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Enchanted Kingdoms: A Limited Edition Twisted Fairytale Anthology

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Old tales: New twist The stories you loved as a child have been twisted into wildly addictive tales that will bewitch you as an adult: enchanted castles, spellbinding magic, handsome princes, beautiful princesses, and as many happily-ever-afters as your heart desires. Cherish this mesmerizing set of 20 classic tales retold by a collection of best-selling and award-winning au Old tales: New twist The stories you loved as a child have been twisted into wildly addictive tales that will bewitch you as an adult: enchanted castles, spellbinding magic, handsome princes, beautiful princesses, and as many happily-ever-afters as your heart desires. Cherish this mesmerizing set of 20 classic tales retold by a collection of best-selling and award-winning authors. Each novel-length story features a different take on your favorite fairytale. Your every fantasy will come to life in ways you could never have imagined, packed full of heart-wrenching romance, gripping adventure, and magic that will weave you in its spell. Scroll up and one-click now to grab this limited edition set before the clock strikes midnight! All proceeds benefit Puzzle Peace United, a children's autism charity. Fairytales include: Alice in Wonderland by J. A. Armitage and J.A. Culican Cinderella by Kimbra Swain Snow White and Rose Red by Eileen Mueller and A.J. Ponder Beauty and the Beast by Beth Hale Aladdin by Zara Quentin Rumpelstiltskin by Craig Halloran Sleeping Beauty by Stacey O'Neale Wizard of Oz by Amanda Marin Snow White and the Seven Dwarves by Lacy Sheridan Red Riding Hood by May Dawson Rapunzel by Anne Stryker Sinbad the Sailor by Cassidy Taylor Robin Hood by Jacque Stevens Little Match Girl by Lee Ann Ward Twelve Dancing Princesses by Kit Winters Mulan by Charlotte Daniels and Charlie Daniels The Nightingale by IreAnne Chambers and Rachel McManamay The Girl without Hands by Daphne Moore Nix of the Mill Pond by Astrid V.J


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Old tales: New twist The stories you loved as a child have been twisted into wildly addictive tales that will bewitch you as an adult: enchanted castles, spellbinding magic, handsome princes, beautiful princesses, and as many happily-ever-afters as your heart desires. Cherish this mesmerizing set of 20 classic tales retold by a collection of best-selling and award-winning au Old tales: New twist The stories you loved as a child have been twisted into wildly addictive tales that will bewitch you as an adult: enchanted castles, spellbinding magic, handsome princes, beautiful princesses, and as many happily-ever-afters as your heart desires. Cherish this mesmerizing set of 20 classic tales retold by a collection of best-selling and award-winning authors. Each novel-length story features a different take on your favorite fairytale. Your every fantasy will come to life in ways you could never have imagined, packed full of heart-wrenching romance, gripping adventure, and magic that will weave you in its spell. Scroll up and one-click now to grab this limited edition set before the clock strikes midnight! All proceeds benefit Puzzle Peace United, a children's autism charity. Fairytales include: Alice in Wonderland by J. A. Armitage and J.A. Culican Cinderella by Kimbra Swain Snow White and Rose Red by Eileen Mueller and A.J. Ponder Beauty and the Beast by Beth Hale Aladdin by Zara Quentin Rumpelstiltskin by Craig Halloran Sleeping Beauty by Stacey O'Neale Wizard of Oz by Amanda Marin Snow White and the Seven Dwarves by Lacy Sheridan Red Riding Hood by May Dawson Rapunzel by Anne Stryker Sinbad the Sailor by Cassidy Taylor Robin Hood by Jacque Stevens Little Match Girl by Lee Ann Ward Twelve Dancing Princesses by Kit Winters Mulan by Charlotte Daniels and Charlie Daniels The Nightingale by IreAnne Chambers and Rachel McManamay The Girl without Hands by Daphne Moore Nix of the Mill Pond by Astrid V.J

30 review for Enchanted Kingdoms: A Limited Edition Twisted Fairytale Anthology

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    An amazing collection of fairytales such as we have never seen before. Unbelievable, I thoroughly enjoyed these versions, especially the one by Jacque Stevens. Perfect retelling of Robin Hood. Outstanding. Zara Quentin also had a fabulous story called Enchanted Wishes. An Aladdin retelling that you will never read again. The story Robin Hood by Jacque Stevens is definitely not the way you expect it to be. Fantastic. JA Armitage’s story , Silver Hands was another well written one. Totally enjoyab An amazing collection of fairytales such as we have never seen before. Unbelievable, I thoroughly enjoyed these versions, especially the one by Jacque Stevens. Perfect retelling of Robin Hood. Outstanding. Zara Quentin also had a fabulous story called Enchanted Wishes. An Aladdin retelling that you will never read again. The story Robin Hood by Jacque Stevens is definitely not the way you expect it to be. Fantastic. JA Armitage’s story , Silver Hands was another well written one. Totally enjoyable.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marie Reed

    I am currently reading this anthology. My rating is an average of the stories I have read and may change in the future. We're All Mad Here by J.A. Armitage and J.A. Culican 5/5 stars Alice and her mother are cleaning out a house. When wandering on her own, Alice discovers a mirror and accidentally falls through. Time travel, alternate realities, and dragon shifters come and go as Alice tries to find her way back home. Ash and Cynder by Kimbra Swain 1/5 stars I didn't like this story at all. Ashtyn s I am currently reading this anthology. My rating is an average of the stories I have read and may change in the future. We're All Mad Here by J.A. Armitage and J.A. Culican 5/5 stars Alice and her mother are cleaning out a house. When wandering on her own, Alice discovers a mirror and accidentally falls through. Time travel, alternate realities, and dragon shifters come and go as Alice tries to find her way back home. Ash and Cynder by Kimbra Swain 1/5 stars I didn't like this story at all. Ashtyn should not have had a chance at the death trials at all, and every single male character her age is attracted to her. I read it all hoping that the ending would change my mind and I ended up hating it even more. Snow and Red by Eileen Mueller and A.J. Ponder 4/5 I don't read a lot of shifter-heavy fantasy, but dragons are Mueller's speciality, so I'm glad to finally get a glimpse of her writing. I don't know much about the original Rose Red fairytale, but it doesn't fit with the Snow White tale at all. *edited to add that I did go find the Rose Red & Snow White tale and it does go along with it quite well* As a story itself though, after I was able to get into it, I was very impressed. Rose and her sister Snow run into the Draki twins who are dragon shifters searching for their parents, who were kidnapped by mages. The sisters also have magic powers but no idea how they work or where they came from. Tainted by Beth Hale 2/5 stars No magic in this one. Just angsty teenagers who all realize they aren't the only ones with problems. The ending is super rushed and tacked on. Enchanted Wishes by Zara Quentin 5/5 stars The tale of Aladdin told from the Genie's point of view, who has been enslaved from a young age. Her wish to be free results in being enslaved to the lamp, and her journey to freedom will not come easily. Rumpel's Revenge by Craig Halloran 4/5 I didn't really care for this one until the last few chapters, and the end was so utterly ridiculous that I must read the sequel. Cursed Beauty by Stacey O'Neale 4/5 Not only was this a fun change from the usual Sleeping Beauty retelling with the role reversal, but the added witch element really made it it's own story. The characters were well put together for the length of the story and I would love to see more books added to this tale, focusing on many different people and aspects of the world introduced here. Naiya’s Wish by Astrid V.J. 4/5 stars The nix wants to keep the child of the mill owner safe, and her wish starts a chain reaction of magic that creates chaos. The back and forth between characters was a little confusing at times, but I enjoyed seeing everyone's side of the story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Astrid V.J.

