that's not all that helpful. Same with the section on Time; the immortal Peter Drucker starts The Effective Executive talking about Time Management, and his advice about Time Management is absolutely essential. I'm a corporate executive that has spent a lot of time thinking about meetings and time management, and Scott's advice in this book is weak and not particularly actionable. Tidying your Team, as well, was just useless. There are entire books about empowerment and teamwork - my favorite being Turn the Ship Around - and to talk about Tidying your Team to Spark Joy in just a few pages can't begin to make a dent. Ultimately, I think he fails because he tries to cover too many hard topics with very little space. And he tries to use the "Spark Joy" metric as a club for every one of them, which often feels like a huge stretch. Also - and this is a pet peeve of mine - Scott uses "studies show that..." about 1000 times...without citing the studies.

  2. 5 out of 5

    rachel ☾

    i just got approved for Marie Kondo's newest book. i've well and truly Peaked ◯ Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Blog • Goodreads • Twitter • Instagram i just got approved for Marie Kondo's newest book. i've well and truly Peaked ◯ Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Blog • Goodreads • Twitter • Instagram

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    For white collar workers, primarily, but there are a lot of good takeaways here about what it means to have joy at work. If you liked Kondo's Tidying Up, you'll dig this. For white collar workers, primarily, but there are a lot of good takeaways here about what it means to have joy at work. If you liked Kondo's Tidying Up, you'll dig this.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Big thank you to Little, Brown and Company for the ARC! Marie Kondo again writes a wholly accessible and applicable self-help book! Despite being a college student not yet in the professional scene, I still found the advice and tips helpful, especially within the realm of digital tidying up! I am someone who considers herself a bit like Marie, in that we both enjoy keeping only what (in my case, think) we need. This book helped me see that while yes, I may be able to find all my things rather qui Big thank you to Little, Brown and Company for the ARC! Marie Kondo again writes a wholly accessible and applicable self-help book! Despite being a college student not yet in the professional scene, I still found the advice and tips helpful, especially within the realm of digital tidying up! I am someone who considers herself a bit like Marie, in that we both enjoy keeping only what (in my case, think) we need. This book helped me see that while yes, I may be able to find all my things rather quickly, I am still debilitating myself by holding onto everything. A very easy to read and giftable book that is sure to help everyone in some way!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    The humor of reading this while being quarantined at home is not lost on me. It may seem irrelevant to read about sparking joy at work when you’re not physically in the office, but I find that many of these principles still apply. My desk right now is actually a dining table, which I’m also using as my mask sewing area. It’s cluttered and distracting. Kondo states that keeping a clean workspace allows you to focus better on your work, and I find that to be true now more than ever when I’m having The humor of reading this while being quarantined at home is not lost on me. It may seem irrelevant to read about sparking joy at work when you’re not physically in the office, but I find that many of these principles still apply. My desk right now is actually a dining table, which I’m also using as my mask sewing area. It’s cluttered and distracting. Kondo states that keeping a clean workspace allows you to focus better on your work, and I find that to be true now more than ever when I’m having to make due with the only functional work areas I have. Likewise, there is a lot of useful information in here about having more effective meetings, organizing your digital files, and how to maintain a productive schedule. Many points are carried over from Kondo’s previous books, so if you’ve read those already, there isn’t a ton of new material here, but I still found it to be a worthwhile read and reminder about how to keep my life tidy amidst chaos. See more of my reviews: Blog // Instagram

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ben Rogers

    REALLY basic book. I am really unimpressed. Like, basic self-help knowledge. Then, a TON of BOOMER computer how-to's. Like how to empty your email. HOW TO CREATE DESKTOP FOLDERS?!?!?!?!? Who is this written for, Kondo?! Also, PUBLISHER, who releases an "AT WORK" book now!?!? I would have postponed the release of this. Very disappointed. 2/5 REALLY basic book. I am really unimpressed. Like, basic self-help knowledge. Then, a TON of BOOMER computer how-to's. Like how to empty your email. HOW TO CREATE DESKTOP FOLDERS?!?!?!?!? Who is this written for, Kondo?! Also, PUBLISHER, who releases an "AT WORK" book now!?!? I would have postponed the release of this. Very disappointed. 2/5

