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Concrete Rose

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International phenomenon Angie Thomas revisits Garden Heights seventeen years before the events of The Hate U Give in this searing and poignant exploration of Black boyhood and manhood. If there’s one thing seventeen-year-old Maverick Carter knows, it’s that a real man takes care of his family. As the son of a former gang legend, Mav does that the only way he knows how: dea International phenomenon Angie Thomas revisits Garden Heights seventeen years before the events of The Hate U Give in this searing and poignant exploration of Black boyhood and manhood. If there’s one thing seventeen-year-old Maverick Carter knows, it’s that a real man takes care of his family. As the son of a former gang legend, Mav does that the only way he knows how: dealing for the King Lords. With this money he can help his mom, who works two jobs while his dad’s in prison. Life’s not perfect, but with a fly girlfriend and a cousin who always has his back, Mav’s got everything under control. Until, that is, Maverick finds out he’s a father. Suddenly he has a baby, Seven, who depends on him for everything. But it’s not so easy to sling dope, finish school, and raise a child. So when he’s offered the chance to go straight, he takes it. In a world where he’s expected to amount to nothing, maybe Mav can prove he’s different. When King Lord blood runs through your veins, though, you can't just walk away. Loyalty, revenge, and responsibility threaten to tear Mav apart, especially after the brutal murder of a loved one. He’ll have to figure out for himself what it really means to be a man.


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International phenomenon Angie Thomas revisits Garden Heights seventeen years before the events of The Hate U Give in this searing and poignant exploration of Black boyhood and manhood. If there’s one thing seventeen-year-old Maverick Carter knows, it’s that a real man takes care of his family. As the son of a former gang legend, Mav does that the only way he knows how: dea International phenomenon Angie Thomas revisits Garden Heights seventeen years before the events of The Hate U Give in this searing and poignant exploration of Black boyhood and manhood. If there’s one thing seventeen-year-old Maverick Carter knows, it’s that a real man takes care of his family. As the son of a former gang legend, Mav does that the only way he knows how: dealing for the King Lords. With this money he can help his mom, who works two jobs while his dad’s in prison. Life’s not perfect, but with a fly girlfriend and a cousin who always has his back, Mav’s got everything under control. Until, that is, Maverick finds out he’s a father. Suddenly he has a baby, Seven, who depends on him for everything. But it’s not so easy to sling dope, finish school, and raise a child. So when he’s offered the chance to go straight, he takes it. In a world where he’s expected to amount to nothing, maybe Mav can prove he’s different. When King Lord blood runs through your veins, though, you can't just walk away. Loyalty, revenge, and responsibility threaten to tear Mav apart, especially after the brutal murder of a loved one. He’ll have to figure out for himself what it really means to be a man.

30 review for Concrete Rose

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hailey (Hailey in Bookland)

    Angie Thomas is such a talented writer and I loved reading more about the backstory behind the parents in THUG. Maverick was a character I really loved in that book so to get a book entirely focused on him and see all he went through it, I really enjoyed it. The plot is definitely quieter than her other books, but I didn’t mind that so much really. I thought that even though there wasn’t a ton of super dramatic moments it still had enough to keep me intrigued and the characters were distinctive Angie Thomas is such a talented writer and I loved reading more about the backstory behind the parents in THUG. Maverick was a character I really loved in that book so to get a book entirely focused on him and see all he went through it, I really enjoyed it. The plot is definitely quieter than her other books, but I didn’t mind that so much really. I thought that even though there wasn’t a ton of super dramatic moments it still had enough to keep me intrigued and the characters were distinctive enough that I wanted to know where they ended up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Angelica

