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I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You: Using Personality Insights to Work and Live Effectively with Others

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No one is right or wrong - just different! Tracing the growth of the study of personality type from its roots in the work of Carl Jung to today's subtly nuanced type theory, I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You shows how greatly our individual personality preferences affect our interactions with others. By shedding light on individual characteristics and tendencies, psychologis No one is right or wrong - just different! Tracing the growth of the study of personality type from its roots in the work of Carl Jung to today's subtly nuanced type theory, I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You shows how greatly our individual personality preferences affect our interactions with others. By shedding light on individual characteristics and tendencies, psychologists Roger R. Pearman and Sarah C. Albritton teach us how to overcome our natural inclination to judge difference in order to recognize and celebrate it. This new second edition includes current research into psychological type, information about the benefits of using type to enhance health and manage stress, discussion of the link between type and emotional intelligence and analysis of how personality preferences translate across generational and cultural divides.


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No one is right or wrong - just different! Tracing the growth of the study of personality type from its roots in the work of Carl Jung to today's subtly nuanced type theory, I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You shows how greatly our individual personality preferences affect our interactions with others. By shedding light on individual characteristics and tendencies, psychologis No one is right or wrong - just different! Tracing the growth of the study of personality type from its roots in the work of Carl Jung to today's subtly nuanced type theory, I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You shows how greatly our individual personality preferences affect our interactions with others. By shedding light on individual characteristics and tendencies, psychologists Roger R. Pearman and Sarah C. Albritton teach us how to overcome our natural inclination to judge difference in order to recognize and celebrate it. This new second edition includes current research into psychological type, information about the benefits of using type to enhance health and manage stress, discussion of the link between type and emotional intelligence and analysis of how personality preferences translate across generational and cultural divides.

57 review for I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You: Using Personality Insights to Work and Live Effectively with Others

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ana Mardoll

    I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You / 978-1-857-88552-1 I'm admittedly not a big fan of the Myers-Briggs personality types model. I've seen the model employed badly, too many times, at corporate retreats that seemed to use the model to stereotype and as an excuse to avoid getting to know individuals meaningfully. (One teacher argued that there was no point in ASKING an employee's opinion if you already knew what their "type" would want in any given situation - asking might result in misunderstandings I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You / 978-1-857-88552-1 I'm admittedly not a big fan of the Myers-Briggs personality types model. I've seen the model employed badly, too many times, at corporate retreats that seemed to use the model to stereotype and as an excuse to avoid getting to know individuals meaningfully. (One teacher argued that there was no point in ASKING an employee's opinion if you already knew what their "type" would want in any given situation - asking might result in misunderstandings, or in polite lies, from an employee who didn't know or couldn't express what their type "really" would want!) I've also, anecdotally, taken many iterations of the test many times (as well as having family members rate me on their own), only to get a different type almost every single time. I can't honestly say that I've "collected" all 16 types, but I HAVE been each of the 8 subtypes, at various times. And I'm not alone - studies have shown that 50% of people who re-test get a different type at time of retest, and while this may be chalked up to poor testing, or poor self-reporting, or any number of other inherent difficulties in personality typing, the overall process makes me a little concerned. Nevertheless, I did try to keep an open mind going into this book when I received it from NetGalley, and I was at first prepared to recommend this book "if you must read a Myers-Briggs book", but deeper reading left me with mixed feelings. From the start, there's a lot that's done right here. The authors carefully explain the general concepts of typing and really hammer home the crucial fact that types are "general preferences" per person, and not locked in behaviors. The authors note, "...we cannot make predictions of behavior or competencies based solely upon a person's type preferences," and I appreciate this strongly worded warning to corporate managers who try to staff projects based on personality type alone. In addition, the type components are much more clearly explained here - it's nice to see an author make the "correct" (according to Jung, anyway) distinction between introversion/extroversion, instead of leaving it to the current colloquial meaning of shy/outgoing (the English language having evolved extensively in the 60 years since Jung's ideas were published). Despite the strong start, though, the writing starts to flounder - a lot of the material here is basically unsupported and loosely linked anecdotes about interactions with various children and managers, and the anecdotes frankly seem to me to be a stronger argument in favor of better communication overall (and general open-mindedness to differences) as opposed to a reason to study the 16 personality types in any kind of depth. The anecdotes seem flowing and disjointed, and sometimes don't seem to have a compelling connection to the current topic in the book. Ultimately, I appreciate that the authors make the point that the Myers-Briggs model cannot be used in any scientifically significant sense to predict individual behavior, but once that has been established, I have to ask what is the point of a book dedicated to understanding the 16 types? I'd expected the super-title ("I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You") to be more about understanding and tolerance to opposing opinions, rather than about pigeonholing people into "Sensing" types who "predictably" (except when they don't!) think and act a certain way - which is how the children in the anecdotes are described. I suppose if you're a firm believer in the Myers-Briggs model, this might be a valuable resource for how to think from another typical point of view, but I'm not sure you'll enjoy wading through all the anecdotes to get there. And if you're not a believer in the Myers-Briggs model, this book certainly isn't going to change your mind. NOTE: This review is based on a free Advance Review Copy of this book provided through NetGalley. ~ Ana Mardoll