  7. 5 out of 5

    ➸ Gwen de Sade

    *throws book out of the window* Didn‘t spark joy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Plateresca

    I started listening to The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing, then saw this book, and as I was at the same time wondering what to do about my email clutter, I made a pause to listen to this one. And I'm more or less happy with the book's solution to the email problem, so fine, thanks :) Otherwise, one must note that this book is by Marie and another guy; she mostly speaks about physical clutter, and I'd say that if you read her book on tidying up, y I started listening to The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing, then saw this book, and as I was at the same time wondering what to do about my email clutter, I made a pause to listen to this one. And I'm more or less happy with the book's solution to the email problem, so fine, thanks :) Otherwise, one must note that this book is by Marie and another guy; she mostly speaks about physical clutter, and I'd say that if you read her book on tidying up, you can just skip this one and apply the same principles, - especially if you don't work in an office with other people. The other guy, Scott Sonenshein, speaks about digital things, and I've heard most of those: hide your phone, don't multi-task, etc. But still, the book did have some useful tips, and I have to listen to something when doing a particular kind of boring mechanical work anyway, so :)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    This book did an amazing job motivating me and making me take action cleaning up my digital clutter! I cleaned up my entire email inbox, and my hard drive, my desk, and how I go forward maintaining less clutter. A tidy workspace is a tidy mind :) Marie Kondo also has great advice on keeping the right mindset. She has really great tips. Way too corporate for me though lol organizing teams, your social network, meetings. The title does say "Joy at Work" though so I can't complain haha Marie gives gre This book did an amazing job motivating me and making me take action cleaning up my digital clutter! I cleaned up my entire email inbox, and my hard drive, my desk, and how I go forward maintaining less clutter. A tidy workspace is a tidy mind :) Marie Kondo also has great advice on keeping the right mindset. She has really great tips. Way too corporate for me though lol organizing teams, your social network, meetings. The title does say "Joy at Work" though so I can't complain haha Marie gives great advice to pile like things together to see how much you really have of one thing. I had approx 100 pens in my desk drawer and I finally got rid of 80% of them! Also, I didn't even realize I had 8 white outs, and 6 scissors lol Why do I need so many? I don't... so I gave them away to where someone will actually use them.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scottsdale Public Library

    Mess, disorganization, and a cluttered desk can ruin your joy for your job. Some of my biggest take-aways were the strategies to cope with digital clutter and the ways your work environment can help reduce your overall stress levels. KonMari fans who work a desk job will be interested in the stories, studies, and strategies shared by Marie Kondo and Scott Sonenshein that make for a more productive work environment. - Michelle V.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    As a very tidy person already, I adore Marie Kondo and frequent books about organizational psychologists like Scott Sonenshein. But this book isn’t really for me - it’s for people that have trouble keeping things tidy, and feel like they have no control over their physical and digital workspaces. For those people, I do think this book can help. Kondo’s “spark joy” message is soft pedaled, probably with the assumption that white collar workers could find it sappy. Still, the advice is practical. As a very tidy person already, I adore Marie Kondo and frequent books about organizational psychologists like Scott Sonenshein. But this book isn’t really for me - it’s for people that have trouble keeping things tidy, and feel like they have no control over their physical and digital workspaces. For those people, I do think this book can help. Kondo’s “spark joy” message is soft pedaled, probably with the assumption that white collar workers could find it sappy. Still, the advice is practical. Kondo and Sonenshein are clear on personal responsibility and instituting boundaries, and focus mainly on storytelling as a means of getting their points across. For the most part, that works. For employees that aren’t white collar, don’t have their own work spaces, and have very little in their own personal control, this book will not help you and might even hurt a little. A lot of what is suggested here has to do with the choices we make, which might be a non-starter for a lot of work places. Still, Kondo and Sonenshein provide lots of small, practical advice that is easy to implement and low-stakes. I came away with a good amount of things to try, and even thinking about digital workspaces differently thanks to Sonenshein’s perspective.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

    Reading Marie's books just soothes me, okay? Reading Marie's books just soothes me, okay?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tuti

    fun to read & useful - inspires you to tidy not only your desk (i found the idea to keep no paper too radical at first, but helpful then!) - but also your decisions, your projects & your meetings.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Pretty basic stuff. Only a few chapters are by Marie Kondo. The rest are quick hits on a lot of topics that don’t currently apply to me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Charity

