website statistics The Bad Muslim Discount - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

The Bad Muslim Discount

Availability: Ready to download

Following two families from Pakistan and Iraq in the 1990s to San Francisco in 2016, Bad Muslim Discount is a hilarious, timely, and provocative comic novel about being Muslim immigrants in modern America. For fans of Hanif Kureshi, Mira Jacob, and Mohammed Hanif. It is 1995, and Anvar Faris is a restless, rebellious, and sharp-tongued boy doing his best to grow up in Karac Following two families from Pakistan and Iraq in the 1990s to San Francisco in 2016, Bad Muslim Discount is a hilarious, timely, and provocative comic novel about being Muslim immigrants in modern America. For fans of Hanif Kureshi, Mira Jacob, and Mohammed Hanif. It is 1995, and Anvar Faris is a restless, rebellious, and sharp-tongued boy doing his best to grow up in Karachi, Pakistan. As fundamentalists in the government become increasingly strident and the zealots next door start roaming the streets in gangs to help make Islam great again, his family decides, not quite unanimously, to start life over in California. The irony is not lost on Anvar that in America, his deeply devout mother and his model-Muslim brother are the ones who fit right in with the tightly knit and gossipy Desi community. Anvar wants more. At the same time, thousands of miles away, Safwa, a young girl suffocating in war-torn Baghdad with her grief-stricken, conservative father will find a very different and far more dangerous path to America. These two narratives are intrinsically linked, and when their worlds come together, the fates of two remarkably different people intertwine and set off a series of events that rock their whole community to its core. The Bad Muslim Discount is an irreverent, dramatic, and often hysterically funny debut novel by an amazing new voice. With deep insight, warmth, and an irreverent sense of humor, Syed Masood examines quirky and intense familial relationships, arranged marriage, Islamic identity, and how to live together in modern America.


Compare

Following two families from Pakistan and Iraq in the 1990s to San Francisco in 2016, Bad Muslim Discount is a hilarious, timely, and provocative comic novel about being Muslim immigrants in modern America. For fans of Hanif Kureshi, Mira Jacob, and Mohammed Hanif. It is 1995, and Anvar Faris is a restless, rebellious, and sharp-tongued boy doing his best to grow up in Karac Following two families from Pakistan and Iraq in the 1990s to San Francisco in 2016, Bad Muslim Discount is a hilarious, timely, and provocative comic novel about being Muslim immigrants in modern America. For fans of Hanif Kureshi, Mira Jacob, and Mohammed Hanif. It is 1995, and Anvar Faris is a restless, rebellious, and sharp-tongued boy doing his best to grow up in Karachi, Pakistan. As fundamentalists in the government become increasingly strident and the zealots next door start roaming the streets in gangs to help make Islam great again, his family decides, not quite unanimously, to start life over in California. The irony is not lost on Anvar that in America, his deeply devout mother and his model-Muslim brother are the ones who fit right in with the tightly knit and gossipy Desi community. Anvar wants more. At the same time, thousands of miles away, Safwa, a young girl suffocating in war-torn Baghdad with her grief-stricken, conservative father will find a very different and far more dangerous path to America. These two narratives are intrinsically linked, and when their worlds come together, the fates of two remarkably different people intertwine and set off a series of events that rock their whole community to its core. The Bad Muslim Discount is an irreverent, dramatic, and often hysterically funny debut novel by an amazing new voice. With deep insight, warmth, and an irreverent sense of humor, Syed Masood examines quirky and intense familial relationships, arranged marriage, Islamic identity, and how to live together in modern America.

30 review for The Bad Muslim Discount

  1. 4 out of 5

    On the Same Page

    ARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Update 10/03/2021: After listening to a podcast with the author (thanks to Kelsie), there's something I think I should clarify. The original review (which I haven't changed) implies that I think the characters' opinions reflect the author's. I don't necessarily believe that. Do I still think this book is a poor representation of Muslims? Absolutely. Regardless of whether this is meant as satire or not, meant for Ame ARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Update 10/03/2021: After listening to a podcast with the author (thanks to Kelsie), there's something I think I should clarify. The original review (which I haven't changed) implies that I think the characters' opinions reflect the author's. I don't necessarily believe that. Do I still think this book is a poor representation of Muslims? Absolutely. Regardless of whether this is meant as satire or not, meant for American Muslims since it is #OwnVoices or not, a story that does its best to mock practicing Muslims at every turn is falling short. If the Muslim representation is meant to be diverse, it's very strange that this depiction of Muslims is so out of focus. ---------- I've been thinking about how to write this review since I finished the book, and even though I've started typing I still don't know what words to use. I've never given books the power to wound me, and this one is no exception, but to say that I was annoyed would be a massive understatement. Mostly, I was left feeling disappointed at another book that further promotes the same dangerous stereotypes about Muslims that led to Trump getting elected. The book follows Anvar and Azza, both Muslims who don't feel much of a connection to their faith (until it suits them to pray, but I'll come back to that later). Anvar comes from a Pakistani family that immigrated because his father was feeling uncomfortable with the Islamic fervor spreading in his country. Azza is Iraqi, and after her father gets captured and tortured, she no longer feels safe. When a young man offers her a way out of Iraq, she's more than willing to pay the price, but finds herself trapped after. In Anvar, she finds a sort of freedom, a choice she has made for herself and herself alone, and an escape from the controlling men in her life. I want to start by saying that the reason I'm frustrated with this book actually has nothing to do with Anvar and Azza. In fact, I really enjoyed Anvar's humor, and found myself often grinning at his jokes. Neither of them is religious, but that doesn't make the representation invalid. I recognize that not everyone connects to Islam the same way I do, and I respect that. Azza's struggles felt relatable in a way, and it's understandable that, when someone gets abused by a person who claims to be religious, it'll turn them away from that faith. Despite the fact that there is a diverse range of Muslim characters in this story, the core of it can be summed up as this: Muslims who practice their religion are potential terrorists, control freaks, abusers or righteous to the point of harming other people just for the sake of doing the right thing, while Muslims who don't have a strong connection to their faith, who don't practice their religion, don't pray, drink alcohol and have sex when they want to, those are the only "good" Muslims. This stereotypical idea of what it means to be Muslim is prevalent in the entire book. “If Abu Fahd had planned to kill Azza, it would’ve been because he thought God wanted him to do it. He wouldn’t have called it murder like you just did. He would’ve called it a sacrifice.” “It is incomprehensible.” You know who else this is incomprehensible to? Practicing Muslims. “Muslims— our generation, in the West— are like the Frankenstein monster. We’re stapled and glued together, part West, part East. A little bit of Muslim here, a little bit of skeptic there. We put ourselves together as best we can and that makes us, not pretty, of course, but unique.” Another fantastic generalization. According to this, it's impossible to be both modern and Muslim? Logical and Muslim? Smart and Muslim? I'm not sure what he's trying to say here. Anvar and Azza do remember they're Muslim when they're in trouble. Then they send up a quick prayer to God, and always make it a point to say, "well, that didn't help, go figure". Yeah, I think we get it by now, you think practicing Muslims are ridiculous. I don't think the world needs another book with the same old (wrong) stereotypes. How about something different for once? I could've been fine with this book if there had been a couple of Muslim characters who are religious but also just normal people. We exist, I promise. We're not some mythical unicorn. We're also not insane, or boring (because we believe in God, obviously, so we must be so tedious during conversations), or go about kicking people because they do things we don't agree with. Case in point: Hi, I'm Heena, and I'm a practicing Muslim. I pray five times a day. I fast every Ramadan. I wear a hijab. Nobody is forcing me to practice Islam. I have a Bachelor's degree and am a senior software developer in a predominately male field. My faith has never stopped me from living my life. And I do all this while--gasp--living in Europe. We exist.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Larry H

