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The story of a Native American girl struggling to find her joy again. It’s been a hard year for Maisie Cannon, ever since she hurt her leg and could not keep up with her ballet training and auditions. Her blended family is loving and supportive, but Maisie knows that they just can’t understand how hopeless she feels. With everything she’s dealing with, Maisie is not excited The story of a Native American girl struggling to find her joy again. It’s been a hard year for Maisie Cannon, ever since she hurt her leg and could not keep up with her ballet training and auditions. Her blended family is loving and supportive, but Maisie knows that they just can’t understand how hopeless she feels. With everything she’s dealing with, Maisie is not excited for their family midwinter road trip along the coast, near the Makah community where her mother grew up. But soon, Maisie’s anxieties and dark moods start to hurt as much as the pain in her knee. How can she keep pretending to be strong when on the inside she feels as roiling and cold as the ocean?


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The story of a Native American girl struggling to find her joy again. It’s been a hard year for Maisie Cannon, ever since she hurt her leg and could not keep up with her ballet training and auditions. Her blended family is loving and supportive, but Maisie knows that they just can’t understand how hopeless she feels. With everything she’s dealing with, Maisie is not excited The story of a Native American girl struggling to find her joy again. It’s been a hard year for Maisie Cannon, ever since she hurt her leg and could not keep up with her ballet training and auditions. Her blended family is loving and supportive, but Maisie knows that they just can’t understand how hopeless she feels. With everything she’s dealing with, Maisie is not excited for their family midwinter road trip along the coast, near the Makah community where her mother grew up. But soon, Maisie’s anxieties and dark moods start to hurt as much as the pain in her knee. How can she keep pretending to be strong when on the inside she feels as roiling and cold as the ocean?

30 review for The Sea in Winter

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rajiv

    [Blog]::[Youtube]::[Twitter]::[Instagram]::[Pinterest]::[Bloglovin] The Sea in Winter is a beautiful, emotional tale about feeling hopeless and struggling to move on. Firstly, before I get into Maisie’s storyline, I must applaud the author for the details she put into the novel. Although targeted for middle grade, I learned a lot from reading this story about the Makah Nation and the Native tribes. Moreover, this book was an eye-opener for me, from the Elwha Dam to the Duwamish Tribe. The auth [Blog]::[Youtube]::[Twitter]::[Instagram]::[Pinterest]::[Bloglovin] The Sea in Winter is a beautiful, emotional tale about feeling hopeless and struggling to move on. Firstly, before I get into Maisie’s storyline, I must applaud the author for the details she put into the novel. Although targeted for middle grade, I learned a lot from reading this story about the Makah Nation and the Native tribes. Moreover, this book was an eye-opener for me, from the Elwha Dam to the Duwamish Tribe. The author beautifully includes many facts for a simple tale, and it made the book stand out. Coming to the plot, I thought the author portrayed a beautiful message about how people cope with hopelessness and failure and have trouble moving on. It was interesting to see how Maisie struggles and fights this battle at such a young age. Additionally, Maisie’s family is terrific and strengthens the story very nicely. Also, I loved Conor! He sparks the tale with his innocence and charm in this otherwise serious novel. Another part that stood out for me was the bond between Jack and Maisie. The author wrote their relationship realistically, and I loved the scenes at the motel where they share popcorn. However, there were a few minor parts that I felt could have been slightly better. For instance, I would have liked the author to give more details of the accident that made Maisie behave this way. Also, I felt like, at times, there was a shift of focus from Maisie’s issues to her mother’s problems. Apart from that, I enjoyed “The Sea in Winter.” It is a quick, simple, but beautiful, heartwarming story about hope and family, with many interesting facts. Overall, I enjoyed it and thought that a reader of any age would appreciate it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Afoma (Reading Middle Grade)

