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The First War

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As war threatens his family, Wu Ying must decide on his path to immortality and the mortal ties that bind Winter has passed, taking with it the hope of peace. The state of Wei deploy an increasing number of cultivators and soldiers, intent on taking over the state of Shen. Caught in-between the armies is Wu Ying's village and all those that he cares about. Advised to keep aw As war threatens his family, Wu Ying must decide on his path to immortality and the mortal ties that bind Winter has passed, taking with it the hope of peace. The state of Wei deploy an increasing number of cultivators and soldiers, intent on taking over the state of Shen. Caught in-between the armies is Wu Ying's village and all those that he cares about. Advised to keep away from the approaching war, Wu Ying will have to decide what is more important - his journey to immortality or the ties to the mortal that he holds onto still. Or perhaps, there is a third way, one that balances both the needs of Heaven and destiny and the karmic ties of the family. The First War is book three of the xianxia cultivation series, A Thousand Li. The series features immortal cultivation, gods, wondrous martial art styles and spirit beasts and will be loved by wuxia and xanxia fans. A Thousand Li is written by Tao Wong, the bestselling scifi and fantasy LitRPG author of the System Apocalypse, Adventures on Brad and the Hidden Wishes.


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As war threatens his family, Wu Ying must decide on his path to immortality and the mortal ties that bind Winter has passed, taking with it the hope of peace. The state of Wei deploy an increasing number of cultivators and soldiers, intent on taking over the state of Shen. Caught in-between the armies is Wu Ying's village and all those that he cares about. Advised to keep aw As war threatens his family, Wu Ying must decide on his path to immortality and the mortal ties that bind Winter has passed, taking with it the hope of peace. The state of Wei deploy an increasing number of cultivators and soldiers, intent on taking over the state of Shen. Caught in-between the armies is Wu Ying's village and all those that he cares about. Advised to keep away from the approaching war, Wu Ying will have to decide what is more important - his journey to immortality or the ties to the mortal that he holds onto still. Or perhaps, there is a third way, one that balances both the needs of Heaven and destiny and the karmic ties of the family. The First War is book three of the xianxia cultivation series, A Thousand Li. The series features immortal cultivation, gods, wondrous martial art styles and spirit beasts and will be loved by wuxia and xanxia fans. A Thousand Li is written by Tao Wong, the bestselling scifi and fantasy LitRPG author of the System Apocalypse, Adventures on Brad and the Hidden Wishes.

30 review for The First War

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Meadows

    Starting to sense a theme I’m a fan of this author but similar to system apocalypse his books seem to start off with a good premise, story, action. Then you realize you’re 3 book in and nothing’s happening. Book 1 was great, book 2 was slow but hey, still has potential. I was half way through this book and realized this is boring. So I found myself skipping parts just to make sure I didn’t miss anything in the end. And let’s just say I didn’t. Absolutely no advancement from them MC waste of a bo Starting to sense a theme I’m a fan of this author but similar to system apocalypse his books seem to start off with a good premise, story, action. Then you realize you’re 3 book in and nothing’s happening. Book 1 was great, book 2 was slow but hey, still has potential. I was half way through this book and realized this is boring. So I found myself skipping parts just to make sure I didn’t miss anything in the end. And let’s just say I didn’t. Absolutely no advancement from them MC waste of a book

  2. 5 out of 5

    GaiusPrimus

    The book was entertaining but it doesn't move the story forward much, besides some minor character growth by Wu Ying. I have really enjoyed this cultivation series in the past but I was expecting a similar experience this time around and there just wasn't enough there. This is hard for me to say, as I have really looked forward to every Tao Wong release, regardless of the series. Will continue to read the series when book #4 becomes available. The book was entertaining but it doesn't move the story forward much, besides some minor character growth by Wu Ying. I have really enjoyed this cultivation series in the past but I was expecting a similar experience this time around and there just wasn't enough there. This is hard for me to say, as I have really looked forward to every Tao Wong release, regardless of the series. Will continue to read the series when book #4 becomes available.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Russell Gray

