website statistics The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, March/April 2020 - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, March/April 2020

Availability: Ready to download

THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION March/April • 71st Year of Publication NOVELLAS COME THE REVOLUTION -83- Ian Tregillis NOVELETS KIKELOMO ULTRASHEEN -8- Dare Segun Falowo THE LAST LEGEND -36- Matthew Hughes HACKSILVER -204- Elizabeth Bear DEATH ON THE NEFERTEM EXPRESS -228- Brian Trent SHORT STORIES THE MILLION-MILE SNIPER -31- SL Huang RED SWORD OF THE CELIAC -128- John Poss THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION March/April • 71st Year of Publication NOVELLAS COME THE REVOLUTION -83- Ian Tregillis NOVELETS KIKELOMO ULTRASHEEN -8- Dare Segun Falowo THE LAST LEGEND -36- Matthew Hughes HACKSILVER -204- Elizabeth Bear DEATH ON THE NEFERTEM EXPRESS -228- Brian Trent SHORT STORIES THE MILLION-MILE SNIPER -31- SL Huang RED SWORD OF THE CELIAC -128- John Possidente SAY YOU’RE SORRY -134- Amman Sabet A SOLITARY CRANE CIRCLES COLD MOUNTAIN -151- Gregor Hartmann A FEAST OF BUTTERFLIES -172- Amanda Hollander HUNGRY IS THE EARTH -198- William Ledbetter THE MAN I LOVE -251- James Patrick Kelly DEPARTMENTS BOOKS TO LOOK FOR - 65- Charles de Lint BOOKS -75- Elizabeth Hand FILMS: WET SCREAMS -188- David J. Skal SCIENCE: NATURAL DISASTERS IN UTOPIA -193- Jerry Oltion COMING ATTRACTIONS -256- CURIOSITIES -258- Graham Andrews Cartoons: Arthur Masear (30. 150), Kendra Allenby (74, 127), Mark Heath (132), Nick Downes (187). COVER BY MONDOLITHIC STUDIOS


Compare

THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION March/April • 71st Year of Publication NOVELLAS COME THE REVOLUTION -83- Ian Tregillis NOVELETS KIKELOMO ULTRASHEEN -8- Dare Segun Falowo THE LAST LEGEND -36- Matthew Hughes HACKSILVER -204- Elizabeth Bear DEATH ON THE NEFERTEM EXPRESS -228- Brian Trent SHORT STORIES THE MILLION-MILE SNIPER -31- SL Huang RED SWORD OF THE CELIAC -128- John Poss THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION March/April • 71st Year of Publication NOVELLAS COME THE REVOLUTION -83- Ian Tregillis NOVELETS KIKELOMO ULTRASHEEN -8- Dare Segun Falowo THE LAST LEGEND -36- Matthew Hughes HACKSILVER -204- Elizabeth Bear DEATH ON THE NEFERTEM EXPRESS -228- Brian Trent SHORT STORIES THE MILLION-MILE SNIPER -31- SL Huang RED SWORD OF THE CELIAC -128- John Possidente SAY YOU’RE SORRY -134- Amman Sabet A SOLITARY CRANE CIRCLES COLD MOUNTAIN -151- Gregor Hartmann A FEAST OF BUTTERFLIES -172- Amanda Hollander HUNGRY IS THE EARTH -198- William Ledbetter THE MAN I LOVE -251- James Patrick Kelly DEPARTMENTS BOOKS TO LOOK FOR - 65- Charles de Lint BOOKS -75- Elizabeth Hand FILMS: WET SCREAMS -188- David J. Skal SCIENCE: NATURAL DISASTERS IN UTOPIA -193- Jerry Oltion COMING ATTRACTIONS -256- CURIOSITIES -258- Graham Andrews Cartoons: Arthur Masear (30. 150), Kendra Allenby (74, 127), Mark Heath (132), Nick Downes (187). COVER BY MONDOLITHIC STUDIOS

30 review for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, March/April 2020