    At this point, I am convinced that Angie Thomas can do no wrong. The way she creates characters and atmosphere is something of beauty.  I think the most special thing about her writing is just how real it is. It's not just that she depicts realistic situations and people, but that her stories feel real. Like these things are happening and you can see and feel these character's frustrations and struggles. You can so clearly understand their emotions and their situations and it's just so to read ab At this point, I am convinced that Angie Thomas can do no wrong. The way she creates characters and atmosphere is something of beauty.  I think the most special thing about her writing is just how real it is. It's not just that she depicts realistic situations and people, but that her stories feel real. Like these things are happening and you can see and feel these character's frustrations and struggles. You can so clearly understand their emotions and their situations and it's just so to read about. Maverick is such a wonderful character. Although we knew him from The Hate U Give, he gets his time to shine in Concrete Rose. He's interesting and complex, and most importantly, he is a fantastic father. From the very beginning, you see the love he has for his children, despite the circumstances. All of the other characters were equally wonderful, however minor. Angie Thomas puts so much life and personality into every single character interaction that it's hard not to feel like you know them all on some personal level. It's easy to imagine that this world and these characters continue on outside of the story.  I think my favorite thing about this book is the simple fact that it's not the kind of story that gets written about. YA contemporary is overrun by white, middle class, suburban teenagers. And while those stories do deserve to be told, stories like this one, often get overlooked, or not published at all. It's a story that shows all the good and the bad that exists in real life places like Garden Heights. It shows the complexities, the tragedies, and the triumphs, of people whose stories have rarely gotten told. And it does all of this without either praising or demonizing it, but rather showing it all as it is. I think that's where the realism I was talking about comes from. All of the problems don't get solved in the end. Bad things continue to exist even after our heroes are triumphant. It's real life. Overall, I enjoyed and highly recommend this book. As I said, I am certain that Angie Thomas can do no wrong. I am highly anticipating whatever else she comes out with next.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kai

    “The apple don’t fall far from the tree, but it can roll away from it. It simply need a little push.” Angie Thomas did it again. Wrote the perfect book. Tens across the board. Before I get into this a disclaimer that this is a prequel to THUG so unless you’ve read the book or seen the film this includes major spoilers. I wasn’t so keen on Maverick as a main character in general, mostly because he is this straight, manly man and I’m…not. But I soon realised that he is easily as relatable as Starr an “The apple don’t fall far from the tree, but it can roll away from it. It simply need a little push.” Angie Thomas did it again. Wrote the perfect book. Tens across the board. Before I get into this a disclaimer that this is a prequel to THUG so unless you’ve read the book or seen the film this includes major spoilers. I wasn’t so keen on Maverick as a main character in general, mostly because he is this straight, manly man and I’m…not. But I soon realised that he is easily as relatable as Starr and Bri, and this book is just as empowering and important as THUG and OTCU. It’s written especially for Black boys that find themselves in hopeless situations, who are told that they are worthless, that they’re thugs, that they’re not allowed to dream. But through Maverick, Angie shows that although their lives are set up unfairly, Black boys from the hood have the right to a bright future as much as anybody else. And sometimes all you need is for someone to sit you down and tell you that you are worth it and that you are deserving. There’s also the harmful idea that Black boys don’t read, which we know is false, but when you never get to see yourself represented then you might not realise that your story is worth telling. Which is exactly why this book is so needed. Here’s a quote from the book that sums it all up: One of the biggest lies ever told is that Black men don’t feel emotions. Guess it’s easier to not see us a human when you think we’re heartless. Fact of the matter is, we feel things. Hurt, pain, sadness, all of it. We got a right to show them feelings as much as anybody else. It took me a couple of chapters to really get into this book, but I had the exact same experience with the THUG and OTCU so I wasn’t worried. I knew I would get the hang of it sooner or later. There’s a lot of characters and details to take in, and I think it also takes me a minute or two to get used to the AAVE style of writing, which is not something I encounter often in books. I know that readers and reviewers have critised the style in the past, and I think it’s okay to criticise writing styles in general, but complaining about it simply because you don’t like a certain dialect or language says more about you than the quality of the book. I honestly think the writing was beautiful and poignant. Angie hits a balance that is full of feeling without ever being corny or clichéd. I also love how she writes dialogue; the banter is witty and sassy but never hurtful. It cracked me up several times because Angie is genuinely funny. And overall there are some amazing quotes in the book, real life lessons. I found myself rereading them over and over again because they capture the sense of the moment with such wisdom. You gotta love people enough to let them go, especially when you’re the reason they’re gone. When it comes to characters and plot I have absolutely no complaints. They all seem real as life to me. Their characterisation makes total sense to me, their actions were in line with their motives and they had the depth necessary to form a bond with them. I loved (loved loved) the representation of queer parents because it’s something so joyful and beautiful that we don’t get to see much of even though they have always been here; the arts and media simply failed to represent them properly. And I really love Angie for including that. Plotwise it all worked for me as well. It’s cool to see all these tiny details that we then get to see again in THUG, like the store, the relationship between Starr’s parents as well as Iesha and King and Carlos (who was a real dick, my god). It made me want to reread THUG badly, and that’s exactly what I did. As a reader, we also know that the plot will take a turn for the worse and Maverick will have to make some painful decisions that may or may not have awful conseqeuences. But it doesn’t feel forced or over the top. It also ended sooner than I thought it would and now I’m really craving a sequel, something set between Concrete Rose and THUG, maybe from Lisa’s POV? But I have a feeling this might be the last book in the THUG series, and I do believe in trilogies. Something else I loved were all the easter eggs hidden between the lines. There are nods to Nic Stone and her Dear Martin series, and Kobe Bryant was mentioned a number of times. I’m sure there was more that I missed, but what truly hit me hard was seeing all these characters that don’t make it to, or don’t survive THUG. We see them as cute and vulnerable babies, and it goes to show that all the victims of police brutality and gun violence are more than a hasthag. Others we see as teenagers and realise that what lies ahead of them will cause them real pain and heartache. Grief hit you in waves. Sometimes it pull me out to sea and take me under. No wonder it’s hard to beathe as I cry. A single review cannot express how exceptional Concrete Rose is. Truly outstanding on every level, both when it comes to the writing itself and the power of the story. Find more of my books on Instagram