    This is a review of four books in the Enchanted Kingdoms set. Silent Melody by Alice Ivinya 5/5 When I was a child, my parents took me to Hamelin to visit some friends and I remember being struck by the local folktale about the Pied Piper and the lost children, which, incidentally is a true story. Naturally, when I saw Ivinya had done a retelling of the folktale for this set, I just HAD to read it first and she didn’t disappoint. I love this tale of a young deaf girl who goes after the Pied Piper This is a review of four books in the Enchanted Kingdoms set. Silent Melody by Alice Ivinya 5/5 When I was a child, my parents took me to Hamelin to visit some friends and I remember being struck by the local folktale about the Pied Piper and the lost children, which, incidentally is a true story. Naturally, when I saw Ivinya had done a retelling of the folktale for this set, I just HAD to read it first and she didn’t disappoint. I love this tale of a young deaf girl who goes after the Pied Piper to rescue her sister and the other stolen children. I highly recommend this book. Robin’s Hood by Jacque Stevens 5/5 I’m a huge fan of the Merry Adventures of Robin Hood and, as such, I was a little dubious about a modern young adult retelling, but Stevens totally delivers. I was hooked from the get go. And the twist! Oh, what a twist! It was brilliant, believable and totally made me fall in love with this fun cast of characters all over again. Ash and Cynder by Kimbra Swain 4/5 This Cinderella retelling is a stroke of genius. Swain's combination of the fairytale elements with Gods, the Hunger Games and a splash of Game of Thrones is brilliant. The execution requires some polishing to transform this good book into something viscerally unforgettable. I sincerely hope this author republished after refining this to a perfect gem, as brilliant as the diamond slipper, symbol of this tale. Queen of Snow by Jessie Cal and Laura Burton 4/5 In box sets like this, there’s always a risk for good authors to pale next to those beside them. I thoroughly enjoyed Queen of Snow, but it didn’t quite hit the spot for me the way the other two I’ve read did. That is not the fault of the authors. Queen of Snow is a great origins tale for The Snow Queen which is one of my favorite fairytales. I loved the interplay between Aria and Jack. These two characters really grew on me over the course of the story and the ending was really spot on in bringing the two of them to life. The plot was nail-biting exciting and I couldn’t put it down. A really think it will be an amazing adventure for younger readers who are still testing the waters of the reading experience. Overall, a wonderful set so far and a brilliant cause to support. I’d like to thank his group of authors for their incredible initiative. Now, without further ado, I think I’m going to go back to my reading 😉

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katheyer

    “Enchanted Kingdoms” is a wonderful compilation of over twenty fairy-tales retelling, very aptly bearing the subtitle “A Limited Edition Twisted Fairytale Anthology”. This is limited edition offer, whose proceedings go to Puzzle Peace United, which is a charity dedicated to children with autism. A great opportunity to contribute while enjoying some of the best twisted fairy-tale retellings ever offered. This is a vast compilation; all stories have novel-length and offer a different approach to t “Enchanted Kingdoms” is a wonderful compilation of over twenty fairy-tales retelling, very aptly bearing the subtitle “A Limited Edition Twisted Fairytale Anthology”. This is limited edition offer, whose proceedings go to Puzzle Peace United, which is a charity dedicated to children with autism. A great opportunity to contribute while enjoying some of the best twisted fairy-tale retellings ever offered. This is a vast compilation; all stories have novel-length and offer a different approach to the tales. Two of them strike for different reasons: “Silver Hands” by Daphne Moore and D. Fisher and "Robin's Hood: A Tale of Sherwood Forest" by Jacque Stevens. Silver Hands is a wonderful gothic retelling of an already dark story “Silver Hands” takes a gothic approach to “The Handless Maiden” an original tale collected by the Brother Grimm and first published in 1812 in their “Children’s and Household Tales” (dt. Kinder and Hausmärchen) compilation as tale 31, later on reworked under its final version and republished in 1857. Grimm’s fairy-tales were originally a lot darker than their more known modern version, let us not forget that while the term ‘grim’ is much older than the brothers (is actually an old Germanic word meaning ‘fierce’, ‘savage’, sometimes even ‘painful’, first added to English in the 12th century BE), the modern use of ‘grim’ (from the late 1880s on) is tightly linked to the brothers’ stories. The original tale is a cautionary tale at its core, that intends to show the danger of temptation and the worth of virtue. It the tale of a man hunted by the devil and tempted to the point that he ends up cutting her own daughter hands, while still struggling to remain true to his morals. A typical Christian tale of the day destined to highlight the dangers of falling into the Devil’s lure. I will not give up the plot of this retelling, I would not wish to take even a comma of this fantastic retelling, Moore and Fisher has masterfully succeed in taking the original and while staying true to the core of the tale (lure, temptation, struggle, redemption) construct a wonderful gothic story that manages to infuse the story with a very contemporary feeling despite its gothic undertone. Robin of Locksley might be dead, his wife however, is very much capable to fight on her own “Robin’s Hood. A Tale of Sherwood Forest” is a story inspired by the classical tale “Robin Hood”. Jacque Stevens uses the core story to create a highly original retelling of the world-renowned tale, that revolves around Marian of Locksley, the Lady Earl of Huntingdon, widow of Robin of Locksley (who never returned from the Crusade). At barely sixteen, and without a proper guardian (her father died when she was merely five-years-old), Marian is a commodity the sheriff is intended to cash on, and thus he chooses her new husband, one of his vicious lackeys will do. Take control over Lady Locksley and gain free reins to extortion the people and keep them on the blink of starvation… win/win or so the sheriff thinks. At Marian lowest point, a charismatic thief appears, a savior of the poor, who could change the status-quo forever, can he possibly be Robin himself, returned from beyond the grave to save his people, or there is a much close to home explanation. I approached this tale with some apprehension, shame on me! But let me explain, usually, when you read “gender-bent-story” you usually get a copy-cut story, where the male characters have just become female by the power of gender switch, without any other addictions to the story. Not so in Steven’s tale, this is strong tale that takes the core elements of the classic and develops a brand-new version, whose heroine (Marian) is far for being both a “damsel-in-distress” or/and female version of her husband (Robin). Marian is a highly capable woman, that despite her tragic background (orphan at five, and widow at sixteen) takes her fate in her hands and manages all by itself to overcome the obstacles in her path, while freeing her people in the process.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bek

    I arc read Ash and Cynder. I was not expecting that take at all. Completely new way to see Cinderella. And I loved the ending excerpt put in there. Still haven't decided. I kinda wish there was more to this story I absolutely loved the characters. It reminded me of Hunger Games but without all the theatrics of those books. But just because it reminded me of a different series doesnt mean it read as a copy. Just like the bones of Cinderella were in the story, so were the bones of the other series I arc read Ash and Cynder. I was not expecting that take at all. Completely new way to see Cinderella. And I loved the ending excerpt put in there. Still haven't decided. I kinda wish there was more to this story I absolutely loved the characters. It reminded me of Hunger Games but without all the theatrics of those books. But just because it reminded me of a different series doesnt mean it read as a copy. Just like the bones of Cinderella were in the story, so were the bones of the other series, it reads completely different. Well done never would have guessed this wasnt Kimbra Swains normal writing style. I recommend stepping into the new world of Cynder and Ella.

