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Mack Malloy is a partner in one of Kindle County's top law firms. An ex-cop who joined the firm on a wave of enthusiasm and optimism, he now feels himself to be on the way down, and possibly out. Bert Kamin, gifted, erratic and combative, is one of the firm's star litigators and he has disappeared. Mack Malloy is a partner in one of Kindle County's top law firms. An ex-cop who joined the firm on a wave of enthusiasm and optimism, he now feels himself to be on the way down, and possibly out. Bert Kamin, gifted, erratic and combative, is one of the firm's star litigators and he has disappeared.


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Mack Malloy is a partner in one of Kindle County's top law firms. An ex-cop who joined the firm on a wave of enthusiasm and optimism, he now feels himself to be on the way down, and possibly out. Bert Kamin, gifted, erratic and combative, is one of the firm's star litigators and he has disappeared. Mack Malloy is a partner in one of Kindle County's top law firms. An ex-cop who joined the firm on a wave of enthusiasm and optimism, he now feels himself to be on the way down, and possibly out. Bert Kamin, gifted, erratic and combative, is one of the firm's star litigators and he has disappeared.

30 review for Pleading Guilty

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jarrel

    Strong, likable characters, and some to dislike as well. Fast paced action hi-brow thriller. I really enjoyed the plot and characters. I loved this excellent series, fast pace and intriguing. Fans of Brett Arquette's HAIL series will dig this novel. Strong, likable characters, and some to dislike as well. Fast paced action hi-brow thriller. I really enjoyed the plot and characters. I loved this excellent series, fast pace and intriguing. Fans of Brett Arquette's HAIL series will dig this novel.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lobstergirl

    I really did try to read this terrible book. I have a rule, I can't remember whether it's the 50-page rule or the 100-page rule, but the point is, it's a rule, and I live by it: reach that page and you are committed, like the Clintons' marriage. You do not abandon ship! So for me to drop this book at p. 154 should tell you something. What it should tell you is that I had reached the point in the book where the potbellied, 50-something blue-collar lawyer Mack has gone to the apartment of his host I really did try to read this terrible book. I have a rule, I can't remember whether it's the 50-page rule or the 100-page rule, but the point is, it's a rule, and I live by it: reach that page and you are committed, like the Clintons' marriage. You do not abandon ship! So for me to drop this book at p. 154 should tell you something. What it should tell you is that I had reached the point in the book where the potbellied, 50-something blue-collar lawyer Mack has gone to the apartment of his hostile black law firm colleague Glyndora, who has very reluctantly let him in, after a few minutes he has placed his hands on her nipples, felt an enormous sexual charge, he runs out to buy Seagram's and condoms, and when he gets back to her apartment she won't let him in. Which I was elated about, as I could not have endured a sex scene between them at that or any other point. I dearly love a good police procedural, so clearly I have nothing against the police, or their procedures. But it's impossible to overstate how much I hate writing like this. I'm not a fan of the hardboiled or noir, and this is just ridiculous: "She was pointing out the features of her inner sanctum and I, the former sot who'd done more wandering than a minstrel, was at home conducting a perverse and private romance with Mary Fivefingers." "Glyndora is past forty and showing little wear. This is one good-looking woman and she knows it - built like the brick shithouse you've always heard about, five foot ten in her stocking feet and female every inch of it, a phenomenal set of headlights, a big black fanny, and a proud imperial face, with a majestic look and an aquiline schnozzola that reports on Semitic adventures in West Africa centuries ago." For every sentence like this Turow should be sentenced to 20 hours of community service, perhaps scrubbing the shit out of brick shithouses, or representing me pro bono when I punch him in the face.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Bell

    I am SHOCKED that this book has a rating of 3.71. It is one of the worst books I've ever read. The only thing that keeps it from being the absolute worst is that the premise of the book was interesting (before it was ruined with stilted writing and an all-too-obvious attempt to use as many big words as possible in a failed effort to make the author seem smarter than he is) and I am personally obsessed with trying to see if I can figure out who actually "did it." It's also the first time I have e I am SHOCKED that this book has a rating of 3.71. It is one of the worst books I've ever read. The only thing that keeps it from being the absolute worst is that the premise of the book was interesting (before it was ruined with stilted writing and an all-too-obvious attempt to use as many big words as possible in a failed effort to make the author seem smarter than he is) and I am personally obsessed with trying to see if I can figure out who actually "did it." It's also the first time I have ever wished I bought the abridged version of an audio book. To top it off, I'll never buy another audio book read by this guy. He makes me want to rip the CD player out of my car.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erin (from Long Island, NY)

