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Iron Magicians: The Search for the Magic Crystals: The Comic Book You Can Play (Comic Quests 5)

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This middle-grade graphic novel series makes YOU the hero of a fantasy quest—pick your panel, find items, cast spells, defeat enemies, solve puzzles, and play through new storylines again and again! Step inside a steampunk re-imagining of nineteenth-century Paris, where magic and machines exist in harmony. The Eiffel Tower—a secret weapon built with magic—is almost complete This middle-grade graphic novel series makes YOU the hero of a fantasy quest—pick your panel, find items, cast spells, defeat enemies, solve puzzles, and play through new storylines again and again! Step inside a steampunk re-imagining of nineteenth-century Paris, where magic and machines exist in harmony. The Eiffel Tower—a secret weapon built with magic—is almost complete, but the crystals that power the structure are missing! Find the hidden crystals and survive your dangerous mission. HERE’S HOW TO PLAY: • Select your character and begin your quest. • Numbers are hidden in every panel. Decide where you want to go next, and then flip to the panel with the matching number. • Solve puzzles, cast spells, and defeat enemies in your quest for success. Only after you’ve collected all the crystals will your journey be complete. • If you fail your mission, just start again from the beginning! You can play the book again and again, making different choices every time. Remember, this is no ordinary comic book—what happens next is up to you!


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This middle-grade graphic novel series makes YOU the hero of a fantasy quest—pick your panel, find items, cast spells, defeat enemies, solve puzzles, and play through new storylines again and again! Step inside a steampunk re-imagining of nineteenth-century Paris, where magic and machines exist in harmony. The Eiffel Tower—a secret weapon built with magic—is almost complete This middle-grade graphic novel series makes YOU the hero of a fantasy quest—pick your panel, find items, cast spells, defeat enemies, solve puzzles, and play through new storylines again and again! Step inside a steampunk re-imagining of nineteenth-century Paris, where magic and machines exist in harmony. The Eiffel Tower—a secret weapon built with magic—is almost complete, but the crystals that power the structure are missing! Find the hidden crystals and survive your dangerous mission. HERE’S HOW TO PLAY: • Select your character and begin your quest. • Numbers are hidden in every panel. Decide where you want to go next, and then flip to the panel with the matching number. • Solve puzzles, cast spells, and defeat enemies in your quest for success. Only after you’ve collected all the crystals will your journey be complete. • If you fail your mission, just start again from the beginning! You can play the book again and again, making different choices every time. Remember, this is no ordinary comic book—what happens next is up to you!

46 review for Iron Magicians: The Search for the Magic Crystals: The Comic Book You Can Play (Comic Quests 5)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

    I received a finished copy from the publisher for review. Thank you! First off - the art in this is adorable. Secondly - this is a very entertaining solo game/choose your own adventure comic that reminded me of D&D. I could see this being a great book for younger readers who are into tabletop games and enjoy the stress of leaving it up to the dice. Perfect substitute for game night when your group can't make it or for playing on the road. The paths are very easy to follow and you have so many cho I received a finished copy from the publisher for review. Thank you! First off - the art in this is adorable. Secondly - this is a very entertaining solo game/choose your own adventure comic that reminded me of D&D. I could see this being a great book for younger readers who are into tabletop games and enjoy the stress of leaving it up to the dice. Perfect substitute for game night when your group can't make it or for playing on the road. The paths are very easy to follow and you have so many choices! You could easily read/play through multiple times and have a new exciting adventure each time. You'll probably know the answers to some of the riddles after the first time through - but any adventurer knows that you learn and become wiser during your travels.

  2. 5 out of 5

    soleil

    One of the coolest books I’ve read in a while. I loved this concept.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    The concept of this book was excellent! A choose your own adventure in a comic book format. Unfortunately, there were several things that I didn't love about it. This is not a book that you can pick up on the go and start reading, the reader needs to keep track of several different things on their journey through the story. There are several charts in the front to use for that and the book recommends that you use pencil. My concern is for the kids that borrow the book from the library and are un The concept of this book was excellent! A choose your own adventure in a comic book format. Unfortunately, there were several things that I didn't love about it. This is not a book that you can pick up on the go and start reading, the reader needs to keep track of several different things on their journey through the story. There are several charts in the front to use for that and the book recommends that you use pencil. My concern is for the kids that borrow the book from the library and are unable to write in it. I didn't want to write in my copy so I replicated the charts as well as I could, which took about 30 minutes. I think this could be discouraging for kids who are already hesitant readers. There are also two "wheels" in the back that are supposed to be cut out but would again be a bit of a problem for a library copy. There are suggested ways around this (rolling dice, picking random numbers). Keeping track of all the rules can be slightly confusing but the beginning of the story consists of the main character learning all of the rules pertaining to battles, spells, etc. This is helpful but it took about 25 minutes for me to get to the point where I was actually making my own choices. There was a lot of flipping back to the same frame and choosing the choices that I hadn't chosen before to learn everything. Learning the rules was a bit boring and confusing at times. The quest was interesting but there is a frame where the character stumbles into a satanic ritual. I find this very disturbing and concerning, considering that it's geared towards kids. It is definitely not content that I would feel comfortable recommending to others. The artwork is very nice and the concept can be a lot of fun but to me, the cons tend to outweigh the pros with this one. I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    C. S.