    Well, I think I'm done with this series. I only finished the book out of obligation rather than entertainment. My previous complaint about being bored with the day to day minutia of cultivator life still stands and then grew immensely in this book. The entire book was surprisingly boring considering it was supposed to incorporate more world events and plot. The entire book is mostly just detached exposition. I never really felt any sense of stakes and I honestly also can't call the main character Well, I think I'm done with this series. I only finished the book out of obligation rather than entertainment. My previous complaint about being bored with the day to day minutia of cultivator life still stands and then grew immensely in this book. The entire book was surprisingly boring considering it was supposed to incorporate more world events and plot. The entire book is mostly just detached exposition. I never really felt any sense of stakes and I honestly also can't call the main character anything other than generic and boring. He has no personality other than a few childish tantrums. He seems like a simpleton most of the time other than when the plot needs him to do something competent to move the story forward. I previously held this series up as an example for cultivation novels, but as of this book I can't do that any longer.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Darnell

    Research.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Yablon

    Given the war in the title and all the buildup it received in book 2 of the series I really expected this to be more consequential. Instead we see our protagonist spending the whole book to learn that he should care less about his family (funny sidenote to this series is how every "revelation" the protagonist makes is kinda dumb, his last big one was to care less about how the rich nobles exploited his society). Also there's little point in writing a novel about a war when you then turn around and Given the war in the title and all the buildup it received in book 2 of the series I really expected this to be more consequential. Instead we see our protagonist spending the whole book to learn that he should care less about his family (funny sidenote to this series is how every "revelation" the protagonist makes is kinda dumb, his last big one was to care less about how the rich nobles exploited his society). Also there's little point in writing a novel about a war when you then turn around and have every single member of the protagonist's friend group survive without as much as a lasting injury, ultimately our war turns out to be nothing but a gigantic timekilling exercise that adds nothing to the plot beyond pagecount. Gonna give the series 1 more book before deciding to drop it but after this there is every chance that I just never bother to remember about it when book 4 comes out.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Steve Naylor

    Rating 2.5 stars What happened? This series started off really well. But for whatever reason this progression/cultivation book decided not to have any advancement in it. Really, nothing happened. There was no new enlightenment. No great new technique. There was no progression to finding his Dao. (view spoiler)[ War has come to the land but Wu doesn't want to join. He doesn't want to be a warrior. This is weird since he trains his fighting all the time. He has become an herb gatherer but it doesn Rating 2.5 stars What happened? This series started off really well. But for whatever reason this progression/cultivation book decided not to have any advancement in it. Really, nothing happened. There was no new enlightenment. No great new technique. There was no progression to finding his Dao. (view spoiler)[ War has come to the land but Wu doesn't want to join. He doesn't want to be a warrior. This is weird since he trains his fighting all the time. He has become an herb gatherer but it doesn't seem like that is what he wants to do. He is worried about his home village with the war coming and makes a deal to move the village. In order to do that though he needs permission from the lord... the same one whose son he defeated in the first book. The lord sends him on an almost impossible mission and he and his friends end up fighting in the war anyway. (hide spoiler)] If this series doesn't get back to what it was early on, I am not sure I am going to continue. I mean really, a progression novel in which the main character doesn't progress at all? What's the point?

  7. 5 out of 5

    A.R

    Honestly, I feel that this was the weakest book so far. Our hero gets very little done in this book, most of the relationships do not develop as much as I would like, and he seems to just be stalling this entire book. The war was kind of fun, but really the expedition in the last book was far better. Our hero ends the book realizing something and coming to terms with himself, but I do not feel like his realization was worth the entire book. Still, a fun ride at least that can set up some conflic Honestly, I feel that this was the weakest book so far. Our hero gets very little done in this book, most of the relationships do not develop as much as I would like, and he seems to just be stalling this entire book. The war was kind of fun, but really the expedition in the last book was far better. Our hero ends the book realizing something and coming to terms with himself, but I do not feel like his realization was worth the entire book. Still, a fun ride at least that can set up some conflict in the future. Interesting to see if it plays into the story at all or if its forgotten like I suspect it will be.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Micheal