  1. 5 out of 5

    John Loyd

    4.4 stars rounded down. Several really good stories to offset those that didn't connect with me. 8 • Kikelomo Ultrasheen • 23 pages by Dare Segun Falowo Poor. Daughter of a hairdresser, Kiko, is born with a birthmark, meaning she may be taken by the Onidiri. She learns different hair styles. Many years later her father dies and mother bites off her ear. She goes to Lagos. There was probably symbolism and other stuff that I didn't catch. I didn't connect with the characters and didn't have a sens 4.4 stars rounded down. Several really good stories to offset those that didn't connect with me. 8 • Kikelomo Ultrasheen • 23 pages by Dare Segun Falowo Poor. Daughter of a hairdresser, Kiko, is born with a birthmark, meaning she may be taken by the Onidiri. She learns different hair styles. Many years later her father dies and mother bites off her ear. She goes to Lagos. There was probably symbolism and other stuff that I didn't catch. I didn't connect with the characters and didn't have a sense of what they were trying to accomplish, other than Kiko becoming a hairdresser. 31 • The Million-Mile Sniper • 5 pages by S. L. Huang OK. People made a movie about the guy/gal who made a projectile intersect orbit with a ship, which would have had to be fired months in advance. It wasn't until Yast came up with evidence that people thought it was anything but random space debris. 36 • The Last Legend • 29 pages by Matthew Hughes Very Good. Ardal is doing well in school and expecting to have a fine career. That is until his parents die when he is fifteen, his uncle comes to live with him, drinks away all the college money, puts the farm in debt and sells Ardal himself into a horrible apprenticeship. Eventually he runs away. 83 • Come the Revolution • 45 pages by Ian Tregillis Very Good+. Mag was constructed to be a servitor. When a human gives an order it puts a geas upon her until the task is accomplished. For the first eighteen years of her existence she turns a crank that is sort of a sump pump. She is then brought back to the Forge, not to be destroyed which worried her, but to be reassigned to an ultra-rich family. After being hazed by one of the kitchen robots, she is befriended by Maikel, one of the oldest robots. 128 • Red Sword of the Celiac • 5 pages by John Possidente OK. A reviewer tells us the plots of the Celiac books. Alien monster that eats humans. 134 • Say You're Sorry • 17 pages by Amman Sabet Very Good+. The apology thing has hit New York. Bad things happening to people who insincerely say they're sorry. Bellamy sees it happen to someone on his team, and then to himself. 151 • A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain • 19 pages by Gregor Hartmann Very Good/Excellent. Lili is working on a method that will allow a generation ship, made from a hollowed out asteroid, to make it to it's destination with rational human beings. All the simulations she has run have led to the colonists killing each other off within a couple of generations. 172 • A Feast of Butterflies • 16 pages by Amanda Hollander Good/VG. The Judge sends the Constable to the village on the hill to bring back the girl who eats butterflies or his grandson and four other missing boys. Maybe those boys weren't innocent bystanders who just went missing. 198 • Hungry is the Earth • 6 pages by William Ledbetter OK. Aliens have invaded Earth not in a direct attack but brought an invasive berry plant that keeps crops and other plants from growing. In the end the choice is starve or eat the berries. 204 • Hacksilver • 24 pages by Elizabeth Bear Very Good+/Excellent. Auga, aka Hacksilver, comes back to his home village after eight years to find that his brother has lost the farm due to a blood debt. He rides into town, not the most cautious of ideas, to find out what his (no love lost) brother was supposed to have done. 228 • Death on the Nefertem Express • 23 pages by Brian Trent Good/VG. Five passengers plus crew are on the Nefertem Express staying just ahead of dawn which will roast them. They now have thirty minutes to get going again. When they find the engine missing, Jolene is on top of the suspect list because she is an alleged space pirate. But not a murderer. 251 • The Man I Love • 5 pages by James Patrick Kelly OK+. A bartender opens his business once a week. The patrons are all ghosts in material form.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    "A Feast of Butterflies" by Amanda Hollander and "The Last Legend" by Matthew Hughes is on my list of the Best Short SFF of March 2020: https://1000yearplan.com/2020/04/01/t... "A Feast of Butterflies" by Amanda Hollander and "The Last Legend" by Matthew Hughes is on my list of the Best Short SFF of March 2020: https://1000yearplan.com/2020/04/01/t...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Leroy Erickson