    Christine Day's writing is always quiet, poignant, and insightful, and The Sea in Winter is especially so. Maisie is a deeply introspective character whose suffering will be deeply felt by all who read this book. Yet, this book manages to be uplifting with the help of Maisie's brother Connor and her warm, loving family and friends. If you enjoy middle-grade books with a touch of ballet, heartwarming sibling dynamics, books featuring blended families, and characters dealing with friendship issues Christine Day's writing is always quiet, poignant, and insightful, and The Sea in Winter is especially so. Maisie is a deeply introspective character whose suffering will be deeply felt by all who read this book. Yet, this book manages to be uplifting with the help of Maisie's brother Connor and her warm, loving family and friends. If you enjoy middle-grade books with a touch of ballet, heartwarming sibling dynamics, books featuring blended families, and characters dealing with friendship issues and mental health struggles, this is one to read. Most importantly, however, this is a much welcome addition to a too-small roster of books by Native American authors. Read my full review on my blog. I received an eARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Darla

    Set in Seattle and coastal Washington state, this new middle grade novel is being published under a new imprint called Heartdrum. This exciting project from HarperCollins showcasing the voices of Native creators. This title tells the story of Maisie and her struggles to recover from ACL surgery and her dreams of returning to ballet. Her entire family is of Native descent and as they take a family trip historical events are remembered and historic sites are visited. Much of the book is set in Feb Set in Seattle and coastal Washington state, this new middle grade novel is being published under a new imprint called Heartdrum. This exciting project from HarperCollins showcasing the voices of Native creators. This title tells the story of Maisie and her struggles to recover from ACL surgery and her dreams of returning to ballet. Her entire family is of Native descent and as they take a family trip historical events are remembered and historic sites are visited. Much of the book is set in February and Maisie is spending time at the sea -- giving us the title. What I really loved about this book in addition to the new things I learned about Native history was the strong family structure that Maisie is a part of, especially her interactions with her little brother Connor. While I fell in love with the cover, it seems to depict a girl who is several years younger. It is just not the way I imagined Maisie once I read her story. Still, the book itself is well done and delivers a quality product and represents the new imprint well. Thank you to Heartdrum and Edelweiss+ for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Vina

    Rating 4.5. This is the second book I’ve read by Christine Day. The Sea in Winter focuses on Maisie’s, a middle school student, personal struggle of dealing with a life changing event deterring and challenging her aspirations and passions. The book is a quick read, but the author does a great job in correlating her Mother’s and Maisie tribal struggle in helping Maisie deal with her personal struggles. The one thing I enjoyed of Christine Day character development is Maisie's parent. As an indige Rating 4.5. This is the second book I’ve read by Christine Day. The Sea in Winter focuses on Maisie’s, a middle school student, personal struggle of dealing with a life changing event deterring and challenging her aspirations and passions. The book is a quick read, but the author does a great job in correlating her Mother’s and Maisie tribal struggle in helping Maisie deal with her personal struggles. The one thing I enjoyed of Christine Day character development is Maisie's parent. As an indigenous reader, I was delighted to see a positive portrayal of an indigenous couple’s parenting style, which is rarely displayed in majority of our Indigenous books. I believe we need more of these positive portrayal for our Indigenous children and young adult readers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Enne

    4 stars I adored how messy everything in this book is. Not from the technical standpoint, but from the narrative standpoint. No question or problem in this book seems like it has a clear answer and I loved that. I really enjoyed the family dynamics explored in this book, I thought they were really complex and well-developed. In general, writing complex families is something that Christine Day seems to be really good at, so I will definitely be picking up more of her books in the future for that a 4 stars I adored how messy everything in this book is. Not from the technical standpoint, but from the narrative standpoint. No question or problem in this book seems like it has a clear answer and I loved that. I really enjoyed the family dynamics explored in this book, I thought they were really complex and well-developed. In general, writing complex families is something that Christine Day seems to be really good at, so I will definitely be picking up more of her books in the future for that alone. But I also really loved the way this book explored change, both in the way it explores life-changing events and also just the way people can change over time. I thought the main character’s development tied really well into that and I just adored the way it all came together. This is a book about finding a new place to fit into the world after your reality is tilted or turned on its axis. It’s a book about learning to adapt. But it’s also a book about support and love and how those are the things that can help carry someone through that. I truly enjoyed every second of it. trigger warnings: injury, hospitals, references to/depictions of anxiety and depression, mentions of war & death rep: Indigenous (Makah) MC, Indigenous (Makah & Piscataway) side characters

