website statistics Vulgarians at the Gate: Trash TV and Raunch Radio : Raising Standards of Popular Culture - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Vulgarians at the Gate: Trash TV and Raunch Radio : Raising Standards of Popular Culture

Availability: Ready to download

Do you know what your kids are watching on TV or hearing on the radio? While channel surfing, they may come across an episode of Ally McBeal, in which Ally has anonymous sex in a car wash; the cartoon series South Park, in which one of the characters is a talking piece of excrement; the public airing of dirty laundry on The Jerry Springer Show; the inane, obscene rantings Do you know what your kids are watching on TV or hearing on the radio? While channel surfing, they may come across an episode of Ally McBeal, in which Ally has anonymous sex in a car wash; the cartoon series South Park, in which one of the characters is a talking piece of excrement; the public airing of dirty laundry on The Jerry Springer Show; the inane, obscene rantings of Howard Stern; or the glorified violence that seems to be the staple of every primetime action show. As a key player in the creative excellence that made TV's Golden Age so memorable, Steve Allen is disgusted and outraged by what he sees on television today. Though he's quick to applaud the few good shows now on TV, he is dismayed that these small islands of quality are almost lost in the sea of mediocrity and outright vulgarity that characterizes current television fare. Whereas talent and quality were the benchmarks of the early years of television and radio, pandering to the lowest common denominator in pursuit of advertising dollars and audience share is the main focus of today's programmers and performers. More disturbing than the issue of artistic quality is the effect that such low cultural standards are having on our children. Every day America's youth is being exposed to hideously inappropiate speech and behavior by role models in TV, film, radio, and the music industry. Concern about this crass promotion of sexuality and violence to children is not just an obsession of the religious right. A growing number of people in the entertainment industry, as well as citizens from all walks of life, are disturbed by the coarsening of American entertainment with its glorification of violence and casual, no-consequences sex. To fight this slide toward Gomorrah a campaign called "The Parents Television Council" has been launched, the goal of which is to improve the quality of television and all other facets of the entertainment industry. As honorary chairman, Steve Allen describes not only what the council is doing to raise our cultural standards, but more importantly what all concerned citizens can do to help. Allen argues against complacency; adults may ignore the content of television programming and other entertainment, but children are certainly paying attention and imbibing the not-so-subtle violent and sexually charged messages. The question, says Allen, is: What kind of a society will we bequeath to our children, one dominated by media conglomerates that push anything for a quick buck, or one that reflects the highest standards of our heritage? It's up to us to do something about it., to raise a chorus of protest that echoes the words of the TV anchorman from Network, "I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take it anymore!"


Compare

Do you know what your kids are watching on TV or hearing on the radio? While channel surfing, they may come across an episode of Ally McBeal, in which Ally has anonymous sex in a car wash; the cartoon series South Park, in which one of the characters is a talking piece of excrement; the public airing of dirty laundry on The Jerry Springer Show; the inane, obscene rantings Do you know what your kids are watching on TV or hearing on the radio? While channel surfing, they may come across an episode of Ally McBeal, in which Ally has anonymous sex in a car wash; the cartoon series South Park, in which one of the characters is a talking piece of excrement; the public airing of dirty laundry on The Jerry Springer Show; the inane, obscene rantings of Howard Stern; or the glorified violence that seems to be the staple of every primetime action show. As a key player in the creative excellence that made TV's Golden Age so memorable, Steve Allen is disgusted and outraged by what he sees on television today. Though he's quick to applaud the few good shows now on TV, he is dismayed that these small islands of quality are almost lost in the sea of mediocrity and outright vulgarity that characterizes current television fare. Whereas talent and quality were the benchmarks of the early years of television and radio, pandering to the lowest common denominator in pursuit of advertising dollars and audience share is the main focus of today's programmers and performers. More disturbing than the issue of artistic quality is the effect that such low cultural standards are having on our children. Every day America's youth is being exposed to hideously inappropiate speech and behavior by role models in TV, film, radio, and the music industry. Concern about this crass promotion of sexuality and violence to children is not just an obsession of the religious right. A growing number of people in the entertainment industry, as well as citizens from all walks of life, are disturbed by the coarsening of American entertainment with its glorification of violence and casual, no-consequences sex. To fight this slide toward Gomorrah a campaign called "The Parents Television Council" has been launched, the goal of which is to improve the quality of television and all other facets of the entertainment industry. As honorary chairman, Steve Allen describes not only what the council is doing to raise our cultural standards, but more importantly what all concerned citizens can do to help. Allen argues against complacency; adults may ignore the content of television programming and other entertainment, but children are certainly paying attention and imbibing the not-so-subtle violent and sexually charged messages. The question, says Allen, is: What kind of a society will we bequeath to our children, one dominated by media conglomerates that push anything for a quick buck, or one that reflects the highest standards of our heritage? It's up to us to do something about it., to raise a chorus of protest that echoes the words of the TV anchorman from Network, "I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take it anymore!"

37 review for Vulgarians at the Gate: Trash TV and Raunch Radio : Raising Standards of Popular Culture

  1. 4 out of 5

    Unclebill

    BOOOOOOORING!!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Steve Allen rightly criticizes the media for its tasteless excesses in violence and sexuality. However, he falls into a few logical traps along the way. He praises the bawdy humor of Benny Hill yet decries Madonna's erotic displays in concerts and videos. He also makes a point critical of religion that made me raise my eyebrows, on page 344: "Religious believers of the world, you are free to continue to debate the simple, narrow question that divides you from atheists, but you have no right, in Steve Allen rightly criticizes the media for its tasteless excesses in violence and sexuality. However, he falls into a few logical traps along the way. He praises the bawdy humor of Benny Hill yet decries Madonna's erotic displays in concerts and videos. He also makes a point critical of religion that made me raise my eyebrows, on page 344: "Religious believers of the world, you are free to continue to debate the simple, narrow question that divides you from atheists, but you have no right, in so doing, to treat humanists with contempt." Strange, coming from a man whose book seems like it fits a Christian perspective. But, anyhow, there are religious people who daily question their beliefs and are capable of rational, logical thinking. Had it ever occurred to Mr. Allen that perhaps some of the filth coming over the radio, television, and out of Hollywood is the product of humanist thinking? The last time I checked, Hollywood wasn't exactly a Christian stronghold. Most, if not all, of Hollywood routinely mocks religion, as well as parental authority. There are many humanists like Allen who have strong moral fiber. Then again, there are many humanists who couldn't find the moral high ground, much less occupy it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Steve Allen was a visionary!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    I give him 4 stars for his critique of trash tv and raunch radio. But he gets one star for the anti - religious diatribe at the end of the book which has little to do with the rest of his critique.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  6. 5 out of 5

    Beverly Taylor

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Schaibly

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gstachura

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kriss

  10. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  11. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

  12. 5 out of 5

    Norman Tibbils

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rich

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  16. 5 out of 5

    Greg Stratman

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vanni Pulé

  18. 4 out of 5

    DJ

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alex Strong

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ed Dorsey

  21. 4 out of 5

    James Sheets

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  23. 5 out of 5

    Thom Dunn

  24. 4 out of 5

    Steve Pemberton

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gayle Mangis

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dennis G

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cateline

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rose

  31. 5 out of 5

    Majid Sultan

  32. 4 out of 5

    Joe Bongers

  33. 4 out of 5

    Connie

  34. 4 out of 5

    David Allard

  35. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Paskert

  36. 4 out of 5

    Apex157x

  37. 5 out of 5

    Subodh

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...