website statistics Prints and Drawings of Käthe Kollwitz - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Prints and Drawings of Käthe Kollwitz

Availability: Ready to download

"The Weavers," a landmark of class-conscious art, which depicts, in a series of prints, the plight of the worker and his age-long struggle to better his lot. "Death as a Friend," showing a man greeting his death as an old friend, with a hysterical mixture of joy and terror. "The People," in which a mother shields her offspring from phantoms of hate, poverty, and ignorance "The Weavers," a landmark of class-conscious art, which depicts, in a series of prints, the plight of the worker and his age-long struggle to better his lot. "Death as a Friend," showing a man greeting his death as an old friend, with a hysterical mixture of joy and terror. "The People," in which a mother shields her offspring from phantoms of hate, poverty, and ignorance — and symbolizes woman as creator, begetter of the human race, link between past and future. These works represent the recurrent themes which most characterize the work of Käthe Kollwitz: social consciousness and a sense of the suffering of mankind, an urge to voice the basic maternal attitude, and a preoccupation with death. She has been called a propagandist, a crusader, yet her art is essentially apolitical. Her concern was not with partisan causes, but rather with universal rights. Fundamentally a dramatic artist, Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945) brought to each of her works an uncanny ability to evoke human emotions through subtle gestures and facial expressions. The reactions of her characters were psychologically true primarily because she tested them on herself. The present collection contains 83 of Mrs. Kollwitz's finest works, including the last great print cycles: "The Weavers" of 1898; "The Peasant War" of 1908; "War" of 1925; and "Death" of 1935. These selections provide a full panorama of Mrs. Kollwitz's development as a master of the graphic techniques of etching, woodcutting and lithography. Over 69 of the illustrations have been rephotographed from the original works specially for this edition, and new techniques in photolithography and a larger format have resulted in reproductions that are as close as possible to the prints and drawings themselves.


Compare

"The Weavers," a landmark of class-conscious art, which depicts, in a series of prints, the plight of the worker and his age-long struggle to better his lot. "Death as a Friend," showing a man greeting his death as an old friend, with a hysterical mixture of joy and terror. "The People," in which a mother shields her offspring from phantoms of hate, poverty, and ignorance "The Weavers," a landmark of class-conscious art, which depicts, in a series of prints, the plight of the worker and his age-long struggle to better his lot. "Death as a Friend," showing a man greeting his death as an old friend, with a hysterical mixture of joy and terror. "The People," in which a mother shields her offspring from phantoms of hate, poverty, and ignorance — and symbolizes woman as creator, begetter of the human race, link between past and future. These works represent the recurrent themes which most characterize the work of Käthe Kollwitz: social consciousness and a sense of the suffering of mankind, an urge to voice the basic maternal attitude, and a preoccupation with death. She has been called a propagandist, a crusader, yet her art is essentially apolitical. Her concern was not with partisan causes, but rather with universal rights. Fundamentally a dramatic artist, Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945) brought to each of her works an uncanny ability to evoke human emotions through subtle gestures and facial expressions. The reactions of her characters were psychologically true primarily because she tested them on herself. The present collection contains 83 of Mrs. Kollwitz's finest works, including the last great print cycles: "The Weavers" of 1898; "The Peasant War" of 1908; "War" of 1925; and "Death" of 1935. These selections provide a full panorama of Mrs. Kollwitz's development as a master of the graphic techniques of etching, woodcutting and lithography. Over 69 of the illustrations have been rephotographed from the original works specially for this edition, and new techniques in photolithography and a larger format have resulted in reproductions that are as close as possible to the prints and drawings themselves.

30 review for Prints and Drawings of Käthe Kollwitz

  1. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    A compact Intro with a Kollwitz biography/evaluation preceeds the giant reproductions of the prints and drawings. (Her sculpture is not represented in this book.) The scale of the reproductions is really advantageous and, being monochrome prints and drawings, little is lost in photography and re-printing, compared to art forms where colour and texture are crucial. Kollwitz seems to have had two main strands to her work - social justice and personal tragedy. The former was expressed by themes of w A compact Intro with a Kollwitz biography/evaluation preceeds the giant reproductions of the prints and drawings. (Her sculpture is not represented in this book.) The scale of the reproductions is really advantageous and, being monochrome prints and drawings, little is lost in photography and re-printing, compared to art forms where colour and texture are crucial. Kollwitz seems to have had two main strands to her work - social justice and personal tragedy. The former was expressed by themes of workers' rights, poverty, ill-health and powerlessness and by pacifism. She didn't subscribe to any particular political movement or party, however and the link between the social justice works and the individual tragedies is simply basic human compassion. Kollwitz evidently had this in abundance. There is also a clear connection between her pacifism and the theme of individuals meeting Death (personified) with diverse reactions. Kollwitz had enormous talent for expressing emotion through depiction of bodily posture and facial expression and this is what gives her work its power. I'm glad to have discovered her museum on my trip to Berlin last year.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ronan Mcdonnell

    I have a new favourite artist. These drawings made my heart pound. The text was an apt, quick intro duction, but the reproductions took centre stage. Many are at 100%, single colour, and on a paper you might expect of the original prints & drawings. Lovely, simple, direct. But such sadness too.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    Used this book for an art history report -- her art, especially her self portraits were very inspiring. She expresses her emotions so beautifully in her prints and sculpture.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Kaethe Kollwitz had a deep empathy for the working classes, especially the widows and children of Germany during and between World Wars I and II. Their powerlessness and suffering were portrayed again and again in her art. She had a preoccupation with death, depicting it sometimes as a thief, other times as a friend. Her work is very moving, and through it one senses the quiet dignity of her life as well. The excellent introduction by Carl Zigrosser sets the context and enables a greater appreci Kaethe Kollwitz had a deep empathy for the working classes, especially the widows and children of Germany during and between World Wars I and II. Their powerlessness and suffering were portrayed again and again in her art. She had a preoccupation with death, depicting it sometimes as a thief, other times as a friend. Her work is very moving, and through it one senses the quiet dignity of her life as well. The excellent introduction by Carl Zigrosser sets the context and enables a greater appreciation of her life and work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Norman

    Although the edition I read was an older one than this, I found the introduction and biography just enough to pique my interest in this fascinating artist. Her subject matter can appear somewhere dark, but the execution of it is worth an exploration.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Paul Taylor

    Large format. Limited biographical information but cover in brief text with extensive illustration the evolution of her main works (but no photgraphs of her scultures, which dominated the latter part of her life).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Domhnall

    Very simple drawings on inexpensive paper and yet powerful work with a real impact. Well worth obtaining a copy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Gass

    Kollwitz is perhaps Germany's greatest female expressionist. Her block prints and sculptures capture the love and anguish of motherhood, especially. The introduction is quite good. Kollwitz is perhaps Germany's greatest female expressionist. Her block prints and sculptures capture the love and anguish of motherhood, especially. The introduction is quite good.

  9. 4 out of 5

    April

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dana

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rat de bibliothèque

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Earley

  14. 5 out of 5

    Felicia

  15. 4 out of 5

    Louise Robinson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Akemi Mccormick

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christina

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karyn

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sara Morgan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Broadnax

  23. 4 out of 5

    I

  24. 4 out of 5

    Penny Bainbridge

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ai

  26. 4 out of 5

    Milena

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark Horst

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mikk

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.