  6. 4 out of 5

    Laura Gardner

    Lovely! Sometimes giving up on dreams is inevitable and this book is about that struggle.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kathie

    Thank you Edelweiss+ and the publisher for an eARC of this book. I requested this eARC because I enjoyed the author's first book, and the cover on this one totally sucked me in. I'm so glad I did, because this is a good I'll be recommending for several reasons. All Maisie wants to do is recover from her ACL injury, and get back to dancing. She has dreams of becoming a professional ballet dancer, and auditions are already taking place for summer intensives. But although she's making strides, the in Thank you Edelweiss+ and the publisher for an eARC of this book. I requested this eARC because I enjoyed the author's first book, and the cover on this one totally sucked me in. I'm so glad I did, because this is a good I'll be recommending for several reasons. All Maisie wants to do is recover from her ACL injury, and get back to dancing. She has dreams of becoming a professional ballet dancer, and auditions are already taking place for summer intensives. But although she's making strides, the injury is taking time to heal, and she's frustrated, feeling alienated from the world that she feels is like a second home. Her mom and step-dad want to help her, but she has so many feelings inside that she starts directing them at the people she loves. A family hiking trip leads to emotions coming to a boil, just when Maisie is going to need her family the most. I loved this story, partly because Maisie's passion was so palpable, but also because the frustration, impatience, and longing to return to something she loved is so relatable. Many young athletes will face a setback at some point in their lives, and learning how to deal with the realities of it and looking outside the narrow path one has chosen is a valuable learning experience. I also really loved her relationship with her family, and how supportive her mom and step-dad try to be. There is a lot of love in this family, clearly visible even through the hurt and anger. I also really enjoyed Maisie connecting to her family heritage. Her mom is Makah, her father was Piscataway, and her step-dad, Jack, is from the Elwha Klallam Tribe. Jack knows a great deal about the Pacific Northwest history, and through his stories, and the stories of her mom during their hiking trip to her area where she grew up, there is a lot of valuable Native history taught through this story. I will definitely be adding this book to my collection in the new year.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Ward

    'The Sea in Winter' is a wonderful middle grade contemporary fiction novel that deals with something that every person can relate to - pain. Maisie is a great main character for the story and I really empathized with her. She's very realistic and rounded; we get to see her go through some really rough times in the story. She's been physically injured and can't dance ballet like she wanted. Maisie has to deal with different types of pain - both physical and emotional - and the author was able to 'The Sea in Winter' is a wonderful middle grade contemporary fiction novel that deals with something that every person can relate to - pain. Maisie is a great main character for the story and I really empathized with her. She's very realistic and rounded; we get to see her go through some really rough times in the story. She's been physically injured and can't dance ballet like she wanted. Maisie has to deal with different types of pain - both physical and emotional - and the author was able to make her feel so real that my heart hurt for her. Every single reader will be able to relate to Maisie in one way or another. Pain is universal and everyone will experience some amount of it within their lives. But the story isn't just about Maisie's emotional problems that are starting to get out of hand. It's also about living with the pain, learning from it, and moving on. It's a reminder to all of us that although there will be pain and suffering in our lives, it's not going to last forever. Maisie was able to get through her issues with the help and support of her family and some other important people. I thought this was a great story at face value that tackles a universal topic in our world as well. I definitely recommend this book to fans of middle grade fiction, contemporary fiction, and readers of all ages are sure to get something out of this story. Disclosure: I received a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carli