    I enjoyed the first 2 in this series as legal thrillers, some of the best i'd ever read.. But this 1 took a turn- we weren't in the courtroom (or courtroom prep,) it was more behind the scenes of a law firm. There were some personal & some business antics that the narrator had to figure out. As a character driven "mystery" it was well written- the narrator was morally questionable & certainly interesting, but there were a lot of financial angles & it didn't hook me like the courtrooms had. I enjoyed the first 2 in this series as legal thrillers, some of the best i'd ever read.. But this 1 took a turn- we weren't in the courtroom (or courtroom prep,) it was more behind the scenes of a law firm. There were some personal & some business antics that the narrator had to figure out. As a character driven "mystery" it was well written- the narrator was morally questionable & certainly interesting, but there were a lot of financial angles & it didn't hook me like the courtrooms had.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Henri Moreaux

    The story of a law firm struggling with a case corporate embezzlement and a missing lawyer. The interesting sounding scenario of the blurb quickly devolves into a plodding, slow and methodical story line written in the form of dictated notes by the protagonist. Whilst being duller than a room with no lights on it does manage to at least achieve a willingness for the reader to see how the story ends, but provides very little else. It's not 1 star crap, but 2 stars is rather optimistic. The story of a law firm struggling with a case corporate embezzlement and a missing lawyer. The interesting sounding scenario of the blurb quickly devolves into a plodding, slow and methodical story line written in the form of dictated notes by the protagonist. Whilst being duller than a room with no lights on it does manage to at least achieve a willingness for the reader to see how the story ends, but provides very little else. It's not 1 star crap, but 2 stars is rather optimistic.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jason Radak

    I just read this book for the second time. I was always remembered the narrator with questionable morals, and wanted a refresher on how this feat is achieved. Upon the reread, however, I noticed a lot that I didn't remember from the nineties, such as the foretelling of corporate omnipotence, and the completely inaccurate conclusions Mack comes to during his investigation. Wonderful book. I just read this book for the second time. I was always remembered the narrator with questionable morals, and wanted a refresher on how this feat is achieved. Upon the reread, however, I noticed a lot that I didn't remember from the nineties, such as the foretelling of corporate omnipotence, and the completely inaccurate conclusions Mack comes to during his investigation. Wonderful book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mare Kinley

    Yeah. This book did not thrill me. I liked the cover art. I generally like Scott Turow. I hated--let me be clear--hated the narrative voice. It seemed sloppy, tired, drafty (as in 2nd draft). While I know that this was intended to be an epistolary letters-to-no-one narration, it still didn't work for me. I have read many, many books with this premise, and, in general, I like the style. While I can't quite put my finger on exactly why it didn't work here, there is no question in my mind that it d Yeah. This book did not thrill me. I liked the cover art. I generally like Scott Turow. I hated--let me be clear--hated the narrative voice. It seemed sloppy, tired, drafty (as in 2nd draft). While I know that this was intended to be an epistolary letters-to-no-one narration, it still didn't work for me. I have read many, many books with this premise, and, in general, I like the style. While I can't quite put my finger on exactly why it didn't work here, there is no question in my mind that it didn't work here. At least not for me, and as this is my review, that's what counts. The plot line was OK. I suppose the biggest actual surprise was the sideline romantic interest of Bert, but I really couldn't have cared less. Waaaay too big a deal was made of his sexuality. Do intelligent, urban lawyers actually still give even half a damn about it? I have a hard time believing that they do. I'll still read more Turow, but give this one a miss.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    This is the third book in the Kindle County Legal Thrillers by author Scott Turow. This series started with a bang for me when I read the first book ‘Presumed Innocent’ but the next two books have been a bit of a let down. This one was the worst yet in my opinion and although I enjoy the writing I just couldn’t get excited by this one and was a close call whether to finish it or not. For me I prefer the authors novels that are based around the court room. The novel is narrated by attorney Mack Ma This is the third book in the Kindle County Legal Thrillers by author Scott Turow. This series started with a bang for me when I read the first book ‘Presumed Innocent’ but the next two books have been a bit of a let down. This one was the worst yet in my opinion and although I enjoy the writing I just couldn’t get excited by this one and was a close call whether to finish it or not. For me I prefer the authors novels that are based around the court room. The novel is narrated by attorney Mack Malloy who is ex police, in his fifties and a recovering alcoholic. Mack works as an attorney at Gage & Griswell and is trying to locate another partner in the firm who has disappeared along with several million dollars. Trying to find his colleague is not a straight forward task and Mack’s life could be potentially put in danger. I already have the rest of the books in this series so don’t intend to give up just yet, Scott Turow is a top author on his day.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Petie McCarty