    Good follow up The book is a fun read and follows the MC through doubts and battles. Very entertaining to say the least.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    The story itself was ok, it was just too drawn out for my tastes. I found myself struggling to stawy awake many times during it's reading, even though the story carried along relatively smoothly, it just had too much trivial details to make it a fun read. Those who enjoy extra information, lots of details, and plenty of sidelines won't have this problem, I'm sure. It does bring this piece of the story to a satisfactory ending, so there is that, but for me, it was just too slow doing so. The story itself was ok, it was just too drawn out for my tastes. I found myself struggling to stawy awake many times during it's reading, even though the story carried along relatively smoothly, it just had too much trivial details to make it a fun read. Those who enjoy extra information, lots of details, and plenty of sidelines won't have this problem, I'm sure. It does bring this piece of the story to a satisfactory ending, so there is that, but for me, it was just too slow doing so.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Artrain

    Well we've tanked. The lack of planning of the series shows. Book seems to be written just for the sake of writing, and continuing what little story there is. That still would have been fine, but unfortunately, the author fell into the trap of conjuring up dramatic situations by introducing new and absurd inconsistencies into his characters. This book honestly felt like it had absolutely different characters from the one's I've been reading so far. The MC suddenly becomes angry as a wild boar at Well we've tanked. The lack of planning of the series shows. Book seems to be written just for the sake of writing, and continuing what little story there is. That still would have been fine, but unfortunately, the author fell into the trap of conjuring up dramatic situations by introducing new and absurd inconsistencies into his characters. This book honestly felt like it had absolutely different characters from the one's I've been reading so far. The MC suddenly becomes angry as a wild boar at the silliest things. Worse, he's not angry in the silently upset kind of way, but in a way that makes him lash out at everyone around him. Who the heck is this person and where in the nine hells did he come from? Going from a person who was sensible enough to be the one to calm his angry friend down from doing reckless things in the very first chapters of the first book, now we see someone who absolutely cannot tolerate even a hint of anyone saying anything against him. And that includes his own friends trying to give him suggestions or just throwing out ideas! And worse, this is on top of his friends having done and immensely big favour to him in the first place! What the actual f**k?! At first I thought that, even though it was all feeling horribly inconsistent, the author was trying to use this as a growth opportunity for his main character. But nothing of the sort happened, and in the end it started to seem like the author felt his MC's actions were natural and justified! Apparently its completely normal to expect your friends to risk their lives for you for nothing, and rub them all the wrong way while you're doing it! Incredible! Who knew?! The inconsistencies don't stop here though. The book is just full of them. (view spoiler)[We have a main character who is first considering to participate in a war that might affect his country, and by consequence his family and other peasant families like his. Then suddenly he takes a turn and wants absolutely nothing to do with the war. Apparently participating in such an activity with abundant loss of life is unsettling to him, and he wants nothing to do with it. This is despite him training to become a sword artist by the way. Well, maybe he's going to knit sweaters with his sword. Then when he learns that his own village might face actual danger, he wants to do anything to save them. Which in this case means relocating them close to his sect where the war won't have a direct effect. Okaaaay.... you want to do anything to save your village, but you don't want to join a war to do your bit to try and protect hundreds of such villages even though you have been blessed with the power? Alriiiiight.... As fate would have it, and as would be a more obvious spoiler from the title of this book, he does still end up having to participate in the war. And there we see that despite being specifically in a platoon thats in the reserves, he defies order and rushes in battle because he cannot stay still while others are fighting and dying???!!! What??? Then why was he so against joining the war in the first place? If he so much wants to help people, why did he not choose to fight for them initially? There are even other minor bizarre and inconsistent situations, for example the one where he anxiously waits for his love interest to come back from her mission, wondering if anything has happened to her. And then the moment she comes back, he then ends up having a very public spat with her just because he did not like her opinion on what they could do to solve his situation! (hide spoiler)] It is just a horrendous mess overall. I'll try the next book to see if it gets better, but its feeling highly doubtful. I don't even know which main character we'll get in the next book. The sensible, normal person of the first book? The utterly confused and unmotivated person of the second book? Or the one spitting hissy fits at everything and nothing of the third.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Zachery