    Nothing really good, but nothing really bad either, in this issue. Dare Segun Falowo - Kikelomo Ultrasheen - 3 stars - The daughter of a hair dresser in Nigeria (?) grows up also learning how to style hair in all of the special ceremonial forms, but ends up being taken into a fantasy/supernatural group at the end of the story. Very hard to understand all of the cultural references, or even to know if they are real or fantasy. SL Huang - The Million-Mile Sniper - 2 stars - A sniper in space who has Nothing really good, but nothing really bad either, in this issue. Dare Segun Falowo - Kikelomo Ultrasheen - 3 stars - The daughter of a hair dresser in Nigeria (?) grows up also learning how to style hair in all of the special ceremonial forms, but ends up being taken into a fantasy/supernatural group at the end of the story. Very hard to understand all of the cultural references, or even to know if they are real or fantasy. SL Huang - The Million-Mile Sniper - 2 stars - A sniper in space who has to fire his shots far enough ahead of time that his target would have to follow an advance schedule down to the fraction of a second. Nonsense. Matthew Hughes - The Last Legend - 4 stars - A young man with a bright future has that future stolen away when his parents die and an uncle becomes his caretaker and steals all of the family money. He is sold as an apprentice, but finally escapes and fulfills his destiny. A good story. Ian Tregillis - Come The Revolution - 4 stars - A robot with an AI brain, but extremely rigid controls over her decision making, lives a boring life in multiple jobs. She ends up at a site with other robots where she is exposed to new ideas and, finally, a major change in her life. An interesting story. John Possidente - Red Sword Of The Celiac - 2 stars - A story about a book review of an old book, and the previous two parts of a trilogy. Inventive, but ... Amman Sabet - Say You’re Sorry - 4 stars - Some plague (?) hits the world which causes people who give insincere apologies to suffer physical harm. Unusual. Gregor Hartmann - A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain - 4 stars - The world is planning to send several thousand colonists on a 400 year trip inside a hollowed out asteroid to an Earth type planet orbiting another star. A sociophysicist is trying out various models to determine what the best social structure would be for the colonists in order to avoid conflict during the long trip. She can't find a workable solution until she tries something which goes totally against normal logic. A good story. Amanda Hollander - A Feast Of Butterflies - 4 stars - Five missing young men, a previous set of murders in which they may have been involved, the young sister of one of the murder victims, a constable trying to do the right thing, and magic. A nice story. William Ledbetter - Hungry Is The Earth - 3 stars - Alien invaders infest Earth with an alien plant which tends to kill existing plants on Earth. A young sister and brother find out that things might not be exactly how they seem. An odd story. Elizabeth Bear - Hacksilver - 4 stars - A Viking returns home after many years of travel to find out that his brother and family have been driven away because of a blood debt, and he is dragged into it, too. He ends up having to wrestle a giant in order to survive and, maybe, save his family. Another good story. Brian Trent - Death On The Nefertem Express - 3 stars - Sabotage on a train running a tight schedule on an alien world threatens to kill everybody on board the train. Weird science and flat characters. James Patrick Kelly - The Man I Love - 4 stars - A man is running a bar all day, every day, in which all of the customers are ghosts in mid-transition from life to eternity. Not much to it, but a good story.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    Favorite Stories: The Man I Loved by James Patrick Kelly: This was SO GOOD, this was one of those stories that improves your day, makes you smile and has makes me want more stories from the Happy Valley Tavern. The Last Legend by Matthew Hughes: I had no clue until the very end where this story was going Of the 12 stories only 2 were duds (in my opinion) ...Also some of the cartoons were hilarious!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kam Yung Soh