    Oh my gosh! My first Scott Turow novel and WOW. Awesome book! His incredible metaphors [the absolute BEST part] make you hoot out loud with laughter or nod your head in total agreement with the philosophical bent few have the guts to express aloud. He takes a down-on-his-luck and almost at times pitiable hero and still makes you want to root for him...makes you want to know him. Mr. Turow has the acerbic wit of Nelson DeMille's John Corey novels, and I will for sure be reading his other novels. Oh my gosh! My first Scott Turow novel and WOW. Awesome book! His incredible metaphors [the absolute BEST part] make you hoot out loud with laughter or nod your head in total agreement with the philosophical bent few have the guts to express aloud. He takes a down-on-his-luck and almost at times pitiable hero and still makes you want to root for him...makes you want to know him. Mr. Turow has the acerbic wit of Nelson DeMille's John Corey novels, and I will for sure be reading his other novels. Mr. Turow's, not Mr. DeMille's.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Karl Jorgenson

    Really rich, really deep. This is what a character driven mystery should be. Turow brings them to life, throws in a credible, twisty plot and a satisfying ending, and does it all with some of the most evocative prose I have ever read. Copyright 1993, I gave up on Turow after 'The Burden of Proof' which I found way too slow. Perhaps I changed, perhaps Turow's second novel was a self-indulgent work or rushed, as second novels often are. My bad. Really rich, really deep. This is what a character driven mystery should be. Turow brings them to life, throws in a credible, twisty plot and a satisfying ending, and does it all with some of the most evocative prose I have ever read. Copyright 1993, I gave up on Turow after 'The Burden of Proof' which I found way too slow. Perhaps I changed, perhaps Turow's second novel was a self-indulgent work or rushed, as second novels often are. My bad.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pat

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Depressed law firm partner searches for another missing partner who is mixed up with fixing basketball games, homosexuality and a $6 million fake payment. Complicated. Just OK.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    A prominent law partner has disappeared (again) from the firm. This time it's different. There is $5.6 million also missing through a mysterious transfer of funds to an off-shore bank. His friend Mack is tasked to find him and get back the money. Right... A story is well told but... if it was a film, it would probably be rated GP-13 for language and sexual situations. A prominent law partner has disappeared (again) from the firm. This time it's different. There is $5.6 million also missing through a mysterious transfer of funds to an off-shore bank. His friend Mack is tasked to find him and get back the money. Right... A story is well told but... if it was a film, it would probably be rated GP-13 for language and sexual situations.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Larry Bassett