    This book is where I finally stopped reading this series, for a few reasons. The appeal of this series, from what I've seen from others who like it (and from what I've seen of the authors intent), is that unlike virtually every other Xianxia protagonist, the main character is just an average cultivator. He progresses at an average rate, and actually stays in his sect for a long time, allowing characters to stick around and become fleshed out, and for character development to happen. In theory, thi This book is where I finally stopped reading this series, for a few reasons. The appeal of this series, from what I've seen from others who like it (and from what I've seen of the authors intent), is that unlike virtually every other Xianxia protagonist, the main character is just an average cultivator. He progresses at an average rate, and actually stays in his sect for a long time, allowing characters to stick around and become fleshed out, and for character development to happen. In theory, this is great! In practice, I don't think it lives up to the premise, for a few reasons: 1) He makes nearly no progress after book one. He's portrayed as a "dumb peasant", and virtually everyone else outstrips him. Rather than an "average cultivator", to me he comes off as the bottom of the class. While constant power escalation can be a problem (and opposite to the point of this series), I feel sideways progression where characters work on utility abilities, defense, sense, versatility, or meaningful crafting is a far better method to deal with power creep, and leads to more fleshing out of the world. 2) To build on this, his "craft/career" he takes up is essentially herb-tending. A lot of detail is spent on him tending fields, but he does almost nothing with it. There's no interesting scenes of strange plant growth methods, no potion making or alchemy, no growing walls or building out of plants, no scenes of him growing magical plants as appliance equivalents (heater, air conditioner, etc.) just dry, boring scenes that could have described a normal peasant farmer. Additionally, it seems like one of the worst pay jobs he could have taken. The only real use (and decent pay days) he gets out of it is occasionally having the knowledge to pick and preserve some valuable plants in the wild, or being brought on an expedition to grab a rare plant as a backup. 3) Even with the above, I might have pushed on if the characters really were developed enough. But I don't really care about anyone. Not the protagonist, his friends, his teachers.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steven Brown

    An enjoyable third book to the series. I have the feeling that the author could really make this into a long but very worthwhile series. The stories so far have all been interesting and have pulled me through from beginning to end. While the author does have a tendency every once in awhile to throw out if you words that require the reader to either have a thesaurus or Kindle to look it up in the dictionary. Honestly that's not too bad though it just does tend to pull you out of the book long enou An enjoyable third book to the series. I have the feeling that the author could really make this into a long but very worthwhile series. The stories so far have all been interesting and have pulled me through from beginning to end. While the author does have a tendency every once in awhile to throw out if you words that require the reader to either have a thesaurus or Kindle to look it up in the dictionary. Honestly that's not too bad though it just does tend to pull you out of the book long enough to figure out what he meant. This is a young adult martial arts fantasy that is appropriate for young adults and above. It does not get really heavily into young adult tropes such as angst and extreme romantic drama. There is some romance as well as humor and of course plenty of action. One thing I do enjoy about the series is that the character is fairly deep. He is not a shining Knight but he is not one of those dark and brooding Gray characters. It is interesting to see how sometimes what I want as a reader is flipped on its head a bit and still just as good. The main protagonist has been through the last three books generally weaker than everybody around him but building a strong foundation and setting himself up I think for success later. I'm not sure if he'll become one of the all powerful characters that many protagonists of his ilk becomes at least not immediately. I do think that the author may have mixed up some names of side characters. At the same time there is enough names that it is quite confusing at times but for the most part it is a real smooth read. I do think this was a faster read in the previous two books but overall the entire series is a quick and enjoyable read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Morley