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    Along with only 2% of the population, I am an INFJ, an Introverted Intuitive type. At times I do feel a little crazy, and so I nearly cried joyous tears to realize that I am...uggh...utterably predictable :) For years I thought I was an ISFJ. To learn that I was really more of an Intuitive than a Sensor made a tremendous difference!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Horn

    Not written for a lay audience, or anyone who didn't want to be bored to tears. Potentially interesting subject matter, but presented in driest fashion imaginable. Best reserved for professionals in personality research or hard-core masochists. Not written for a lay audience, or anyone who didn't want to be bored to tears. Potentially interesting subject matter, but presented in driest fashion imaginable. Best reserved for professionals in personality research or hard-core masochists.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This overview of Myers-Briggs and Jungian type theory has been so helpful to me in my personal and professional life. I had skimmed it several years ago, but read it again after being selected as a supervisor. I recommend it to anyone who needs to find ways to connect with others who seem very difficult or hard to understand.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    A good reference book. I wouldnt recommend it for those without a basic understanding of personality typology, as it is a bit heavy if you dont. Definitely not a book to read from cover to cover, but gives a good framework which you can dip in and out of.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ciro

    A very academic read in general, but explains some of the very nuanced and sometimes intricate differences within type that I found lacking in other MBTI books. Would not start learning about type with this book as it's very dry. A very academic read in general, but explains some of the very nuanced and sometimes intricate differences within type that I found lacking in other MBTI books. Would not start learning about type with this book as it's very dry.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aalaa

    عارفة المعلومات مسبقا

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    Quick review for a very complex, informative read. I don't know if I can do justice to reflecting about this text in terms of the amount of information it has on personality type based on the MBTI standard, but it's very helpful, especially from a research/scientific standpoint in psychological and sociological standards. I wouldn't say that "I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You" is the best text for introduction for a lay audience - because it's more of an academic text and vetted examination of MBT Quick review for a very complex, informative read. I don't know if I can do justice to reflecting about this text in terms of the amount of information it has on personality type based on the MBTI standard, but it's very helpful, especially from a research/scientific standpoint in psychological and sociological standards. I wouldn't say that "I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You" is the best text for introduction for a lay audience - because it's more of an academic text and vetted examination of MBTI. In a sense, that's both a pro and con - a virtue because it's well researched and compiles the data and expansions in table forms and reflective formats on each component of the personality type, but the vice is that it becomes a bit too weighted in its respective arguments. I thought this book started out with much intrigue and steam when it identified each of the components of the MBTI and what characteristics, strengths, weaknesses, and interaction components that each of the combinations had. The tables were great summations of each type, but there were also thorough expansions on what each of these components meant and examples in the workplace and lifestyles to how they came into play. The more practical applications to daily life came in the latter sections, and I appreciated the expansions. This isn't the kind of book one can read in one sitting, and I'll admit it took me a while to go through in terms of digesting all it had to offer, but it's certainly one I'd recommend as a go-to text on MBTI, and I see myself revisiting the information not just for information on my particular type (INTJ), but also understanding other people who may have a different type than me. Of course, we are all more than just a specific type as we function as people with various sets of experiences, goals and desires, but it does help to understand why some people think the way they do and be able to understand what processes they may use in their thinking and ideologies. Overall score: 4/5 stars. Note: I received this as an ARC from NetGalley, from the publisher.