    This inventive, gamified graphic novel is a lot of fun, and will definitely appeal to fans of both choose-your-own-adventure and role-playing games like D&D. The visuals are engaging and I loved the steampunk/magic aesthetic. Would definitely love a physical copy to play around with, as navigating was a bit fiddly on the digital copy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shellina Nefelibata

    VERY interesting concept. I wanted to love it. A lot of the page flipping could have been avoided by making it more linear. Just at the beginning you have to flip to three different pages and back to the ‘main’ panel to learn spells and combat, which could have been explained easier.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    I chose this for my PopSugar 2021 Reading Challenge prompt: A book in a different format than what you usually read. I was very excited when I randomly discovered this book and purchased it for my school library. It's a great concept and I have been hand selling it to my middle school students. Playing through it myself I cut out the Wheel of Destiny. I will make a pocket for it and let it live in there so students can use it. But even if it is lost, there are still way combat/navigate around Paris I chose this for my PopSugar 2021 Reading Challenge prompt: A book in a different format than what you usually read. I was very excited when I randomly discovered this book and purchased it for my school library. It's a great concept and I have been hand selling it to my middle school students. Playing through it myself I cut out the Wheel of Destiny. I will make a pocket for it and let it live in there so students can use it. But even if it is lost, there are still way combat/navigate around Paris. Overall, I liked this and it was fun. But there were parts I was stuck and, if I followed the letter of the law, there would have been no way out. For example, I couldn't figure out how to leave the lab in the swamp since I failed at the password challenge. There were also parts where I was pretty low on money and didn't have enough charisma to get further. I was surprised by the demonic ritual in the middle of this. I am surprised I haven't received parent complaints about this title as my school library is a religious one.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Grixie

    I haven't read all of the panels yet but so far its great I haven't read all of the panels yet but so far its great