  6. 4 out of 5

    OldBird

    The usual caveat to anthologies applies: So many different authors, stories and styles will mean some appeal to some readers more than others. I wanted to give everything a fair go because, well, these authors got together for a charity collection and wow, did they put on a spread. I don't doubt there's an audience for each of these novels even if I'm not it. I do wish there had been some kind of synopsis/genre label for the individual stories to help decide what to read. My stand out favourites The usual caveat to anthologies applies: So many different authors, stories and styles will mean some appeal to some readers more than others. I wanted to give everything a fair go because, well, these authors got together for a charity collection and wow, did they put on a spread. I don't doubt there's an audience for each of these novels even if I'm not it. I do wish there had been some kind of synopsis/genre label for the individual stories to help decide what to read. My stand out favourites were The Ruin of Snow and Silent Melody - they both did that 1st person POV with a mature tone of voice that I really like in YA. I didn't read every book in its entirety due to not being my thing, but I gave each a few chapters to get to know them. We're All Mad Here (Alice in Wonderland) A girl helping her mom clear out an old English mansion falls through a portal into another time... Or is it just another time? Things aren't all they seem in this village, and it's not just because it's a rural backwater. ++++ Ashe and Cynder (Cinderella) Every year a female champion is chosen to appease Cynder, Lord of the volcano. Ashylin is unlikely to be chosen by the crown prince for this honour, being mistreated by her step-family. That is until she gets a chance she never imagined... ++++ Snow and Red (Snow White and Rose Red) Two sisters with opposing magical powers, a mysterious father, a secretive mother, and some "hot" guys at the bar... ++++ Tainted (Beauty & The Beast) Carlynn Delbert's dad's in trouble again. He's accused of trying to steal something important from his employer and faces jail; something he won't survive given his serious mental health issues. Carlynn goes to corporate family's young leader, Sean, to ask for leniency, only to meet with a seemingly stony-hearted, scarred young man. Between all the drama at her fancy prep school and the push-pull relationship she strikes up with Sean, how will Carlynn cope? ++++ Enchanted Wishes (Aladdin) A girl longing for freedom ends up chained in a very different way, eventually meeting a well-meaning master who might just be able to give her what she wants - after he's married the daughter of the sultan. If only that darned vizier weren't so certain that it could never happen... -- A fun and flighty Aladdin retelling, closer to Disney in it's innocent cuteness once we get into the actual Aladdin part. A couple of typos and maybe a little bit tighter editing, but nothing to stop ot from being a light bite of YA with magic and ladies sticking up for themselves. ++++ Rumple's Revenge (Rumplestiltskin) A poor woman finds herself promised to the King when she spins straw into gold... Only she didn't. And the King's witchy consort Luna isn't pleased. She wants the crown, darn it! She'll prove the girl had magical help from the tricksy Gobbleman Rumple, and then she'll get her heart's desire. Except it's not that simple when idiot kings, innocent maidens and fae-folk are concerned. ++++ Cursed Beauty (Sleeping Beauty) A young witch inherits the family curse of being a Blood Witch. Her unique magic is supposed to sustain the dying lands of her people, but at the cost of her life. Like her ancestors before her, she will slowly become one with the earth. Before she can feel too resigned to her fate, she discovers a terrible truth: even her powers won't be enough this time. The witch lands will die unless she travels beyond them to a faraway kingdom where a cursed prince sleeps... ++++ City of Gold & Glass (Wizard of Oz) Imogen the nymph is still new to this ferrying souls to the afterlife business, but she's pretty sure the guy she's been assigned is supposed to actually be dead on arrival on the other side. Evander just wants to hang on, to go home to his mom and sister who need him. Together they must travel deep into Aeternum, the land after life, and seek the help of the only one who can send Evander back to his world. -- This one makes me think Maggie Stiefvater. ++++ The Ruin of Snow (Snow White & the Seven Dwarves) Neyva is a witch from a long line of witches. Unknown to society around them, they scheme, they plot, they kill. But when Neyva's turn to pledge herself to the witch goddess Nalcai comes, she finds herself afraid to sacrifice her heart. She chooses to run, hunted by her mother and sisters for her betrayal of their ways. But as luck would have it, she stumbles across seven outsiders all touched by some other fell magic. She promises to break their curse in return for shelter and protection. But does a witch from a heartless family truly care enough to aid these strangers? And what secrets do they hide that got them on the wrong side of dark magic? -- OMG was that a magical, dark and unexpected ride! The Snow White, make her more akin to the Evil Queen origins trope, throw in a dash of Fruits Basket and a whole load of melancholy YA vibes. (view spoiler)[ I loved how while it's got bits and pieces of the fairytale it's riffing on, it goes off on a completely different journey to the one you probably had in mind. Poisoned apples, curses, evil mothers, magic mirrors and seven... social misfits, shall we say, all feature in a gloriously weird tale of witches and what it means to sacrifice ones heart for power. The narration is cool and collected - think a more grown up style of YA, something a bit Curse So Dark and Lonely - and Neyva is a tough but relatable character with plenty of flaws and self doubts. The romance is steady and believable, the plot full of surprises. My only reason not for giving 5 stars would be that I got massively confused by how the magic system worked. Every time Neyva went off into a self-exploration trance, I had even less of an idea of what was going on with how witches' magic worked (view spoiler)[- if they didn't need to be promised to Nalcai to enhance/control their abilities, how come anyone bothered? If Morgana could control her powers (except that curse business, strangly enough) without it, how come Neyva couldn't control hers? How could Morgana not undo the curse, but move it over instead? Ack, questions! (hide spoiler)] . The same went for the magical battles where I felt the actual actions occurring weren't overly clear. There was one thing (view spoiler)[(the identity of who wanted to hurt Morgana enough to kill her child) (hide spoiler)] that sadly never got addressed, and another case where something important related to it foreshadowed in Neyva's thoughts (view spoiler)[(that non-witches can possibly steal witch-powers by killing a witch) (hide spoiler)] she then promptly seemed to forget. Addressing those would have made this even better, but regardless I really kinda loved it. (hide spoiler)] ++++ Scarlet and Shadow (Red Riding Hood) First in series - unresolved main story Scarlet's a Hunter. Shadow's a wolf. When she's betrayed by her team mates, the two end up in adjoining cells... And maybe on the same side, if they want to escape their captors. But do they want to escape each other? -- Yikes. Sweary, insta-lusty, violent paranormal romance was not what I expected in this anthology at all. If I pretend Shadow talks like Sawyer from LOST, I can just about deal with his attitude problem. I'm not a bit fan of the hot-n-heavy phwoar style of attraction and insta-fated-mates tropes so this was a bit of a tricky one for me. Luckily it doesn't pile it on too thickly in this opening episode. I felt the ending was a bit of a tease, suddenly leaving everything unresolved in the way that frustrated me, though to be fair it's not a mid-scene cliffhanger type ending either. If anything really bothered me, it was the editing. It's very readable - not being my usual thing I wouldn't have been able to finish it if it weren't - and it'd suit those looking for a short, sharp paranormal series of the usual Werewolf meets Hunter trope. ++++ Crumbling Towers (Rapunzel) First in series - Cliffhanger A girl raised by robots in a tower suddenly finds her door opened, and a chance encounter with a strange boy brings up more questions than either has answers for. That is, until there's news from outside... -- I liked the weirdness of the idea, being a mash up of Red Queen/Lunar Chronicles and Full Metal Alchemist, but found the world difficult to understand. (view spoiler)[Disclaimer: I only have a fleeting knowledge of FMA, so maybe if I already knew the whole alchemy-as-transference thing, I'd have gotten the explanation of how it worked. The magic and technology worlds clashing also didn't quite gel for me, but again that could be because I didn't understand a lot of what was going on until later. Very YA towards the end with strangely accepting characters on one hand alongside the more traditional "so unfair!!1!" adults. A bit more scene setting of Eden's captivity (she fixed things? Why?) and clearer ideas on how the world worked (is this a post-magical-apocalypse story based on reality or..?) would have helped a lot. (hide spoiler)] But I appreciated an actual slow-burn romance that never took away from the story, and it was an entertaining weird YA read that I think others would enjoy more than me. ++++ Robin's Hood (Robin Hood) First in series - can be read as stand alone When young Robin of Locksley went away to war leaving her behind, Lady Marian always hoped he'd return so that they could become man and wife in more than just marriage contract. But after several years of no news, the Sheriff of Nottingham and his cousin Guy arrive to take the Locksley lands from the presumably dead lord. Unfair punishments, cruel taxes and the prospects of a forced marriage inspire Marian to take up her husband's hood and name in order to fight back. -- A pretty good YA Robin Hood retelling. I won't say I was gripped, as it is you usual Marian-as-Robin story, but she's a level-headed narrator and it's smoothly told. Bad guys (or Guy-s?) aren't moustache twirling villains, and the good guys aren't saints (certainly not one portly Friar!) There could have been more character interactions and less time in Marian's inner monologue, just to grow characters and relationships a little more, but it was a nice enough read and I'd recommend it to straight-out retelling fans. ++++ Like Matches For Wishes (Little Match Girl) Mila is just a poor peddler girl selling oddities on the streets to support her ailing Gram, dreaming of a better life. She'd settle for one with baker's son Jordy, but what if her wish to find out her mysterious heritage changes her life forever? Can young love survive what she discovers? -- Not really any surprises to be had here, but an easy to read story of a girl with a heavy foreshadowed heritage (view spoiler)[(how she didn't twig herself is beyond me, but Milla could be a bit silly in over-reacting to things). I got frustrated by how Milla blew the romantic issues out of proportion (especially when written 1st person; the events that caused conflict were framed so as to be obvious to the reader what was going on (view spoiler)[(as in Treena making sure Milla's watching before forcibly snogging a visible uncomfortable Jordy) (hide spoiler)] ), and found it very strange how she just took everything in her stride considering the revelations about her heritage. (hide spoiler)] It was an entertaining tale of rags to riches that'd suit those who like all the YA fantasy tropes. ++++ Queen of Snow (Snow Queen) First in Series Jack's just lost his grandpa when a strange girl appears at the funeral. He swears he knows her... Yet she's from another world. A world Jack finds himself trapped in... ++++ Siren's Broken Song (Little Mermaid) Letha's had enough of life on land. She's resigned to her fate to become foam on the waves. But on her way home, she runs afoul of some fellow dark fae. She's rescued by a mysterious man who seems to want nothing in return, but who is this stranger and what does he want with a songless siren? ++++ Silent Melody (Pied Piper) First in series - can be read as stand alone Adelaide's been deaf since she was a child, and that's always made her an outsider. But when magical music sweeps away the children of Hamlin into a realm through the mountains, she's the only one not affected by the mysterious Piper's spell. Only she can resist the magic he plays for his broken, heartless Queen, and only she can rescue the children stolen from their worlds. She just needs to do it before anyone else dies in the Queen's fearsome challenges. -- A slow start, but once we finally got into the Queen's lair the tension just kept building. Adelaide's a sympathetic character; being an outcast because of her hearing loss made her hard but not without a heart. There's a very obvious romance, but it never overshadows the main story or takes over from those almost Hunger Games vibes I started getting. It wasn't quite as tense as I'd hoped by the end... (view spoiler)[I did think the ending resolution was a tad anti-climactic given all the fear and death that Adelaide had witnessed - I expected her to at least have to force the Queen to accept her heart back/return Piper's heart rather than just submit to her wishes and boom, it's all over and everyone goes home. (hide spoiler)] But still it was an engaging read, and one that could continue! ++++ Of Blades and Blossoms (Mulan) First in series - cliffhanger Aki Nakamura never expected to visit her family's homeland of Japan, but when her grandmother wants to take her sickly younger brother Ren as heir to the family business she's got no choice but to accompany him. When Ren is rejected for being ill, the burden falls to Aki to impress the board members despite being an outsider. What she also doesn't know is that a great paranormal war is brewing, and with Ren unable to be the heir, it's up to Aki to take his place amongst the boy-warriors who are to protect the world from darkness. -- I wasn't 100% sold on a retelling of Mulan being set in Japan if I'm honest. If you like anime and Disney's version of Mulan with an American teenager ogling the Shang substitute, it'd be right up your dojo. ++++ Silver Hands (Girl Without Hands) A girl with a prototype chip in her head stuck in a dystopian city surrounded by zombie-like creatures faces prejudice and intrigues, even from within her own family. ++++ Naiya's Wish (Nix of the Mill Pond) A nix watches the miller of Kvarn's wife jealously, longing for a child of her own. ++++ Promises and Pixie Dust (Thumbelina) Lina, a tiny girl, and a Huntsman travel their oppressed fantasy kingdom searching for the fairies, to find out just who she really is... Provided their history doesn't get in the way. -- There was somthing really Shrek about this one's setting; a bit flippant fairy tale fantasy with it's cast of friendly ogres and beer-swilling princesses, but with an edge of melancholy that these two authors do so well.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tee-Hee Tara