    It took me a couple of days to read this, since I kept getting up in the middle of it to organize something in my office. Which I suppose is a good testament to the strength of her method. If you have never read Marie Kondo before, this is a great book to start with, especially if you are a blue collar worker. She focuses a lot on group teamwork and how to spark joy together at the office, in cleaning your office space, and delegating tasks; her co-writer also talks about this, and how to organiz It took me a couple of days to read this, since I kept getting up in the middle of it to organize something in my office. Which I suppose is a good testament to the strength of her method. If you have never read Marie Kondo before, this is a great book to start with, especially if you are a blue collar worker. She focuses a lot on group teamwork and how to spark joy together at the office, in cleaning your office space, and delegating tasks; her co-writer also talks about this, and how to organize e-mails, make your time more efficient, etc. Like many other reviewers, I found Marie's sections of the book warmer and more likable than Scott's, simply because I'm so used to her way of communicating. She likes to spark joy in the reader. If you've read her before, there's not a ton of new information here specifically about office organization, but there were a few things, especially in the last chapter, that leapt out at me -- things she learned from her husband's work techniques that really made me think. It's as much about having an uncluttered mind and clear (non-abstract, but specific) purpose as it is an uncluttered desk. One thing he recommends is to prioritize your people -- he focuses on his family first and everyone else second. I think there's some truth in that, we often take those we love most for granted and waste energy and mental resources trying to make other people like us... who won't, and may never like us. Marie said she was hesitant to expand her business, in case people hated her. Her therapist said, "They already hate you." (He tells that to everyone.) So she Googled herself, found an article on "Why we hate Marie Kondo," and... went ahead and expanded her business. Good for her. Also, if you hate Marie, you don't really understand her message. It's not about dumping your books in a landfill. It's about ONLY OWNING THINGS THAT GIVE YOU JOY.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sonali Dabade

    I really liked reading this book! *** UPDATE *** Full review is now up on my YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/rp0LzqgXkBw I really liked reading this book! *** UPDATE *** Full review is now up on my YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/rp0LzqgXkBw

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kira

    I absolutely adore Marie Kondo and this collaboration with Scott Sonenshein was just wonderful. Joy at Work is a very interesting read for those who are looking to be more productive in their work life and Marie Kondo's 'Konmari' method provides an easy, thoughtful way to do so. I really enjoyed the parts of this book about digital minimalism which were a collaborative effort between the two authors and felt inspired to minimise my own digital life through this. Thank you to NetGalley for providi I absolutely adore Marie Kondo and this collaboration with Scott Sonenshein was just wonderful. Joy at Work is a very interesting read for those who are looking to be more productive in their work life and Marie Kondo's 'Konmari' method provides an easy, thoughtful way to do so. I really enjoyed the parts of this book about digital minimalism which were a collaborative effort between the two authors and felt inspired to minimise my own digital life through this. Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an Advanced Readers Copy in exchange for an honest review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anne (ReadEatGameRepeat)

    I thought this was an interesting and motivating book. Okay so confession time, this book arrived addressed to me along with other books I did order, but I did not order this book at all. I contacted the place I ordered the book from and they said I didn't have to return it so I decided to keep it and read it. This was actually a pretty quick read and I do think I got something from it even though right now I'm not actually working I'm looking forward to applying these lessons to my own space wh I thought this was an interesting and motivating book. Okay so confession time, this book arrived addressed to me along with other books I did order, but I did not order this book at all. I contacted the place I ordered the book from and they said I didn't have to return it so I decided to keep it and read it. This was actually a pretty quick read and I do think I got something from it even though right now I'm not actually working I'm looking forward to applying these lessons to my own space when I get back to uni for my Master thesis. I do love both the writers, they both have an interesting voice and I thought it was interesting that they had both anecdotes but also actual research about the psychology of tidying up and how being organized helps you in different ways. Should I ever be in the position to get a house I will probably pick up some of these books to read and learn from. Although this is not an amazing book (probably because of the nature of it - I mean its a non-fiction about tidying) I do think I'll re-read it whenever I do actually get a job (someone please not-hate me enough to hire me - I swear I'm semi competent).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (Remarkablylisa)