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5. This is a quiet, moving novel about Maisie, whose knee injury at ballet has her in a deep funk. Ballet has been her entire life, and even with a supportive family, she finds herself unable to respond to friends’ calls and texts, and feels a deep sense of dread. A family vacation to the coast, near the community where her mother grew up, though meant to heal her, exposes these wounds further. With a Native American family at the center and a strong message of hope, hand this to though ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5. This is a quiet, moving novel about Maisie, whose knee injury at ballet has her in a deep funk. Ballet has been her entire life, and even with a supportive family, she finds herself unable to respond to friends’ calls and texts, and feels a deep sense of dread. A family vacation to the coast, near the community where her mother grew up, though meant to heal her, exposes these wounds further. With a Native American family at the center and a strong message of hope, hand this to thoughtful readers. Recommended for grades 5-8.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Thank you to Harper Collins & HarperKids for sending me a finishing copy in exchange for an honest review and promotion. All opinions are my own.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    A quietly beautiful book that explores what happens to Maisie Cannon, after an injury sidelines her from her one true passion—ballet. Woven seamlessly into the story was information about the indigenous people of the Northwest (mostly). I loved hearing about their ancestors, traditions, and respect for their waters and land. What stood out to me the most, though, was addressing mental health issues that both Maisie and her mother face. In my humble opinion, MG and YA need to continue to include t A quietly beautiful book that explores what happens to Maisie Cannon, after an injury sidelines her from her one true passion—ballet. Woven seamlessly into the story was information about the indigenous people of the Northwest (mostly). I loved hearing about their ancestors, traditions, and respect for their waters and land. What stood out to me the most, though, was addressing mental health issues that both Maisie and her mother face. In my humble opinion, MG and YA need to continue to include this topic so that kids and teens can see tending to their mental health as normal and necessary.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Colette