    I’m not exactly racing through this Kindle County series. This is the third in the series. I read number two seven months ago! Pleading Guilty was published twenty years ago. So you can see that it took me a while to get to it. Mack Malloy is a lawyer at the Gage & Griswell law office. Maybe low man on the totem pole even though he has been there twenty years. The daytime life of the firm “is devoted to making the world safe for airlines, banks and insurance companies.” Mack will tell you: “We al I’m not exactly racing through this Kindle County series. This is the third in the series. I read number two seven months ago! Pleading Guilty was published twenty years ago. So you can see that it took me a while to get to it. Mack Malloy is a lawyer at the Gage & Griswell law office. Maybe low man on the totem pole even though he has been there twenty years. The daytime life of the firm “is devoted to making the world safe for airlines, banks and insurance companies.” Mack will tell you: “We all know my story. I’m too old to learn to do something else, too greedy to give up the money I make, and too burnt out to deserve it.” I wasn’t prepared properly for the first surprise as Mack prowled in someone else’s apartment: I went to the kitchen to check out the fridge, still trying to see how long our hero had been gone, another old cop move, smell the milk, check the pull date. When I opened the fridge, there was a dead guy staring back. That is quite some way to end a chapter. Turow likes to end each chapter with a significant final sentence or paragraph. I guess that is not too unusual for a mystery writer now that I think about it. Later there is a good follow up about the refrigerator man. In this book there is a page about Mack falling off the wagon. Here is one paragraph of that fall: So much of life is will. I had spun the golden cap off the pint before I knew what I’d done, and repeated that old phrase to myself. I had heard it from Leotis Griswell, not long before he died. I looked into the open bottle as if it were a blind eye, and was reminded for whatever reason of looking down on something else, another seat of pleasure. The sharp perfume of the alcohol filled me with a pang, as acute and painful as a distant sighting of a lovely woman whose name I’ll never know. For some reason I thought this was beautiful and read it several times as I thought about an alcoholic I had known. One day she decided to go to AA and stop drinking. She tells me her life has gotten gradually better since that moment. This book took me back to that moment, a beautiful moment of hope for the future. This is a story about a search for a missing man – who happens to be a big shot lawyer in a big firm – who has evidently absconded with $5.6 million. The money is from the escrow account for the settlement of lawsuits against the world’s biggest airline for a crash that killed 247 people. This money has been hanging around for a while and when it is all sorted out it looks like the airline is going to make money because they were sued. This is not news they want to share so the bosses suggest that if they don’t find the missing lawyer they just cover it up. This is not a missing person story with a lot of action. It is big action when the drunk Mack Malloy throws up on a kid stealing the radio out of his car. Or when he plays racket ball or gets thrown out of someone’s apartment. Big time action? No. If thinking is an action, then there is plenty of action. Thoughts everywhere including volumes from Mack. I’d rather believe in will than fate. I drink or don’t drink. I’ll try to find Bert or I won’t. I’ll take the money and run or else return it. Better to find options than that bondage of cause and effect. It all goes back to Augustine. We choose the Good. Or the Evil. And pay the price. Not necessarily deep but maybe foreshadowing thoughts. I gave the first two books in the series four stars and expected to do the same for this one. It was billed as a thriller but I found very little that got my adrenalin going. White collar crime is not thrilling by its very nature. It tries to remain hidden. There was some intrigue here and the outcome was not clear to me until the final pages. On the basis of the two previous four star books, I am giving Turow the benefit of the doubt and three stars. The quality of the next book in the series will determine whether I place any priority on moving on to other Turow books.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. About the book: Mack Malloy is a partner in one of Kindle County's top law firms. An ex-cop who joined the firm on a wave of enthusiasm and optimism, he now feels himself to be on the way down, and possibly out. Bert Kamin, gifted, erratic and combative, is one of the firm's star litigators and he has disappeared. My Review I love legal thrillers as a rule. I just find it all very interesting to follow a case through to the end. However, in this case, I didn't enjoy it all that much. The story star About the book: Mack Malloy is a partner in one of Kindle County's top law firms. An ex-cop who joined the firm on a wave of enthusiasm and optimism, he now feels himself to be on the way down, and possibly out. Bert Kamin, gifted, erratic and combative, is one of the firm's star litigators and he has disappeared. My Review I love legal thrillers as a rule. I just find it all very interesting to follow a case through to the end. However, in this case, I didn't enjoy it all that much. The story starts by giving some background on Mack, who is a mixed up guy and kind of bumbles his way through this case. In other words, he's not really supposed to solve it, but he does. I was a little disappointed in some of his actions along the way, but I guess that was supposed to make the storyline exciting. Even so, there are a few surprises but not that "I can't believe that just happened" kind of surprises. I would have loved to see more twists and more exciting sub-plots. While the characters were pretty well-developed, the storyline was all over the place. The writer made the characters believable, and they really fit my impressions of big corporate law firms (haha!). The storylines however, did not seem cohesive. There was way too much going on! It was really very annoying. The ending was a little unexpected (I really thought Mack would respond differently) but I guess that's where it was heading anyway. It took me a LONG time to read this book and that also frustrated me! LOL! Overall, I just wasn't impressed. Would I read another book by this author... maybe, but it won't be a priority.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