    Better than book 2 Let’s get this out of the way, book two was not good. It rambled on and on with really no point. The character didn’t develop much. The dialogue was non-existent so I had no real hope for this book. However, I was pleasantly surprised that the author returned with a story that made the first book so interesting. The protagonists friendship and relationships to others gave much needed depth to the story. It helped make the quest interesting and relatable. Not to mention added dia Better than book 2 Let’s get this out of the way, book two was not good. It rambled on and on with really no point. The character didn’t develop much. The dialogue was non-existent so I had no real hope for this book. However, I was pleasantly surprised that the author returned with a story that made the first book so interesting. The protagonists friendship and relationships to others gave much needed depth to the story. It helped make the quest interesting and relatable. Not to mention added dialogue. The author I think admits at the first of the book that the book 2 was a waste of time. If fact he says so when referring to how nothing was accomplished by it. After reading this book I see no reason why you should read #2. Other than Tu He’s injury, which doesn’t get addressed in this book either. The antagonist in the first book returns and adds complexity to the story. Neither a friend nor a real enemy. So a more realistic approach, instead of doing the standard Harry Potter rivalry. Even the girlfriend though unbelievable after the 2 book was utilized to make realistic growth by the protagonist. In the end I liked the book. Three stars because even though I liked it, the book wasn’t great from cover to cover. There were some really boring parts as well.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Brandon

    I mean this is a decent story. It is more of a side story. Very little growth happens to the MC. There is some emotional growth. Which is good and sets up the future. The MC literally does not move up his power until the very end of the book.... like the last words. The MC does not feel special. I mean he doesn't need to be OP but there is little to nothing unique that make me care about him specifically. There is no hook if that makes sense. I'll keep reading because Tao writes good stuff and I I mean this is a decent story. It is more of a side story. Very little growth happens to the MC. There is some emotional growth. Which is good and sets up the future. The MC literally does not move up his power until the very end of the book.... like the last words. The MC does not feel special. I mean he doesn't need to be OP but there is little to nothing unique that make me care about him specifically. There is no hook if that makes sense. I'll keep reading because Tao writes good stuff and I'm curious to see what he does. I will close by saying it was disappointing to see the MC fail at the beginning of the book and then show very little growth. I think he needs to distinguish himself some how. Maybe he is able to focus on both the physical body (tanky like that armored warrior?) and the spiritual. We will see I guess. If in book 4 there is a ton of growth, I probably would have graded this differently had 3-4 been one book since a major complaint would have been removed. Last thought to author... you basically made this an entire book about going that last step, and then to end his ascension with little to no fan fair or exploration felt hollow.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Clint Young

    Alert First, my review: “This was a fun book. I am glad that I read it. You should try it too.” Over the past year it has become apparent that my reviews are somewhat antagonistic and I apologize to those of you that have taken offense. I think I had hoped to change peoples’ minds about reviewing works of art and that seems to have backfired spectacularly. However, I am still going to be true to myself and write what I believe. To the author: Thank you for this chance to escape reality and enjoy t Alert First, my review: “This was a fun book. I am glad that I read it. You should try it too.” Over the past year it has become apparent that my reviews are somewhat antagonistic and I apologize to those of you that have taken offense. I think I had hoped to change peoples’ minds about reviewing works of art and that seems to have backfired spectacularly. However, I am still going to be true to myself and write what I believe. To the author: Thank you for this chance to escape reality and enjoy the world you created! Keep up the good work. To my fellow reviewers: Messaging me and reviewing my reviews is as productive as trying to shovel water out of the ocean. Stop. I get it. Let’s just all live peacefully. To potential readers: Art needs to be experienced at an individual level. You are the only one that can determine what you like and don’t like. Don’t let others make that decision for you. You should definitely read the book and completely ignore all of the reviews. You are a much better judge of what you will like than anyone here. Cheers