  9. 4 out of 5

    مريم فريد

    This book will give you an insight to the famous MBTI theory of personality types. It has a very good level of explanations for beginners who want to learn more in this field. It's very interesting and will catch on you to go through it all simply because you can relate to the information on every page. The book chapters will start from the basics taking you through what personality types are all about, help you define your own personality type, and eventually discuss all the implications of that This book will give you an insight to the famous MBTI theory of personality types. It has a very good level of explanations for beginners who want to learn more in this field. It's very interesting and will catch on you to go through it all simply because you can relate to the information on every page. The book chapters will start from the basics taking you through what personality types are all about, help you define your own personality type, and eventually discuss all the implications of that in the different aspects of interactions in one's life. Personally, I found chapter 6 which talks about how personality types affects our communications the most interesting, it really shows how complex types can be and leaves you at the end with the fact that people can never be categorized but a bit more understood. And this is all that might be needed to enlighten our relationships with others. The take home message I would say was how to value differences in people, how to have one extra reason to justify a person's act. This is not a book that you can read one time, definitely needs another visit to digest all the thoughts it has to offer.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    A bit heavy - it's taken me a year to read this, off and on! - but pretty sound as far as type and Jungian/Myers-Briggs personality theory go, with some cognitive function theory as well. The authors stress that all types are valuable and good, and also that type is a 'subtext' to the real individual. Plenty of explanations about what people expect, trust and appreciate, and how easy it is to get caught up in our own preconceived ideas. Lots of charts summarising how each of the sixteen Myers-Br A bit heavy - it's taken me a year to read this, off and on! - but pretty sound as far as type and Jungian/Myers-Briggs personality theory go, with some cognitive function theory as well. The authors stress that all types are valuable and good, and also that type is a 'subtext' to the real individual. Plenty of explanations about what people expect, trust and appreciate, and how easy it is to get caught up in our own preconceived ideas. Lots of charts summarising how each of the sixteen Myers-Briggs types is most likely to react or behave under certain circumstances. Of course, people are far more than their type, and these are not hard-and-fast rules for communication. But when there are personality clashes, it could well be worth referring to this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Angélique (Angel)

    This was an amazingly insightful and intriguing book. The authors delivered the information in such a captivating manner that it was easy to become immersed in the info. Their use of analogies and charts really helped expound upon what they had already said. I can honestly say I know a lot more about myself and others around me because of this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Farras Eldy

    Picked this book because i've always interested in personality types. Boy, this book just changes my perception about types almost entirely. I used to think that there are always better types, but after reading this, i realized that is the wrong approach to types. This book essentially is a tool for helping people understand, that others might not act or think the way you prefer. It's a tool for achieving better communication. We just have to value other preferable action and thoughts, because i Picked this book because i've always interested in personality types. Boy, this book just changes my perception about types almost entirely. I used to think that there are always better types, but after reading this, i realized that is the wrong approach to types. This book essentially is a tool for helping people understand, that others might not act or think the way you prefer. It's a tool for achieving better communication. We just have to value other preferable action and thoughts, because if you can understand others, you'll realize that they're not crazy, they're just not you.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    Decent summary of understanding different personality types' behaviour, motivation and potential. It makes senses that these things are more interesting for introverts who probably have better skills to apply some of the learnings in real life and benefit from them. Generally a bit more believable framework than zodiac signs. Because, of course, Jung. Decent summary of understanding different personality types' behaviour, motivation and potential. It makes senses that these things are more interesting for introverts who probably have better skills to apply some of the learnings in real life and benefit from them. Generally a bit more believable framework than zodiac signs. Because, of course, Jung.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    The information was well-researched-great for anyone who wants to know what backs up the labels. However, with the title so inviting, I thought it would be more engaging for an ‘everyday’ reader. This is more for someone who would want to delve into more technical knowledge about the types. It was not exactly what I was looking for at this time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rachelle

    I'm not Crazy, I'm Just Not You... research heavy book focused on dissecting the personality types and relationships between differing values and perspectives. Many charts showing assessments for each type felt repetitive and individual centered, would have enjoyed to read more about how types affect other types in relationships. I'm not Crazy, I'm Just Not You... research heavy book focused on dissecting the personality types and relationships between differing values and perspectives. Many charts showing assessments for each type felt repetitive and individual centered, would have enjoyed to read more about how types affect other types in relationships.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shu Min

