website statistics The Manga Guide to Databases - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

The Manga Guide to Databases

Availability: Ready to download

Want to learn about databases without the tedium? With its unique combination of Japanese-style comics and serious educational content, The Manga Guide to Databases is just the book for you. Princess Ruruna is stressed out. With the king and queen away, she has to manage the Kingdom of Kod's humongous fruit-selling empire. Overseas departments, scads of inventory, conflicti Want to learn about databases without the tedium? With its unique combination of Japanese-style comics and serious educational content, The Manga Guide to Databases is just the book for you. Princess Ruruna is stressed out. With the king and queen away, she has to manage the Kingdom of Kod's humongous fruit-selling empire. Overseas departments, scads of inventory, conflicting prices, and so many customers! It's all such a confusing mess. But a mysterious book and a helpful fairy promise to solve her organizational problems-with the practical magic of databases. In The Manga Guide to Databases, Tico the fairy teaches the Princess how to simplify her data management. We follow along as they design a relational database, understand the entity-relationship model, perform basic database operations, and delve into more advanced topics. Once the Princess is familiar with transactions and basic SQL statements, she can keep her data timely and accurate for the entire kingdom. Finally, Tico explains ways to make the database more efficient and secure, and they discuss methods for concurrency and replication. Examples and exercises (with answer keys) help you learn, and an appendix of frequently used SQL statements gives the tools you need to create and maintain full-featured databases. (Of course, it wouldn't be a royal kingdom without some drama, so read on to find out who gets the girl-the arrogant prince or the humble servant.) This EduManga book is a translation of a bestselling series in Japan, co-published with Ohmsha, Ltd., of Tokyo, Japan.


Compare

Want to learn about databases without the tedium? With its unique combination of Japanese-style comics and serious educational content, The Manga Guide to Databases is just the book for you. Princess Ruruna is stressed out. With the king and queen away, she has to manage the Kingdom of Kod's humongous fruit-selling empire. Overseas departments, scads of inventory, conflicti Want to learn about databases without the tedium? With its unique combination of Japanese-style comics and serious educational content, The Manga Guide to Databases is just the book for you. Princess Ruruna is stressed out. With the king and queen away, she has to manage the Kingdom of Kod's humongous fruit-selling empire. Overseas departments, scads of inventory, conflicting prices, and so many customers! It's all such a confusing mess. But a mysterious book and a helpful fairy promise to solve her organizational problems-with the practical magic of databases. In The Manga Guide to Databases, Tico the fairy teaches the Princess how to simplify her data management. We follow along as they design a relational database, understand the entity-relationship model, perform basic database operations, and delve into more advanced topics. Once the Princess is familiar with transactions and basic SQL statements, she can keep her data timely and accurate for the entire kingdom. Finally, Tico explains ways to make the database more efficient and secure, and they discuss methods for concurrency and replication. Examples and exercises (with answer keys) help you learn, and an appendix of frequently used SQL statements gives the tools you need to create and maintain full-featured databases. (Of course, it wouldn't be a royal kingdom without some drama, so read on to find out who gets the girl-the arrogant prince or the humble servant.) This EduManga book is a translation of a bestselling series in Japan, co-published with Ohmsha, Ltd., of Tokyo, Japan.