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Trickey

    I enjoyed it, but I'm not sure that Warfare is the best venue for this series. The bureaucracy wouldn't go well with the individualism seen. When you have two powerful forces, sects and armies, I would expect them to either battle, an uneasy true or one would subsume the other. I would really expect to see the army using its own more regimented form of cultivation instead of trying to bring in specialists. Even mercenaries are under the commands of the general. While these were, the command seem I enjoyed it, but I'm not sure that Warfare is the best venue for this series. The bureaucracy wouldn't go well with the individualism seen. When you have two powerful forces, sects and armies, I would expect them to either battle, an uneasy true or one would subsume the other. I would really expect to see the army using its own more regimented form of cultivation instead of trying to bring in specialists. Even mercenaries are under the commands of the general. While these were, the command seemed looser than I would expect in a regimented society. It wasn't enough to detract from my enjoyment of the story. *Old review, removed because the footnotes were not supposed to be in the Audible version. . * The definitions were offputting It was OK, warfare isn't a great venue for this story, my main complaint is that in the final quarter of the book, he decided to start explaining some Chinese terms. It broke the flow to hear an explanation that Chinese chess is chess and that one mandarin term was a curse word. If you're going to put these in, put them as footnotes and tell the Audible reader to not read them please. I either knew or could figure out from context all the explanations.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Walling

    Stories centered around cultivation systems tend to have a lot of problems, so A Thousand Li manages to be a standout within the genre simply by avoiding those problems. The characters and setting are generally believable, the prose is fine, and egregious plot holes are avoided. Truthfully, the biggest issue with this book of the series is the pacing. What is the point of cultivation story where the cultivator does not advance? Why read progression fantasy where the main character does not progre Stories centered around cultivation systems tend to have a lot of problems, so A Thousand Li manages to be a standout within the genre simply by avoiding those problems. The characters and setting are generally believable, the prose is fine, and egregious plot holes are avoided. Truthfully, the biggest issue with this book of the series is the pacing. What is the point of cultivation story where the cultivator does not advance? Why read progression fantasy where the main character does not progress? This book has a significant amount of only moderately interesting introspection, which in the end doesn't amount to much. The characters' relationships do evolve, which is good, but there wasn't much advancement in the other aspects of the story. This is still a good option for scratching the xianxia/cultivation story itch, but I do hope that the author picks up the pace in future works.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yoshino

    A proper cultivation novel by an English author, wow have been waiting for something like this for a long time, and this didn't disappoint. Also nicely avoided the OP trap that most of these books have. The story is engaging, the character are realistic and relatable. There still is no overarching plot but that's the norm for cultivation novels. Wouldnt really like the revenge focused plot that most of them follow anyway. Doesn't suit our protagonist and its already way overdone. The only flaw i A proper cultivation novel by an English author, wow have been waiting for something like this for a long time, and this didn't disappoint. Also nicely avoided the OP trap that most of these books have. The story is engaging, the character are realistic and relatable. There still is no overarching plot but that's the norm for cultivation novels. Wouldnt really like the revenge focused plot that most of them follow anyway. Doesn't suit our protagonist and its already way overdone. The only flaw if one is that the story is somewhat slow-paced. With how big the world seems to be, our protagonist has not really explored it in any way or even shown a desire yet. Does look that it will pick up in the next book though. Eagerly waiting for the next book in the series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alesia