    The Bad Muslim Discount , the new novel by Syed M. Masood, is a funny, emotionally searing, and thought-provoking look at the experience of Muslim immigrants in the U.S. “There is no true measure of pain. Each hurt is unique, and even small wounds can bleed a lot.” Anvar Faris and his family live in Pakistan until fundamentalism becomes more prevalent and his father moves them to California. His devout mother, for whom Anvar’s sarcasm and nonchalance toward their religion is a constant source o The Bad Muslim Discount , the new novel by Syed M. Masood, is a funny, emotionally searing, and thought-provoking look at the experience of Muslim immigrants in the U.S. “There is no true measure of pain. Each hurt is unique, and even small wounds can bleed a lot.” Anvar Faris and his family live in Pakistan until fundamentalism becomes more prevalent and his father moves them to California. His devout mother, for whom Anvar’s sarcasm and nonchalance toward their religion is a constant source of frustration, and his older brother, who always does the right things, quickly adjust to life in America. Anvar decides he’ll do everything he can to be a bad Muslim. Meanwhile, in Iraq, Safwa, a young woman, is living a life full of grief, violence, guilt, and anger. When circumstances grow ever-more dangerous, she must make an untenable bargain in order to get her and her father to America. It is a necessary but dangerous agreement. When Anvar and Safwa’s lives intersect in the mid-2010s, both are struggling in different ways. But how they choose to survive—and depend on one another to do so—will have powerful repercussions on their lives and those they care about. This book was so powerful and unforgettable, an amazing look at relationships, family obligations, religion, prejudice, love, pain, and salvation. I was so moved at times and at others I laughed out loud. The characters Masood created, even the supporting characters, were so appealing and memorable. Thanks to my friend Louis, a fellow Bookstagrammer, for reading The Bad Muslim Discount with me. It’s always fun to discuss books with you, and to find one we both loved that didn’t depress us!! Check out my list of the best books I read in 2020 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2021/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2020.html. Check out my list of the best books of the last decade at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/my-favorite-books-of-decade.html. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com. Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aimal (Bookshelves & Paperbacks)

    Starting to realize that every OwnVoices Muslim book I connect with will be shredded apart by more ~pious~ Muslims who think it’s bad rep. All I say is that one POV character in this book is someone who isn’t that great of a person, and his own bad experiences with religion lead him to judge anyone religious he meets. that’s not a good thing lol. That’s acknowledged in-text. He has to work on his own anti-religious prejudices, and him being unlikable is the whole point. The second POV character Starting to realize that every OwnVoices Muslim book I connect with will be shredded apart by more ~pious~ Muslims who think it’s bad rep. All I say is that one POV character in this book is someone who isn’t that great of a person, and his own bad experiences with religion lead him to judge anyone religious he meets. that’s not a good thing lol. That’s acknowledged in-text. He has to work on his own anti-religious prejudices, and him being unlikable is the whole point. The second POV character is a refugee through whom we see the hypocrisies of religious MEN. Fathers who claim to be righteous but abuse their children. Men who preach virtue but take advantage of women. That’s a story that many, many people unfortunately live and it’s one worth telling. Religion is a nuanced thing, and people experience it very differently depending on the cultures they grew up in, their experiences with religion and religious people. I, too, am a Muslim. I am also Pakistani. I connected deeply with this book despite finding both characters somewhat unrelatable, just because I thought it had valuable things to say about empathy and faith and morality. Anyone who waters it down to “all the practicing muslims in this are bad” has missed the point spectacularly.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jite