    **I received a Digital ARC of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.** I initially requested this ARC because I loved the author's previous novel, which I read because I am a fan of the illustrator who did the cover art for both books, Michaela Goade. However, I am delighted that through Goade, I found a new favorite author! Maisie, the protagonist, struggles with intense emotions and family frustrations after a serious ballet injury. She struggles, both physically and emotiona **I received a Digital ARC of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.** I initially requested this ARC because I loved the author's previous novel, which I read because I am a fan of the illustrator who did the cover art for both books, Michaela Goade. However, I am delighted that through Goade, I found a new favorite author! Maisie, the protagonist, struggles with intense emotions and family frustrations after a serious ballet injury. She struggles, both physically and emotionally, to navigate her healing journey as she attends school, physical therapy, and travels with her blended family. Ultimately, her story ends in a realistic and heartening manner. Though my middle school years were very different from Maisie's, I found so many similarities in our stories. I spent a summer in Seattle as a middle schooler, where Maisie lives. Like Maisie, I studied ballet throughout my childhood. And perhaps most importantly (to me) I'm Indigenous. This is exactly the book I wish I had access to as a middle schooler. I also struggled with big emotions at that age, and would have appreciated Maisie's journey. This is an #ownvoices book that I needed badly and am so glad exists for young people now. Day's writing is really lovely- it doesn't feel stilted or heavy-handed, like many middle-grade novels do. I loved the references to the dams and whaling- touchpoints I could relate to. My summer in Seattle involved studying what might happen if the dams were to be removed. I'm so happy Maisie lives the reality of the world where the dams were removed! Like Maisie's mother, I was also deeply affected by racism surrounding Indigenous rights when I was a child. I will be buying this book when it debuts, for myself and as gifts for kids in my life.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    "And so, I'm forced to let it flow. The tears run hot down my cheeks, cooling as they drip down my chin. And all I can do is shudder through the pain. Watch as my breath forms small clouds in the air. And think about everything I should have done differently." You know how sometimes you're fortunate enough to read a book at the exact right moment in your life? Well, I feel like The Sea in Winter came to me just when I needed it. (I haven't been reading as much lately, only listening to audioboo "And so, I'm forced to let it flow. The tears run hot down my cheeks, cooling as they drip down my chin. And all I can do is shudder through the pain. Watch as my breath forms small clouds in the air. And think about everything I should have done differently." You know how sometimes you're fortunate enough to read a book at the exact right moment in your life? Well, I feel like The Sea in Winter came to me just when I needed it. (I haven't been reading as much lately, only listening to audiobooks, because of some anxiety and depression while we're in a pandemic) After reading Christine Day's I Can Make This Promise, I was hoping she'd continue to write more books. I work in a library and I've recommended that book to so many kids and other library workers. I think The Sea in Winter, which I loved even more than her Day's first book, is essential reading for young children. The Sea in Winter is the first Native-focused book for Harper Collins's Children's imprint Heartdrum. Heartdrum was inspired by the #WENEEDDIVERSEBOOK campaign launched a few years ago around 2014 or 2015. I CANNOT wait to read more from this imprint. Christine Day's The Sea in Winter tells the story of a young girl named Maisie whose dream is to become a professional ballerina. Prior to the story's start, Maisie sustains a serious injury, tearing her ACL, after attempting a move for more advanced ballerinas. Maisie suffers from anxiety and depression as she sees her ballerina friends audition for prestigious schools while she is still in recovery. Her irritability and sadness is amplified while her family is away on a midwinter trip because she only keeps her feelings and emotions hidden. "I won't lie to you, Maisie. It took me a long time to stop feeling those regrets. It took me a long time to realize there was nothing I could've done. No way to ever bring him back. And that I could've spent the rest of my life chasing his ghost, wishing for a life other than the one I was living. Maisie is the daughter of two Native parents of the Makah and Piscataway nation. Maisie's dad tragically died while fighting in Afghanistan when Maisie was only a baby. The quote above from Maisie's mom echoes Maisie's own feelings of wanting to change the outcome of a tragedy. For much of The Sea in Winter, Maisie feels alone. She wishes that she could change not just the outcome of her situation, but she wishes that she could revert nearly every choice she's made that brought her to this moment. She punishes herself for the way things are, exactly as her mom did when her mom's husband died in war. Maisie and her mom are very similar and it brings some comfort to Maisie that her feelings are valid. As we all know, it's easier to dwell on the what ifs, rather than attempting to move on. Onward, move forward. Accept the situation. The burden Maise and her mom carry is heavy, but you live through it knowing you are loved. The Sea in Winter incorporates history of the Makah Indian Nation, healthy coping mechanisms for trauma, the importance of therapy, and the seriousness of children experiencing anxiety and depression. I adored it and cried a lot. Thanks Christine Day! You are a treasure, one that Connor is aching to find...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Mcavoy