30 review for The Manga Guide to Databases

  1. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    I'm well-versed in databases, but this manga impressed me with its broad introduction into the stuff. Although I wonder to what extent a little kid could crawl through all the text, ironically a college student would look down on it for havint too little text. But make no mistake: this could be a revolutionary learning tool in the right hands. If it takes 15 weeks with a textbook to learn about databases, consider what could happen if this book could teach the concepts in a single week! I must fin I'm well-versed in databases, but this manga impressed me with its broad introduction into the stuff. Although I wonder to what extent a little kid could crawl through all the text, ironically a college student would look down on it for havint too little text. But make no mistake: this could be a revolutionary learning tool in the right hands. If it takes 15 weeks with a textbook to learn about databases, consider what could happen if this book could teach the concepts in a single week! I must find a 9 year old to test this on.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    Intrigue, jealousy, romance, and structured query language... It actually works, and as a broad introduction to databases, I found that I learned and retained quite a bit of the material presented. Chapters present the basic information in Manga format, then expand on the material in more detail with helpful diagrams, tables, and examples of queries, etc. I still do not understand the stylistic format of Manga. Overly exaggerated and extremely literal comic characters, emotions, and actions do not Intrigue, jealousy, romance, and structured query language... It actually works, and as a broad introduction to databases, I found that I learned and retained quite a bit of the material presented. Chapters present the basic information in Manga format, then expand on the material in more detail with helpful diagrams, tables, and examples of queries, etc. I still do not understand the stylistic format of Manga. Overly exaggerated and extremely literal comic characters, emotions, and actions do not make sense to my classic (read: 1960s) Marvel-raised self.

  3. 5 out of 5

    ems

    i didn't know 2 people falling in love over their shared love of fruit export databases could b so cute & informative i didn't know 2 people falling in love over their shared love of fruit export databases could b so cute & informative

  4. 5 out of 5

    Story

    Learning things as an adult isn't an easy thing. We're ridiculously hard on ourselves when the basics of a thing, like notation and terminology, are entirely new, and we just don't get them. The Manga Guide series provides a little breathing room to that effect here. The "plot" is silly, and unselfconscious about it-- it's not trying to be anything other than a light device for teaching, and unlike some of the teaching materials and videos of the 80's, it doesn't pretend to seriousness of plot. M Learning things as an adult isn't an easy thing. We're ridiculously hard on ourselves when the basics of a thing, like notation and terminology, are entirely new, and we just don't get them. The Manga Guide series provides a little breathing room to that effect here. The "plot" is silly, and unselfconscious about it-- it's not trying to be anything other than a light device for teaching, and unlike some of the teaching materials and videos of the 80's, it doesn't pretend to seriousness of plot. Moreover, it doesn't talk down to the reader. It embraces silliness AND DOESN'T INSULT THE READER'S INTELLIGENCE. That is HUGE when you already feel self conscious about the fact that you don't know a thing. It covers all of the basics needed for a real introduction to SQL, and has a meaty set of exercises on using SQL to perform queries. The best part of it is that as a comic, images are built in to its narrative flow, so it becomes easy to add visuals for concepts that really require them to understand or benefit from concretizing abstractions. There were some topics I needed a little extra explanation to get at understanding how they work, but this is a solid place to start if you're new to programming and need to learn about SQL. And pun bonus: only after I started the book and my partner looked over my shoulder only to snerk and giggle did I feel self conscious. "What?" I asked. "Kingdom of Kod," they said. "I hate to ask you to explain a joke," I said. "It's probably a pun on Ed Codd," they said. "SQL is built on the relational model he described in a paper." "Ah!" I said, and snerked too. Then I fell down a rabbit hole of questions about how this all came about. Well done!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul Kline

    I imagine this is the perfect book for some to learn about Relational Databases, but I thought it was pretty meh. Reminded me of people who dress up their dogs. Dogs are already cute; why are you putting them in tiny tuxes? Going through a good, real-world example can be just as satisfying and doesn't need an extraneous story-line. All that aside, the example database could have been better and more clearly introduced. I also thought the way normalization was explained was convoluted and generall I imagine this is the perfect book for some to learn about Relational Databases, but I thought it was pretty meh. Reminded me of people who dress up their dogs. Dogs are already cute; why are you putting them in tiny tuxes? Going through a good, real-world example can be just as satisfying and doesn't need an extraneous story-line. All that aside, the example database could have been better and more clearly introduced. I also thought the way normalization was explained was convoluted and generally inapplicable. On the positive side, there are bits of good information throughout.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Jungco

    I used this book as a reading material before my lecture in database making. Surprisingly, knowing my students, most of them actually read and finished the manga during the weekend. I also enjoyed these books/manga. Very interesting.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Keith Davis