    First 5-star read of the year and I’m absolutely wowed! First off, I must confess that this book wasn’t what I expected. Yes, it had the dry wit and irreverent humour I anticipated given the cover and title of the book, but more than that it took me on a journey of questioning and faith and exploring your beliefs and the things you think you know, and the injustices and inevitabilities of life, and it was absolutely brilliant- from the writing to the storytelling. The book tells the story of 2 ce First 5-star read of the year and I’m absolutely wowed! First off, I must confess that this book wasn’t what I expected. Yes, it had the dry wit and irreverent humour I anticipated given the cover and title of the book, but more than that it took me on a journey of questioning and faith and exploring your beliefs and the things you think you know, and the injustices and inevitabilities of life, and it was absolutely brilliant- from the writing to the storytelling. The book tells the story of 2 central characters who are imperfect and broken in different ways. Anwar is an irreverent skeptic from a Muslim family. Born and raised in Pakistan, his clever humorous wit and irreverent questions about matters of faith were already a concern to his religious mother, long before he moved to America. Now a wise-cracking, chronically underachieving adult, he finds himself in Hafeez Bhatti’s rundown building as one of the philanthropists collection of bad Muslims a.k.a broken and imperfect people in need of help. There he meets Azza, an undocumented immigrant who shares his lack of ability to settle and find peace, and a history that is more devastatingly brutal than he can imagine. It’s incredibly difficult to summarize this book and the intersections of the characters and their story without giving it all away. This book examines themes of love, family and friendship in a way that is beautifully relatable, but also themes of religious faith, resilience, and fear in ways that any person of faith or lack thereof would find compellingly apt. The book is divided into parts which represent different timelines- from the mid 1990s in part 1 to 2016/2017 and the election of Donald Trump into office. This isn’t an especially political book, other than the way politics intersects with life, until the end when clearly during the 2016 election which happens near the end of the book, populist ideologies become a reality for the characters in a way. But even though Islamophobia is a minor theme in this book, this is not a book about that or about us vs them. It’s a book about people. The characters felt incredibly real and that verisimilitude, whilst emotionally engaging when reading Anvar’s sections, becomes almost brutal when reading Azza’s. And yet as emotionally-charged as this novel is, it’s perfectly balanced with Anvar’s dark sense of humor and Azza’s almost fatalistic sense of reality. This book is sad and painful, but you won’t be able to put it down. The language is beyond gorgeous, the insights eminently quoteworthy- I found myself highlighting large swathes of this book and its brilliant takes on faith and brotherhood, injustice and fear. I found Anvar to be an odd mix of bold irreverence and cautious fear. Overtly, this book feels like it is about being “good” vs being “bad” according to religious and cultural standards. But in reality, I felt like it was a book about meeting expectations the world has of you or you have of yourself, a book about struggling to fit in and feeling different, a book about self-sabotage and identity, a book about resilience and finding oneself. This book won’t be for everyone. If you’re conservative or a practicing Muslim, you might be offended by the protagonists’ irreverent viewpoints about various articles of faith as he is on his journey to come to terms with his faith, this might be one to avoid, you will probably be offended. Sometimes Anvar’s indictment of himself as a “bad Muslim” oddly feels like an indictment of “good Muslim’s” who don’t share his struggles with his faith, whom he judges as negatively as he perceives himself judged by them. I am a person of faith (Christ follower) and I know the feeling of feeling “a way” when it appears like someone is “being funny” about your beliefs and judging you for living according to your faith. The fact is not every book that questions faith can be for everyone- we are all at different points in our acceptance that someone questioning our beliefs doesn’t have to be blasphemous or doesn’t have to mean that we question our beliefs. Thank God that He is God and isn’t dependent on the doubts or casual words of human being and thank God that one’s faith doesn’t has to be dampened by the aspersions cast by others. For me as a Christian, even though this was clearly a book where Anvar’s (the main character’s) relationship with Islam was explored extensively as a major theme, I found his journey applicable and relatable as someone who also grew up in the Christian faith as a practicing Christian, having questions and still having faith but also trying to understand my own personal relationship with God not based on my family’s relationship or my Church’s sermons. And I think at its heart, for Anwar, that’s what this story is about. It’s about being a back-slidden person, about being a remedial person of faith, about trying to be better, and from Azza, it’s a book about this world draining the faith out of you but still finding the kernel of hope that perhaps all is not lost and there is still beauty and faith left. I think one of the reasons why I’m so in love with this book is because I love characters that are broken and imperfect, characters that have no reason to believe in anything anymore and yet are on a journey to decide for themselves what they believe. I’m a huge fan of the characters in this book, in my life I’ve known Anvars and Zuhas, maybe only 1 or 2 Azzas, and for that reason it felt like they were getting their story. I didn’t necessarily LOVE any of the characters, but I enjoyed reading them and thinking about them and spending time with them. I think this is a great book for all the black sheep, the questioners, the ones on their own journeys of faith and life, the ones who have been hurt, the ones healing, the families that can’t speak of the love they have for each other. I am so blown away by this book- I read it in less than 24 hours and literally couldn’t put it down needing to know what would happen next. I adored this but am looking forward to reading more own voices reviews to get other perspectives on this. For me, it was absolutely brilliant! Super grateful to Doubleday Books for a complimentary copy of this book through NetGalley.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    The Bad Muslim Discount is more substantial than its cover suggests. With insight and dry humor, Masood tracks the immigrant experience through the eyes of Anvar, who moved to California from Pakistan as a boy, and Safwa, who has just arrived in San Francisco from Baghdad. A surprising, enjoyable novel - at times profound, but never ponderous.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    2.5 ⭐ I went into this blind. There were more politics than I care for. Two Muslims, one from Iraq and another from Pakistan came to America under different circumstances. I enjoy reading about different culture, beliefs, and tradition. There were some humor but those were only at the beginning. Parts of the book did leave a bitter taste which I will not go into. The writing was good and so were the voice narrators. At first I thought I would love it, but I didn't. 2.5 ⭐ I went into this blind. There were more politics than I care for. Two Muslims, one from Iraq and another from Pakistan came to America under different circumstances. I enjoy reading about different culture, beliefs, and tradition. There were some humor but those were only at the beginning. Parts of the book did leave a bitter taste which I will not go into. The writing was good and so were the voice narrators. At first I thought I would love it, but I didn't.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katie Mac

    I received an eARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Admittedly, I was one of the many readers who went into this expecting something more light and humorous. This assumption was purely based on the cover (didn't listen to the old adage, apparently). While there's funny moments scattered throughout the book (particularly from Anvar, a former lawyer and one of the protagonists), Masood has crafted a deep, compelling, and often devastating story featuring voices that are I received an eARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Admittedly, I was one of the many readers who went into this expecting something more light and humorous. This assumption was purely based on the cover (didn't listen to the old adage, apparently). While there's funny moments scattered throughout the book (particularly from Anvar, a former lawyer and one of the protagonists), Masood has crafted a deep, compelling, and often devastating story featuring voices that are not traditionally heard. My heart broke repeatedly for Azza, who came to the US from Afghanistan with her abusive father and ill-intentioned "fiance." While Azza's strength is apparent in how she deals with the tragedies that are lobbed at her, it was hard not to compare her struggles to the lesser ones of Anvar, who came to the US from Pakistan when he was younger. (I guess that's the point, though.) All of this is a testament to a strong piece of #ownvoices writing in which Masood skillfully portrays the uniqueness within the Muslim community, highlighting bad Muslims, pious Muslims, and those in the middle. Without giving anything away, it's a fast-paced ride of a book toward the end.

  8. 5 out of 5

    fanna

    April 6, 2020: Pakistani (ownvoices) & Iraqi immigrant, and Muslim representation (!!!) in a diverse desi community of those who left the Indian subcontinent. This is promising to be romantic, political and hilarious...which is the perfect recipe for me so y'all better pray for me to read this ASAP. April 6, 2020: Pakistani (ownvoices) & Iraqi immigrant, and Muslim representation (!!!) in a diverse desi community of those who left the Indian subcontinent. This is promising to be romantic, political and hilarious...which is the perfect recipe for me so y'all better pray for me to read this ASAP.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zainab