    3 1/2 stars. A quiet, thoughtful book. There are several huge pluses: Maisie and her blended family are all first peoples - Makah/Piscataway. Woven into the story is lots of familial and cultural information. The author (this feels super presumptuous of me) strikes a great balance of having her native American background be a background part of her life and, also explicitly inform her experience. The reader gets that Maisie and her family have the experience of feeling that their history is unre 3 1/2 stars. A quiet, thoughtful book. There are several huge pluses: Maisie and her blended family are all first peoples - Makah/Piscataway. Woven into the story is lots of familial and cultural information. The author (this feels super presumptuous of me) strikes a great balance of having her native American background be a background part of her life and, also explicitly inform her experience. The reader gets that Maisie and her family have the experience of feeling that their history is unrecognized by others. This helps explain why Maisie puts such importance on being a famous ballerina - among other things she wants to represent. But Maisie is recovering from a serious injury that may derail her plans for a future as a professional ballerina. There is lots of dance info. As she watches her future unravel, Maisie detaches- failing to respond to friends, losing interest in school and lashing out at her family. The story is deep and realistic and addresses many issues pertinent to middle school kids. My concern is there is a LOT of description. When Maisie passes through a hospital waiting room we know the color of the walls, what the desk is made out of, how many potted plants there are and their location, the expression of the people waiting in the chairs. Sometimes this excessive description works to convey Maisie’s state of mind but sometimes it bogs the story down. I worry kids won’t be willing to wade through it all. There is an element of didacticism. Everything we are told is worth knowing but it will require a sympathetic reader to put up with what feels like information overload. When Maisie’s appropriately concerned parents suggest she see a therapist there is a textbook perfect explication of why therapy is a good idea. Unlike any tween or teen I ever dealt with, Maisie is receptive and respectful of her mother’s experience. She is an exceptionally good kid and her parents are great but it all felt a little sanitized. So bottom line, I would buy this book for a school library and I’d be thrilled to hand it to a thoughtful dance obsessed kid and I love that it shows how a child (with support) can push through depression and anxiety and move towards a new future. Pet peeve: I HATED that the Treaty of Paris was repeatedly held up as some dumb piece of history Maisie couldn’t be bothered to care about and that was entirely irrelevant to her life. REALLY! Do we really need to throw shade on the relevancy of an event that ended the slaughter of millions and redrew borders on three continents and set in motion events resulting in the deaths of tens of millions?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shari

    This second book by Christine Day is as beautiful and layered as her first one, I Can Make This Promise. The Sea in Winter features Maisie, who is struggling with a huge personal loss. After years of ballet training, Maisie has injured her knee, a setback that has left her feeling isolated from her friends and the world of dance that she loves. As she works to get back into dancing condition, she also struggles with her feelings about friendships, her family, and her own heritage. Her mother is This second book by Christine Day is as beautiful and layered as her first one, I Can Make This Promise. The Sea in Winter features Maisie, who is struggling with a huge personal loss. After years of ballet training, Maisie has injured her knee, a setback that has left her feeling isolated from her friends and the world of dance that she loves. As she works to get back into dancing condition, she also struggles with her feelings about friendships, her family, and her own heritage. Her mother is Makah and her father, who died in Afghanistan when Maisie was a newborn, was Piscataway. As Maisie wrestles with her conflicting feelings, her family (including her stepfather and brother) journeys into Olympic National Park to hike into historic Makah territory. The stories she hears from her mother, the support from her stepfather, and the adoration of her younger brother, along with text missives from her friends at home, all guide her along the path she needs to take into true healing. This is a beautiful story that many young people will relate to after the traumas of 2020. Themes of grief, recovery, trauma, therapy, loss, and letting others help us are all timely and relevant in today's world, and I am grateful for this book that will help young people experiencing loss as well as teaching them more about the indigenous people of our nation.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kary H.

    I received an e-ARC of this book from NetGalley and was so happy I did. There are times when a second novel doesn’t live up to the debut work, but Christine Day did it again. This novel was wonderful. Maisie is recovering from a ballet injury and struggling not only physically but mentally and emotionally. She feels distant from her family and friends and tries to walk the path of recovery on her own. Maisie’s family, their tribal identities, and the strong sense of place only make this middle g I received an e-ARC of this book from NetGalley and was so happy I did. There are times when a second novel doesn’t live up to the debut work, but Christine Day did it again. This novel was wonderful. Maisie is recovering from a ballet injury and struggling not only physically but mentally and emotionally. She feels distant from her family and friends and tries to walk the path of recovery on her own. Maisie’s family, their tribal identities, and the strong sense of place only make this middle grade novel better. A point toward the end that I particularly appreciated was Maisie’s mom discussing her own work with a therapist and Maisie beginning that same work. I can’t recall when I’ve seen that portrayed before (although I’m sure it exists), but it was such an important detail. I loved Maisie’s story and can’t wait to get it in the hands of our patrons.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Maisie, a Native American teen , is struggling to get back to her "old" life. Ever since she hurt her knee, she hasn't been able to do practice ballet or attend any auditions. This was her life and many of her friends are from ballet classes. She is feeling hopeless and lost. It isn't until she explodes on a family trip that her mother finally realizes how lost Maisie is. With a therapists help, she slowly starts to look forward to the future - even if ballet may not be a part of it. Set in Seatt Maisie, a Native American teen , is struggling to get back to her "old" life. Ever since she hurt her knee, she hasn't been able to do practice ballet or attend any auditions. This was her life and many of her friends are from ballet classes. She is feeling hopeless and lost. It isn't until she explodes on a family trip that her mother finally realizes how lost Maisie is. With a therapists help, she slowly starts to look forward to the future - even if ballet may not be a part of it. Set in Seattle, the reader also learns some background history of the Native Americans, some of their customs and historic sites in that area. There is also a great author's note at the end with more information.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shirley Freeman