    Kind of weird time for me to read this when I'm working from home because of COVID-19 but it helped remind me that i need to clean my desk thoroughly. the rest of the advice unfortunately does not apply to me. Perfect for a working parent, someone who is involved in a lot of things, or someone with a need to network with others. Kind of weird time for me to read this when I'm working from home because of COVID-19 but it helped remind me that i need to clean my desk thoroughly. the rest of the advice unfortunately does not apply to me. Perfect for a working parent, someone who is involved in a lot of things, or someone with a need to network with others.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ying Ying

    I loved the book, especially the end of the book. The author’s love of organizing things is just contagious. I also feel the joy when everything is clean and neat; even the idea of things being clean and neat is sexy. Quite a few tips to take away for life: including making your controllable space a place of joy, and being grateful for things that serve us day to day.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Umi

    This one is not even irritating in a fun way, it’s literally almost all just like, respond to emails when you get them, like, wow, I never thought of that! Does not really get into what happens when you respond to the emails and people keep responding to you (possibly the worst part of ‘working’) but did tell me how to clean my desk (does anyone even work anywhere that isn’t open plan (read: an actual hellscape) any more (and lest you get smart, I do mean before now)??). Something something some This one is not even irritating in a fun way, it’s literally almost all just like, respond to emails when you get them, like, wow, I never thought of that! Does not really get into what happens when you respond to the emails and people keep responding to you (possibly the worst part of ‘working’) but did tell me how to clean my desk (does anyone even work anywhere that isn’t open plan (read: an actual hellscape) any more (and lest you get smart, I do mean before now)??). Something something something putting too many little comments in parenthetical sparks joy I guess sorry bye Also they were way too into saying that stuff ‘spark[ed] joy’ and certainly we as a society have learned our lesson about catchphrases by now?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Esther King

    I think that most of the ideas in this book have already been propounded in Marie Kondo's former books, and this is much of the same, but targeted toward the workplace. There are some nice tips and hints to incorporate here if you have an office job, which seems to be a decreasing luxury in the modern world, but there's not too much in here that was new material. I find that the methods put forward in all her books are quite effective and helpful if they're something you have the time for. The i I think that most of the ideas in this book have already been propounded in Marie Kondo's former books, and this is much of the same, but targeted toward the workplace. There are some nice tips and hints to incorporate here if you have an office job, which seems to be a decreasing luxury in the modern world, but there's not too much in here that was new material. I find that the methods put forward in all her books are quite effective and helpful if they're something you have the time for. The idea of 'sparking joy' is a very sweet thing, and it helps to clarify what is and isn't helpful to keep in your life. However, if you've read one, you're getting close to having read them all. The digital application of tidying up is nice to see as an aside and gives some weight to the idea of a tidy desktop and simplifying your digital space too, but besides that, there's not much new to pick up.

  23. 4 out of 5

    biblio_mom (Aiza)

    "Studies conclude that people can reasonably handle about 150 meaningful connections. Beyond that it's hard to genuinely known people in your network". - Scott (Chapter 7 : Tidying Your Network) Well I have to agreed to that. It blows my mind because its true. And I think, I only known less than half of people that I followed on Instagram. Maybe around 200? 😅 The capter talks about the amount of followers we have and the amount of time we spent on social medias daily. Something to really ponder u "Studies conclude that people can reasonably handle about 150 meaningful connections. Beyond that it's hard to genuinely known people in your network". - Scott (Chapter 7 : Tidying Your Network) Well I have to agreed to that. It blows my mind because its true. And I think, I only known less than half of people that I followed on Instagram. Maybe around 200? 😅 The capter talks about the amount of followers we have and the amount of time we spent on social medias daily. Something to really ponder upon. There are 13 chapters in this book, 4 out of 11 chapters are written by Marie Kondo, while the rest are from her co-author, Scott Sonenshein; Why Tidy, If You Keep Falling Back To Clutter, Tidying Your Workspace, Tidying Digital Work, Tidying Time, Tidying Decisions, Tidying Your Network, Tidying Meetings, Tidying Teams, Sharing The Magic of Tidying, and How To Spark Even More Joy At Work. My favourite line from Chapter One would be the fact that "clutter also adversely affects health" and in chapter 3, "question to ask yourself is what role that book plays in your life". Overall, this book is an okay for me. I truly enjoyed most of Marie Kondo's parts especially when she shared about the hardship to maintain her own joy in her consulting job, until she came to a decision to go independent. But thats just the beginning to even more general clutters in her career. If you are already her Konmari method's fan, you might expect some of the points written. What's new for me, personally, that I have never thought of doing are decluttering my networks, digital works and the amounts BOOKS that I just recently accumulated. 😆