    It didn't pick up until 75% into the book. I found myself reading just because I'd committed to the first two novels and figured I should finish this one. It took a lot longer, than reading the first, and shorter than reading the second because I skimmed a lot of the 2nd. The 2nd book, and the 2nd half of this book could have been one novel. There's a lack of genuine connection, to the secondary characters, a pattern I've noticed from Tao Wong's other books. I enjoy novels where I get to witness It didn't pick up until 75% into the book. I found myself reading just because I'd committed to the first two novels and figured I should finish this one. It took a lot longer, than reading the first, and shorter than reading the second because I skimmed a lot of the 2nd. The 2nd book, and the 2nd half of this book could have been one novel. There's a lack of genuine connection, to the secondary characters, a pattern I've noticed from Tao Wong's other books. I enjoy novels where I get to witness the character grow, I also enjoy having action--even if it's emotionally charged to help carry me along. I'm curious about the 4th, I'll finish the series, but I'm not really excited for it. I almost gave it up.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This was a really frustrating read. Wu Ying spent the entire novel repeatedly going on about how he shouldn't do X, Y, or Z for many, many reasons, then 3 seconds later going ahead and doing X, Y, and Z for the flimsiest of reasons. Despite being older in this book, he acts like he's actually gotten younger, or somehow lost a few dozen IQ points. This adversely affected his relationships with those around him, not that they were well fleshed out to begin with. The war portion came across as kind This was a really frustrating read. Wu Ying spent the entire novel repeatedly going on about how he shouldn't do X, Y, or Z for many, many reasons, then 3 seconds later going ahead and doing X, Y, and Z for the flimsiest of reasons. Despite being older in this book, he acts like he's actually gotten younger, or somehow lost a few dozen IQ points. This adversely affected his relationships with those around him, not that they were well fleshed out to begin with. The war portion came across as kinda boring, and there was a lack of motivation for a lot of the actions taken by the secondary characters - or by the main cast for that matter. All in all this was pretty disappointing, I'll give the next book a chance, I like the series and the concept, so hopefully the next book is better.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    One of my favorites This series is one of my favorites mainly because the MR is not an covered powered monster. He may eventually arrive there, but the first three books focuses on his journey and what drives him. There is a deep back story and a thorough fleshing out of the supporting characters. By the end of this book3, the MC has arrived at a revelation that allows him to progress his ability as well as his future. While this book is a bit more slower pace than the previous two, it is needed One of my favorites This series is one of my favorites mainly because the MR is not an covered powered monster. He may eventually arrive there, but the first three books focuses on his journey and what drives him. There is a deep back story and a thorough fleshing out of the supporting characters. By the end of this book3, the MC has arrived at a revelation that allows him to progress his ability as well as his future. While this book is a bit more slower pace than the previous two, it is needed as it sets up the overall story arc for expansion. I eagerly await the release of book4

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cameron

    One of my favorite cultivation stories A thousand Li stands as one of the best examples of a pure cultivation story within the genre. It both exceeds expectations for the genre by having a character who is not “suddenly the most powerful” but also maintains the tropes in interesting ways. The powerful noble he beat earlier in the series returns for some profound commentary on the world - the search for dao being the primary drive rather than simple power. For finding meaning, true meaning, is the One of my favorite cultivation stories A thousand Li stands as one of the best examples of a pure cultivation story within the genre. It both exceeds expectations for the genre by having a character who is not “suddenly the most powerful” but also maintains the tropes in interesting ways. The powerful noble he beat earlier in the series returns for some profound commentary on the world - the search for dao being the primary drive rather than simple power. For finding meaning, true meaning, is the way toward enlightenment- and that is what cultivation is. The enlightenment of the soul that improves the body as well