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)

    Angie Thomas is so fucking good at what she does. This book was fantastic. TW: gang violence, gun violence, drug dealing, racism

  5. 4 out of 5

    ♡ jules ♡

    update: thank you netgalley gods for the arc ..................................................................................................... angie thomas said let's give my readers what they want, so she gave us maverick's backstory. wake me up when january 2021 begins. update: thank you netgalley gods for the arc ..................................................................................................... angie thomas said let's give my readers what they want, so she gave us maverick's backstory. wake me up when january 2021 begins.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elle

    As if there could ever be any doubt that Angie Thomas would deliver. The Hate U Give was a major hit that’s still sitting pretty on the New York Times bestseller list after ✨ 2 0 5 ✨ weeks!! On the Come Up, my favorite of hers, was technically not part of this two-book series, but shares a common setting with the others, and features some of the most memorable characters I have come across. Thomas has really become an auto-read author for me and I’m so glad her books are so widely available to t As if there could ever be any doubt that Angie Thomas would deliver. The Hate U Give was a major hit that’s still sitting pretty on the New York Times bestseller list after ✨ 2 0 5 ✨ weeks!! On the Come Up, my favorite of hers, was technically not part of this two-book series, but shares a common setting with the others, and features some of the most memorable characters I have come across. Thomas has really become an auto-read author for me and I’m so glad her books are so widely available to teenagers in the US right now. As difficult as it can be to write a sequel, it seems even harder to successfully pull off a prequel, especially to a book so beloved. But in the Acknowledgments of Concrete Rose Thomas says that she was inspired to write a young Maverick’s story after seeing Russell Hornsby depict Starr’s father in the movie adaptation. This is the kind of organic extension of a story that I think makes for compelling spin-offs, as opposed to just a general reluctance to leave a world behind or as a way to capitalize on former successes. In this novel, Maverick Carter is a 17-year-old living in Garden Heights, with his mother working two jobs and his father incarcerated. His world is turned upside down when he finds out a one night stand resulted in a pregnancy and is soon struggling to balance the new responsibilities thrust upon him. Between trying to help out his mother, high school, fatherhood, his girlfriend Lisa and tension amongst the members of the gang he’s basically been born into, the King Lords, Maverick is having a hard time coping under the mounting pressure. If you read The Hate U Give, you can probably guess some of the other challenges Maverick will soon face as well. He’s really still a kid, a teenager, but is suddenly stricken with pains and burdens most adults won’t have to face until much later in their lives, if at all. The dehumanization of young Black men in America has been a topic that many authors, including Thomas and her friend Nic Stone, have been writing about years before the George Floyd and Black Lives Matter protests in the summer of 2020. And I expect them to keep writing these stories as long as they are, unfortunately, relevant to the society we currently live in. As per usual Angie Thomas’ characters are just next level. They feel so tangible and real, like you know them personally. It’s difficult not to empathize with their struggles even if you have no real experience with what they’re going through. But that’s the sign of good writing and probably why most of us read; we want to feel things entirely new but also familiar. The humanity in Thomas’ writing is probably her greatest asset and why I will always go back to her work. And though it doesn’t contain any direct spoilers, I’m decided to put what I thought of the ending under the tags just to be safe: (view spoiler)[Based on Maverick’s history in The Hate U Give, I kept waiting for the final shoe to drop at the end. Even with only a couple of pages left, I was expecting a flash of sirens or an ominous knock at the door to take Maverick away. But since that didn’t happen in this novel, I think I’m only now fully appreciating the way Angie Thomas decided to end this portion of Maverick Carter’s story. I’m sure there was pressure as an author to put a final twist at the end, but she chose to prioritize not just her character’s journey but what ending this book with that kind of negative scene would mean to a reader who identifies with Maverick. Infinite respect to the author for being so conscious of the implications of her work! 🙌 (hide spoiler)] I know Thomas has mentioned in interviews that Concrete Rose will be the last of her books set in Garden Heights, but I’m still so excited to see what she comes out with next. Her work means so much to so many people, especially younger people who don’t often get to see themselves reflected in the protagonists they read about. And I just really appreciate what she’s done for Young Adult fiction and the entire publishing industry. She’s truly a game-changing author with so much more to say.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gabby