    Based on the description of the book, the novel seemed to be about two immigrants coming to America with different backgrounds and trying to navigate their new identities and religion. It was far from that. The story follows Anvar and Azza, two immigrant Muslims. Anvar, a boy that comes from a Pakistani family that left Pakistan because of his father did not feel as though he had the freedom to do things that he enjoyed (playing music, movies, etc) without getting backlash from their community. Based on the description of the book, the novel seemed to be about two immigrants coming to America with different backgrounds and trying to navigate their new identities and religion. It was far from that. The story follows Anvar and Azza, two immigrant Muslims. Anvar, a boy that comes from a Pakistani family that left Pakistan because of his father did not feel as though he had the freedom to do things that he enjoyed (playing music, movies, etc) without getting backlash from their community. Azza grew up in war-torn Iraq, loses family members, and her father captured by US soldiers. She no longer feels safe in Iraq and finds a way out but at a price. The two end up meeting and Azza uses Anvar as a "savior" to get away from her life and the men that control it. I am disappointed by this book because of how it depicts different types of Muslims. Muslims who are religious, pray, or fast are shown as extremists, abusers (either mentally or physically, or disconnected from "regular" people. Those who don't follow their religion or do not have a strong connection to their faith are considered to be the heroes. The practicing Muslims that Anvar and Azza are surrounded by feel disconnected from them. Anvar's mom constantly compares him to his brother and is saying that he will go to hell. Azza's dad abuses her driving her away from her faith. It is upsetting to see that with Muslim "representation" there is also a lack of it. People are not two-dimensional, either just good or bad. The author paints the picture that even the Muslims that were born and raised in America are not "American" or "modern" enough. The main characters have no actual depth to them, even though they had difficulty finding their place, there is no development for either of them, okay fine maybe a .005 increase of growth. I didn't find either of them to be likable. They both struggle to even relate to people who are "in the middle" such as Anvar's dad or Zuha. The part I did like was the recognition of the hypocrisy of America, such as going to Iraq or even DHS getting involved. But some of the strong sentiments did not seem to fit in the story. Overall, I am disappointed by this book and still on the search for more books of accurate Muslim representation. A Place for Us is one of the few books that I found has an accurate representation.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dianne

    I will start by saying that I am not a Muslim, a Pakistani, or an Iraqi; I found this to be a challenging read because of that. This may also be a better book for those who aren't Republicans! I found that there was absolutely nothing at all humorous about this book and the synopsis was very misleading. This book deals with many issues that Muslims deal with in their own countries -then it speaks of how certain Muslims are dealt with in the USA. I honestly did not like any of the characters except I will start by saying that I am not a Muslim, a Pakistani, or an Iraqi; I found this to be a challenging read because of that. This may also be a better book for those who aren't Republicans! I found that there was absolutely nothing at all humorous about this book and the synopsis was very misleading. This book deals with many issues that Muslims deal with in their own countries -then it speaks of how certain Muslims are dealt with in the USA. I honestly did not like any of the characters except for perhaps a few of the secondary characters. I tried to feel empathy or sympathy, especially with Azz/Safwa, but I just couldn't. Then I found this quote: Azza/Safwa- "But you Americans never think much about who may get hurt, as long as you get what you want." and found myself liking her even less since that is what she had been doing throughout this whole book. I did learn a lot from this book, and I was curious enough to see how it ended, so that is what kept me from giving it a two-star review. *ARC supplied by the publisher and author.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sahar

    The Bad Muslim Discount is yet another failed attempt at using the medium of contemporary literature to earnestly portray the lives of American Muslims—if you can even call the protagonists in this novel ‘Muslims’ in the first place (not speculating, their own admission). The dual perspective narrative centres on Anvar, a Pakistani boy and Safwa, an Iraqi girl, both of whom flee their respective home countries to find refuge in the States. Amusingly, what makes this book stand out amongst its re The Bad Muslim Discount is yet another failed attempt at using the medium of contemporary literature to earnestly portray the lives of American Muslims—if you can even call the protagonists in this novel ‘Muslims’ in the first place (not speculating, their own admission). The dual perspective narrative centres on Anvar, a Pakistani boy and Safwa, an Iraqi girl, both of whom flee their respective home countries to find refuge in the States. Amusingly, what makes this book stand out amongst its representation-boasting fraudulent brethren is the protagonists acute awareness and acceptance of being a ‘bad’ Muslim in the first instance, differing vastly from the ignorant/in-denial characters that populate other Muslim-centred novels. It’s almost as if the author was trying to break the literary fourth wall by using the veneer of first person self-awareness and humour to justify the delusory narrative and insulting portrayal of religion. I’ve personally never seen that done before, so kudos to for spicing things up and taking a new angle to slate orthodoxy. This feat is further evidenced by Anvar’s incessant hostile behaviour towards anyone deemed religious in any capacity. Is this unrealistic of someone who had an irreligious upbringing? No. But the excessive cynicism with which he approaches religion/practicing individuals comes across as nothing more than thinly-veiled projections of his own insecurities. It’s not even that the protagonists are the ones baselessly perceiving religious individuals in this book as toxic, manipulative, irrational and abusive for no reason—it’s because those religious side characters truly *are* all of the above. I’m not about to sit here and blindly defend such vile characters by virtue of them being practicing Muslims, but I find it flagrantly dishonest that not ONE of these so-called “religious” characters serves any function other than to ‘prove’ the protagonists poor stance on religion and it being the ultimate source of evil. This narrative is no different from right-wing media at this point, not least because the book counterproductively drives home the notion that Muslims that practice their faith in earnest are inherently evil and intolerant. It’s interesting. Anvar readily defends atheists, getting personally offended at a minor mockery of their “creed”, but when it comes to making an effort to understand his own beliefs (or lack thereof) to dissolve his constant mental conflict, he simply decides to put his intellect on hold, for cognitive reconciliation is just too much effort. We can break down this notion of religious people being evil further: Anvar’s mum is religious and toxic, his brother is performatively religious and manipulative, his religious MSA is mean for defending their deen (rapper btw), his girlfriend who later finds religion is suddenly unlikeable, the hijabi chick is judgemental for believing hijab is fardh, and all the masjid uncles are misogynistic and abusive. Contrastingly, every irreligious, liberal, Islam-loathing character is the exemplar of tolerance, kindness and love, which is obviously everything Islam and Muslims are not. E.g. 1 - girlfriend Zuha on the road to religiosity whilst still being with him: “She’d convinced Zuha that it was worthwhile to at least try to pray five times a day, which meant that whenever we managed to get a night together, an alarm went off at five or six in the morning for the predawn prayer. I was tempted to get up and pray myself a couple of times, if only to ask Allah to rain down misery, pestilence and maybe boils, if He was so inclined, onto Zuha’s religious friend for these ridiculously early mornings.” E.g. 2 - Safwa’s abuser being religious: “He was—no, he is a bad man. He looks nice and he talks nice, you know, and he acts religious, so Abu liked him.” (using religion to justify heinous acts). To reiterate, the author attempts to pitch Anvar’s lacklustre perception of organised religion as a deliberate, intentional reflection of cognitive dissonance and irreconcilable beliefs about God and/or religion, but that being said I utterly fail to buy into the fact that in big California he is unable to find ONE person in his vicinity that follows Islam like a normal person and doesn’t have an ISIS-fan boy (or girl 😳) condemn-the-entire-world-to-hell mentality. At least try to make your clever and charming on-par-with-neo-atheists-in-intellect protagonist a bit realistic. Being indifferent to religion is one thing, but being actively anti-religion (read: borderline Islamophobic) is simply not convincing of a character who bears little to no religious or spiritual trauma/abuse and simply decides to up and loathe religion one day by virtue of it preventing him from having fun. He also bizarrely compares himself to Lot’s wife: “I felt something like kinship with her then, that woman centuries removed from me, abandoning her city in distress, leaving her home to its perilous fate. How could she have been expected to resist a glance back, and why had her punishment, for so small a transgression, been so severe?” Now, let’s talk about Safwa. She lives in Iraq, her father is captured and horrifically tortured by American soldiers during the invasion of Iraq, her family is extremely poor and both her mother and siblings pass away, leaving Safwa with her traumatised, abusive father. She is exposed to another abusive man when they flee to Afghanistan and it is with this man that Safwa and her father flee to the States. Unlike Anvar, Safwa is a deeply emotionally traumatised and unstable individual and so her bleak outlook of life and poor perception of religion was indeed justified and realistic. That being said, I didn’t see the point of her character in the overall story, as it mainly focused on Anvar’s life struggles. When both protagonists’ paths eventually converge, it was a very lacklustre moment and Safwa’s subsequent actions with him were deeply unrealistic given her trauma, abuse and hatred of men. Safwa’s character didn’t really add to the story at large. “Because I am a bad person and a bad Muslim. I’d like to be worse.” - Safwa. Idk why but this made me laugh. If there is one thing I will the author credit for, it is that he has a knack for storytelling. Yes, the narrative was a pain and I didn’t like a single character (perhaps bar Hafeez Bhai), I couldn’t help but marvel at the quick wit of some of the characters. Though Anvar’s endless banter did get old, I actually enjoyed the conversations he had with other characters. I’m not sure whether to praise or criticise the clear distinction in tone and writing for each perspective, it was either intentionally done to represent the male/female traumatised/non-traumatised dichotomy or it’s just that the author doesn’t know how to write female characters and this just happened to play in his favour. 2/5 ⭐️⭐️ Here are some excerpts I liked: “Turned out that being with someone is an acquired skill. There is an art to it. Basically, you have to watch your partner take a chisel—or a war hammer, depending on the day—and chip away at the ideal version of them that you’ve created in your mind. The person you fall in love with is always slightly different from the person you need to stay in love with.” “For the first time in forever, my world began to get bigger again. How amazing a thing a book is. How wonderful a piece of paper and a pen. A lot of things about religion do not make sense to me, it is true, but I understand why, in that desert mountain cave, when the history of man was about to change, God’s first command to His last prophet was one simple word. Read.” “Young people are so silly. You think you know the whole world. You think you understand everything. The truth is that you read aloud the story of your life and don’t realize that it is in first person. Each and every one of you tells their own life story to the soul of the world, all the while thinking you are the only one with a story to tell.” “It’s like there is nothing good, nothing noble, nothing precious left. Everywhere I look there is only pain and struggle and just a shadow over everything. You should know that I never feel that way when I am with you. You’re the light of my world. You make the universe beautiful.” “We live on stolen land,” I finally said, “in a country built on slavery and reliant on the continued economic exploitation of other people. The oppressor always lives in fear of the oppressed. Americans have always been afraid—of those native to this continent, of Black people, of Japanese citizens they interned, and now of Muslims and immigrants. So the real question, I think, is who is next?”