    A better than average issue with good tales by Matthew Hughes, Gregor Hartmann, Amanda Hollander, Elizabeth Bear and a fantastic tale involving thinking mechanicals beings by Ian Tregillis. - "Kikelomo Ultrasheen" by Dare Segun Falowo: an African fantasy story about a girl blessed or cursed with the ability to affect people by weaving and perming their hair. When she is forced to run away to the city, she falls into company of people who can use her ability until she returns years later to her mo A better than average issue with good tales by Matthew Hughes, Gregor Hartmann, Amanda Hollander, Elizabeth Bear and a fantastic tale involving thinking mechanicals beings by Ian Tregillis. - "Kikelomo Ultrasheen" by Dare Segun Falowo: an African fantasy story about a girl blessed or cursed with the ability to affect people by weaving and perming their hair. When she is forced to run away to the city, she falls into company of people who can use her ability until she returns years later to her mother to fulfil her destiny. - "The Million-Mile Sniper" by SL Huang: a somewhat unbelievable tale of a sniper that can find its target spaceship for an unimaginable distance away, and a detective who somehow is able to deduce what happened from the evidence. - "The Last Legend" by Matthew Hughes: a fascinating tale about a boy who is destined for greatness; until tragedy strikes and he is forced to make a living with a lowly job. Then an incident happens and he is forced to run away. Then, while in the company of another man, he encounters a strange magical dead region with only a blind man living in it. As in all such tales, it would be destiny that they would all come together at that time; or perhaps the strong hand of determinism and the strange lack of free will. - "Come the Revolution" by Ian Tregillis: a gripping tale set in an alternative world where mechanical thinking beings serve humans and are limited in their actions by the interaction of various internal geas that force them to obey commands or suffer 'pain'. But one particular mechanical 'dreams' of being free and one day that dream is fulfilled; with repercussions for humanity. - "Red Sword of the Celiac" by John Possidente: a short piece about a reviewer reluctantly reviewing an editor's favorite 'unknown author' book. - "Say You're Sorry" by Amman Sabet: a tale where saying your are sorry but not meaning it will have physical repercussions for the person involved. - "A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain" by Gregor Hartmann: an interesting look at a future where civilisation has become more environmentally oriented. But one last legacy of the previous 'machine-oriented' past remains: a hollow asteroid to be launched to a new world on a journey that will last many generations. It is the job of one woman to figure out how the inhabitants of the asteroid will survive the journey with an 'intact' society (not reverting to say, cannibalism) but as her many attempts to create a working one fail, it may require a rethink and a journey to simpler times for her to get the right answer. - "A Feast of Butterflies" by Amanda Hollander: an unusual fantasy story about a police officer in an unnamed area ruled by a corrupt landowner who demands that he arrests a girl that may be linked to the disappearance of his grandson. During his investigations, he learns more about the unusual girl who feasts on butterflies from his predecessor's files and comes to an arrangement with her to locate the grandson and get rid of the landowner in a most unusual manner. - "Hungry Is the Earth" by William Ledbetter: on a Earth invaded by strange plants that are harvested by aliens, one girl struggles to feed and save his younger brother. But hope seems lost when her plant seeds fail and she makes one last desperate attempt, not knowing if it will kill them or turn them into something not quite human. - "Hacksilver" by Elizabeth Bear: a returning Viking discovers his brother's farm taken over and his brother exiled for a crime. When he himself is exiled, he has only his wits to help him with a wresting match with a giant and prove that his brother has been framed for the crime. - "Death on the Nefertem Express" by Brian Trent: when a train that stays on the edge of disaster on a planet breaks down, it takes a probable pirate turned detective to figure out who caused the breakdown, why and how to save herself and the passengers. The clue to solve the mystery is there for the reader to see. - "The Man I Love" by James Patrick Kelly: in an unusual bar where ghosts come to congregate, one lonely ghosts waits for a special person to come to bar. And on this night, he does indeed come.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    This issue contains an Alchemy Wars prequel novella, "Come the Revolution", by Ian Tregillis. Queen Mab's awakening, her life, and her freedom, make for a compelling tale. This issue contains an Alchemy Wars prequel novella, "Come the Revolution", by Ian Tregillis. Queen Mab's awakening, her life, and her freedom, make for a compelling tale.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Poetreehugger

    Favourites: The Last Legend by Matthew Hughes—colourful, fantastical, wowza. Come the Revolution by Ian Tregillis— a robot tragedy, and the robots get my sympathy. A Feast of Butterflies by Amanda Hollander— I don’t like spiders and snakes, but I couldn’t put it down. Hacksilver by Elizabeth Bear— A high five out of five! This one hits all the spots. Death on the Nefertem Express— Suspense, all the skills of Agatha Christie in a quick read, and a snappy ending. The Man I Love by James Patrick Kelly— R Favourites: The Last Legend by Matthew Hughes—colourful, fantastical, wowza. Come the Revolution by Ian Tregillis— a robot tragedy, and the robots get my sympathy. A Feast of Butterflies by Amanda Hollander— I don’t like spiders and snakes, but I couldn’t put it down. Hacksilver by Elizabeth Bear— A high five out of five! This one hits all the spots. Death on the Nefertem Express— Suspense, all the skills of Agatha Christie in a quick read, and a snappy ending. The Man I Love by James Patrick Kelly— Romantic, left me wishing for saxophone music. The rest of the stories were definitely eminently readable.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I picked up this issue of F&SF specifically for Come the Revolution, a prequel novella to The Alchemy Wars, a brilliant alternate history series that was the perfect combination of concept and execution. It was great to be back in this imaginative alt-history world and I really enjoyed seeing the backstory and humble beginnings of the mad Queen Mab, who eventually goes on to lead a robot “Clakker” army seeking vengeance on humanity. This story moves with alacrity and Tregillis is once again in fi I picked up this issue of F&SF specifically for Come the Revolution, a prequel novella to The Alchemy Wars, a brilliant alternate history series that was the perfect combination of concept and execution. It was great to be back in this imaginative alt-history world and I really enjoyed seeing the backstory and humble beginnings of the mad Queen Mab, who eventually goes on to lead a robot “Clakker” army seeking vengeance on humanity. This story moves with alacrity and Tregillis is once again in fine form as he’s crafted an excellent primer for newcomers to the series or those thinking of embarking on a reread. See this review and others at The Speculative Shelf.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Hurley