    I listened to this story told by a young girl (12 or so?) who is trying to recover from a knee injury which is threatening her dreamed of future as a ballet dancer. At first I felt like there was too much description of trivial things but I realize that's partly because as a reader, I tend to skim those details and as a listener, I have to stay with them. I ended up liking the story quite a bit - Maisy is struggling with anxiety and borderline depression (those terms aren't used until close to t I listened to this story told by a young girl (12 or so?) who is trying to recover from a knee injury which is threatening her dreamed of future as a ballet dancer. At first I felt like there was too much description of trivial things but I realize that's partly because as a reader, I tend to skim those details and as a listener, I have to stay with them. I ended up liking the story quite a bit - Maisy is struggling with anxiety and borderline depression (those terms aren't used until close to the end) - but she has a wonderfully supportive family and eventually finds the help she needs to come to terms with the loss or alteration of her dreams. A great story for helping remove the stigma of therapy.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Thank you Day for writing an accurate portrayal of recovery after a torn ACL. Maisie's lopsided path to recovery was filled with depression and a loss of identity after realizing she can't continue the activity she loves the most. Chapters were sprinkled with Maisie enduring muscle spasms, aches, and pain as she migrated through the days. Day didn't shy away from including the tedious but necessary recovery after ACL reconstruction and the months to years it takes. The ending was perfect because Thank you Day for writing an accurate portrayal of recovery after a torn ACL. Maisie's lopsided path to recovery was filled with depression and a loss of identity after realizing she can't continue the activity she loves the most. Chapters were sprinkled with Maisie enduring muscle spasms, aches, and pain as she migrated through the days. Day didn't shy away from including the tedious but necessary recovery after ACL reconstruction and the months to years it takes. The ending was perfect because instead of a fairytale closure where Maisie is back in the ballet studio and miraculously pain free, she is learning to accept that her future is uncertain and she needs to recover completely before deciding her path.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Book talk notes FNMI friendly. Girl gets injured in a ballet accident and is taken out of classes for a year. Her friends are all ballet friends so she becomes depressed and isolated. Her grades start slipping. She becomes short tempered with her family. then her family goes on vacation in an area with connections back to her first nations roots. She starts to grow, but then gets injured again and her ballet career looks like it is going to end. Interspersed with how her mother dealt with the de Book talk notes FNMI friendly. Girl gets injured in a ballet accident and is taken out of classes for a year. Her friends are all ballet friends so she becomes depressed and isolated. Her grades start slipping. She becomes short tempered with her family. then her family goes on vacation in an area with connections back to her first nations roots. She starts to grow, but then gets injured again and her ballet career looks like it is going to end. Interspersed with how her mother dealt with the death of her first husband, who was in the military. About grief, dealing with loss, and learning how to move on.