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Moore

    Thank you NetGalley, Doubleday Books, and Syed M. Masood for the opportunity to review this book! I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced reader's copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. In this story, we follow two families who immigrate to the United States from Pakistan and Iraq throughout the 90's all the way until 2016. The main character, Anvar, constantly finds himself in the shadow of his seemingly perfect older brother. As a result, Thank you NetGalley, Doubleday Books, and Syed M. Masood for the opportunity to review this book! I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced reader's copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. In this story, we follow two families who immigrate to the United States from Pakistan and Iraq throughout the 90's all the way until 2016. The main character, Anvar, constantly finds himself in the shadow of his seemingly perfect older brother. As a result, he is cynical about his life's current circumstances but is soon thrown into the lives of two women with different backgrounds and personalities. He realizes he will have to develop very different emotional repertoires to understand each woman. I loved getting to learn more about different cultures and what it must have felt like to leave everything behind and move to a place so different from your homeland. This book has so much depth and emotion, I absolutely loved it! There are funny parts, violent parts, emotional parts, all melding together to create an excellent book. I highly recommend giving this book a try if you like learning about immigration, Muslim culture, living in the shadow of your siblings, and love.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    The Bad Muslim Discount was a book I didn't know I had been waiting for. Following Anvar, whose family leaves Pakistan for California when he is a child, and Azza, who flees Iraq for Taliban-ruled Afghanistan and then enters America illegally as a young woman, this novel deftly examines two sides of the Muslim faith. Centered around the metaphor of life as a checkers game, both protagonists learn that there is no move without a counter-move, and no decision without repercussions. Written with al The Bad Muslim Discount was a book I didn't know I had been waiting for. Following Anvar, whose family leaves Pakistan for California when he is a child, and Azza, who flees Iraq for Taliban-ruled Afghanistan and then enters America illegally as a young woman, this novel deftly examines two sides of the Muslim faith. Centered around the metaphor of life as a checkers game, both protagonists learn that there is no move without a counter-move, and no decision without repercussions. Written with almost lyrical prose, this novel kept me engaged and engrossed from the first moment. Author Masood focuses tightly on the character development of Anvar and Azza, but includes enough other supporting cast members to round out the storyline and help the reader empathize with the protagonists.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jordyn

