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Night of the Eye

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Magic at its peak! It will soon be the Night of the Eye, a rare time when all three moons align in high sanction over the lands of Krynn. On the eve of Guerrand DiThon's political marriage to a rival family, the young noble is visited by a strange, powerful mage who knows more about him than he does himself. Seduced by promises of wizardly might, Guerrand slips away beneat Magic at its peak! It will soon be the Night of the Eye, a rare time when all three moons align in high sanction over the lands of Krynn. On the eve of Guerrand DiThon's political marriage to a rival family, the young noble is visited by a strange, powerful mage who knows more about him than he does himself. Seduced by promises of wizardly might, Guerrand slips away beneath the triple moons and journeys for the Tower of Wayreth. No one thinks he will survive the deadly trek to the tower, but he does. It's only then that Guerrand realizes that he has made many enemies in his journey. One of these foes would not only see Guerrand dead, but the three orders of sorcery destroyed with him.


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Magic at its peak! It will soon be the Night of the Eye, a rare time when all three moons align in high sanction over the lands of Krynn. On the eve of Guerrand DiThon's political marriage to a rival family, the young noble is visited by a strange, powerful mage who knows more about him than he does himself. Seduced by promises of wizardly might, Guerrand slips away beneat Magic at its peak! It will soon be the Night of the Eye, a rare time when all three moons align in high sanction over the lands of Krynn. On the eve of Guerrand DiThon's political marriage to a rival family, the young noble is visited by a strange, powerful mage who knows more about him than he does himself. Seduced by promises of wizardly might, Guerrand slips away beneath the triple moons and journeys for the Tower of Wayreth. No one thinks he will survive the deadly trek to the tower, but he does. It's only then that Guerrand realizes that he has made many enemies in his journey. One of these foes would not only see Guerrand dead, but the three orders of sorcery destroyed with him.

30 review for Night of the Eye

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    In the land of Northern Ergoth, Guerrand DiThon struggles against his familial obligations to become a cavalier. He meets a mage, Belize, who convinces him to go to Wayreth to the Tower of High Sorcery to become a mage. Guerrand does so and goes into training to become a mage under the tutelage of Justarius, a mage of the Red Robes. But, Belize has other plans for Guerrand, as well as for his own dreams of power. During an event known as the Night of the Eye, he wants to enter a forgotten realm w In the land of Northern Ergoth, Guerrand DiThon struggles against his familial obligations to become a cavalier. He meets a mage, Belize, who convinces him to go to Wayreth to the Tower of High Sorcery to become a mage. Guerrand does so and goes into training to become a mage under the tutelage of Justarius, a mage of the Red Robes. But, Belize has other plans for Guerrand, as well as for his own dreams of power. During an event known as the Night of the Eye, he wants to enter a forgotten realm where the gods of magic have stored vast amounts of magical knowledge. That's the basis for this story. I shall not spoil any more of the plot. While this isn't to the level of some of the other Dragonlance books, it is still an entertaining read. I've always enjoyed reading about the mages of Dragonlance and I tend to appreciate the magic system (White/Red/Black). While the story is good, nothing special though, I really enjoyed seeing characters from the Twins Trilogy. This story takes place a few decades before the events of Raistlin, but some of the major players are here- Par-Salian, Ladonna and even Justarius (before he became the head of the Red robes). I also appreciated a brief rundown of the curse placed upon the Tower of High Sorcery in Palanthas. It, of course, is the same one that Raistlin claimed in his time. Those little additons made me appreciate the story a bit more. I think this is one any Dragonlance fan will appreciate. If you've enevr read any of the series, no worries this story can stand easily on its own. Its the same setting but has nothing to do with the later story told during the Twins trilogy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jim C