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    I've had decades of experience of gamebooks, but this was a rare instance of it being in comic book form. It's the usual thing of getting used to the fighting mechanism (and use of spells, here, too), then dashing through the map of the story. Here, Paris needs you to find 30 magical gems to power the protective aura an almost-complete Eiffel Tower will give it. You're ostensibly allowed to go wherever you choose, in whichever order, so the storyline is not set in one strict routine – but the pr I've had decades of experience of gamebooks, but this was a rare instance of it being in comic book form. It's the usual thing of getting used to the fighting mechanism (and use of spells, here, too), then dashing through the map of the story. Here, Paris needs you to find 30 magical gems to power the protective aura an almost-complete Eiffel Tower will give it. You're ostensibly allowed to go wherever you choose, in whichever order, so the storyline is not set in one strict routine – but the problems might have started before then. I'd been playing for some time and I still hadn't gone past the tutorial stage – so much of the introduction I'd already read is just repeated by characters, and even though you get to have a fight with a rabid dog and get given a spell, amongst other equipping goings-on, nothing had got up to speed. There was just no narrative flow – you were never reading one panel below the preceding, as in a comic, but flicking through to find what you had been told to do. With a gamebook this stage would have been a lot easier, for paragraphs can be whatever length they need – here it was see panel – go to panel – see panel – go to panel ad infinitum, with almost boring repetition. Nothing about this sequential art book was directly sequential. There never was any real narrative flow of that kind, to be true, but soon I found that didn't really matter. I'd got past the introductory phase, I'd started to see the first mission, and I'd also seen some benefits to this being in comic form. Yes, after I'd flicked to far too much nonsense (mapping my way as I went – time is precious, you know) I'd realised that the art itself offered visual clues of ways to go – on a page of text it might not be obvious which is the door to the outside, or which group of people outside the Louvre to speak to first, while here it's designed to be evident. And the book's format is so much closer to a computer game's, in that (if you're being honest with yourself and the book) it often relies on chance whether you pass the right way with the right amount of money, weapons, spells, or even gender. As always you have to be honest too with the answers to the puzzles and riddles, but some of them hardly make any difference if you get them right or not. I was still seeing awkward things that kind of gave me negative vibes, though. The mission from the mall can earn you 5 of your 30 targets if you're one gender, and a whopping 7 if you're another. It's also greatly more difficult to even start it if born the wrong way. (Elsewhere the map of the book pretends to split by gender, but goes to the exact same place.) After thoroughly mapping the mall branch of the story, and one other (saying goodbye to someone I'd yet to meet in the process, and gaining 12 of my 30 thingummies), I thought to give up, aware of my final verdict. But, you know what? I carried on. I really did have the urge to spend time on finding out what the haunted opera singer could reveal (not 12 of my 30, but a few, nonetheless), and indeed what all the other quests showed. Some were silly, fairytale-based fisticuffs; one section pretended to have a much more moral grounding, and tried to relate to the consequences of our actions. One got me through to the main section end and boss fight exceedingly quickly, and on mapping back gave me things I can't remember being used at all. But still, for those conclusions and impressions. One, this is a book where you struggle to kill yourself by your own poor decisions, it's mostly down to fighting where you will lose your life. Another is that this is immense – yes, I was definitely slowed down by mapping each branch of every plotline as I went on, but even so this is an undertaking. It only has the same amount of story beats as the standard "Fighting Fantasy" game-book, 400, but this feels like there's so much more to do. And while that stayed at the same plodding flick-look-decide-flick-look-decide rhythm, it still certainly engaged. The child-friendly fantasy here is done very well. Finally, however, this has to be bought as a comic book gamebook, and not for the kindle. If the page links are embedded and you can just click from one panel to another, that would be fine – but then that would be an app in my mind, and not an e-book. My review copy was a digital file, and it was really awkward to always scroll to the one exact panel needed, then the next, and so on and so on. I'm sure, however, reading and playing this on paper would be a slow-burning pleasure. But why it's so much easier for girls, I'll never know.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I picked up this interactive comic book at BookExpo this year. Comics are not normally my thing but this one looked intriguing. Glad that I did! It was fun and I enjoyed playing through it (which I did several times with different outcomes). It is a fantasy quest set in 19th century Paris. You are tasked with finding 30 power crystals and are instructed to bring them to the Eiffel Tower in order to complete it and make the city safe. You choose what character you wish to be and start your quest I picked up this interactive comic book at BookExpo this year. Comics are not normally my thing but this one looked intriguing. Glad that I did! It was fun and I enjoyed playing through it (which I did several times with different outcomes). It is a fantasy quest set in 19th century Paris. You are tasked with finding 30 power crystals and are instructed to bring them to the Eiffel Tower in order to complete it and make the city safe. You choose what character you wish to be and start your quest by choosing a numbered door. Then you find the corresponding number within the comic panels and follow the instructions. Simple enough but it does take a little time to get up to speed on how to play. I liked that you could make your own choices and are not stuck with just one outcome. I tried not writing everything down at first. Big mistake! I could not keep straight what tools I had acquired or how many crystals I had unless I kept a tally. At the beginning is a few pages for the reader/player to use in tracking all the “stuff”. The illustrations were fabulous and done much better than your normal comic. The pages were glossy and extra thick to allow for the abuse the comic will get over its lifetime as kids play and replay the quest. I was not fond of the idea of using a crayon as a spinner for the wheel found in the back that you cut out. As suggested, I opted for using dice and found this more to my liking. The major negative is the flipping, flipping and flipping of pages as you are constantly being directed to a new panel. Once I got used to it the quest played smoothly. It just took me a little bit to adjust to the non-comic book format of going to the next panel in order. I recommend this interactive comic to all comic book lovers. However, some of the youngest readers might find it a little hard to grasp all the rules and may need adult help. I received a free copy for review purposes. All my opinions are my own. For more of my reviews, any author interviews, see my blog at www.thespineview.com.

  11. 4 out of 5

    BookTrib.com

    Imagine a comic book that has all the immersive power of a video game, complete with side quests, battles, hidden treasure and choices that have consequences. In Iron Magicians: The Search for the Magic Crystals (Quirk Books), the reader becomes the protagonist. In a fantastical steampunk Paris, Gustave Eiffel is unveiling his Tower at the World’s Fair. The reader is called upon to collect crystals which will charge the tower to defend Paris against a magical attack. But will they succeed? And wh Imagine a comic book that has all the immersive power of a video game, complete with side quests, battles, hidden treasure and choices that have consequences. In Iron Magicians: The Search for the Magic Crystals (Quirk Books), the reader becomes the protagonist. In a fantastical steampunk Paris, Gustave Eiffel is unveiling his Tower at the World’s Fair. The reader is called upon to collect crystals which will charge the tower to defend Paris against a magical attack. But will they succeed? And what kind of person will they become? Written by Cetrix and illustrated by Yuio, Iron Magicians is an intricate game that you won’t want to stop playing. The reader travels the Paris streets, looks for ghosts in the Opera Garnier, hunts zombies in Père Lachaise cemetery and encounters magical paintings in the Louvre. This is a choose-your-own-adventure comic, guaranteeing that each read-through will be unique. Readers start the quest as either a boy or a girl, each with different charisma, magic and technology stats. As the quest unfolds, the reader can change these stats using potions, spells or clothing items. Tear-out sheets (as well as printable ones online, or you can use a notebook) make keeping track easy and fun. The rest of the review: https://booktrib.com/2019/08/iron-mag...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tonja Drecker