    A database fairy explains SQL to a princess. Actually a very good introduction to databases if you can get past the hyper-cuteness of it all.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    Having read one of these books before, I was cautiously optimistic that this book would be both entertaining and instructive and I found that to be the case.  In many ways this book is similar to the last book in the series that I read [1], and will encourage me to read more of these books as my library has quite a few of them.  If this book is not exactly groundbreaking in its approach, it does provide a humorous way to justify the learning of databases and explore what it is that they have to Having read one of these books before, I was cautiously optimistic that this book would be both entertaining and instructive and I found that to be the case.  In many ways this book is similar to the last book in the series that I read [1], and will encourage me to read more of these books as my library has quite a few of them.  If this book is not exactly groundbreaking in its approach, it does provide a humorous way to justify the learning of databases and explore what it is that they have to offer to the reader even if few of the readers are likely to be in the same sort of life that the characters in the book are nor are they likely to learn about databases in the same way.  This is a book that goes well beyond what it needs to do in order to make its point about the joy and practicality of databases and the sense of whimsy that the novel has is certainly something that I appreciated reading and that drew at least a few smiles to my face when it comes to thinking about this book's approach. This book is about 200 pages and is divided into six chapters.  After a short preface the book begins with a discussion of what a database is through the appearance of a fairy in a book that explains databases to a princess and one of her nerdy advisers who are running the kingdom while the king is away (1).  After that there is a discussion about what a relational database is as opposed to other types of databases like hierarchical ones (2).  This leads to a discussion of the E-R model in several cases and the design of databases for the fruit-growing kingdom (3).  After that the database fairy explains to her students how to use basic SQL commands (4).  What follows is a discussion about how to operate databases and provide locks as well as indexing and recovering from disasters (5).  The book then ends with a discussion of how databases are everywhere, which even includes a look at the king's book on fruit which his daughter didn't know about as well as some heartfelt goodbyes (6).  Included in the book is a subplot where the princess decides not to marry a playboy and chooses to marry her intelligent adviser/protector, showing herself to be less of an airhead than might have been originally assumed. How is it best to teach databases?  As someone who works in the field of data analysis there are many ways that I have seen databases explored.  Most of them are highly technical and not very exciting.  This has lead to plenty of space where a book like this can make a subject that seems very difficult much easier to grasp in its fundamentals.  If the reader does not need to learn SQL in great detail, the fundamental understanding of join and union and select statements explored here ought to be enough to provide at least a basic understanding of databases and what they do, and this is likely to be enough for the reader to at least understand and appreciate what the quants in their company are up to in creating and administrating databases.  Even beyond that this book offers some humor in exploring the way that databases serve as a basic and foundational background to a great many important functions when it comes to ensuring that data can be updated, even as the book explores the trade-offs that are often involved in creating databases for use by a large group of people. [1] https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2019...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Deng

    Very quick read since I just took a databases class. Overall, this book doesn’t cover the same depth as a college level course (and I didn’t expect it to), but I really enjoyed the explanation of first and second normal forms, which we didn’t go over since third normal form is the only usable form. It definitely increased my understanding of databases on a conceptual level and the visual guides were helpful, as the concepts taught in class tend to be purely based on logic and methodical formulas Very quick read since I just took a databases class. Overall, this book doesn’t cover the same depth as a college level course (and I didn’t expect it to), but I really enjoyed the explanation of first and second normal forms, which we didn’t go over since third normal form is the only usable form. It definitely increased my understanding of databases on a conceptual level and the visual guides were helpful, as the concepts taught in class tend to be purely based on logic and methodical formulas. This provided an additional layer of intuition. Unfortunately the plot is somewhat thin.