    Gives general descriptions of the 16 types in areas such as emotional intelligence, trust, hot buttons and so on, that anyone with a basic understanding of the 8 Jungian cognitive functions can come up with, and offers no suggestions or tips on what to do with the information in everyday life. Useful for academic understanding if you don't have much knowledge of the MBTI types or cognitive functions, but not if you want a book with applicable tips and suggestions. Really regret getting it, thoug Gives general descriptions of the 16 types in areas such as emotional intelligence, trust, hot buttons and so on, that anyone with a basic understanding of the 8 Jungian cognitive functions can come up with, and offers no suggestions or tips on what to do with the information in everyday life. Useful for academic understanding if you don't have much knowledge of the MBTI types or cognitive functions, but not if you want a book with applicable tips and suggestions. Really regret getting it, thought it had to be good since it covered a wide range of topics and was based on the cognitive functions. Lesson learnt, read through the author's other books, and check if it's available at the library before deciding to get it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Helen Hnin

    Thumbed through the book. Good but wasn't impressed. Info-dump and heavy. Probably will never read it again. Thumbed through the book. Good but wasn't impressed. Info-dump and heavy. Probably will never read it again.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Manly

    A really good and easy to read book on personality type.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    This book takes an approach to MBTI that is far more useful than the common "horoscope" stereotyping and scapegoating that many use type theory to reinforce. Descriptions are always discussed on a continuum, and explained in ways that are respectful of free will, as well as cultural, generational, and other differences. The intent behind the book is to foster an understanding of differences, and to encourage people to not only value diversity in personality, but to work with it. Used appropriatel This book takes an approach to MBTI that is far more useful than the common "horoscope" stereotyping and scapegoating that many use type theory to reinforce. Descriptions are always discussed on a continuum, and explained in ways that are respectful of free will, as well as cultural, generational, and other differences. The intent behind the book is to foster an understanding of differences, and to encourage people to not only value diversity in personality, but to work with it. Used appropriately, this book can go a long way to helping people understand the differences in personality that dictate how energy is used, preferences for data and analysis, and how people interact with the world and internally. As I read the book, I remembered recent conflicts in my life that probably came down simply to my own personal preferences clashing with other people's and causing misunderstandings about intent. Knowing that a behavior I use to show trust can seem suspect to another type helps me to realize how deeply we project our own point of view onto other people. The author cautions against using type to excuse behavior, to discriminate against people, or to reinforce stereotypes. I personally have been discriminated against in hiring because of a PR-administered test. I was told that I was a great fit for the position, and to just be honest on the test which was nothing more than a paperwork "formality." I knew full well that the job would typically be an Extravert job, but since I was told that the test was a formality, I was honest, and they let me know very quickly thereafter that I wasn't as good a fit as they had thought. The book explains why this is a completely inappropriate use of the MBTI instrument. My hope is that applying the lessons of this book will help me to be able to understand other people much better. As an INTP, sometimes social considerations flummox me - not because I'm uncaring, but because the way that I interact isn't what other people are looking for from me. I can pick up on clues that others are uncomfortable, but I can't always figure out why or how to find common ground. I now have tools to reframe my own statements so that I can be understood, and to show more empathy and concern for those considerations others hold dear. I also hope to use the lessons in this book to develop my own preferences, strengths, and areas for improvement. I have consistently been expected to stifle aspects of my type throughout my life, and it's a relief to understand more accurately what stresses me and what excites me. I resonate with the tendencies of my type, and this helped me understand why certain aspects of my life are unfulfilling. Hopefully, I'll be able to grow in a way that nurtures myself while understanding what others are looking for and providing that without compromising my own sense of integrity. To be complete, I also think there are a few parts of the book that are written in an ambiguous way that could be easily misunderstood. For example, sometimes the contrasts of Feeling and Thinking oversimplify Thinking as "straight line" reasoning compared to Feeling as "fractal", and had me wondering if I have been mistyped all these years. As I read on, I absolutely am a Thinker, and every subsequent description of how Thinkers describe themselves was right on. There were a few more descriptions that were similarly confusing, but there was always enough subsequent detail to clarify.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrea D