  24. 5 out of 5

    Favian

    Marie Kondo and Scott Sonenshein smoothly collaborated on how to extend the concept of tidying in the work place. The targeted readers are those who have their own dedicated workstations. I expected to merely gain supplementary knowledge on the KonMari method through the same process of questioning whether an object being held sparks joy. Instead, I was blown away by the breadth and width of the book, as it included much-needed steps on digital decluttering (Finally!), handling meetings with pro Marie Kondo and Scott Sonenshein smoothly collaborated on how to extend the concept of tidying in the work place. The targeted readers are those who have their own dedicated workstations. I expected to merely gain supplementary knowledge on the KonMari method through the same process of questioning whether an object being held sparks joy. Instead, I was blown away by the breadth and width of the book, as it included much-needed steps on digital decluttering (Finally!), handling meetings with proper decorum, and being engaging team leaders and team players, regardless of one's job title. I also appreciated Marie Kondo's honesty when she shared that she herself struggles in maintaining spotless levels of tidiness, especially once she became a mother. Grab a copy of this book to rediscover the importance of gratitude, conviction, and being truly present in the work setting.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Em

    OK, so I'm not going to climb under my desk every morning and wipe down the cables underneath (something Marie used to do to bring joy to her workplace), but the book has some good tips for simplifying your working life. OK, so I'm not going to climb under my desk every morning and wipe down the cables underneath (something Marie used to do to bring joy to her workplace), but the book has some good tips for simplifying your working life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Abby Johnson

    KonMari fans will want to pick up this latest if they have a desk job and struggle with clutter at work.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shruti Sharma

    I am surprised why I took so much time to finish it. It's a good book (nothing great, but good), one that you'll enjoy reading if your work life is a mess. Mine is not a mess, but chaotic by choice. And I know already what I need to do. So this book was a 'gentle reminder' to put all those ideas in my head to work. If your work life doesn't spark joy, pick this book. I enjoyed parts written by Marie more than Scott's. May be because Marie has given more personal examples. BTW, if you don't have I am surprised why I took so much time to finish it. It's a good book (nothing great, but good), one that you'll enjoy reading if your work life is a mess. Mine is not a mess, but chaotic by choice. And I know already what I need to do. So this book was a 'gentle reminder' to put all those ideas in my head to work. If your work life doesn't spark joy, pick this book. I enjoyed parts written by Marie more than Scott's. May be because Marie has given more personal examples. BTW, if you don't have a job, because you are a business owner or a freelancer, you can still pick this book. It's a good book for any kind of work that you do.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Abiman

    1-1.5. Yikes. A large chunk of the book pushes that having a clean desk or clean inbox, a favorite pen, or a picture nearby can help you feel or create joy at work. The author does eventually concede and sneak in a few lines that actually your work will bring joy if it’s fulfilling or the tasks lead to greater fulfillment. There were a few snippets in the teams and meetings chapters that brought some value as those takeaways were actually based on reality. Recommend reading just those chapters a 1-1.5. Yikes. A large chunk of the book pushes that having a clean desk or clean inbox, a favorite pen, or a picture nearby can help you feel or create joy at work. The author does eventually concede and sneak in a few lines that actually your work will bring joy if it’s fulfilling or the tasks lead to greater fulfillment. There were a few snippets in the teams and meetings chapters that brought some value as those takeaways were actually based on reality. Recommend reading just those chapters and skipping the rest.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    There was some weird corporate mumbo-jumbo, but overall I find Marie Kondo extremely soothing to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Briones

    Some good ideas were taken from this, nothing life changing.

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