    The Man I Love" by James Patrick Kelly was my favorite, but I also enjoyed SL Huang's "The Million Mile Sniper," Amanda Hollander's "A Feast for Butterflies," Elizabeth Bear's "Hacksilver," and Ian Tregellis's novella. A very solid issue overall! The Man I Love" by James Patrick Kelly was my favorite, but I also enjoyed SL Huang's "The Million Mile Sniper," Amanda Hollander's "A Feast for Butterflies," Elizabeth Bear's "Hacksilver," and Ian Tregellis's novella. A very solid issue overall!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jordi

    If I had to choose a single story from this issue of F&SF I think I would go for “Kikelomo Ultrasheen”, from Dare Segun Falowo - a story inspired in local Nigerian mythology, drawing also from childhood memories of the author. One of those stories that is so well written that you simply forgot you are reading, while strange moons and new gods appear in front of you - hypnotic. Other stories that I loved were the novella “Come the Revolution” by Ian Tregillis, or “A Feast of Butterflies” by Amand If I had to choose a single story from this issue of F&SF I think I would go for “Kikelomo Ultrasheen”, from Dare Segun Falowo - a story inspired in local Nigerian mythology, drawing also from childhood memories of the author. One of those stories that is so well written that you simply forgot you are reading, while strange moons and new gods appear in front of you - hypnotic. Other stories that I loved were the novella “Come the Revolution” by Ian Tregillis, or “A Feast of Butterflies” by Amanda Hollander. The former, even dealing with a worn-out science fiction trope (the rebellion of the machines), it still shines for its original steampunk setting and the character building. Amanda Hollander, on the other hand, offers a dark fantasy tale that overflows with imagination, a small masterpiece of storytelling using fantastic elements to deal with the bleak reality of bullying. But there’s more in this issue. C.C. Finlay rescues a couple of stories from Matthew Hughes and Elizabeth Bear coming from a failed anthology project of mythology-inspired stories edited by Gardner Dozois. Matthew Hugues delivers an entertaining pulp story about a runaway orphan that meets an eccentric hermit that will turn out to be something completely different. The story from Elizabeth Bear is also quite interesting - a peculiar tale of family blood debts using elements from Northern Europe mythology. Finally, there’s also a couple of short stories that I also enjoyed very much: “Red Sword of the Celiac”, by John Possidente, and “The Man I Love”, by James Patrick Kelly. The first one is a fictional review of a genre novel from one of those cult authors that nobody knows but some fans adore - those that you are always looking for in dusty bookshelves in second-hand bookstores. “The Man I Love”, that closes the issue, is a touching story about lonely ghosts in forgotten bars, of time-enduring love.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

    My first foray into a modern literary magazine--and it was quite a hoot. Even recognized one of the authors (a friend!). Really enjoyed this and am considering whether I should subscribe. On the one hand, I like the idea of supporting this kind of writing, but I also know that I have a limited amount of time to read--I'd like to get some novels in there too :). Throwing the question out there: is anyone a subscriber? Hit me up and tell me what you think. My first foray into a modern literary magazine--and it was quite a hoot. Even recognized one of the authors (a friend!). Really enjoyed this and am considering whether I should subscribe. On the one hand, I like the idea of supporting this kind of writing, but I also know that I have a limited amount of time to read--I'd like to get some novels in there too :). Throwing the question out there: is anyone a subscriber? Hit me up and tell me what you think.

  12. 4 out of 5

    David Orgel

    Ian Tregillis's novella, "Come the Revolution," is a stand-out. Superbly imagined and written, it's an original take on the robot trope. I've placed Tregillis's The Mechanical on my "Want to Read" list. Ian Tregillis's novella, "Come the Revolution," is a stand-out. Superbly imagined and written, it's an original take on the robot trope. I've placed Tregillis's The Mechanical on my "Want to Read" list.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    Another strong issue. Standouts for me were KIKELOMO ULTRASHEEN by Dare Segun Falowo and COME THE REVOLUTION by Ian Tregillis

  14. 5 out of 5

    Fernando Goulart

    A Great Edition full of great stories. My favorite were: “The Last Legend” by Matthew Hughes “Come the Revolution” by Ian Tregillis “A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain” by Gregor Hartmann “A Feast of Butterflies” by Amanda Hollander, “Hacksilver” by Elizabeth Bear