    My rating is 3.5 stars. This novel takes place in the Dragonlance setting and is the first book in a trilogy. It is about Guerrand who likes magic and wants to become a mage. His brother and guardian, Cormac, wants him to become a knight. Cormac, who despises magic, realizes Guerrand is giving him the runaround and Cormac plans to marry off Guerrand for his own gain. Guerrand takes off to find his own place in the world. This was an enjoyable coming of age novel. The main character is likeable and My rating is 3.5 stars. This novel takes place in the Dragonlance setting and is the first book in a trilogy. It is about Guerrand who likes magic and wants to become a mage. His brother and guardian, Cormac, wants him to become a knight. Cormac, who despises magic, realizes Guerrand is giving him the runaround and Cormac plans to marry off Guerrand for his own gain. Guerrand takes off to find his own place in the world. This was an enjoyable coming of age novel. The main character is likeable and he surrounds himself with other likeable characters. This novel explores magic in this world and gives us a look at the training people do trying to master it. I really enjoyed the different types of spells that were on display. This book also has other concepts like loyalty, jealousy, and romance that heighten the experience of reading this novel. The only problem I had with this novel was the ending as it was a little abrupt. This is an nice introduction to a new trilogy in this setting. It concentrates more on the magic component than sword fights and dragons. If one is looking for a more in depth view of magic this novel fits the bill.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    I first read this book in 6th grade, 21 years ago, and though I had forgotten much, okay nearly all of it, I always remembered liking The Night of the Eye by Mary Kirchoff. Well, after 21 years, not only was it as good as I remember it, but I am certain to have picked up more of the subtle nuances I know I must have missed when I read this book as a preadolescent. The nature of imagination is infinite, and allows for the destruction of 4th wall with the stroke of a pen. Compare the spell list by I first read this book in 6th grade, 21 years ago, and though I had forgotten much, okay nearly all of it, I always remembered liking The Night of the Eye by Mary Kirchoff. Well, after 21 years, not only was it as good as I remember it, but I am certain to have picked up more of the subtle nuances I know I must have missed when I read this book as a preadolescent. The nature of imagination is infinite, and allows for the destruction of 4th wall with the stroke of a pen. Compare the spell list by the wizard player character class in the Player's Handbook of Dungeons and Dragons to the spells commonly found in the novels: light, sleep, charm, fireball, lightning bolt etc. The reason for the reduction lies in the balance of power. If every high level wizard were running around slinging 'wish' spells, how could a writer establish a sense of gravity within the world? In the first installment of The Defenders of Magic Trilogy, The Night of The Eye, Mary Kirchoff gives us a showcase of magic, past the mundane spells commonly found in most DragonLance books, albeit at a measured pace. Some readers may find the journey to be slow, and bereft of "action" unaware of the smooth and steady gradation, the details behind the arcane. The...simpler tempo allows, and even necessitates for rich character development, and may be more suitable for mature audiences. I was amazed at the sensitivity the author took near the end *spoiler* when Rand finally visits his sister at Castle DiThon, and Kirah "warmed briefly at the mention of the other apprentice Lyim." That's not so obvious, what Kirah must have been thinking and wrestling with. Here she must place blind faith in a complete stranger and when Rand mentions Lyim, the triangle finally becomes complete and allows her mind to rest at ease knowing she made the right decision to place trust in Lyim, previously a total stranger. And there are plenty more transitional sentences that help the reader empathize and visualize, either what is going on inside the characters head, or in the story. Subtle transitional sentences. Smart. It's not just a fireworks display of magic, its the thinking that fuels that arcane. How can I, the reader, become a wizard? Its the visualization technique that Rand must master. Its the contrast between rote memorization and understanding, facility that matters. It is the sensory information outside of sight, invoked BY sight. It IS the fireworks display at the end of the book. Since not every DragonLance book features a showcase of magic (besides Raistlin, and even Palin's big spell in Dragons of Summer Flame amplified by the staff was kind of anonymous) I feel like the author was blessed to be able to write at this kind of level (epic level magic) by the higher ups in the DragonLance world (Margaret Weiss & Tracy Hickman). It is this feeling of the magic woven smoothly and balanced into the text that gives the impression of the spells being so researched in order to manifest ways into writing like a wizard. Again, its those subtle transition sentences that give insight into the lifestyle of the magi (lemon water & also...what is gooseberry preserves? cant say that sounds appealing lolz) and the phrase 'Dead Heads' (Justarius was plucking the dead heads...) that might betray use of psychedelics, but this is a good thing. This book is rich in writing, and demands care, or perhaps experience, or more aptly a higher character level of the reader to appreciate all of its subtleties that bring the world of wizards to life. I always wondered why *spoiler* it was that the protagonists chose the red robes, but now that I am 21 years older, I appreciate the gravity of neutrality. Distilling the headlong passion out of decision making. Weighing the consequences, and sticking to your guns (literally your *own* guns) and resisting from either overreacting or swinging too hard on the pendulum in reaction to an event or information. I also liked reading about how a neutrally aligned character might react such as in the beginning when the head of the three orders are explaining their positions. The Mistress of the Black Robes tries to, lets say massage, or justify use of the dark arts (black magic) with the inner sense of passion we all have, and the Head of the Red Robes smirks. Subtle transition sentences that give you insights into how wizards might think. If my memory serves me correctly, the fireworks only get bigger and better from here including a new druidic magic. Doesn't Rand somehow end up on the moon? I forget, its been 21 years and next on my reading que is The Blood Mirror by Brent Weeks (The Lightbringer trilogy which I also recommend). But 21 years later, The Night of The Eye by Mary Kirchoff still holds up, and with greater depth than I remember (I dont know how I could have absorbed all of the subtle nuances in this book in 6th grade).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I admit, whenever I go to read a book labelled "Dragonlance" or "The Forgotten Realms" or some other such world, I always hesitate. Don't ask me why - past experience has taught me that they're great reads. However, I still have that moment's pause before I begin reading. In this book, like always, I was pleasantly surprised. The story's main character is a man named Guerrand (or "Rand" for short). He's a bit cautious and timid at the beginning, but it's great to see him grow and become more sure I admit, whenever I go to read a book labelled "Dragonlance" or "The Forgotten Realms" or some other such world, I always hesitate. Don't ask me why - past experience has taught me that they're great reads. However, I still have that moment's pause before I begin reading. In this book, like always, I was pleasantly surprised. The story's main character is a man named Guerrand (or "Rand" for short). He's a bit cautious and timid at the beginning, but it's great to see him grow and become more sure of himself through the story. The magic is described beautifully. I'm not sure what else to say without spoiling anything... but if you're looking in a story with adventure, a hint of potential romance, and interesting characters, you should try this one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ronald Wilcox

