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Huawei, 5G and National Security: A Lawfare Compilation: A Kindle ebook from the Lawfare Institute

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What are the national security implications of 5G technology? And how concerned should we be about Chinese companies like Huawei getting a foothold in 5G networks? Featuring chapters originally published as articles on Lawfare, this new ebook from the Lawfare Institute gathers contributors’ recent expert analysis on various issues surrounding these vexing 5G challenges. Us What are the national security implications of 5G technology? And how concerned should we be about Chinese companies like Huawei getting a foothold in 5G networks? Featuring chapters originally published as articles on Lawfare, this new ebook from the Lawfare Institute gathers contributors’ recent expert analysis on various issues surrounding these vexing 5G challenges. Useful to 5G novices and experts in the field alike, the information and insights in this compilation shed light on the crucial intersection of communications technology and national security.


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What are the national security implications of 5G technology? And how concerned should we be about Chinese companies like Huawei getting a foothold in 5G networks? Featuring chapters originally published as articles on Lawfare, this new ebook from the Lawfare Institute gathers contributors’ recent expert analysis on various issues surrounding these vexing 5G challenges. Us What are the national security implications of 5G technology? And how concerned should we be about Chinese companies like Huawei getting a foothold in 5G networks? Featuring chapters originally published as articles on Lawfare, this new ebook from the Lawfare Institute gathers contributors’ recent expert analysis on various issues surrounding these vexing 5G challenges. Useful to 5G novices and experts in the field alike, the information and insights in this compilation shed light on the crucial intersection of communications technology and national security.

7 review for Huawei, 5G and National Security: A Lawfare Compilation: A Kindle ebook from the Lawfare Institute

  1. 4 out of 5

    Fred Cheyunski

    Legal and Policy Matters from Now to 6G - When looking for books about 5G and Huawei as there has been attention to related topics in the news (e.g. the UK deciding not to include the Chinese company’s products as 5G networks are built out in its country), I stumbled upon this title. While going with another book first (see my review of Gallardo’s “5G Networking: Learning 5G Technology Explained for Dummies”) to better understand the technology, I then returned to this one to get a further appre Legal and Policy Matters from Now to 6G - When looking for books about 5G and Huawei as there has been attention to related topics in the news (e.g. the UK deciding not to include the Chinese company’s products as 5G networks are built out in its country), I stumbled upon this title. While going with another book first (see my review of Gallardo’s “5G Networking: Learning 5G Technology Explained for Dummies”) to better understand the technology, I then returned to this one to get a further appreciation of the security issues involved. To my edification and satisfaction, the different chapters dealt with not only the various legal and policy matters but also a description of 5G technology and its potential impacts. More specifically, the contents include 14 articles by different authors on various aspects of the subject that had appeared on the Lawfare Blog. Particularly, the respective Chapters include: (1) "Keeping Huawei Hardware Out of the U.S. Is Not Enough To Secure 5G” by Tom Wheeler and Robert D. Williams; (2) "5G Networks Must Be Secure and Reliable" by Jim Baker; (3) "Huawei and Managing 5G Risk" by Herb Lin; (4) "Is Huawei a “Foreign Power” or an “Agent of a Foreign Power” Under FISA? Insights from the Sanctions Case" by Bobby Chesney; (5) "Huawei Technology v. U.S.: Summary and Context" by Stephanie Zable; (6) "A Risk Analysis of Huawei 5G" by Nicholas Weaver; (7) "The Risks of Huawei Risk Mitigation" by Alexei Bulazel, Sophia d’Antoine, Perri Adams, and Dave Aitel; (8) "On Risk Mitigation and Huawei: A Response" by Herb Lin; (9) "The Technical Consequences of Trump’s Telecom Supply Chain Emergency" by Nicholas Weaver; (10) "The Confused U.S. Messaging Campaign on Huawei" by Justin Sherman and Robert Morgus; (11) "Do Patents Protect National Security?" by Charles Duan; (12)"What Congress Is (and Isn’t) Doing on 5G" by Margaret Taylor; (13) "Rethinking Encryption" by Jim Baker; and (14) "Setting the Stage for U.S. Leadership in 6G" by Martijn Rasser. Comments that were most helpful to me included those providing 5G background. For instance, in Chapter (1) Wheeler and Williams state that “A 5G network is essentially a collection of microprocessors rapidly sending packets of data among themselves.” Then in Chapter (2) Baker remarks such as “5G promises to revolutionize how people use technology” and “. . . as 5G enables data to be transmitted much more quickly, the number of devices connected to the internet will likely explode, producing massive economic benefits for those who can quickly take full advantage of the new technology.” Regarding 5G security, my favorite parts were those that laid out the issues as directly and strait forwardly as possibly. For example, as indicated in Chapter (1) “The goal of effective 5G cybersecurity should be to anticipate and ameliorate foreign attackers exploiting the internet’s connections for their own purposes through any of these vectors . . . The Russians, Iranians, North Koreans and others have already proven their abilities to penetrate U.S. networks to cause harm—and the networks they broke into didn’t use Chinese equipment . . . In short, the 5G cybersecurity challenge is much more complicated than simply dealing with network equipment and Huawei” (on related matters see my review of “The Mueller Report”). As explained in Chapter (2), the complications include that “. . . 5G will bring with it substantial national security, cybersecurity, and privacy risks . . . China is committed to overtaking the United States as the predominant world power especially with regard to advanced technology such as 5G . . . The US cannot fall substantially behind China in 5G implementation. . . “ At the same time “. . . It is critical that 5G networks be both reliable and secure . . . [and] . . . “Network security and reliability are not receiving enough attention.” A useful comparison is that the relationship of Huawei to the Chinese government is not unlike the Kaspersky-Russia relationship as described in by Chesney in Chapter (4). That is “. . . all Chinese companies have comprehensive obligations . . . to comply when the Chinese government seeks information or assistance for national security purposes.” Furthermore, another account goes “. . . that there are deep ties between Huawei and Chinese intelligence services and Huawei might act as an agent of those services rather than as an independent company with an arms-length relationship with its government.” In addition to these factors, Chapter (10) expresses that “The Trump administration’s narrative frequently blurs the line between the issues. . . it’s easy to see the measures against Huawei as part of pressure placed on China’s economy to extract concessions down the road . . .many countries, particularly in Europe, now have reason to harbor doubts that U.S. claims might just be motivated by a trade war” (see my reviews of Kahna’s “The Future is Asian” and Sharma’s “The Rise and Fall of Nations”). Along with the other security and economic competitiveness issues, I was surprised and resigned to Rasser’s Chapter (14) suggestion that “Though it may sound premature, now is the time to focus on what comes next: 6G. . . .These advances will bring opportunities for breakthroughs in data transmission over shorter wavelengths than 5G—meaning [that] . . . With decisive action today, the U.S. can ensure its status as the undisputed leader in wireless technology within 10 years” (for related topics see my review of Kelly’s “The Inevitable”). Given that the articles included were written at different times by different authors, there is some repetition and redundancy. However, if you are so inclined this book is a fine starter in further exploring such 5G related matters.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hiroyuki Hatada

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robbie Forkish

  4. 4 out of 5

    David Wilson

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sean Leach

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rick Howard

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