  21. 5 out of 5

    KC

    Twelve-year-old Maisie Cannon loves ballet and nothing is more important but when an injury sidelines her tryout plans for a summer dance academy, she slumps into a depression. During a winter school break, her parents and younger brother embark upon a road trip to the Olympic peninsula and to visit the Makah territory, where her mother grew up. Along the way, Maisie discovers the trials and tribulations of her ancestors while helping with her own revelations. (For me, this story hits all the tr Twelve-year-old Maisie Cannon loves ballet and nothing is more important but when an injury sidelines her tryout plans for a summer dance academy, she slumps into a depression. During a winter school break, her parents and younger brother embark upon a road trip to the Olympic peninsula and to visit the Makah territory, where her mother grew up. Along the way, Maisie discovers the trials and tribulations of her ancestors while helping with her own revelations. (For me, this story hits all the tropes)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alma

    Many hopes and dreams are shattered in middle school, leaving students feeling as if they’re surrounded by pieces of their lives that can’t be reassembled. Maisie’s story of strength and resilience will resound with these readers and, hopefully, give them the belief that this too shall pass. Read more on my blog: https://shouldireaditornot.wordpress.... Many hopes and dreams are shattered in middle school, leaving students feeling as if they’re surrounded by pieces of their lives that can’t be reassembled. Maisie’s story of strength and resilience will resound with these readers and, hopefully, give them the belief that this too shall pass. Read more on my blog: https://shouldireaditornot.wordpress....

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sierra Dertinger

    A beautiful, heartwarming story about Maisie Cannon who is recovering from a knee injury from dance. She wants nothing more than to dance again, but that is not the only pain she faces. A story that delves into emotional distress, loneliness, hope, and therapy. What I loved most was the relationships between the characters, especially Maisie and her step-dad.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Misra

    I love this author. Such a great storyteller! A beautifully told story of a Native American girl who is a dancer coping with the difficulty of a physical injury. I appreciated getting to learn more about Makah, Klallam, and other indigenous tribes to Washington state/Seattle area. #ownvoices #nativereads

  25. 5 out of 5

    Franki Sibberson

    Love so much about this book. A complex character going through so many changes in life, dealing with depression and anxiety. So much Indigenous history throughout and an incredible author's note. Perfect for middle grades. Love so much about this book. A complex character going through so many changes in life, dealing with depression and anxiety. So much Indigenous history throughout and an incredible author's note. Perfect for middle grades.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    Come for The Sea in Winter's cozy cover and stay for a story that explores loss in a way we don't often focus on. Many readers will relate to Maisie's heartbreak due to broken dreams - but they'll connect as they're reminded of the resilience we all have within us, too. Come for The Sea in Winter's cozy cover and stay for a story that explores loss in a way we don't often focus on. Many readers will relate to Maisie's heartbreak due to broken dreams - but they'll connect as they're reminded of the resilience we all have within us, too.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Madison

    It took me way too long to get around to reading this one - but another fabulous book from Christine! She brings our local tribal history into the modern day and brings it to life in a beautiful way. I love Maisy and her family and loved this book!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sam Bloom

    2-for-2!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hoover Public Library Kids and Teens

    Maisie is a young ballerina sidelined by a major injury. Her surgery was successful, and her recovery is progressing . . . but not fast enough. How can she find her joy again?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Christine Day's second book, The Sea in Winter was outstanding. As someone who has dealt with injuries that prevented me from reaching some of the goals of my youth, I could relate to the main characters' internal struggles. I loved Maisie's blended family, her friendships, and the Indigenous history shared by her stepfather throughout. Students passionate about dance and relationships will definitely be hooked quickly by this great story. Christine Day's second book, The Sea in Winter was outstanding. As someone who has dealt with injuries that prevented me from reaching some of the goals of my youth, I could relate to the main characters' internal struggles. I loved Maisie's blended family, her friendships, and the Indigenous history shared by her stepfather throughout. Students passionate about dance and relationships will definitely be hooked quickly by this great story.

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