    4.5 stars This was great. I loved reading a book from Mavericks POV and learning more about their family history. Here’s a reading vlog where I read this book and explain more of my thoughts on it: https://youtu.be/p06Cutmiyco 4.5 stars This was great. I loved reading a book from Mavericks POV and learning more about their family history. Here’s a reading vlog where I read this book and explain more of my thoughts on it: https://youtu.be/p06Cutmiyco

  8. 5 out of 5

    NReads

    I wouldn't be surprised if this became New York Times bestseller like right now I wouldn't be surprised if this became New York Times bestseller like right now

  9. 4 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    Preorder placed. The countdown begins!! Earlier: WE HAVE A TITLE. WE HAVE A COVER. I AM SO IN LOVE. Seriously though, really loving the title of this. Hard and soft at the same time. This is going to be moving, y'all. Let's all put it on our TBRs! Preorder placed. The countdown begins!! Earlier: WE HAVE A TITLE. WE HAVE A COVER. I AM SO IN LOVE. Seriously though, really loving the title of this. Hard and soft at the same time. This is going to be moving, y'all. Let's all put it on our TBRs!

  10. 5 out of 5

    L.C. Perry

    A BLACK MAN. WITH A DURAG. ON. A. COVERRRRRRRR. And it's Maverick's backstory?!?!?! Angie Thomas, just take my money already. Y'all you have no idea how important this is. Stories like this are some of the most important because of all the terrible stereotypes it's up against. The stigma around black men from the hood is staggering. They're judged so much by people who don't know a thing about what they go through. It's time we all gained more perspective because black men are not monolithic. A BLACK MAN. WITH A DURAG. ON. A. COVERRRRRRRR. And it's Maverick's backstory?!?!?! Angie Thomas, just take my money already. Y'all you have no idea how important this is. Stories like this are some of the most important because of all the terrible stereotypes it's up against. The stigma around black men from the hood is staggering. They're judged so much by people who don't know a thing about what they go through. It's time we all gained more perspective because black men are not monolithic.