    Very informative. If you really want a thorough understanding of the different personality types you can get it here. I would suggest not just reading it but really study it. I learned “enough”.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shawna

    I picked this book up because I thought it might help me move up in my career if I started learning how to better communicate with other people. I got so much more than that out of it though. I have been recommending this book to everybody I know. After reading the information about personality types and how they interact I was able to reinterpret conversations I had had not only at work but also with my husband and friends and I now feel like I have a much better understanding of how the other I picked this book up because I thought it might help me move up in my career if I started learning how to better communicate with other people. I got so much more than that out of it though. I have been recommending this book to everybody I know. After reading the information about personality types and how they interact I was able to reinterpret conversations I had had not only at work but also with my husband and friends and I now feel like I have a much better understanding of how the other people were interpreting the conversations. It was very enlightening. However, there were some topics that I think could have been written in a way that was easier to follow. The biggest challenge of this book is getting through the first section. The first section discussed the history of type theory and some of the broad ideas behind it however without any background in type theory I found it difficult to follow. So if you pick up this book be aware that the author assumes some knowledge of type theory going in. The second section of this book describes the different elements of type theory and how the different independent elements of a personality type fit together. I actually had a moment while reading chapter 5 that it all clicked for me and I had to go back and skim all of the previous chapters again but once the elements of type fell into place the rest of the book was very easy to follow and made a great deal of sense. Sections 3 4 and 5 are about using type knowledge in your daily life. I personally have already found uses for it. My husband and I are exact opposite personality types and after reading this book I have found that I am able to frame requests and issues in a way that he better understands. This has led to an incredible improvement in how we communicate. I have also used this information in my communications with co workers and seen a marked improvement. Overall, I strongly recommend this book. It is not like a horoscope that will tell you how you or someone else is going to respond although it is tempting to try to assume that you know how someone else is going to behave once you think you know what their type is but that is not the purpose of this book. This book is great for illuminating how you naturally perceive issues and helping you make sure that when you communicate with other people you are aware of the possible weaknesses of your perspective. This book will also help you learn to frame your thoughts in a way that other people can more easily understand. I would particularly recommend this book for managers of any kind. as I think it will be a great tool to help improve the effectiveness of any group.

  22. 5 out of 5

    J Marie

    I found this book repetitive, dry, and unhelpful compared to other things I've been reading on type theory. It might just be that it wasn't written by/designed for an ENFP like me; there are too many charts, too little narrative or context. I understand that the authors wanted to keep things as scientific as possible, not relying on anecdotes to communicate their points, but honestly after reading through every single chart giving one more (nearly identical) component of type, I still don't feel I found this book repetitive, dry, and unhelpful compared to other things I've been reading on type theory. It might just be that it wasn't written by/designed for an ENFP like me; there are too many charts, too little narrative or context. I understand that the authors wanted to keep things as scientific as possible, not relying on anecdotes to communicate their points, but honestly after reading through every single chart giving one more (nearly identical) component of type, I still don't feel like I learned a lot of new things. So that you have some context for my reaction, the resources on type that I've loved have been Isabel Briggs-Myers' Gifts Differing and Gordon D. Lawrence's People Types and Tiger Stripes (on type and learning theory). I think I wanted both more theory and more application rather than the relentless description that tried to come at type from every angle possible but failed to add much depth if you've already read a lot on it. I think something that made it difficult for me to engage from early on was that when (briefly) discussing type dynamics and the functional stack, this book gives a different pattern than every other source (including Gifts Differing) I've seen - it says the tertiary function is the same orientation as the auxiliary. So as an ENFP, my functions would be Ne, Fi, Ti, Si. I have not seen that anywhere else and no sources were given, no discussion as to controversy or departure from a norm...I'll admit that colored my experience of the rest of the book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    "who will speak for the wolf?" absolutely loved it. I thoroughly enjoyed the informative nature and clear presentation of the MBTI structure and foundational basis. I personally found the "dry" aspects (as others put it) the most useful. The outlines and bullet points made for great references, and were always followed by practical stories and personal experiences which helped to apply each concept to real world examples. The book briefly touches on the importance and relevance Carl Jung played "who will speak for the wolf?" absolutely loved it. I thoroughly enjoyed the informative nature and clear presentation of the MBTI structure and foundational basis. I personally found the "dry" aspects (as others put it) the most useful. The outlines and bullet points made for great references, and were always followed by practical stories and personal experiences which helped to apply each concept to real world examples. The book briefly touches on the importance and relevance Carl Jung played in originating the development of MBTI. Although anyone familiar with Jung, his concepts & achievement, is sure to appreciate his influence, as the symbols, archetypes and individuation process are echoed throughout. But the real worth of this read is learning how effectively understand, communicate with and value the unique differences in others.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Reiden