    This book follows Anvar and Safwa, both separately and when their world’s collide by chance. Anvar considers and takes pride in his “bad Muslim” status, always trying to other and step away from his family’s grasp when they were in Pakistan and even more as they move to San Francisco. Then, there’s Safwa, who we first see Baghdad, suffocating by the war torn city and by her conservative father, while trying to fill the role that has been decided for her...and then she makes the dangerous journey This book follows Anvar and Safwa, both separately and when their world’s collide by chance. Anvar considers and takes pride in his “bad Muslim” status, always trying to other and step away from his family’s grasp when they were in Pakistan and even more as they move to San Francisco. Then, there’s Safwa, who we first see Baghdad, suffocating by the war torn city and by her conservative father, while trying to fill the role that has been decided for her...and then she makes the dangerous journey to the US. This book talked about immigration (both legal and not), the complexity of one’s relationship to religion, finding yourself and your place in the world, relationships and the complexity of them when it comes to, both, familial and romantic. I loved this book. I loved the writing. I loved how this author captured these characters, their relationships with people and their faith or lack thereof. I loved how he intertwined humor and sadness and happiness and tough topics all seamlessly together. I loved the authenticity and how much I FELT for these characters. I loved learning more about another culture and peoples experiences without feeling like I was learning in the moment. I loved the messages interwoven in the story of empathy, and understanding, and love, and change, and so much more. I love how the author made my heart connect to the words on the paper and made me want to both savor every sentence but also devour the book whole. I could talk about this book all day...but, here is ONE of my favorite quotes from the zillion I wrote down that isn’t too long: “Remember to never take more from the world than you can give back to it.” Thank you so much @doubledaybooks for this #gifted copy this was definitely my favorite read of January and will probably remain one of my favorites of the year. ⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️ Trigger warnings: abuse, islamophobia, religious bigotry, non consensual sex, minor mentions of trump election 2016, mentions of torture ⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️⚠️

  15. 5 out of 5

    Charisma D

    To think that this book will probably be overlooked because of its cover... BUT, like they say, don’t judge a book by its cover. This book was everything I hoped it would be, and more. Masood truly showed the difference between being Muslim from South Asia and being a Muslim American. I really learned so much from this book from verses from the Quran, to how life was demonstrated in the Middle East during the time Americans began invading there countries to how a Muslim looks at the world compar To think that this book will probably be overlooked because of its cover... BUT, like they say, don’t judge a book by its cover. This book was everything I hoped it would be, and more. Masood truly showed the difference between being Muslim from South Asia and being a Muslim American. I really learned so much from this book from verses from the Quran, to how life was demonstrated in the Middle East during the time Americans began invading there countries to how a Muslim looks at the world compared to a Muslim American and there world views. This is not a light hearted read and it goes to show how truly talented Masood is. He has a great eye for detail and truly understands the importance of explaining his culture and religion to readers in a most pleasant way. This is not a book to try and skim through nor is it a book that you can become easily distracted with. There is some satire with one of the MCs and it does lighten the mood up a bit but it just goes to show the difference between him and devoted Muslims. I loved how it showed in the end, what the book truly is about is how even though Allah kept repeating how everyone must do the right thing, one never knows what the right thing truly is. The world is simply not black and white. Every action has an equal or opposite reaction. This novel tore through all my emotions and truly left my heart sad but filled with hope. It is okay to read a heavy book and still fall in love with it and its purpose, its education and its message. Thank you to double day books for this gifted copy in an exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Liz Hein

    4.5 stars! This incredibly layered story read both like a Shakespearean comedy and tragedy simultaneously. I could not put it down.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mia

    This was such an interesting book. First of all the cover is crazy beautiful. Second, the story is was actually surprising to me. I thought it was going to be a bit of a romcom, but it was much more complex. I love the diversity and own voice writing. I was hooked from the beginning. All the feels in this one. Laughs and cringes. Racism and family pressure mixed with immigration to America...adding in friendship and finding one's own way. All around a good book. I can see how some could possibly This was such an interesting book. First of all the cover is crazy beautiful. Second, the story is was actually surprising to me. I thought it was going to be a bit of a romcom, but it was much more complex. I love the diversity and own voice writing. I was hooked from the beginning. All the feels in this one. Laughs and cringes. Racism and family pressure mixed with immigration to America...adding in friendship and finding one's own way. All around a good book. I can see how some could possibly be offended by some things, but I think it's important to be open to expanding our hearts and minds.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Susie | Novel Visits

    Yes, everything you’ve heard about 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐁𝐀𝐃 𝐌𝐔𝐒𝐋𝐈𝐌 𝐃𝐈𝐒𝐂𝐎𝐔𝐍𝐓 by Syed M. Masood IS true! So let’s break it down.⁣ ⁣ It’s an unexpected take on the immigrant experience. True, this story features two very different Muslim families who immigrate to the U.S., one from Pakistan, the other from Iraq. The son of one, Anvar, and the daughter of another, Azza, are the cornerstones of Masood’s tale.⁣ ⁣ It’s full of irreverent humor. Yes, and in the best possible way. The author is indiscriminate in who and what Yes, everything you’ve heard about 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐁𝐀𝐃 𝐌𝐔𝐒𝐋𝐈𝐌 𝐃𝐈𝐒𝐂𝐎𝐔𝐍𝐓 by Syed M. Masood IS true! So let’s break it down.⁣ ⁣ It’s an unexpected take on the immigrant experience. True, this story features two very different Muslim families who immigrate to the U.S., one from Pakistan, the other from Iraq. The son of one, Anvar, and the daughter of another, Azza, are the cornerstones of Masood’s tale.⁣ ⁣ It’s full of irreverent humor. Yes, and in the best possible way. The author is indiscriminate in who and what he pokes fun at: Muslims, non-Muslims, stereotypes of both, politics, parenting, relationships. It was all fair game, but handled with a deft touch that never felt mean and often had me laughing out loud.⁣ ⁣ It’s a story of relationships. Above all else this is true. I loved the relationships in Anvar’s life. His connections to his grandmother and father were especially touching, and even his more tenuous relationships with his older brother and mother were full of heart. Azza’s relationships were not as simple, and as such gave real depth to this story.⁣ ⁣ Its writing is stellar. Without a doubt Masood’s brilliant storytelling made 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘉𝘢𝘥 𝘔𝘶𝘴𝘭𝘪𝘮 𝘋𝘪𝘴𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘵 one of my top books so far this year. Packed with humor, love, religion, family, and politics, in lesser hands this could have been too much, but Masood wove it all together brilliantly. I flew through the pages and was left wanting more. I now have only one question. When will his next book be coming out?

  19. 4 out of 5

    ✫erin✫

    I'm so sad that I didn't love this book. I am such a fan of this author's other books and have read incredible reviews of people who truly connected with this novel. Unfortunately, I couldn't get into it, the characters and the plot just confused me more as I went on. Please don't be swayed negatively towards this book by my review, sooo many individuals adored it. I'm so sad that I didn't love this book. I am such a fan of this author's other books and have read incredible reviews of people who truly connected with this novel. Unfortunately, I couldn't get into it, the characters and the plot just confused me more as I went on. Please don't be swayed negatively towards this book by my review, sooo many individuals adored it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    melhara

