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Artemisia Gentileschi and Feminism in Early Modern Europe

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Artemisia Gentileschi is by far the most famous woman artist of the premodern era. Her art addressed issues that resonate today, such as sexual violence and women’s problematic relationship to political power. Her powerful paintings with vigorous female protagonists chime with modern audiences, and she is celebrated by feminist critics and scholars.   This book breaks new Artemisia Gentileschi is by far the most famous woman artist of the premodern era. Her art addressed issues that resonate today, such as sexual violence and women’s problematic relationship to political power. Her powerful paintings with vigorous female protagonists chime with modern audiences, and she is celebrated by feminist critics and scholars.   This book breaks new ground by placing Gentileschi in the context of women’s political history. Mary D. Garrard, noted Gentileschi scholar, shows that the artist most likely knew or knew about contemporary writers such as the Venetian feminists Lucrezia Marinella and Arcangela Tarabotti. She discusses recently discovered paintings, offers fresh perspectives on known works, and examines the artist anew in the context of feminist history. This beautifully illustrated book gives for the first time a full portrait of a strong woman artist who fought back through her art.


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Artemisia Gentileschi is by far the most famous woman artist of the premodern era. Her art addressed issues that resonate today, such as sexual violence and women’s problematic relationship to political power. Her powerful paintings with vigorous female protagonists chime with modern audiences, and she is celebrated by feminist critics and scholars.   This book breaks new Artemisia Gentileschi is by far the most famous woman artist of the premodern era. Her art addressed issues that resonate today, such as sexual violence and women’s problematic relationship to political power. Her powerful paintings with vigorous female protagonists chime with modern audiences, and she is celebrated by feminist critics and scholars.   This book breaks new ground by placing Gentileschi in the context of women’s political history. Mary D. Garrard, noted Gentileschi scholar, shows that the artist most likely knew or knew about contemporary writers such as the Venetian feminists Lucrezia Marinella and Arcangela Tarabotti. She discusses recently discovered paintings, offers fresh perspectives on known works, and examines the artist anew in the context of feminist history. This beautifully illustrated book gives for the first time a full portrait of a strong woman artist who fought back through her art.

47 review for Artemisia Gentileschi and Feminism in Early Modern Europe

  1. 5 out of 5

    Wouter

    While certainly not without its merits, I found the book rather disappointing, simply because most of Garrard's interpretations and positions are insufficiently supported by evidence, both with regard to Artemisia's life and her paintings. Published in a series about famous artists for a general audience, I often wondered what a casual reader of art history would make of it, as Garrard often conjectures her postmodern feminist views onto Artemisia's paintings while sometimes overlooking more sim While certainly not without its merits, I found the book rather disappointing, simply because most of Garrard's interpretations and positions are insufficiently supported by evidence, both with regard to Artemisia's life and her paintings. Published in a series about famous artists for a general audience, I often wondered what a casual reader of art history would make of it, as Garrard often conjectures her postmodern feminist views onto Artemisia's paintings while sometimes overlooking more simple explanations. I also disliked her attempts at making her views palatable to contemporary readers, by including references to Trump and Brett Kavanaugh (amongst others), which I find have no place here.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joy Airaudi

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    Sophie F

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    Angela Atehortua

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    Colleen Hetherington

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    Natalie F

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    Meganne

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    Carlotta

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    Brenna

  10. 4 out of 5

    Whippet mom

  11. 4 out of 5

    womanist bibliophile

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maddy

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paul Manoguerra

  14. 4 out of 5

    Enheduanna

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    Lew Stanisława

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    Max

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    Sara

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    Katherine

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    Kiran

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    Gemma

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    Amy

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    Stephanie

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    Jeanelle

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    Lana

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    Carla Nólalliv

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    Emily

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    Phil Sun

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    Katrina Feraco

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    Cassie

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    Valerie

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  32. 5 out of 5

    karaskindredspirits

  33. 5 out of 5

    KC Marie Pandell

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    Joanna

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    Alison

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    Victoria Jones

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    Sarah Malcolm

  38. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Drake

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    Maria João Gomes da Costa

  40. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  41. 5 out of 5

    Emmibug

  42. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  43. 5 out of 5

    Júlio

  44. 5 out of 5

    AlexK_D1

  45. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  46. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

  47. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

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