    I've skimmed a lot of a MBTI personality books, but this is the first one that I've read straight through. The organization and chapters were done well. Instead of just giving general differences between the types, the book is broken into smaller sections that look at each type's differences in areas such as: communication, emotional intelligence, motivators, stressor, thinking patters, etc. This book will definitely be a resource I will reference in the future. Possibly a 5-star when compared t I've skimmed a lot of a MBTI personality books, but this is the first one that I've read straight through. The organization and chapters were done well. Instead of just giving general differences between the types, the book is broken into smaller sections that look at each type's differences in areas such as: communication, emotional intelligence, motivators, stressor, thinking patters, etc. This book will definitely be a resource I will reference in the future. Possibly a 5-star when compared to other MBTI books I've looked at.

  25. 4 out of 5

    May

    Hmm...I was expecting the book to give me more in-depth analysis of the 16 different Myers Briggs personality types but each chapter tends to give a general overview of that particular theme (e.g. communication pathways or value differences) and then give 2-3 sentence comment in chart form for each of the personality type. Needless to say, this book was not what I expected and hence, my "ok" rating. Thought I have to admit, the title elicited several chuckles among work colleagues! Hmm...I was expecting the book to give me more in-depth analysis of the 16 different Myers Briggs personality types but each chapter tends to give a general overview of that particular theme (e.g. communication pathways or value differences) and then give 2-3 sentence comment in chart form for each of the personality type. Needless to say, this book was not what I expected and hence, my "ok" rating. Thought I have to admit, the title elicited several chuckles among work colleagues!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Morag Gray

    This is a good follow-on book. You need to have some understanding of personailty typing, particulary the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, in order to get the best out of this work. Rather than providing the reader with descriptions of each type, it delves into the realms of how to develop weaker parts of the personality, how to recognise reactions in oneself and in other types, and how to deal with them.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    I'm thinking 3.5 stars here. I've been dipping in and out of this book for a few months and finally finished it. I identify strongly with my MBTI personality type and this book has lots of interesting information about how my dominant and secondary functions manifest themselves in everyday situations. Parts of it are a little dry, but mostly it moved right along and kept my attention. I'm thinking 3.5 stars here. I've been dipping in and out of this book for a few months and finally finished it. I identify strongly with my MBTI personality type and this book has lots of interesting information about how my dominant and secondary functions manifest themselves in everyday situations. Parts of it are a little dry, but mostly it moved right along and kept my attention.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Abdullah Al-Elewah

    Great book, which explain the importance of understanding the personality type. One can discover his own type in the first chapters. It helped me to understand people around me starting with my family and close friends. I recommend this book for who is interested in the MBTI theory of personality types.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Felix

    Really great Meyers-Briggs type of personality profiling. Gives you some insights into your personality. However, StrengthQuest by Gallup is so far and beyond better. I think there is a book out there called Strengths 2.0 for this purpose.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  31. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  32. 5 out of 5

    Isaac

  33. 4 out of 5

    Anja

  34. 4 out of 5

    Hanabira

  35. 4 out of 5

    Angie

  36. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  37. 4 out of 5

    Meg

  38. 5 out of 5

    Kaori

  39. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  40. 4 out of 5

    Paulien

  41. 5 out of 5

    Dewi

  42. 5 out of 5

    Rhen Khong

  43. 5 out of 5

    Natashi

  44. 4 out of 5

    Prathna

  45. 5 out of 5

    Casey

  46. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

  47. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  48. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

  49. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  50. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  51. 5 out of 5

    Luke

  52. 4 out of 5

    Anne Hawn Smith

  53. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Robbins

  54. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  55. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

  56. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

  57. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany42986

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