  11. 4 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    Concrete Rose is the highly anticipated prequel novel to the super-famous The Hate U Give! I am always so so curious when authors get to do sequels or prequels...flesh out their world and show us other sides to minor characters. This one is set in the '90s and is about Starr's dad as a 17-year-old. And -- OH WOW -- he was a disaster. But also I ached for Mav and all he went through and just the sheer weight of the burden left on his shoulders. He is still a kid through all of this, and he made s Concrete Rose is the highly anticipated prequel novel to the super-famous The Hate U Give! I am always so so curious when authors get to do sequels or prequels...flesh out their world and show us other sides to minor characters. This one is set in the '90s and is about Starr's dad as a 17-year-old. And -- OH WOW -- he was a disaster. But also I ached for Mav and all he went through and just the sheer weight of the burden left on his shoulders. He is still a kid through all of this, and he made so many thoughtless decisions, but the way he unpacks what it is to be a man makes for a story that will hit your heart hard. I think THUG and On the Come Up are my favourite Angie Thomas books, but Concrete Rose takes us on quite a different journey. It hits a lot of the themes Angie Thomas often writes about: life for Black teens, poverty, being in or around gangs, facing a world that is systematically built to crush them, everything from microagressions to vicious racism -- and, so importantly, the joy of what life CAN and WILL be. There's hope in these pages, as well as love and fierce pride over making a life for yourself no matter what the world throws at you. Also it's nice reading about a teen dad! I don't think I've read a YA featuring a teen dad before. Mav ends up with near sole custody of his 3-month-old baby, Seven (omggg Seven ) and it's so sad how it all happened, but like Mav is the BEST dad. He gets overwhelmed and has no idea what he's doing. But he never, never does anything but love his son and want to be the best father. Of course there's all the drama we know from THUG --  Seven isn't Mav's girlfriend's baby. And Mav's expected to work, go to school, raise his kid, keep his head up in the gang he had to join for protection, and win back Lisa. It's a lot. His overwhelm and heartbreak is really palpable on page. You LIVE this with him. And he's just so proud of his kid, no matter what. He's ashamed of himself at times, but never his baby. It's really lovely. The plot mostly is Mav learning to bloom in hard places. (Concrete !! Rose!!) It's not super fast-paced, but there's drama and angst and heartbreak and baby-shaped-poop-catastrophes. I whipped through it all in one day and that was nice I will admit, Mav is quite sexist and I felt all the girls (Iesha and Lisa included) were barely developed. And NO ONE cut Mav slack?! Like the girls were so so harsh on him but...um they were not blameless. So that was frustrating. It's a story about Black boys learning what it is to be men -- and the strength of vulnerability and love and being gentle. Another incredible read from an incredible author. “Son, one of the biggest lies ever told is that black men don't feel emotions. Guess it's easier not to see us as human when you think we're heartless. Fact of the matter is, we feel things. Hurt, pain, sadness, all of it. We got a right to show them feelings as much as anybody else."

  12. 5 out of 5

    Larry H

    Angie Thomas' new book, Concrete Rose , is simply amazing. This is a powerful look at the life and challenges faced by a young Black man. This prequel to The Hate U Give (but you don't need to have read that book first) takes us back to Garden Heights 17 years earlier. Maverick Carter knows his responsibility is to take care of his mom while his father, a former gang legend, is in prison. But the only way for a 17-year-old to truly help his mom is to sell drugs on the side for his gang, th Angie Thomas' new book, Concrete Rose , is simply amazing. This is a powerful look at the life and challenges faced by a young Black man. This prequel to The Hate U Give (but you don't need to have read that book first) takes us back to Garden Heights 17 years earlier. Maverick Carter knows his responsibility is to take care of his mom while his father, a former gang legend, is in prison. But the only way for a 17-year-old to truly help his mom is to sell drugs on the side for his gang, the King Lords. While Maverick knows his life could be better—he’d love people to stop looking at him as a pale imitation of his father—he’s happy with his girlfriend and he has a cousin who looks out for him. And then his life is completely upended when he finds out he’s the father of a three-month-old boy. How can he be a father when he’s still a child himself? While it completely changes his life, he’s determined to be a better father than the one he had. But he can’t be a father if he’s dealing drugs, so as much as “real work” pains him, when he’s given the chance to walk away from the gang life, he does. When tragedy strikes and Maverick makes a foolish mistake, he’s faced with a decision: does he do what he needs to in order to survive and take care of his family, or does he continue to walk the right path, even if it may be the harder one? Concrete Rose was just a fantastic book. I will never know the challenges faced by young Black men, but Thomas takes the reader into that world and gives a glimpse of the struggle between right and wrong, between boyhood and manhood, between being tough and being right. Thomas never ceases to dazzle me with her power as a storyteller, her ability to make you think and make you feel and make you root for her characters. With this book, she has created another masterpiece that will resonate for long afterward. Check out my list of the best books I read in 2020 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2021/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2020.html. Check out my list of the best books of the last decade at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/my-favorite-books-of-decade.html. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com. Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sahil Javed

    january 2021 can't come fast enough. angie thomas is back again with what i'm sure is going to be a fucking masterpiece. january 2021 can't come fast enough. angie thomas is back again with what i'm sure is going to be a fucking masterpiece.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Starlah

    4.5 stars!