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    Time and time again I become more fascinated by the diverse mystery stories that appear in science fiction magazines such as Fantasy & Science Fiction. They are wondrous and imaginative and cleverly written. This particular issue was a real treat for me. It included a great mystery whodunit in the Agatha Christie tradition titled: Death on the Nefertem Express by Brian Trent. This story is a classic mystery with an other-worldly twist. I also really enjoyed another Sci-Fi crime story titled: The Time and time again I become more fascinated by the diverse mystery stories that appear in science fiction magazines such as Fantasy & Science Fiction. They are wondrous and imaginative and cleverly written. This particular issue was a real treat for me. It included a great mystery whodunit in the Agatha Christie tradition titled: Death on the Nefertem Express by Brian Trent. This story is a classic mystery with an other-worldly twist. I also really enjoyed another Sci-Fi crime story titled: The Million-Mile Sniper by SL Huang. The other standout for me was the Science Department column titled: Natural Disasters in Utopia. A hauntingly relevant article for our times, (Almost too relevant) about the science of location during a natural disaster, with a message about the importance of helping others in need. Very appropriate. Bravo Jerry Oltion! The amount of fiction from fresh voices (both old and new) is well worth the cover price of this magazine. Great issue!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin DeHaan

    My favorites were “The Last Legend”, “Come the Revolution”, and “Say You’re Sorry” Great cover this issue!

  17. 5 out of 5

    VexenReplica

    4.5/5, rounded up. I ended up enjoying most of the stories in this edition. Favs included: "The Last Legend," "Come the Revolution," and "A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain." Of note, I haven't read Tregillis's Alchemy Wars series, but the prequel novella is still very enjoyable with no prior knowledge, and I might even pick it up later... 4.5/5, rounded up. I ended up enjoying most of the stories in this edition. Favs included: "The Last Legend," "Come the Revolution," and "A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain." Of note, I haven't read Tregillis's Alchemy Wars series, but the prequel novella is still very enjoyable with no prior knowledge, and I might even pick it up later...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cheyenne

    Total Average: 4.2 Story Breakdown: Kikelomo Ultrasheen - 4 The Million Mile Sniper - 5 The Last Legend - 4 Come the Revolution - 5 The Red Sword of the Celiac - 3 For My Shipmates at Journey's End - 4 Say You're Sorry - 4 A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain - 5 4 Vesta - 4 A Feast of Butterflies - 4 Hungry is the Earth - 5 Hacksilver - 4 Death on the Nefertem Express - 4 The Man I Love - 4 Total Average: 4.2 Story Breakdown: Kikelomo Ultrasheen - 4 The Million Mile Sniper - 5 The Last Legend - 4 Come the Revolution - 5 The Red Sword of the Celiac - 3 For My Shipmates at Journey's End - 4 Say You're Sorry - 4 A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain - 5 4 Vesta - 4 A Feast of Butterflies - 4 Hungry is the Earth - 5 Hacksilver - 4 Death on the Nefertem Express - 4 The Man I Love - 4

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael Frasca

    My favorite stories: - KIKELOMO ULTRASHEEN by Dare Segun Falowo. 
Braided hair as milestones in a journey through life. Wonderful poetic cadence to the prose. Be sure to read about Yoruba culture before reading this story! - THE MILLION-MILE SNIPER by SL Huang. 
In cinema, the surface reality is less engaging than the constructed myth. But sometimes the constructed myth pales in comparision to the hidden reality. - THE LAST LEGEND by Matthew Hughes. A young boy is inexplicably orphaned, inexplicabl My favorite stories: - KIKELOMO ULTRASHEEN by Dare Segun Falowo. 
Braided hair as milestones in a journey through life. Wonderful poetic cadence to the prose. Be sure to read about Yoruba culture before reading this story! - THE MILLION-MILE SNIPER by SL Huang. 
In cinema, the surface reality is less engaging than the constructed myth. But sometimes the constructed myth pales in comparision to the hidden reality. - THE LAST LEGEND by Matthew Hughes. A young boy is inexplicably orphaned, inexplicably apprenticed and finally inexplicably on the lam. But maybe everything wasn’t inexplicable after all. - COME THE REVOLUTION by Ian Tregillis. Servitors of the world unite…you have nothing to lose but your geasa!
 The 17th century robot uprising told from a lowly servitor’s viewpoint. I really felt her pain. - A SOLITARY CRANE CIRCLES COLD MOUNTAIN by Gregor Hartmann.
 Two problems—Planning a proper society for a generational ship that doesn’t end in cannibalism AND somehow convincing the recent anti-Machinist cultural revolution to go ahead with its launch. - A FEAST OF BUTTERFLIES by Amanda Hollander. “Injustice could drive you mad. Or…it could change your very nature.” 
I am really enjoying the stories of newcomer Hollander. I hope we see more of her stories in upcoming issues. Pairs well with Bannerless (Carrie Vaughn.) - HACKSILVER by Elizabeth Bear. 
Bad luck or good luck? You can never be sure which until the end of the day, especially if you are trying to bend it to the latter.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    Just finished Come the Revolution, by Ian Tregillis. Stunning story, and very apropos for the current moment vis-a-vis US race relations. With one notable exception (and I'll get to that when I write up the review of the rest of the stories), this was a terrific issue, easily the best I've read from F&SF in the past 6 months. Just finished Come the Revolution, by Ian Tregillis. Stunning story, and very apropos for the current moment vis-a-vis US race relations. With one notable exception (and I'll get to that when I write up the review of the rest of the stories), this was a terrific issue, easily the best I've read from F&SF in the past 6 months.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    Each issue a Masterpiece In my opinion this publication is mesmerizingly entertaining and enthralling. Each issue transports you to infinite realms of imagination. You are guaranteed to have your sense of wonder renewed and your heart touched by the profundity contained within.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mark Catalfano