    * I received an ARC for Crumbling Towers by Anne Stryker in this set in an exchanged for an honest review* I absolutely DEVOURED this novel within 3 days. Forget everything you thought you knew about the tale of Rapunzel- this re-telling has it all! Anne Stryker creates a vivid world filled with fantasy, but also borderlines on the edge of Sci-fi vibes. That being said, this is not a sci-fi book. But I do think that fans of sci-fi would love this. Robots, mages, and alchemists fill the scene here. * I received an ARC for Crumbling Towers by Anne Stryker in this set in an exchanged for an honest review* I absolutely DEVOURED this novel within 3 days. Forget everything you thought you knew about the tale of Rapunzel- this re-telling has it all! Anne Stryker creates a vivid world filled with fantasy, but also borderlines on the edge of Sci-fi vibes. That being said, this is not a sci-fi book. But I do think that fans of sci-fi would love this. Robots, mages, and alchemists fill the scene here. Oh, and there’s a cat too. Because who doesn’t love cats? The author tackles very challenging subjects in a beautiful and delicate way, without negating the legitimacy and seriousness of the issues at hand. This book has themes and topics including abuse, trauma, discrimination, toxic relationships/abuse of power, necromancy, and racial issues. The consideration that in a war- is either side ever truly innocent? What draws the line between good and evil, and do we have the choice to do better? It also has some representation for us disabled folks! The topic that stood out the most to me was the idea that being perfect is not all it seems, its just a facade. You are beautiful because of your flaws and imperfections... Without giving too much away, or including too many spoilers, this novel was flat out a non-stop page turner, that left me wanting more and more and more. I found myself to keep saying ‘just one more chapter’. The MC develops so well in the story, and is an incredibly strong female lead, which I love, and there’s a very sweet and vulnerable slow burn romance. Just my cup of tea. I consider this book to be one of my all time favorite fantasy novels. FIVE STARS!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dorel