  15. 4 out of 5

    jenny✨

    i fell into this today without meaning to—but once i started, i couldn't stop. in truth, i shouldn't be surprised. big mav was one of my favourite characters when i first read The Hate U Give all those years ago, a novel that moved me and made me EXCITED and hopeful for the future of diverse publishing. i have starr, maverick, and the carters' fierce love to thank for that. now that we get to read his story and watch him grow into himself as a seventeen-year-old father-to-be of two... it's been a i fell into this today without meaning to—but once i started, i couldn't stop. in truth, i shouldn't be surprised. big mav was one of my favourite characters when i first read The Hate U Give all those years ago, a novel that moved me and made me EXCITED and hopeful for the future of diverse publishing. i have starr, maverick, and the carters' fierce love to thank for that. now that we get to read his story and watch him grow into himself as a seventeen-year-old father-to-be of two... it's been a great journey. these are characters i would return to, time and again. bottom line: regardless of whether you feel immense THUG nostalgia like me: read. this. book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sana

    I really wasn't expecting there to be ARCs but daaaamn -------------------------------------- Holy shit, Angie Thomas out here really writing a book about Starr's dad, Maverick Carter, and expects it to get banned like THUG got? WE STAN 👏👏 More about the book here I really wasn't expecting there to be ARCs but daaaamn -------------------------------------- Holy shit, Angie Thomas out here really writing a book about Starr's dad, Maverick Carter, and expects it to get banned like THUG got? WE STAN 👏👏 More about the book here

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kevin (Irish Reader)

    Another amazing read from Angie Thomas! This book is a prequel to The Hate U Give and it might just be my favourite prequel I’ve read. I really loved reading through the eyes of a 17 year old Maverick and seeing how he dealt with everything he was going through. Family is also a huge theme in this book and I really enjoyed seeing Maverick’s family relationships and dynamics, and also seeing him putting his loved ones first and doing anything he could to provide for them. I also really loved all o Another amazing read from Angie Thomas! This book is a prequel to The Hate U Give and it might just be my favourite prequel I’ve read. I really loved reading through the eyes of a 17 year old Maverick and seeing how he dealt with everything he was going through. Family is also a huge theme in this book and I really enjoyed seeing Maverick’s family relationships and dynamics, and also seeing him putting his loved ones first and doing anything he could to provide for them. I also really loved all of the little details linking to The Hate U Give such as Mavericks children and how he came up with the names of them. (These children being the main characters in The Hate U Give). Another amazing read from Angie Thomas! Highly recommend it and especially if you’ve already read The Hate U Give. I did a reading vlog on my YouTube Channel where I read this book and shared more of my thoughts. If you’d like to see that video, it’s linked here: https://youtu.be/Y0sZjZkM51Q

  18. 4 out of 5

    nat

    I haven't read THUG yet but THIS COVER IS SO AMAZING I STAN THE BLACK EXCELLENCE I haven't read THUG yet but THIS COVER IS SO AMAZING I STAN THE BLACK EXCELLENCE

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

    This is a fantastic book with a lot of heart. Concrete Rose has a great balance of heavy, relevant topics and light hearted humor that genuinely made me ‘lol’ at times. I fell even more in love with these characters that I was already so invested in after reading The Hate U Give. Maverick and Lisa are everything and Angie did not disappoint.

  20. 4 out of 5

    NAT.orious reads ☾

    Let's be real, folks. We're all over 2020 by now anyway, so we might as well jump straight to January 2021 when this amazing book will grace us. Let's be real, folks. We're all over 2020 by now anyway, so we might as well jump straight to January 2021 when this amazing book will grace us.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    4 stars “Son, one of the biggest lies ever told is that black men don't feel emotions. Guess it's easier not to see us as human when you think we're heartless. Fact of the matter is, we feel things. Hurt, pain, sadness, all of it. We got a right to show them feelings as much as anybody else.” Concrete Rose is a prequel to ‘The Hate You Give’ and the story of Starr’s father, Maverick Carter, when he was a teenager. I love Angie Thomas writing and Mav’s story was so good. Seeing his str 4 stars “Son, one of the biggest lies ever told is that black men don't feel emotions. Guess it's easier not to see us as human when you think we're heartless. Fact of the matter is, we feel things. Hurt, pain, sadness, all of it. We got a right to show them feelings as much as anybody else.” Concrete Rose is a prequel to ‘The Hate You Give’ and the story of Starr’s father, Maverick Carter, when he was a teenager. I love Angie Thomas writing and Mav’s story was so good. Seeing his struggles and how he overcame them was inspiring. He grew up in a way that made it hard to make good choices. The easy choices aren’t the ones he wants to make now that he has a son, and a daughter on the way. He struggles to provide for them and be there for them, but he shows it can be done. I loved his coming of age story and it was great to be back in this world and see how he got his start. Audio book source: Libby (library borrow) Story Rating: 4 stars Narrator: Dion Graham Narration Rating: 4.5 stars Genre: Contemporary Fiction (YA) Length: 8 hours and 17 minutes