    Very good tale set in the DragonLance series of novels set on Krynn. Magic was mostly stripped from the land for awhile but the three branches of magic are gradually building again. Guerrand is the younger brother of Lord Cormac and has aspirations of becoming a mage but his brother, who hates magic, insists he learn to be a cavalier instead. After ten years in training, he still has not progressed beyond squire because it is not what he wants. When his younger brother is killed, Guerrand is app Very good tale set in the DragonLance series of novels set on Krynn. Magic was mostly stripped from the land for awhile but the three branches of magic are gradually building again. Guerrand is the younger brother of Lord Cormac and has aspirations of becoming a mage but his brother, who hates magic, insists he learn to be a cavalier instead. After ten years in training, he still has not progressed beyond squire because it is not what he wants. When his younger brother is killed, Guerrand is approached by a mysterious mage who encourages him to follow his dream to be a mage instead of continuing as a cavalier-in-training and marrying a woman to get back some lands for his family. He runs away and follows his dream, not suspecting the difficult times ahead for him and his family .... Very likable protagonist and absorbing story. Looking forward to reading the next two in the trilogy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mark Adkins

    The first book of a trilogy set in the Dragonlance universe. While this book is aimed at people that are familiar with the Dragonlance books I think you could still read and understand what is going on without having read any prior Dragonlance books.