  23. 4 out of 5

    Larry

    Almost no character progression but still worth a read I am going to give the forth book a shot but honestly the character is so flawed with no real progression that I am doubting that’s a good idea. The story is ok, it’s written well without the normal irritations you would find in a lot of the xanxia/ wuxia novels you can find on the web. My main concern is that I gave up on another series this author wrote for the same deeply flawed, lack of MC progression. At this point I almost feel that I o Almost no character progression but still worth a read I am going to give the forth book a shot but honestly the character is so flawed with no real progression that I am doubting that’s a good idea. The story is ok, it’s written well without the normal irritations you would find in a lot of the xanxia/ wuxia novels you can find on the web. My main concern is that I gave up on another series this author wrote for the same deeply flawed, lack of MC progression. At this point I almost feel that I owe it to the author to finish reading one of his series to see if he just has a very slow cadence in character progression/ growth, or if I should put him in the discard pile.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    I think this will be my last book in the series. I don't know what happened, but it feels like I'm reading a completely different series. Thing seem way off, compared to the first two books. This book feels like the author is trying to keep it as close to traditional Chinese Mythology as possible (if the notes weren't obvious enough). The entire tone of the novel changed compared to what I remember. It is reading like a slice of life novel. There is no crazy fantastic events happening (jumping off I think this will be my last book in the series. I don't know what happened, but it feels like I'm reading a completely different series. Thing seem way off, compared to the first two books. This book feels like the author is trying to keep it as close to traditional Chinese Mythology as possible (if the notes weren't obvious enough). The entire tone of the novel changed compared to what I remember. It is reading like a slice of life novel. There is no crazy fantastic events happening (jumping off a 30 foot wall and surviving aside). This will be the end of my journey with Wu Ying. 2.5/5 Stars

  25. 5 out of 5

    jerry smith

    A good story with fairly interesting characters. There was no fall of in the story between books. If you liked the 1st and 2nd book, you should like this one also. I am still interested and will read the 4th book also. Author has a slight tendency to have the Main character to do stupid things, but he usually learns from them and doesn't repeat them. I hate when authors have the Main continually do stupid stuff as a device solely to kick the story down the road. If the Main is stupid and fails A good story with fairly interesting characters. There was no fall of in the story between books. If you liked the 1st and 2nd book, you should like this one also. I am still interested and will read the 4th book also. Author has a slight tendency to have the Main character to do stupid things, but he usually learns from them and doesn't repeat them. I hate when authors have the Main continually do stupid stuff as a device solely to kick the story down the road. If the Main is stupid and fails ever learn. I don't care about them and stop reading the book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jen King

    Back on track A better book then the second. A more cohesive story with with clear goals by the protagonist compared to the second book where it felt as though the book simply had a narrator, and not a main character. Not as good as the first. The first benefit from an overarching antagonists with related challenges. This third book felt like a series of disconnected challenges.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Anderson

    The Next Chapter One of the reasons I enjoy Tao Wong as an author is the character arcs for the protagonist allow for character development. Today’s indie authors often make the mistake of making their hero’s to be all knowing and perfect. One of the reasons I enjoy A Thousand Li is we get to be part of the journey. We see the failures, step by step growth, and partial successes of the main characters. Well done.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Devan

    Not a fan. I read silver fox and the western hero before reading this and the difference between the two cultivation novels was astounding. It was so bad I stopped at 30%. I remembered the last book being sort of boring and when this one started out the same way I stopped that OCD part of me from forcing myself to finish it. In the first 20% all that happens is the MC walks around talking to people about stuff. Could have deleted that entire portion and lost nothing.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robert Perry

    Great new series. I find that I always look for your book to come out. Love your style and all the thought you put in to your books and series as a whole. That being said this book as always was great. There is one thing that I find different. The speed with which your main character has grown in both marital arts and cultivation has been a lot slower than in your other books. I look forward to the next book. Thank you so much for your hard work and dedication. Rob

  30. 4 out of 5

    Devon Strachan

    I learned a lot of what not to do from this book. Jesus *facepalm, I really gotta let this go. Starting this series after Red Rising was like applying a calming balm to my shot nerves. But, the author needs to meditate on actions and consequences. And he should study exactly how to capitalize on what the plot requires and character growth. Something went horribly wrong here. Jesus Christ, what's a waste of time. I learned a lot of what not to do from this book. Jesus *facepalm, I really gotta let this go. Starting this series after Red Rising was like applying a calming balm to my shot nerves. But, the author needs to meditate on actions and consequences. And he should study exactly how to capitalize on what the plot requires and character growth. Something went horribly wrong here. Jesus Christ, what's a waste of time.

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