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    "Concrete Rose" may or may not have broken me a bit. "The Hate U Give" was better than this book, but this book was still amazing nonetheless. It's going to be very hard to review this book because it's perfection. Angie Thomas has a way of writing that makes you want to not stop reading until you're done with the book. Considering this book is a prequel, I have to say that this book is just amazing. Prequels can usually go two ways they can either be amazing or trash. "Concrete Rose" was an amaz "Concrete Rose" may or may not have broken me a bit. "The Hate U Give" was better than this book, but this book was still amazing nonetheless. It's going to be very hard to review this book because it's perfection. Angie Thomas has a way of writing that makes you want to not stop reading until you're done with the book. Considering this book is a prequel, I have to say that this book is just amazing. Prequels can usually go two ways they can either be amazing or trash. "Concrete Rose" was an amazing prequel. Angie Thomas had amazing writing in both "Concrete Rose" and "The Hate U Give" which is something not that many authors can do when writing prequels. This book follows Maverick's life as a teenager. It shows him dealing with a friend's death, school, violence, etcetera. "Concrete Rose" wasn't as needed as "The Hate U Give" since that book deals with things like racism, police brutality, and other things like that, and I don't think there was any of that in "Concrete Rose," (except for some racism) unless I forgot about it/missed it. I loved all the characters in the book, every single one of them. Maverick, Lisa, Seven, even king and Iesha. I just loved them all. I also loved the lgbtq+ rep (even though it's only one character). Maverick's mom is bi, and that's pretty much the only lgbtq+ rep, but I still loved it! Overall, I have no complaints or anything negative to say about this book. "Concrete Rose" was like "The Hate U Give," complete and utter perfection. So glad I picked it up! "Every single rose reading this book, whether you live in concrete or not. Keep surviving, keep thriving. Your beauty is a gift to the world." *** How am I going to review perfection? RTC

  23. 5 out of 5

    sofia

    SO SO SO SO SO GOOD. EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ THIS BOOK !

  24. 4 out of 5

    Whispering Stories

    Book Reviewed on www.whisperingstories.com Concrete Rose is the prequel to the amazing YA novel ‘The Hate You Give‘ which was released in 2017 and is predominantly about Maverick Carter who is the father of the protagonist Starr from the first book. If you haven’t read, The Hate you Give, then I’m not sure this book will mean that much to you. Seventeen-year-old Maverick (Mav or Lil Don) lives with his mum. He has no siblings and his father who was the King Lord of the neighbourhood is in prison. Book Reviewed on www.whisperingstories.com Concrete Rose is the prequel to the amazing YA novel ‘The Hate You Give‘ which was released in 2017 and is predominantly about Maverick Carter who is the father of the protagonist Starr from the first book. If you haven’t read, The Hate you Give, then I’m not sure this book will mean that much to you. Seventeen-year-old Maverick (Mav or Lil Don) lives with his mum. He has no siblings and his father who was the King Lord of the neighbourhood is in prison. Maverick has followed in his father’s footsteps selling drugs, that is until he unexpectedly becomes a father and is left holding the baby when the mother ups and leaves Maverick with their child. Now Mav needs to be responsible. Mav gets a part-time job at the local shop and is still at school but with his son needing more and more things and seeing his friends with flash new items can Mav stay on the straight and narrow or is the lure of easy money too much for him to keep away from? I was so eager to read Concrete Rose as I adored The Hate you Give and Maverick is a fabulous character in it. Always teaching his children to be responsible and how to behave around the police, etc. I was intrigued to read his backstory and whilst there are sixteen-years we still don’t know about as this book ends before Starr is born, it was fascinating to see Mav as a young lad who had to grow up quickly and what shaped his life. The characters are truly amazing. It was fun to see some characters from the first book making an appearance in their younger years. I do wonder if there will be an in-between book, especially as we never get to witness any real beef between Mav and King like in The Hate you Give, or if I am remembering rightly (It has been a few years since I read the first book), Mav does a stint in prison, but this would have been in the missing years. Angie Thomas has a way with words. She pulls you in the story and you can feel, hear, and be a part of every chapter. I certainly became emotionally involved in the plot and got angry when Mav did and upset when he did too. The setting is easy to visualise too and I would love to see them adapt this book as well. This is a book that you must read if you read and loved the first. It is superb. You can tell how good a book is when you start going slower towards the end as you don’t want it to end. I now can’t wait for more novels from Ms. Thomas.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mina