  7. 5 out of 5

    D

    Great story. Likeable characters. Full of suspense and humor. I look forward to reading the second book in the trilogy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kubany Csongor

    Nothing special. It was OK.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    This is a really good read. The novel caught my attention from the 1st chapter. Rand is faced with many hard choices throughout the book, that really brings him to life.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beau

    Delightful fun. Some interesting and original elements added to the world of Krynn. Almost family-friendly or Harry-Potter-like. Could be read without any knowledge of Dragonlance.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Bain

    Despite my 3-star rating, I really enjoyed this book. Comparing it to other titles that I have given 4 stars to, though, it does fall somewhat short. Night of the Eye is an refreshingly interesting book on mages. The world of magic is made up of three orders (White-good, Black-evil, and Red-neutral) and they are tasked with keeping balance between the forces of god and evil. But one of the mages threatens to destroy that to gain power. It is a slow-starting book. I very much caught myself thinking Despite my 3-star rating, I really enjoyed this book. Comparing it to other titles that I have given 4 stars to, though, it does fall somewhat short. Night of the Eye is an refreshingly interesting book on mages. The world of magic is made up of three orders (White-good, Black-evil, and Red-neutral) and they are tasked with keeping balance between the forces of god and evil. But one of the mages threatens to destroy that to gain power. It is a slow-starting book. I very much caught myself thinking, "okay, but who cares?" and then "let's get to using some spells already". Then there were times that the conversations felt cliche and unrealistic. But overall, once Guerrand, the protagonist, begun to become proficient in casting, the book got pretty interesting. The epilogue leaves off really nicely too. Recommend for anyone looking for a wizard book besides Harry Potter or maybe for lovers of High Fantasy, but I don't know that I would for someone just looking for good read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tabitha

    I was very pleased to see components used while the apprentices cast magic. I also enjoyed learning of Justarius' way of viewing magic and learning how to craft your own spells. Magic has never been explained in such terms in Dragonlance that I am aware of. I quite enjoyed the fact that Rand's familiar was a seagull, I haven't seen that before. Their banter back and forth was entertaining and had me smiling a few times. All in all I enjoyed this book. It was not my favorite Dragonlance, that must I was very pleased to see components used while the apprentices cast magic. I also enjoyed learning of Justarius' way of viewing magic and learning how to craft your own spells. Magic has never been explained in such terms in Dragonlance that I am aware of. I quite enjoyed the fact that Rand's familiar was a seagull, I haven't seen that before. Their banter back and forth was entertaining and had me smiling a few times. All in all I enjoyed this book. It was not my favorite Dragonlance, that must be reserved for the stories that include Raistlin Majere, but I would suggest it to anyone who enjoys the magic of Krynn.

  13. 4 out of 5

    MEG Munro

    Very very easy to become immersed in this story Ms. Kirchoff certainly knows how to keep you enticed throughout the entire storyline. The characters are easy to picture in your head because the author allows you see inside and out what the character is really about. I dare say that if Ms. Kirchoff wrote a storyline on a scrap paper, it would be outstanding!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lana

    love the use of magic, am enjoying reading this trilogy!! guerrand is a lovable character and esme is so charming and feisty!! lyim proved to be a true friend even if his intentions where not always so but in the end he did his bit for guerrand to his detriment!! Love to meet justarius and the great white robe and black robe mages but not so the scary evil red robe/black!!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Luke

    This was one of the very first fantasy novels I ever read, and the first Dragonlance book I read. The world and mechanics drew me in, and I've never left. I fully credit the Defenders of Magic series as the start of my deep love of fantasy. This was one of the very first fantasy novels I ever read, and the first Dragonlance book I read. The world and mechanics drew me in, and I've never left. I fully credit the Defenders of Magic series as the start of my deep love of fantasy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Miche D

    Slow at times. A little shallow in it's characterization. Slow at times. A little shallow in it's characterization.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Faria

    Por fin otra buena historia para el mundo de dragonlance. Aunque al final no es lo que prometen al principio del libro, es bastatnte buena la historia

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Otterson

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  23. 5 out of 5

    Todd Bjarnson

  24. 4 out of 5

    Royanna Cahill

  25. 4 out of 5

    Randy Roper

  26. 5 out of 5

    Will Wittwer

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Dillhunt

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hollie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gina Kenley

  30. 4 out of 5

    Martin

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