    In this set I liked 9 out of 20 books 📚. ASH AND CYNDER: This is the 1st book I read book by Kimbra Swain. This book's storyline was okay. This book's storyline was confusing. The characters was okay. The ending was okay. TAINTED: This is the 1st book I read by Beth Hale. This book's storyline was okay. The characters was okay. The ending was okay. RUMPEL'S REVENGE: This is the 1st book I read by Craig Halloran. This book's storyline was okay. Some parts of story 📖 was gruesome. The characters w In this set I liked 9 out of 20 books 📚. ASH AND CYNDER: This is the 1st book I read book by Kimbra Swain. This book's storyline was okay. This book's storyline was confusing. The characters was okay. The ending was okay. TAINTED: This is the 1st book I read by Beth Hale. This book's storyline was okay. The characters was okay. The ending was okay. RUMPEL'S REVENGE: This is the 1st book I read by Craig Halloran. This book's storyline was okay. Some parts of story 📖 was gruesome. The characters were okay. The ending was okay. CURSED BEAUTY: This is the 1st book I read by Stacey O'Neale. I liked this book's storyline. I liked the action in this story. I liked Sage's character. I liked Hazel's character. I liked the ending. SCARLET AND SHADOW: This is the 1st book I read by May Dawson. This book's storyline was okay. The characters was okay. The ending was okay. ROBIN HOOD 🦊: This is the 1st book I read Jacque Stevens. I liked this book's storyline. The dialogue in this story made me laugh 😂. I liked the characters. I liked the ending. QUEEN 👸 OF SNOW 🌨: This book's storyline was okay. I liked Jack's character. I liked Aria's character. I liked the ending. OF BLADES AND BLOSSOMS: This is the 1st book I read by Charlotte & Charlie Daniels. I liked the book's storyline. I liked the action in this story. I liked the characters in this story. I liked the ending. PROMISES AND PIXIE DUST: This is the 1st book I read by Robin D. Mahle & Elle Madison. I liked this book's storyline. I liked Lina's character. I felt sorry for Lina. I liked Edrich's character. I liked the ending. Even though I'm not much of a paranormal reader I'm happy 😊 this set introduced me to J.A. Armitage, Kimbra Swain, Eileen Mueller, Beth Hale, Zara Quentin, Craig Halloran, Stacey O'Neale, Amanda Marin, Lacy Sheridan, May Dawson, Anne Stryker, Jacque Stevens, Lee Ann Ward, Nadira Golde, Alice Ivinya, Charlotte & Charile Daniels, Daphne Moore & D Fischer, Astrid Vj, & Robin D Mahle & Elle Madison.

  9. 5 out of 5

    GG

    This review is for Ash and Cynder by the talented Kimbra Swain. I collect Cinderella variants - retellings, cultural ones, etc. - and I was thoroughly delighted by this one. While the fairytale was the jumping off point, the story itself was so much more. I enjoyed seeing the development of characters and world and would love to see more set in that creation. Author Swain is an impressive worldbuilder in her writing and this story was no exception. I read an ARC of the story and look forward to r This review is for Ash and Cynder by the talented Kimbra Swain. I collect Cinderella variants - retellings, cultural ones, etc. - and I was thoroughly delighted by this one. While the fairytale was the jumping off point, the story itself was so much more. I enjoyed seeing the development of characters and world and would love to see more set in that creation. Author Swain is an impressive worldbuilder in her writing and this story was no exception. I read an ARC of the story and look forward to reading the entire collection

  10. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Eyre

    What a fantastic set of fairytale retellings written by some of my favourite authors. This is for Robins Hood by Jacque Stevens What a fantastic retelling of an absolute classic Robin Hood. An extremely well written story with plots twists and turns I did not see coming and a fantastic kick ass character who takes her own fate and that of the people into her hands to free them all. I absolutely loved this and so look forward to the next book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Fairytales in high octane What an exhilarating and exciting way to present favorite fairytales! I'm partial to Ash and Cynder but each story has its own magic and there is truly something for everyone! Fairytales in high octane What an exhilarating and exciting way to present favorite fairytales! I'm partial to Ash and Cynder but each story has its own magic and there is truly something for everyone!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sam Donoghue

    *I received an ARC of Naiya's wish by Astrid V.J. (thank you again), my review is honest and completely my own* This fairytale (The Nix of the Mill-pond) was unknown to me so I don't know how close Astrid stayed to the original story. However, I do know what my thoughts are about this story and I love to share those :) The story follows Naiya, a Nix in a pond and everyone influenced by her decisions. This concept is simple and yet so stretchable. Naiya's wish was, for me, a very easy read. I finished *I received an ARC of Naiya's wish by Astrid V.J. (thank you again), my review is honest and completely my own* This fairytale (The Nix of the Mill-pond) was unknown to me so I don't know how close Astrid stayed to the original story. However, I do know what my thoughts are about this story and I love to share those :) The story follows Naiya, a Nix in a pond and everyone influenced by her decisions. This concept is simple and yet so stretchable. Naiya's wish was, for me, a very easy read. I finished it very fast and had to make my notes afterwards because I didn't wanna stop reading to make them. That's a very good thing but it also means that I didn't gather any quotes or in depth insights. Not because there are no pretty quotes, but because my memory is terrible with them. My favorite character has to be Amina.  From the beginning she moved me.I don't know why but she really got under my skin. She feels so human, so recognisable, so honest. The story is an easy read. I was however left with a lot of questions. Luckily Astrid announced at the end of the book that she has a sequel coming. I really look forward to it and I am really curious to see if it will answer all my questions.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Wendi Wilson

    My review is for Promises and Pixie Dust I loved this creative retelling of Thumbelina. While there was the tiniest bit of angst between the main character and her lifelong friend/love interest, it was mostly an easy, lighthearted read that give you all the best feels. Sassy and charming, the characters sweep you away in this fairy tale world, making you root for that happily ever after you know they deserve. Great story. 5 stars

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lori Hammons

    I thoroughly enjoyed Silver Hands by Daphne Moore and D Fischer. Not being familiar with the fairytale this book is based on, I had no idea what to expect.  Sage lives in a world where debt to credit ratio makes or breaks a House/ family.  People can consciously move around in the realm where data is stored, reminiscent of Tron, yet punishments are barbaric. 