  10. 5 out of 5

    MattBoa

    Again, one of the best Manga Guides (I have 11 of the original 12 ones, although we're sitting at 16 volumes now, I think?). Not big on the art, writing is okay, but damn if it's there. Everything has stuck in my head, which is impressive given it couldn't have at all like nearly everything else in our lives. Yes, you can get a pristine idea of databases with this. Most of all it shows you why we need them. Again, one of the best Manga Guides (I have 11 of the original 12 ones, although we're sitting at 16 volumes now, I think?). Not big on the art, writing is okay, but damn if it's there. Everything has stuck in my head, which is impressive given it couldn't have at all like nearly everything else in our lives. Yes, you can get a pristine idea of databases with this. Most of all it shows you why we need them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    This was a really fast intro/refresher to databases which I found useful as I take a college class on databases. This book provided a great no-knowledge discussion of databases which left me ready to tackle the subject in greater depth. I wish it had discussed relational algebra and relational calculus, but I can appreciate that these topics don't do much to enlighten databases to the uninitiated. This was a really fast intro/refresher to databases which I found useful as I take a college class on databases. This book provided a great no-knowledge discussion of databases which left me ready to tackle the subject in greater depth. I wish it had discussed relational algebra and relational calculus, but I can appreciate that these topics don't do much to enlighten databases to the uninitiated.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nate Stevens

    A really cute way of presenting something profoundly hard to learn without sitting at the computer pounding your head on the keyboard (and your company's specific database design & implementation) for days. Each of the chapters are followed by non-manga guides and questions that, when combined with the narrative style of the book, are pretty helpful. A really cute way of presenting something profoundly hard to learn without sitting at the computer pounding your head on the keyboard (and your company's specific database design & implementation) for days. Each of the chapters are followed by non-manga guides and questions that, when combined with the narrative style of the book, are pretty helpful.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shaurya

    5 stars That's high praise. Nothing less than it deserves. Even if you have NOTHING to do with databases in your life, you will enjoy this book. Transactions, deadlocks, stored procs explained succinctly. You've got to love it. 5 stars That's high praise. Nothing less than it deserves. Even if you have NOTHING to do with databases in your life, you will enjoy this book. Transactions, deadlocks, stored procs explained succinctly. You've got to love it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Demetrio

    A very light and fun read, I fully recommend this for anyone interested in learning the basics of Relational Databases.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rumanu Bhardwaj

    A very accessible introduction to some of the commonly used terms in DBMS. It's a good starting point if the depth and rigor of a standard college textbook seems too overwhelming to begin with. A very accessible introduction to some of the commonly used terms in DBMS. It's a good starting point if the depth and rigor of a standard college textbook seems too overwhelming to begin with.

  16. 5 out of 5

    İzzet Erten

    Curious about “manga about db”, seemed a little absurd to me. Book is surprisingly good!! Many essential concepts are explained clearly...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rai

    A fun way to learn about databases! Probably most useful to somebody who's just starting out, in conjunction with other learning resources. A fun way to learn about databases! Probably most useful to somebody who's just starting out, in conjunction with other learning resources.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marisa

    Fantastic databases 101 book for people that enjoy manga!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Diógenes Fernandes

    It's a good book for begineers. I was trying to take some ideas on how to teach basics so I could teach my brother. :) It's a good book for begineers. I was trying to take some ideas on how to teach basics so I could teach my brother. :)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rush Dar

    A very interesting view of databases.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Mosley

    A great intro to relational databases. Like manga or not, seeing things visually is so helpful for retaining the concepts.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael Larsen