    4.5/5 When I first saw the cover of this book, I thought it was a YA novel (it's not). Instead, it's a bildungsroman of sorts, with a rather complicated dive into the religious and cultural intricacies of being a Muslim in America who is struggling to connect with their faith. This book follows two characters, Anvar and Safwa, who were both raised very differently and have had different religious experiences. First, there's Anvar. Although he was born in Pakistan, he quickly acclimatized to life 4.5/5 When I first saw the cover of this book, I thought it was a YA novel (it's not). Instead, it's a bildungsroman of sorts, with a rather complicated dive into the religious and cultural intricacies of being a Muslim in America who is struggling to connect with their faith. This book follows two characters, Anvar and Safwa, who were both raised very differently and have had different religious experiences. First, there's Anvar. Although he was born in Pakistan, he quickly acclimatized to life in America at a young age and became a religious sceptic and atheist/remedial Muslim. As his family and friends were all Muslims, it really strained his relationships and made him out to be a bad seed and problematic child (one who drinks alcohol, has had premarital sex, eats pork, etc.). Then there's Safwa, who grew up in war-torn Baghdad, raised by an extremely conservative Muslim dad looking to control every aspect of Safwa's life. They embark on a dangerous journey to flee Baghdad and seek refuge in the US. She struggles with both trying to be loyal to her family and trying to gain more freedom. I found this to be a very interesting OwnVoices story about religion and what it means to be a 'good Muslim' (in both a religious and cultural sense). As with most religions, there are different interpretations on what it means to be a 'good' practitioner or a 'good' person. Though I am not Muslim (or religious, for that matter), I have many Muslim friends - many of them continue to practice their faith (ex. praying, wearing the hijab, fasting, etc.), while some of my other friends practice occasionally such as when gathering with family for major holidays and events but otherwise drinks alcohol, has had premarital sex, etc. (much like my Christian/Catholic friends - some are quite devout and pray and go to church regularly, while others only practice whenever convenient). Honestly, I found it quite interesting and drew many parallels between Anvar and Safwa's religious experience with the experiences of some of my Christian and Catholic friends. The characters and character development was also fascinating. I absolutely loved Anvar's grandma, mom and landlord - they were hilarious! I also really enjoyed Anvar's sardonic and self-deprecating humour and personality, although I was rather annoyed by his righteous (and male-privileged) attitudes and actions at times. However, I appreciated that the characters' in this book were all flawed and imperfect. As for Safwa, I didn't really care about her story arc at first. Her story became more interesting when it became intertwined with Anvar's, though I didn't like her as much as I did Anvar and Zuha. Overall though, I thought this was a great book that highlighted how religion is experienced differently by different people. *** #17 of my 2021 Popsugar Reading Challenge - A book by a Muslim American author ***

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christina Billhartz

    Listen. Stop whatever you are doing right now and read this book instead!!! I’m going to switch it up and put my review before my synopsis, because this was book was THAT good.⁣ ⁣ Review: Although the cover of this book looks bright and fun, Masood delves into many heavy topics in this book. From Anvar and Safwa’s struggle with the contradictions and promises of faith, to the lesser-discussed consequences and byproducts of war, there is a LOT to unpack here. ⁣ ⁣ Masood does so much with this novel, Listen. Stop whatever you are doing right now and read this book instead!!! I’m going to switch it up and put my review before my synopsis, because this was book was THAT good.⁣ ⁣ Review: Although the cover of this book looks bright and fun, Masood delves into many heavy topics in this book. From Anvar and Safwa’s struggle with the contradictions and promises of faith, to the lesser-discussed consequences and byproducts of war, there is a LOT to unpack here. ⁣ ⁣ Masood does so much with this novel, but I think one of the most important parts is he changes the conversation about immigration, as well as about the Islamic faith. So often in the news and social media we hear terms like “immigrants” or “Islam” (see also: “illegal immigrants” or “radical Islam”) thrown out as if these are cohesive, indistinguishable groups of people, rather than groups made up of individuals. Here, Masood throws that concept to the wind— he shows how two “immigrants”, who, by societal standards, we would be compelled to say are similar, have entirely different backstories and different journeys to and within the US. He shows the different ways in which individuals identify as Muslim and how different and unique their religious experiences and beliefs are. ⁣ ⁣ In other words, this book is an incredible testament to the resilience of individuality and a challenge to societal preferences to lump people together based on generic identifiers. ⁣ ⁣ Synopsis: Anvar Faris, a young boy from Karachi, Pakistan, moved to the United States with his family after fundamentalism and religious zealots threaten the safety and fabric of his hometown. His mother and brother, devout Muslims, find solace with the Muslim community in America, but as Anvar comes of age, commits to being a “bad Muslim.” He drinks, he has sex, he cracks jokes, and would rather have fun than be restricted.⁣ ⁣ While all of this is unfolding, Safwa, a young girl, is growing up in Baghdad and witnessing the destruction and horror that accompany war. She lives alone with her father, Abu Fahd, a conservative man fighting his own demons after being tortured by the American army. Eventually, Safwa and her father make it to the US, though their journey is far more dangerous than Anvar’s. Stifled under her father’s conservatism and her own doubts, Safwa also prefers to live as a “bad Muslim.”⁣ ⁣ When Safwah and Anvar finally meet, they trigger a chain of events that change not only their own lives, but the lives of their families and community members.⁣

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    The Bad Muslim Discount tells the story of two Muslim characters, whose lives eventually intersect. Anvar grew up in Pakistan in the 1990's and his family later moves to California. Anvar is the sarcastic, witty one in the family and isn't the best at following Muslim practices. Meanwhile his mom and brother who are model Muslims are more readily accepted in their new community. Safwa is a young woman who grows up at the same time in war-torn Baghdad. After her mother and brother die, Safwa and The Bad Muslim Discount tells the story of two Muslim characters, whose lives eventually intersect. Anvar grew up in Pakistan in the 1990's and his family later moves to California. Anvar is the sarcastic, witty one in the family and isn't the best at following Muslim practices. Meanwhile his mom and brother who are model Muslims are more readily accepted in their new community. Safwa is a young woman who grows up at the same time in war-torn Baghdad. After her mother and brother die, Safwa and her conservative, ill-tempered father are determined to make their way to the US to have a better life. Safwa makes a regrettable deal with a young man who promises that he can get them all to America. The book is a clever commentary on the life of Muslims in the modern world and particularly on the experience of Muslim immigrants in the US. There are moments of dark humor in the book and it helps add some levity to balance Safwa's traumatic experiences. The "present day" of the book is right around the time when Trump is elected president and the characters express their concerns over Trump's proposed Muslim Ban. Thank you to the publisher for the review copy!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Grace W

