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Dark Pedagogy: Education, Horror and the Anthropocene (Palgrave Studies in Education and the Environment)

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Dark pedagogy explores how different perspectives can be incorporated into a darker understanding of environmental and sustainability education. Drawing on the work of the classic horror author H.P. Lovecraft and new materialist insights of speculative realism, the authors link Lovecraft’s ‘tales of the horrible’ to the current spectres of environmental degradation, climat Dark pedagogy explores how different perspectives can be incorporated into a darker understanding of environmental and sustainability education. Drawing on the work of the classic horror author H.P. Lovecraft and new materialist insights of speculative realism, the authors link Lovecraft’s ‘tales of the horrible’ to the current spectres of environmental degradation, climate change, and pollution. In doing so, they draw parallels between how humans have always related to the ‘horrible’ things that are scaled beyond our understanding and how education can respond to an era of climate catastrophe in the age of the Anthropocene. A new and darker understanding of environmental and sustainability education is thus developed: using the tripartite reaction pattern of denial, insanity and death to frame the narrative, the book subsequently examines the specific challenges of potentials of developing education and pedagogy for an age of mass extinction. This unflinching book will appeal to students and scholars of dark pedagogies as well as those interested in environment and sustainability education.


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Dark pedagogy explores how different perspectives can be incorporated into a darker understanding of environmental and sustainability education. Drawing on the work of the classic horror author H.P. Lovecraft and new materialist insights of speculative realism, the authors link Lovecraft’s ‘tales of the horrible’ to the current spectres of environmental degradation, climat Dark pedagogy explores how different perspectives can be incorporated into a darker understanding of environmental and sustainability education. Drawing on the work of the classic horror author H.P. Lovecraft and new materialist insights of speculative realism, the authors link Lovecraft’s ‘tales of the horrible’ to the current spectres of environmental degradation, climate change, and pollution. In doing so, they draw parallels between how humans have always related to the ‘horrible’ things that are scaled beyond our understanding and how education can respond to an era of climate catastrophe in the age of the Anthropocene. A new and darker understanding of environmental and sustainability education is thus developed: using the tripartite reaction pattern of denial, insanity and death to frame the narrative, the book subsequently examines the specific challenges of potentials of developing education and pedagogy for an age of mass extinction. This unflinching book will appeal to students and scholars of dark pedagogies as well as those interested in environment and sustainability education.

13 review for Dark Pedagogy: Education, Horror and the Anthropocene (Palgrave Studies in Education and the Environment)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rhys

    It is important, I think, when reading Dark Pedagogy to keep in mind that the authors are writing about pedagogy/learning. I say this because the text at times centers on 'speculative realism' and 'object oriented ontology' [OOO] which can be a distraction from their thesis. In all, I enjoyed the application of OOO into their thinking on pedagogy, and the importance of the 'dark' in decentering Enlightenment humanism into ways that may prepare us better for the future. "The emotional resonance of It is important, I think, when reading Dark Pedagogy to keep in mind that the authors are writing about pedagogy/learning. I say this because the text at times centers on 'speculative realism' and 'object oriented ontology' [OOO] which can be a distraction from their thesis. In all, I enjoyed the application of OOO into their thinking on pedagogy, and the importance of the 'dark' in decentering Enlightenment humanism into ways that may prepare us better for the future. "The emotional resonance of thinking of death in education is, hence, by us interpreted to be partially due to a Kantian outlook on education and learning that still is at the core of educational thought. As we will argue, it is connected to the Kantian anthropocentric notion of the self as being unable to think its own non-being. The engagement with death is thus, in turn, an engagement with that which is foundational to educational thought, that is the assumed unity, autonomy, and invulnerability of the learner as the Enlightenment subject" (p.64). In other words, a more authentic 'Being-towards-death' opens us up to greater vulnerability in the age of the Anthropocene. The 'flat ontology' of OOO helps extend our understanding of world systems to include the other-than-human. There are some strong discussions around such an ethics to extend our horizons in pedagogical efforts, and to break out of the totalizations of the Enlightenment that inhibit our ability to adjust to the new age. The authors refer to Morton as saying "The Anthropocene paradox showcases the manifold ways in which human beings are deeply 'enmeshed' in and 'haunted' by nonhuman aspects of Earth’s planetary reality at the historical moment at which human beings’ technological power over the biosphere is at its peak" (p.106). It requires that we become a bit 'insane' in order to see what has become normalized, to see what has to change. I have to admit, however, that the extended discussions of speculative realism and 'proofs' of flat ontology were distracting at times, as I really can't see how this philosophical movement offers anything different than what has filled philosophical texts for 2500 years. I did, however, appreciate aspects of speculative realism through this application to pedagogy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nita Mocanu

  3. 5 out of 5

    Franz Biberkopf

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tyneelle

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason Pickels

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gina Nim

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ricardo Montero

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anya Masalova

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katka Kováčová

  12. 5 out of 5

    Khanh Thu

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chloé

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