    I’m already a fan of "The Manga Guide to” series, so I figured that “The Manga Guide to Databases” and their take databases would be in the same vein as their other titles (an accompanying storyline, an emphasis on practical topic coverage, and an emphasis on “kawaii”). To meet that end, we are introduced to Princess Raruna, heir apparent to the Kingdom of Cod. We also meet her attendant, Cain, and a fairy named Tico that teaches them about databases… and anyone familiar with Manga has not batte I’m already a fan of "The Manga Guide to” series, so I figured that “The Manga Guide to Databases” and their take databases would be in the same vein as their other titles (an accompanying storyline, an emphasis on practical topic coverage, and an emphasis on “kawaii”). To meet that end, we are introduced to Princess Raruna, heir apparent to the Kingdom of Cod. We also meet her attendant, Cain, and a fairy named Tico that teaches them about databases… and anyone familiar with Manga has not batted an eye with that kind of a description (and sure, if you looked at the cover, you could probably have figured that out as well ;) ). For those not already familiar with Manga and their tropes, this might seem a bit strange, but go with it. Seriously. I can see some of you already thinking “OK, sure, I can see teaching about stars, or maybe even math using Manga, but databases? That’s a bit of a stretch, isn’t it?" Well, let’s take a closer look. Chapter One introduces us to the Kindom of Kod’s main export… fruit (yeah, you were thinking fish. Everyone thinks fish, but no, it’s fruit). Through the bureaucratic and messy system that they have in place, the case is made for why a database is important in the first place, to reduce errors, keep track of important data, and to make sure that data isn’t duplicated in appropriately or not updated when and where it needs to be. This chapter also sets the stage with the scenarios and back story to help define how the database will need to be set up and managed. Chapter Two takes the idea of a database further and discusses what relational databases are, and how they differ from other system such as hierarchical and networked databases. Fields and records are explained as vertical columns (attributes of a relationship) and records (individual collections of various attributes as relates to one given entity at a time). Tables hold these fields and records, and a variety of operations can be performed to both input and extract/format the data to be viewed. Chapter Three goes into the process of designing a database, starting with creating an entity-relationship (E-R) model, and establishing the types of relationship an entity can have (one to one, one to many, many to many). From there, a table is designed, and by examining the relationships, we can see where data is duplicated. We can divide the big table into smaller, interrelated tables in a process called normalization. The concept of both primary and foreign keys are also introduced. Chapter Four introduces us to the Structured Query Language, or SQL. SQL allows users to perform functions that allow them to define, operate, and control data. SELECT statement allow users to select specific fields to display and show values of those fields. The WHERE statement allows users to specify conditions as to what records are displayed. INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE statements let users insert, update and delete data. CREATE TABLE lets a user create a new table, where DROP table lets a user remove (drop) an existing table. Chapter Five focuses on how to operate a database, including how to set user privileges for a database, how to use locking and ensures consistency with multiple users, setting up indexes to perform faster searches, examining transactions and how they can be “rolled forward or rolled back”, and options for disaster recovery and database repair capabilities. Chapter Six shows us how the proliferation of databases affects everyday things that we do, and that we are likely dealing with them in areas we otherwise would not consider (every site that this book review will appear on has a database to store them, and that’s at the simplest level. The chapter also shows us examples of distributed databases, database partitioning, two-phase commits, database replication and the use of stored procedures and triggers to perform commonly repeated tasks. The book ends with a short Appendix with a summary of the most commonly used SQL commands (which would probably make for a nice little project for a dynamic allocation of commands for a web site example page. Bottom Line: If you are an old hand at using databases in general and SQL commands in particular, there’s probably not a whole lot of new material for you here. For those who are just getting into working with databases, this is a much more fun and straightforward way of teaching the ideas than I’ve seen, well, just about anywhere. Do note that this is not going to be the be all and end all of learning about databases, SQL queries or how to effectively design databases. It will, however, go a long way in giving those people who want to learn how to make or manage relational, SQL based databases a simple framework to hang future ideas and learning from.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Robert Beveridge