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lissa Hawley

    I've only had a chance to read one of these stories. Promises and Pixie Dust by Elle Madison and Robin D. Mahle. Such a unique take on Thumbelina. Interesting premise and creative world building. Plus the anthology is for a great cause! I've only had a chance to read one of these stories. Promises and Pixie Dust by Elle Madison and Robin D. Mahle. Such a unique take on Thumbelina. Interesting premise and creative world building. Plus the anthology is for a great cause!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marquise

    A lot of the stories aren't believable historicity-wise, and I felt disappointed by the retellings I was looking forward to the most (Cinderella & Beauty and Beast), and found that the best stories were retellings of tales I don't particularly care about (Robin Hood and the Pied Piper of Hamelin). A lot of the stories aren't believable historicity-wise, and I felt disappointed by the retellings I was looking forward to the most (Cinderella & Beauty and Beast), and found that the best stories were retellings of tales I don't particularly care about (Robin Hood and the Pied Piper of Hamelin).

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sky Sommers

    20 fairytale books in one set, yay! From the companion set of prequels, I spotted some favourite indie authors and... I loved Astrid V.J.’s Naiya’s Wish, a retelling of a lesser known fairytale Nix of the Mill-pond is a real tear-jerker. The story has good forebodying, good pace, excellent world-building and spirals towards the inevitable when danger hits. I really liked how the author portrayed souring of relations and the mother’s plight to keep her child out of the harm’s way. The side of the 20 fairytale books in one set, yay! From the companion set of prequels, I spotted some favourite indie authors and... I loved Astrid V.J.’s Naiya’s Wish, a retelling of a lesser known fairytale Nix of the Mill-pond is a real tear-jerker. The story has good forebodying, good pace, excellent world-building and spirals towards the inevitable when danger hits. I really liked how the author portrayed souring of relations and the mother’s plight to keep her child out of the harm’s way. The side of the misunderstood and neglected father was truly heartfelt. As transformational as ever, Astrid made me think about what GOOD did the naiad intend to do by requesting a child. Really excited to read how Amina fares on her quest. “Follow the path that brings you joy.” Ivinya’s Pied Piper is a mix of the rat catcher tale with elements of 12 dancing princesses. Pied Piper is based on a true story, did you know? 130 kids did go missing in Hamelin in 26.07.1284. Alice Ivinya has been one of my favourite indie authors ever since I read her ‘of Snow’ series of short stories. She chooses the themes of the downtrodden - this time, of a girl who had lost her hearing through sickness. The beginning of the book is heartbreaking. The last words Adelaide ever hears are: “Sleep, Liebling. You’ll feel better in the morning.” When all the village children are taken, from labelled different she becomes hated. I loved this roller-coaster emotional tale bordering on a horror story with elements of enemies to lovers and focusing on sisterly love. And I loved being immersed, once more, in Ivinya’s magical world. Truly, if only people noticed the right things...they’d notice girls from small boring villages in a world of brown can be remarkably courageous. Jacque Stevens’ Robin’s Hood was a treat to read! Not going to spoil it for you, but this story is wonderfully turned on its head, yet it follows all the traditional pit-stops of the original tale - river crossover, saving Will Scarlet, robbing the rich to give to the poor, etc. For me, the story was a mix of Robin Hood (2010) movie and Pixar’s Brave with the author cleverly filling in the gaps of hows and whys. I liked Mare’s fire and determination. Definitely going to read Marion’s Man, the sequel. If you liked Christo’s To Kill A Kingdom, Nadira Golde’s Siren’s Broken Song is up your alleay - as it’s Ariel’s story almost in reverse. This book was a melancholy read, the words swishing in an imperceptible lull of the sea...I could almost feel the ocean. Letha, a siren disappointed in love is making her way to the sea to become foam and end her curse. She is rescued by the Warden of the magical territory, Sebastian and first a friendship and then something more develops. I loved this cautious romance and particularly the bits and bobs from Disney’s Ariel - the treasure cove (not the mermaid’s!) was a hoot and a witch acting the magic therapist...brilliant! And yes, therapy is magic. If you want good pointers on the journey back from depression or just a meh day, this is a magical read. In the main part, Halloran’s Rumple’s Revenge was a sardonic twist on the old folktale that reminded me of the humour in The Princess Bride. Truly, why would the miller’s daughter forgive the greedy king who had told her to spin straw & become queen or die. And that surprise ending...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rose Flynn

    So first and foremost if you are a lover of fairy tales and love to see them retold then this book is an absolute steal! Plus the proceeds go to a charity supporting children with ASD. So many FULL LENGTH fairytales to choose from ranging from classic Disney/Hans Christian Anderson retellings to The Brother's Grimm. To start, I read Astrid VJ's Naiya's Wish, a retelling of the Nix of the Mill Pond. This beautiful tale gives you the perspective of three women, Naiya the nix, Hilda the mother of P So first and foremost if you are a lover of fairy tales and love to see them retold then this book is an absolute steal! Plus the proceeds go to a charity supporting children with ASD. So many FULL LENGTH fairytales to choose from ranging from classic Disney/Hans Christian Anderson retellings to The Brother's Grimm. To start, I read Astrid VJ's Naiya's Wish, a retelling of the Nix of the Mill Pond. This beautiful tale gives you the perspective of three women, Naiya the nix, Hilda the mother of Phillip and Amina, his future wife. Naiya wishes nothing more than to experience being a mother. When the Miller, Nate becomes so desperate in his financial ruin she strikes a deal with him. In exchange for her help in assuring the villagers would use the mill and help to alleviate their poverty, he must bequeath her his soon to be born son, Phillip. She is a misunderstood creature feared by the villagers of Kvarn. They think she is evil, while she protects the mill pond and surrounding waters. This is a tale of misunderstandings with the over arching message of be careful what you wish for. However, shortly after Phillip's birth the priest of Kvarn helps to seal the Nix into her pond so that she may never leave it. Hilda desperately attempts to protect her son from the Nix throughout his childhood and tries desperately to keep him from the Water's edge, with a growing resentment for her husband Nate for what he promised that festers within her. Amina is the Baker's daughter and becomes Phillip's childhood friend and eventual future wife. After the unthinkable happens and Phillip falls into the pond Amina must do everything in her power to save him and embarks on a harrowing journey, sacrificing everything to get back the man she loves. This is the third or fourth book of Astrid VJ's that I have read and with each I get a deeper sense of the world in which her fairytale retellings exist, the magic, the lore, religion and general mythology. As always Astrid demonstrates a masterful use of language to paint word pictures on every page. I appreciated the perspective of one of the creatures in her world in addition to the perspectives of Hilda and Amina. I was grateful to learn that the story does not end at the end of this book and that it continues in another saga called Amina's Quest! I'm excited to read more of these fairytales as I go along!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