    I liked "Death on the Neferten" by Brian Trent and also "The Last Legend" by Matthew Hughes. This issue had a few stories from a cancelled Garder Dozois anthology "The Book of Legends" I liked "Death on the Neferten" by Brian Trent and also "The Last Legend" by Matthew Hughes. This issue had a few stories from a cancelled Garder Dozois anthology "The Book of Legends"

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael Whiteman

    Kikelomo Ultrasheen - Dare Segun Falowo *** A coming of age story for a young hairdresser, marked from birth by the Onidiri to heal people by removing bad ori (in the form of snakes and insects) from their heads. The conflict with her mother over her destiny was a little vague but a nice story overall. The second person works well for a "chosen one" style tale, and lots of detail on different hairstyles! The Million-Mile Sniper - SL Huang ** Short piece framed as commentary on a film based on the t Kikelomo Ultrasheen - Dare Segun Falowo *** A coming of age story for a young hairdresser, marked from birth by the Onidiri to heal people by removing bad ori (in the form of snakes and insects) from their heads. The conflict with her mother over her destiny was a little vague but a nice story overall. The second person works well for a "chosen one" style tale, and lots of detail on different hairstyles! The Million-Mile Sniper - SL Huang ** Short piece framed as commentary on a film based on the titular assassin's final job and conspiracy theories around it. Fun idea but not much there; could be fleshed out more but not sure the premise would withstand it.  The Last Legend - Matthew Hughes ** Fine, well-told but somewhat tired - a young orphaned boy escapes from his miserable apprenticeship and drunkard uncle, goes on a journey and fulfils his destiny. Nothing really bad about it but nothing that sparks either.  Come The Revolution - Ian Tregillis **** Prequel to Tregillis' Alchemy Wars trilogy where clockwork servitors are the technology and military force providing the Dutch empire the power to dominate world affairs. Tells the origin of Mab, a central character from the novels, and deals with similar themes - freedom, slavery, and different ways the slaves cope and rebel against their owners. A good intro to the series or some nice backstory if you've read it.  Red Sword Of The Celiac - John Possidente ** Like the idea of setting the story up as a review of another book, but this didn't quite work for me. Possibly missing some of the meta references but it felt like a straight review of an invented book, without revealing anything going on in the background.  Say You're Sorry - Amman Sabet *** New York is afflicted by a condition where insincere apologies cause ironic injuries to the person apologising. Realy like the idea and using it to explore how apologies themselves are used, usually for the benefit of the person who caused harm, what a sincere apology means and what it means to accept one or not. But, the relationships between the central character and his partner and dad felt a bit flat and it never quite took the extra step it needed.  A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain - Gregor Hartmann * Something defeatist and sad about a story where the grand plan is to strip people of all modern knowledge and send them on a colony ship believing they are Han dynasty villagers, because that societal structure will apparently prevent devolution on the 20-generation journey. Even less enthused by the reason to leave the planet seemingly being that restrictions and efforts to repair the damage done by human industrialisation are too strict.  A Feast Of Butterflies - Amanda Hollander *** A new constable comes to a corrupt town and tries to keep his head down until he has to investigate the disappearance of five boys, including the grandson of the Judge, the de facto boss. Liked the strangeness of the cursed girl who is suspected and the general atmosphere but the final reveal was a little underwhelming and then taken a step further without adding much.  Hungry Is The Earth - William Ledbetter *** Classic alien invasion story with a girl trying to look after her younger brother as the food dwindles, due to the aggressive alien berries the otherwise seemingly peaceful invaders brought with them. Solid stuff, not a twist ending - more of a gentle turn - but well done.  Hacksilver - Elizabeth Bear **** A viking trader returns home after years to find his family's farm taken by a neighbour to settle his brother's blood debt, and that he must also help pay it. Strong sense of place and liked the gentle fantasy of manipulating luck. The satisfaction of the protagonist's revenge on his arrogant adversary after having injustices piled upon him is rich, textbook stuff.  Death On The Nefertem Express - Brian Trent ** Problem with an SF locked room mystery is that, if the answer is an SF device you haven't introduced until the reveal, what's the point? Not helped by flat caricatures as your suspects.  The Man I Love - James Patrick Kelly **** Happy to admit I'm a sucker for a sweet love story and this was super sugary, but it's only a small dose so where's the harm. Our narrator runs a bar for ghosts - they usually fade away eventually but one young woman has been coming for decades and always plays the same song on the jukebox. 