    Mana Takahashi, The Manga Guide to Databases (No Starch Press, 2004) No Starch Press, one of the great repositories of Linux knowledge in America, bills itself as “the finest in geek entertainment.” True, that, and they have outdone themselves in this regard by importing, translating, and publishing Ohmsha Press' edumanga series of books. I've been intrigued by these for a few years, and I figured the best place to start would be with one where I'm conversant with the material; that way I could m Mana Takahashi, The Manga Guide to Databases (No Starch Press, 2004) No Starch Press, one of the great repositories of Linux knowledge in America, bills itself as “the finest in geek entertainment.” True, that, and they have outdone themselves in this regard by importing, translating, and publishing Ohmsha Press' edumanga series of books. I've been intrigued by these for a few years, and I figured the best place to start would be with one where I'm conversant with the material; that way I could make comments that are at least halfway intelligent. (Assuming any of my comments are halfway intelligent; I leave that to the reader to decide.) The Manga Guide to Databases was the obvious choice, given that I've been a database administrator/developer/what-have-you for fifteen years now. And if the rest of the series is as solid as this one, then I may have found a new meaning for the phrase “made of awesome.” If I were a teacher (I don't have the patience for it) doing an intro to databases course, this would be one of the texts. The setting is the Kingdom of Kon, a small island nation whose GNP come from fruit exports. While the king and queen are off touring some of the nations that import Kon's fruit, they've left Princess Ruruna and her trusty aide Cain in charge. When an increase in the price of apples goes horribly wrong, Ruruna realizes Kon needs a better way to manage its business. Enter Tico the Database Fairy, who spends the book teaching Ruruna and Cain about the benefits of storing business data in a relational database, teaching them how to design, construct, and use a simple business database. There's also a romantic subplot with Ruruna and the prince of a neighboring kingdom that adds a bit of interest for folks who look at this sort of thing as a chore. Simply put, this is great stuff. There are a few things that could probably have been done better (Takahashi uses FROM x,y WHERE clauses instead of using JOINs, for example), but I assume some things were done the way they are for maximum portability; JOINs aren't terribly common in MyISAM databases, for example (at least judging by the MySQL books I've been reading). Still, if you're using this as a text for teaching a class, you can add in supplementary material about the bits that aren't here, or that are taught differently than you'd do it. But as far as getting students to read and understand the material, you may be hard-pressed to find a book that's this fun anywhere else, and students who have fun while learning are happy students. Well worth your time. ****

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael Shea

    This book was recommended to me as attempt to do technical writing in comic form. I would not choose this as a paragon example. The story of the princess of the fruit kingdom, Cod, finding a database fairy looked in a book was a little too sweet to be palatable. Nevermind the attempt at adding a love triangle between the princess, the servant, and prince with a high opinion of himself. It was rather cliche. As for the technical content. I found the book quite useful. However, the book followed tw This book was recommended to me as attempt to do technical writing in comic form. I would not choose this as a paragon example. The story of the princess of the fruit kingdom, Cod, finding a database fairy looked in a book was a little too sweet to be palatable. Nevermind the attempt at adding a love triangle between the princess, the servant, and prince with a high opinion of himself. It was rather cliche. As for the technical content. I found the book quite useful. However, the book followed two tracks. The early chapters were almost entirely done in comic form with some recap in text and quiz questions at the end. I found this an effective presentation. However, later chapters began to add more and more text blocks at the end which were not introduced in the comic part of the chapter. For example, in one chapter it talked about joins. In the text section at the back of the chapter, left and right outer joins are introduced and explained without any warning. I wish they would have introduced all the content in comic form and then just repeat the the reference in text form. The quiz questions were great though.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tom Spruce

    Rarely would I call a book on a technical topic as enjoyable. This is one of those rare books and it does a fantastic job of introducing you to the main topics of databases with swift brevity. It packages such an introduction in a cute story. When would you read about a princess story and a love story in a programming book? Plus, the book tests you on your newfound knowledge. If you are a technical writer considering to write some introductory text, you could learn a thing or two from the writin Rarely would I call a book on a technical topic as enjoyable. This is one of those rare books and it does a fantastic job of introducing you to the main topics of databases with swift brevity. It packages such an introduction in a cute story. When would you read about a princess story and a love story in a programming book? Plus, the book tests you on your newfound knowledge. If you are a technical writer considering to write some introductory text, you could learn a thing or two from the writing of this book. Even if you don't plan on writing a comic book, you can still appreciate the way this book quickly gets the reader up to speed on the fundamentals of databases. Instead of unloading ever little detail, you are given a firm foundation to fill such details. Honestly, this book should be a required reading to some businesses who think they want an enterprise web app when all they need is a database.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rini