    The story quality varies. For example: I liked the first story, except for the constant (mostly mild or suggested) profanity. The second story was full of idolatry and misusing the idol’s name, but it doesn’t glorify rape culture, even if that is only addressed for the heroine and not the palace concubines. * mini spoiler* The king who murdered concubines is eventually dealt with, but which systems or people pressured them to become concubines and sold them or bought them? The prince holds the pal The story quality varies. For example: I liked the first story, except for the constant (mostly mild or suggested) profanity. The second story was full of idolatry and misusing the idol’s name, but it doesn’t glorify rape culture, even if that is only addressed for the heroine and not the palace concubines. * mini spoiler* The king who murdered concubines is eventually dealt with, but which systems or people pressured them to become concubines and sold them or bought them? The prince holds the palace sex servant/slave in contempt for being desperate to please him without addressing the poverty, abuse and lack of economic freedom or education that contribute to her desperation. She is treated like a stage prop. The author seems to set up the idol as a sacrificial Christ figure to support women without understanding that women were made in the image of God from the creation of Eve and already deserve respect. The author also really seems to push independent, non-coerced choice in the idol generated Christ figure, without understanding that the fruit of the Spirit is self-control. Further, the author built up this strong role model in the heroine for making independent life decisions and then fails to have her model a healthy way to think through relationship decisions that might be emotionally difficult because no one is a bad choice for a romance partner. There is a reverse-harem romance built up with a surprise non-ending where the heroine’s choice isn’t revealed because it isn’t supposed to be about the man. However, I don’t understand how it makes her stronger that she gets to choose and her choice is left out of the narrative? How does that highlight the importance of her choice? Not recording her choice is just one more way of taking it away from her, and taking the ending away from the reader instead of taking responsibility for having the heroine process her own emotions, discern how she feels, deliberate on her possible choices and where those will lead, place priorities on her social support network investment to support her decided choice, set her own safe boundaries to avoid misunderstandings or jealousy, and to be clear in her communication when she’s saying no (even knowing someone’s feelings might be hurt or that she may experience push back). The second story leaves huge loose ends that are never tied up, including whether or not anyone discusses providing rights to servants or forbidding sexual slavery.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kaye

    ✳️✳️ONE THRILLING ANTHOLOGY✳️✳️ Blasting bloomers boo! This extremely talented and sensational group of authors pulled together for one spectacular rock-our-world tsunami, bringing the sizzling heat and tantalizing magic, revving up the exuberance and catapulting this gem to staggering heights. Hurled headlong into uncharted territory churning with all the knock-outs, low-blows, head-ons and near-misses while handling the captivating drama, underlying currents merge while attentive to the dramati ✳️✳️ONE THRILLING ANTHOLOGY✳️✳️ Blasting bloomers boo! This extremely talented and sensational group of authors pulled together for one spectacular rock-our-world tsunami, bringing the sizzling heat and tantalizing magic, revving up the exuberance and catapulting this gem to staggering heights. Hurled headlong into uncharted territory churning with all the knock-outs, low-blows, head-ons and near-misses while handling the captivating drama, underlying currents merge while attentive to the dramatic twists and wicked turns unfolding, wrapping this jewel up sleek, shiny and tight. Every individual story is full of suspense and intrigue, boasting the gripping intensity, heart pounding encounters and pulse racing situations, each thrilling and unique, with all the exuberance and fervor, putting our characters through their paces, testing them in ways they could have never imagined, flinging this gem to life flawlessly. The characters, interactions and charged atmosphere along with qualities and traits that add depth and diversity, blending into amazing personalities. The scenes are abundantly descriptive with colorful details that blend and flow, creating a majestic backdrop that's so rich and lively it feels as though you're part of the story instead of on the sidelines, feeling everything the characters feel. Amazing job guys, thanks for sharing this awesome little gem with us.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carlynne Toomey

    I'm reviewing Silver Hands by Daphne Moore and D. Fischer. This story is in a collection of fairytale retellings and is a great one! My biggest pet peeve in books is in the details. If you want to know what happens in the book, read the blurb or buy it. I'm going to tell you how well it was written, or not. In this case, it is very well written! The story flows off the pages keeping you engaged and turning page after page, even after you should have gone to bed! The characters are well developed I'm reviewing Silver Hands by Daphne Moore and D. Fischer. This story is in a collection of fairytale retellings and is a great one! My biggest pet peeve in books is in the details. If you want to know what happens in the book, read the blurb or buy it. I'm going to tell you how well it was written, or not. In this case, it is very well written! The story flows off the pages keeping you engaged and turning page after page, even after you should have gone to bed! The characters are well developed and complex. They also grow organically throughout the story. The worldbuilding is believable and so well detailed you feel as if you are there. I've started reading some of the other stories as well and I can tell you that they are all very well written and enjoyable so far! I'm sure the whole book is as good as the parts I've already read and I'm going to read them all. From my experience so far, I highly recommend this to anyone that enjoys fairytale retellings. I received a free copy of this book from the author and am voluntarily leaving a review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    The Mysterious Reader

    I’m a fantasy addict and a lover of classic fairy tales. No surprise then that I’m also a huge fan of fairy tale, fable and legend retellings when they’re well written and imaginative. Happily that’s clearly found in the Enchanted Kingdoms anthology. It’s contributions were written by several of my favorite authors as well as newcomers that I was happy to “meet”. While I have some favorites (I’m going with Robin's Hood by Jacque Stevens, and Alice in Wonderland by J. A. Armitage and J.A. Culican I’m a fantasy addict and a lover of classic fairy tales. No surprise then that I’m also a huge fan of fairy tale, fable and legend retellings when they’re well written and imaginative. Happily that’s clearly found in the Enchanted Kingdoms anthology. It’s contributions were written by several of my favorite authors as well as newcomers that I was happy to “meet”. While I have some favorites (I’m going with Robin's Hood by Jacque Stevens, and Alice in Wonderland by J. A. Armitage and J.A. Culican) it was tough fir me to choose. Great stories, and totally fun to read. Just what a good anthology should do. I’d have downloaded this collection just fir the new stories by authors I know - and it’s easily worth it just for that - but I’m as happy to recommend the anthology as much for those tales as I am for the “new” (to me at least) authors who wrote still enjoyable enough that now I will pursue other tales from.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amber Christiansen

    This review is for Enchanted Wishes. If I think about it after reading everything, I'll revise my review later. I thought this was a great retelling of Aladdin while also being a completely new story. The main character is the genie and aside from the prologue which is actually a scene in the middle, the story starts before Ziba becomes a genie. Not all of the beats from the original are included, but there are enough that it's recognizable as a retelling. The romance between Aladdin and Princess This review is for Enchanted Wishes. If I think about it after reading everything, I'll revise my review later. I thought this was a great retelling of Aladdin while also being a completely new story. The main character is the genie and aside from the prologue which is actually a scene in the middle, the story starts before Ziba becomes a genie. Not all of the beats from the original are included, but there are enough that it's recognizable as a retelling. The romance between Aladdin and Princess Leila is viewed through Ziba's eyes, so this isn't exactly a romance story, but it was still sweet to see it develop. There are a couple of short scenes with different point of view characters, but most of it is from Ziba's viewpoint. I received a free copy of Enchanted Wishes, one of the stories in this book, via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review, but my opinions are my own.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth McDaniel

    Robin’s Hood by Jacque Stevens Marian and Robin were betrothed then married at a young age after her and her brother’s parents died. The Laird of Locksley inherited their lands and titles until they were of age. When Robin and her brother were old enough to fight they left to go to fight with King Richard in the Holy Wars leaving Marian and his father. Years later the crooked Sheriff of Nottingham came to seize their lands by saying Robin was dead and was a traitor. So Marion donned his cloak and Robin’s Hood by Jacque Stevens Marian and Robin were betrothed then married at a young age after her and her brother’s parents died. The Laird of Locksley inherited their lands and titles until they were of age. When Robin and her brother were old enough to fight they left to go to fight with King Richard in the Holy Wars leaving Marian and his father. Years later the crooked Sheriff of Nottingham came to seize their lands by saying Robin was dead and was a traitor. So Marion donned his cloak and became his ghost to some and Robin himself to others. Danger, intrigue, disappointment, twists and exciting adventures as she tried to save her people and free herself from the Sheriffs and his nephew. Fun read and I can’t wait to read the next book. I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stan Hutchings