    (c/p from my review on TheStoryGraph) 4.5 rounded up. This book is really well written and full of beautifully and painfully flawed characters. The only reason this isn't a completely five star one for me is that the early Anvar parts got to be a bit dull for my tastes, particularly when juxtaposed with Safwa's much more engaging story. Maybe that's because I frequently find straight teenage boys slightly dull or maybe it really is just not an overly engage part of the story. Overall though I th (c/p from my review on TheStoryGraph) 4.5 rounded up. This book is really well written and full of beautifully and painfully flawed characters. The only reason this isn't a completely five star one for me is that the early Anvar parts got to be a bit dull for my tastes, particularly when juxtaposed with Safwa's much more engaging story. Maybe that's because I frequently find straight teenage boys slightly dull or maybe it really is just not an overly engage part of the story. Overall though I think this is an incredible story about thinking of others complexly, about how violence begets violence and silence/distance begets resentment and misunderstandings. I thought this a compelling read though I wouldn't describe it as fun one. It is, however, at times, extremely funny. Do heed the TWs though because there are a lot of things I suspect readers will find disturbing. Chronic illness, Death (including at the hands of federal agents), Infidelity, Abuse (both physical and emotoinal), Rape (not overly explicit. None of the "sex" in this book is explicit), Blood, Grief, Animal death, and Islamophobia

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    4.5 stars! Wow! I loved this book! This powerful story is told between two intertwining yet very different characters. It tackles some big issues, has great character development, and is expertly written. I don’t want to give anything away, but it is a book I will not soon forget. Highly recommend! Note: This book is being marketed as funny. There are funny parts in this book, but the subject is serious. I would not classify this as a “light read.”

  25. 5 out of 5

    Meghann Bromley

    I picked up this debut author on a whim because the cover was so amazing...no regrets here the story was great. If you have time, I recommend you spend it reading this. It was a perfect mix of wit and humor mixed with some hard hitting facts of how it feels to be Muslim in Trump’s Merica.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Darr

    "The history of the world is the history of people who went places. People who walked to the horizon. If you get the chance, you should be glad to be one of them." "The history of the world is the history of people who went places. People who walked to the horizon. If you get the chance, you should be glad to be one of them."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Israa

    Thank you NetGalley for this advanced copy. Hilarious. Insightful. Timely. Those are the top three words I would use to describe this book. I enjoyed the story, laughing along the way. I was surprised at how funny and then so quickly insightful, wise, and powerful the story was. I appreciate that the book was not explicit or offensive, while the content is for mature reader's only. While this is labeled as an adult fiction, I can easily see the YA audience reading, enjoying, and benefiting from Thank you NetGalley for this advanced copy. Hilarious. Insightful. Timely. Those are the top three words I would use to describe this book. I enjoyed the story, laughing along the way. I was surprised at how funny and then so quickly insightful, wise, and powerful the story was. I appreciate that the book was not explicit or offensive, while the content is for mature reader's only. While this is labeled as an adult fiction, I can easily see the YA audience reading, enjoying, and benefiting from this book. Yes, the Muslims were really ill-behaved. However, I loved how the characters expressed how they knew what they were doing is wrong as a Muslim. Repentance of the characters is a redeeming quality, which will allow me to recommend it to young Muslim-Americans. As a Muslim growing up in America, it is easy to identify with the characters and sentiments expressed, particularly after the 2016 election. Thank you for the happy ending!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ayesha

    After reading 'More Than Just a Pretty Face' last year, I was really excited to pick this one up, and I'm glad that I got the opportunity to read the arc sent to me by the publishers. The title really piqued my interest, and obviously you can look at the cover yourself. It gorgeous. The plot consist of two main protagonists, a Pakistani American Boy, Anvar, with a major cultural/religious identify crisis thing going on, and an Iraqi girl, Azza, who comes from a family torn apart by war. The book After reading 'More Than Just a Pretty Face' last year, I was really excited to pick this one up, and I'm glad that I got the opportunity to read the arc sent to me by the publishers. The title really piqued my interest, and obviously you can look at the cover yourself. It gorgeous. The plot consist of two main protagonists, a Pakistani American Boy, Anvar, with a major cultural/religious identify crisis thing going on, and an Iraqi girl, Azza, who comes from a family torn apart by war. The book is about both of their stories, and how they interwove. There are many different elements in this book, all of them discussed in a very raw and up-front manner. It deals with mental health issues, PTSD and effects of war on people. It talks about the state of foreign prisoners, how they're treated and what effect it has on their later lives. It also deals with toxic parental relationships, honor killings, forced marriages and rape. After 9/11 muslims had to struggle alot, which this book captured very accurately. It talks about Racism, Sexism and Islamophobia. I can't even begin to comprehend how many different layers of depth this book has. And finally, if you still want a reason to read this book, read it for the Muslim representation. Being a Pakistani myself, I could relate to a few aspects of the book. This book is about a girl who's been through the worst and still believes in God and a guy, who has no faith, but ends up finding it. The only complain I have is that the book is advertised as a 'hysterically funny' and 'humourous' book, when it was neither of those things. It was dark and messed up and literally gave me goosebumps. I'd recommend it to Khalid Hosseini fans because the amount of depth and darkness in this book reminded me of 'A Thousand Splendid Suns'.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kate Jordhamo

    4.5 stars! This book wasn’t at all what I expected, but I enjoyed it so much. While it had fun and witty moments, it was a complex and sometimes devastating narration of two Muslim characters, one who had been in the US since childhood and one who came later in life. Azza and Anvar were complex, engaging characters. I was especially interested in their individual relationships with religion, faith, and family duty. The backdrop of recent world events was also incredibly compelling. The pacing and 4.5 stars! This book wasn’t at all what I expected, but I enjoyed it so much. While it had fun and witty moments, it was a complex and sometimes devastating narration of two Muslim characters, one who had been in the US since childhood and one who came later in life. Azza and Anvar were complex, engaging characters. I was especially interested in their individual relationships with religion, faith, and family duty. The backdrop of recent world events was also incredibly compelling. The pacing and narration switches were jarring in the beginning, but the pacing evened out throughout the novel and it became a fast-paced drive to the end.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shireen Hakim

    "I wasn't attacked because I was Muslim, I was attacked because I wasn't Muslim enough." With The Bad Muslim Discount, Masood brings up the pressures Muslim-Americans face within their own community when they don't live up to arbitrarily enforced standards. Although a similar theme to his genius YA rom-com More Than Just a Pretty Face, The Bad Muslim Discount reflects a more serious and stark Muslim society. I continued to read the novel because of the female protagonist AZZA and I hope to read m "I wasn't attacked because I was Muslim, I was attacked because I wasn't Muslim enough." With The Bad Muslim Discount, Masood brings up the pressures Muslim-Americans face within their own community when they don't live up to arbitrarily enforced standards. Although a similar theme to his genius YA rom-com More Than Just a Pretty Face, The Bad Muslim Discount reflects a more serious and stark Muslim society. I continued to read the novel because of the female protagonist AZZA and I hope to read more unique and essential voices like hers in future stories. Thank you for the ARC.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.