    I ended up reading this for my Database Design class, since I was told by someone who's taken it previously that it ended up being more useful than some of the assigned readings. It was, although I ran into the same problem I tend to run into with the other books in this series - I end up forgetting I'm supposed to be learning things and/or get caught up in the art and have to go back and re-read pages or sections. That said, if you are trying to be figure out databases, this is a useful book for I ended up reading this for my Database Design class, since I was told by someone who's taken it previously that it ended up being more useful than some of the assigned readings. It was, although I ran into the same problem I tend to run into with the other books in this series - I end up forgetting I'm supposed to be learning things and/or get caught up in the art and have to go back and re-read pages or sections. That said, if you are trying to be figure out databases, this is a useful book for explaining theory in an accessible and cute way. Being open to reading a comic book about databases is a good idea, because in some cases I found the tone just a tiny bit patronizing. Keep in mind that while it covers some SQL, it does not go into DBMS systems like Access or Base

  27. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    I'm not a big manga fan but I was curious to see what sort of foundations of databases this book offered. The book is divided into chapters: "What is a Database?", "What is a Relational Database?", "Let's Design a Database", "Let's Learn About SQL", "Let's Operate a Database", "Databases are Everywhere". Each chapter starts with the story portion done in manga form, followed by textbook-style educational material, which goes into more depth than the story part. To tell the truth I wasn't expectin I'm not a big manga fan but I was curious to see what sort of foundations of databases this book offered. The book is divided into chapters: "What is a Database?", "What is a Relational Database?", "Let's Design a Database", "Let's Learn About SQL", "Let's Operate a Database", "Databases are Everywhere". Each chapter starts with the story portion done in manga form, followed by textbook-style educational material, which goes into more depth than the story part. To tell the truth I wasn't expecting much more than the extreme basics of database design and use an so was pleasantly surprised that there was so much good information. It won't make you an expert by any means but it does provide a pretty good foundation for those seeking a basic understanding.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I'm not going to say that I'm an expert on databases now, but I really like the visual instruction style of the manga guide series. This one tells the story of a princess in charge of her kingdom's fruit selling who finds a fairy who knows all about databases to help her. I think the best part was about why you shouldn't just put all your data in one spreadsheet (my usual approach to data management). Basically if you have to repeat information anywhere, you need another spreadsheet. You want to I'm not going to say that I'm an expert on databases now, but I really like the visual instruction style of the manga guide series. This one tells the story of a princess in charge of her kingdom's fruit selling who finds a fairy who knows all about databases to help her. I think the best part was about why you shouldn't just put all your data in one spreadsheet (my usual approach to data management). Basically if you have to repeat information anywhere, you need another spreadsheet. You want to be able to change the data in one spot and have it change it everywhere. The little diagrams helped me to visualize where the data was and what kinds of things go one when multiple people access a database. I have a new appreciation for Google drive!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Nabors

    This is a good book for someone new to web development looking to buff up their computer science knowledge. It's fun and bouncy and easy to chew through. My only complain is that the manga translations seem a little too literal. For instance, a sound effect says "giggling" instead of "giggle." This book would have benefitted from having that portion gone over by a seasoned comics editor. They're available for hire, and I hope the publisher will consider it in the future. A more natural reading o This is a good book for someone new to web development looking to buff up their computer science knowledge. It's fun and bouncy and easy to chew through. My only complain is that the manga translations seem a little too literal. For instance, a sound effect says "giggling" instead of "giggle." This book would have benefitted from having that portion gone over by a seasoned comics editor. They're available for hire, and I hope the publisher will consider it in the future. A more natural reading of the comic would have bumped this into 5 star territory.

  30. 4 out of 5

    A.C. Ahn

    Such a fun book. I read it over the weekend for work to get more familiar with databases. I already knew most the basics, so it served as more of a refresher mini course / boost to my knowledge confidence. It covers the general ideas of the components of a database in manga form, then goes into detail at the end of the chapter, with problem sets. The details can get very in-depth, so more novice readers may choose to skip some of it. The manga plot is a bit lacking, for obvious reasons, but this q Such a fun book. I read it over the weekend for work to get more familiar with databases. I already knew most the basics, so it served as more of a refresher mini course / boost to my knowledge confidence. It covers the general ideas of the components of a database in manga form, then goes into detail at the end of the chapter, with problem sets. The details can get very in-depth, so more novice readers may choose to skip some of it. The manga plot is a bit lacking, for obvious reasons, but this quick guide is still worth the read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.