    This is it! Ms Angie is a phenomenal writer.. I was sceptical about this one, worried that I wouldn't connect with Maverick and his story. But Ms Angie weaved a perfect moving story that depicts how some of our black men and women get caught up in gang life. Nobody is born a banger, but real life circumstances will most likely lead you to it. It's never easy to just get out and make a normal honest living when your black skin already sets you at a disadvantage from the minute you're born. How it This is it! Ms Angie is a phenomenal writer.. I was sceptical about this one, worried that I wouldn't connect with Maverick and his story. But Ms Angie weaved a perfect moving story that depicts how some of our black men and women get caught up in gang life. Nobody is born a banger, but real life circumstances will most likely lead you to it. It's never easy to just get out and make a normal honest living when your black skin already sets you at a disadvantage from the minute you're born. How it means you have to work a million times harder! Maverick's story brought all that full circle. And what a beautiful story it was. Plus since it's Black History Month, fist up for this beautiful queen who's given us this amazing read✊🏿✊🏿✊🏿

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tomes And Textiles

    Even though I knew the ending, I was so taken in by the journey. Angie knows how to write characters that jump off the page and dialog that hits home. Full review to come FULL REVIEW IS UP ON TOMES AND TEXTILES. Well, I am here to report that Angie has done it yet again. She has written a brilliant character study of Starr Carter's (from The Hate U Give--is there anyone out that that HASN'T read this one?) father, Maverick, way back in the olden days, as a 17-year old living in Garden Heights. Whi Even though I knew the ending, I was so taken in by the journey. Angie knows how to write characters that jump off the page and dialog that hits home. Full review to come FULL REVIEW IS UP ON TOMES AND TEXTILES. Well, I am here to report that Angie has done it yet again. She has written a brilliant character study of Starr Carter's (from The Hate U Give--is there anyone out that that HASN'T read this one?) father, Maverick, way back in the olden days, as a 17-year old living in Garden Heights. While this is a prequel and you know where everything is headed, it's still a gripping story of teen fatherhood, toxic male masculinity, temptation (on so many levels), poverty, violence and murder, coming-of-age, identity, community. Angie approached these heavy, heavy topics with such a light pen with characters that just leaped from the pages and straight into your heart. There were moments I laughed and those I cried. This was just a complicated, messy, but life-affirming story. Angie has, yet again, solidified herself as one of the best of her generation. Concrete Rose is truly YA contemporary at its best. Like my content? Buy me a ko-fi.

  27. 4 out of 5

    ✨ A ✨

    Time for me to fall in love with another Angie Thomas book 🙌🏽🤩

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨️ I yeet my books back and forth ✨️ Campbell

    REALLY excited for this one. I wasn't a fan of ON THE COME UP, but THE HATE U GIVE is one of my all-time favorite YA books and made me feel all the feels. If this book provides 1/10 of the feels of THUG, I will consider it a raging success. REALLY excited for this one. I wasn't a fan of ON THE COME UP, but THE HATE U GIVE is one of my all-time favorite YA books and made me feel all the feels. If this book provides 1/10 of the feels of THUG, I will consider it a raging success.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anniek

    I think this is my favourite Angie Thomas book

  30. 4 out of 5

    My_Strange_Reading

    The journey of reading an Angie Thomas book told in emojis: 😬😆😊🥺😩😭💔😡🎉😞😳😥🙁😕🙃🙂😀🥺❤️ There are just so many feelings, y’all. She is such an incredible writer and I can’t wait to recommend this book to my students! Thomas has such a unique way of gripping us and pulling us into the action and hearts of her characters from the first page. Which is why when she rips out the heart of her characters, we feel completely torn in two as well. It’s absolutely amazing. This was everything I wanted it to be for The journey of reading an Angie Thomas book told in emojis: 😬😆😊🥺😩😭💔😡🎉😞😳😥🙁😕🙃🙂😀🥺❤️ There are just so many feelings, y’all. She is such an incredible writer and I can’t wait to recommend this book to my students! Thomas has such a unique way of gripping us and pulling us into the action and hearts of her characters from the first page. Which is why when she rips out the heart of her characters, we feel completely torn in two as well. It’s absolutely amazing. This was everything I wanted it to be for Mav’s story, and I will literally read anything Angie Thomas writes. Forever.

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