    This was a fun mix of mystery solving, graphic novel, and a bit of a choose your own adventure feel, while incorporating even more. In other words, a book to really dive into. I've heard that this was a novel in France in 2014 and was translated. I have not read the other books in the series, but that is not an issue. This adventure surrounds the hunt to restore the power to the Eiffel Tower to keep Paris safe. It's set in a steampunk world around the end of the 1800's. There are downloadable pag This was a fun mix of mystery solving, graphic novel, and a bit of a choose your own adventure feel, while incorporating even more. In other words, a book to really dive into. I've heard that this was a novel in France in 2014 and was translated. I have not read the other books in the series, but that is not an issue. This adventure surrounds the hunt to restore the power to the Eiffel Tower to keep Paris safe. It's set in a steampunk world around the end of the 1800's. There are downloadable pages to help keep track of progress while solving the mysteries, but these are also in the book. In other words, this is an active read on many levels. The story is fun, keeps the reader guessing and has unexpected twists and turns to guarantee a return to try the adventure again. The graphic novel style fits wonderfully—something I've never seen in this form, but really enjoyed. The wording is just right for ages eight to twelve, and even slightly older readers will get caught up in the fun. I recommend this one for all fans of graphic novels, a little steampunk and an adventure which the reader can steer. I received a complimentary copy from Netgalley and was surprised at how fun a read it was!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    What's better than a choose your own adventure novel? A choose your own adventure graphic novel! However, that description doesn't begin to do this book justice. It's really a role playing dice game that children of all ages can enjoy by themselves. Set in late 19th century Paris, you must explore a Steampunk underground world of spells, puzzles, and enemies. Bad choices may lead you to unfortunate perils, but if you gather enough crystals, you might just save the World's Fair by enabling Mr. Ei What's better than a choose your own adventure novel? A choose your own adventure graphic novel! However, that description doesn't begin to do this book justice. It's really a role playing dice game that children of all ages can enjoy by themselves. Set in late 19th century Paris, you must explore a Steampunk underground world of spells, puzzles, and enemies. Bad choices may lead you to unfortunate perils, but if you gather enough crystals, you might just save the World's Fair by enabling Mr. Eiffel to unveil his epic creation. The digital version of this book is difficult to navigate; that's why I plan on buying my own paper copy to play over and over again. It includes worksheets, a map, a compass, and many other useful items. Also important to note is that instead of turning to particular pages, your choices will take you to different comic cells. This will be easy to flip to in book form, but was hard to find with a digital version. I was fortunate to receive a free ARC of this book from Netgalley. The above thoughts, insights, or recommendations are my own meek musings.

  14. 4 out of 5

    FloeticFlo

    I admit that I was intrigued by this concept as soon as I heard about it. And I'm happy to say that the execution was as fun as I'd hoped. In a nutshell, this was a combination of a comic book and a Choose Your Own Adventure book. The instructions are a little complex and may require attention and focus from a middle grader. For me, just reading for fun on a Saturday night, I chose to focus not on the puzzles but on following the storyline through the pages. And like I said, I had fun with it! I I admit that I was intrigued by this concept as soon as I heard about it. And I'm happy to say that the execution was as fun as I'd hoped. In a nutshell, this was a combination of a comic book and a Choose Your Own Adventure book. The instructions are a little complex and may require attention and focus from a middle grader. For me, just reading for fun on a Saturday night, I chose to focus not on the puzzles but on following the storyline through the pages. And like I said, I had fun with it! I definitely think I will be giving this book to my niece or nephew, as it strikes me as a good one to give to a child to get them critically thinking while still having fun. Read the full review on Book Nerds Across America: http://www.booknerdsacrossamerica.com...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    My review's here,https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-re.... My review's here,https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-re....

  16. 4 out of 5

    Assortedtrashprincess

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ал Торо

  18. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

  19. 4 out of 5

    Derek

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Harkleroad

  21. 4 out of 5

    Scott Moore

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matt Harry

  23. 4 out of 5

    mike

  24. 4 out of 5

    CJ

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lyndi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chad

  27. 4 out of 5

    Briana

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Labonte

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kylie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Angkita Chaliha

  31. 5 out of 5

    Carla

  32. 5 out of 5

    Alyazia

  33. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  34. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  35. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Mellen

  36. 5 out of 5

    LibrarEmiller

  37. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Gatzlaff

  38. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  39. 4 out of 5

    Gene

  40. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  41. 4 out of 5

    Quirk Books

  42. 4 out of 5

    unknown

  43. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  44. 4 out of 5

    M

  45. 4 out of 5

    Htaggart

  46. 5 out of 5

    Shana Silva

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