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    All good stories with a couple that were outstanding for me. These would be The Last Legend by Matthew Hughes and Death on the Nefertem Express by Brian Trent. The second is a bit of a locked room mystery with a severe time constraint.

  25. 5 out of 5

    L.A. Jacob

    If this is what the future of Sci-fi is, I don't wanna go there. If this is what the future of Sci-fi is, I don't wanna go there.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Irene Grumman

    Absorbing Stories Design a society, spend a day with a Viking, live with environmental destruction and some intriguing characters in this issue. I liked the combination of whimsy and seriousness, as well as good writing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Yev

    NOVELLAS Come the Revolution - Ian Tregillis Maklobellathistrogantus, mab for short, is a mechanical (robot) of the guild of the Brasswork Throne. Set in roughly the 1700s or 1800s Netherlands. A story of mechanical slavery. It's a prequel to his The Alchemy Wars trilogy. The story reminded me a lot of Detroit: Become Human. ENJOYABLE NOVELETS Kikelomo Ultrasheen - Dare Segun Falowo Hairdressing sure is magical. BLAH The Last Legend - Matthew Hughes A promising young boy has dreams of greatness but lives NOVELLAS Come the Revolution - Ian Tregillis Maklobellathistrogantus, mab for short, is a mechanical (robot) of the guild of the Brasswork Throne. Set in roughly the 1700s or 1800s Netherlands. A story of mechanical slavery. It's a prequel to his The Alchemy Wars trilogy. The story reminded me a lot of Detroit: Become Human. ENJOYABLE NOVELETS Kikelomo Ultrasheen - Dare Segun Falowo Hairdressing sure is magical. BLAH The Last Legend - Matthew Hughes A promising young boy has dreams of greatness but lives a life misery. Will he ever be able to achieve his dreams? OK Hacksilver - Elizabeth Bear A man who went a-viking returns after eight years to his family home, to find much has changed. This is much more legend than fantasy. ENJOYABLE Death on the Nefertem Express - Brian Trent The Nefertem Express is a treaded vehicle heading ever westward to avoid the dawn that incinerates everything. This is its first run. Five passengers are aboard and one of them intends to murder all the others, but who is it? OK SHORT STORIES The Million-Mile Sniper - S.L. Huang An analysis of an omnidoc (movie) that informs the reader of the differences between the dramatization and actual events. MEH Red Sword of the Celiac - John Possidente A review of a fictional novel trilogy about an immortal monster protagonist that eats people. OK Say You're Sorry - Amman Sabet Our world as it is except that saying "Sorry" can cause immediate and inexplicable calamity. MEH A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain - Gregor Hartmann Lili is a sociophysicist developing the ideal society for a generation worldship that will take 400 years to reach its destination without any of the 18,000 passengers in stasis. The setting is China in maybe a century or two hence, with a world in chaos, and a culture ruled by what would currently be considered as social justice eco-terrorists. HIGHLY ENJOYABLE A Feast of Butterflies - Amanda Hollander Strange modern fairy tale of a constable searching for a Judge's son and a girl who eats butterflies. BLAH Hungry is the Earth - William Ledbetter Alien berries infects their hosts so they can spread across the galaxy and be planted on every planet. BLAH The Man I Love - James Patrick Kelly The protagonist runs a bar he inherited from his uncle. It's only open on Mondays. All its patrons are ghosts. OK

  28. 4 out of 5

    Paul Retkwa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tad Kilgore

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...