    It's not the Disney Aladdin, but it's a great story too. This is the backstory of the genie of the lamp. It's not a male who is trapped in the lamp, forced to grant wishes. It's Ziba, a young woman, who made an unfortunate wish herself and was somehow trapped in the lamp. She is compelled to grant three (and only three) wishes, but has some wiggle room in interpreting the wish. Aladdin finally becomes her owner after she suffers a string of unfortunate owners. Aladdin asks Ziba to help him win t It's not the Disney Aladdin, but it's a great story too. This is the backstory of the genie of the lamp. It's not a male who is trapped in the lamp, forced to grant wishes. It's Ziba, a young woman, who made an unfortunate wish herself and was somehow trapped in the lamp. She is compelled to grant three (and only three) wishes, but has some wiggle room in interpreting the wish. Aladdin finally becomes her owner after she suffers a string of unfortunate owners. Aladdin asks Ziba to help him win the hand of the princess. The Vizeer, Umaan, also has designs on the princess and on becoming sultan. How Aladdin, Ziba, and the princess get their expected happy-ever-after ending and Umaan gets his well-deserved fate makes an exciting romance.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cody Smith-Candelaria

    I have only read Silver Hands so far from this collection but it's amazing and I can't wait to check out more. Silver Hands is a complex story, set in a furturistic world where humans are more than and technology and money rules it all. It's got everything you need, great characters, amazing world-building, twists and turns, intrigue, drama and love. It covers all the basics. The characters grow throughtout the story an really become fully imagined beings. The world-building is done so well that I have only read Silver Hands so far from this collection but it's amazing and I can't wait to check out more. Silver Hands is a complex story, set in a furturistic world where humans are more than and technology and money rules it all. It's got everything you need, great characters, amazing world-building, twists and turns, intrigue, drama and love. It covers all the basics. The characters grow throughtout the story an really become fully imagined beings. The world-building is done so well that I could visualize the inside of the tech and I am not tech-minded. I loved every moment of it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    My review is for the story 'Enchanted Wishes: An Aladdin Retelling' by Zara Quentin. Ziba has only known masters, but she longs to be set free, she has a foretelling that might help her get her freedom. So she naturally chases this chance, without knowing if it will lead to her greatest wish. Ziba eventually ends up with a master, that might be familiar with (Aladdin). I liked this new twist to the Aladdin tale, and couldn't help but be hoping for Ziba to get her freedom. I received a free copy of My review is for the story 'Enchanted Wishes: An Aladdin Retelling' by Zara Quentin. Ziba has only known masters, but she longs to be set free, she has a foretelling that might help her get her freedom. So she naturally chases this chance, without knowing if it will lead to her greatest wish. Ziba eventually ends up with a master, that might be familiar with (Aladdin). I liked this new twist to the Aladdin tale, and couldn't help but be hoping for Ziba to get her freedom. I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lillian

    This review is for Promises and Pixie Dust, which is included in the anthology. I received an eARC of this book via the author. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of this review. This is the fairytale retelling I didn’t know I needed! Promises and Pixie Dust by Robin D. Mahle & Elle Madison, who are quickly becoming one of my favorite author duos, is a sweet, standalone retelling of Thumbelina and included in the anthology Enchanted Kingdoms. Following the story of Lina and This review is for Promises and Pixie Dust, which is included in the anthology. I received an eARC of this book via the author. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of this review. This is the fairytale retelling I didn’t know I needed! Promises and Pixie Dust by Robin D. Mahle & Elle Madison, who are quickly becoming one of my favorite author duos, is a sweet, standalone retelling of Thumbelina and included in the anthology Enchanted Kingdoms. Following the story of Lina and Edrich, Promises and Pixie Dust explores the world from two very different points of view as one girl searches for a world she belongs in. The story opens with Lina saying goodbye to her friends and waiting for one person in particular, Edrich. Lina is preparing to enter the enchanted forest and find people like her. That is, Lina wants to find someone that is her size, not much bigger than your thumb. Since her mother’s passing, the call of the forest and to find others like her has only gotten stronger. And why wouldn’t it? Everything in Lina’s life has to be modified for her to use. That doesn’t stop her. Nothing does! She is a force to be reckoned with, even driving a wagon full of supplies with a complicated system of ropes and pulleys. But now there is nothing stopping her from searching except Edrich. To say Edrich is shocked to see Lina at the bar, much less her request to accompany her to the Enchanted Forest, is an understatement. Edrich has spent the last few years trying to forget his little friend and the feelings she stirs in him. As his mother pointed out long ago, Lina deserves better than the half-life he can give her and he the same. So he left, joining a group of mercenaries. Now that life haunts him. With a few days off between jobs, he decides to accompany Lina, he can’t let her go on her own after all. There is a bitterness that festers between these two, though Lina is unaware of the cause only the hurt that she feels. The plot follows these two into the enchanted forest, and I couldn’t love it more! The alternating POV really help bring into focus how the world is seen from a normal sized human like Edrich and Lina’s fairy size. I love their banter, even their tense arguments as you see the tension swelling between these two former friends. My heart ached for them. Overall, I really enjoyed Promises and Pixie Dust. Thumbelina was one of my favorite cartoons growing up, and the authors brought her to life here. I love how intricate and vivid the details of the forest are from Lina’s perspective. It was easy to imagine myself at her size, seeing the world from her POV. If you enjoy YA fantasy, retellings, and of course a bit of romance, I highly recommend Promises and Pixie Dust.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Athena Reed

    Awesome gathering of twisted an terrific tales! Some of the most beautifully written takes on fairy tales. Many were so very creative and unique in their retelling style, with so so many unexpected endings. Not only was the book put together for such a wonderful cause but everyone of these authors have that spark of flame that truly ignite the imagination. I will be searching out all the authors that I had not read before!!!!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Cass

    My review at this time is for Promises and Pixie Dust by Robin D. Mahle and Elle Madison. I adored their take on Thumbelina! Lina is an adorable mini-person raised in a completely human-sized world. While there are plenty of other fairytale creatures, there are none like her...ever. After her mother dies, she decides to follow the rumors to find the fairies from the tales, and suckers her best friend, who has been absent for some time, to accompany her. Edrich is a sourpuss, but begrudgingly goe My review at this time is for Promises and Pixie Dust by Robin D. Mahle and Elle Madison. I adored their take on Thumbelina! Lina is an adorable mini-person raised in a completely human-sized world. While there are plenty of other fairytale creatures, there are none like her...ever. After her mother dies, she decides to follow the rumors to find the fairies from the tales, and suckers her best friend, who has been absent for some time, to accompany her. Edrich is a sourpuss, but begrudgingly goes. They have adventure with surprise twists throughout! I loved this stories and hope that Robin and Elle go back to that world someday and give us more stories! I can't wait to read the rest of the stories in this collection!

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