    I'm not sure how much this had to do with law, but I thought it had a lot to do with human nature. The style of writing was a bit different and might be a turn off for some people because it is not the norm. For me, that made it a bit more interesting. Things kept changing as you went along in the book. The who and why was a constant mystery. Not really a constant mystery in that you thought you knew, but you didn't. I'm not sure how much this had to do with law, but I thought it had a lot to do with human nature. The style of writing was a bit different and might be a turn off for some people because it is not the norm. For me, that made it a bit more interesting. Things kept changing as you went along in the book. The who and why was a constant mystery. Not really a constant mystery in that you thought you knew, but you didn't.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

    This book gave me the slightly unclean feeling I used to get whenever as a kid I hung out with the bad kids my mom told me to stay away from. I kept trying to give the narrator a chance despite, or initially because of, his sad backstory and lack of ambition or self-esteem. But when you throw in that the narrator is also really dumb, I'm out, 100 pages or so in. Best of luck, Mack, and for God's sake, brush your teeth or shave or something. This book gave me the slightly unclean feeling I used to get whenever as a kid I hung out with the bad kids my mom told me to stay away from. I kept trying to give the narrator a chance despite, or initially because of, his sad backstory and lack of ambition or self-esteem. But when you throw in that the narrator is also really dumb, I'm out, 100 pages or so in. Best of luck, Mack, and for God's sake, brush your teeth or shave or something.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I have loved all of Scott Turow's books, particularly Presumed Innocent. This one was so out of character. Not a thriller. I kept thinking something intriguing would happen but not. The main character was rather interesting but I ultimately got tired of his shallowness. Great writing but that was the only thing that got me to the end of the book. I have loved all of Scott Turow's books, particularly Presumed Innocent. This one was so out of character. Not a thriller. I kept thinking something intriguing would happen but not. The main character was rather interesting but I ultimately got tired of his shallowness. Great writing but that was the only thing that got me to the end of the book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brian T

    COMPLEX CHARACTERS AND NON-FORMULAIC PLOT Darkly intriguing plot which breaks from the traditional thriller formula. Populated with interesting, colorful characters who are neither good nor evil, but human - with real human flaws. Great use of language more than makes up for the frequent backstory dumps. A bold and highly satisfying ending. Great read!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robert Barone

    was a tough read. a couple of times I thought of ending my pain but was able to finish it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Roosevelt Wright

    Not a page turner This was not a page turner. It was cerebral. I had to force myself to complete it, and gratefully reached the end.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    The story does take place within a law firm, although it is not particularly focused on legal principles. Calling it a thriller is definitely a misnomer, as there is precious little action. What it does have is a lot of internal reflection about how unfair life is and how morality can be defined or immorality excused, along with a fair amount of raunchiness. All the financial complexities took some inventiveness, but overall I was not impressed.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This book was far from being a “thriller”. I could not wait to get to the end and almost gave up. The story line was confusing and disjointed and consisted mostly of notes that the main character was writing as he searched for a missing lawyer who had allegedly stolen 5 million dollars.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marie Haigis

    I could not develop an interest in the story nor any of the cliché type characters. I gave it a diligent effort. But with books laying around begging to. E read and enjoyed ... I threw in the towel.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tgordon

    This was just ok for me. I was so blown away by the other two I read that I was expecting more.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andy Miller

    This is the 3rd Scott Turow novel in his Kindle County series and the venue shifts from a criminal justice focus in the first two novels to the politics and finance of a big city law firm representing top corporate clients As in his other novels, Turow makes his characters come alive, it's as if he is writing about people you know. The narrator, Mack, is a former cop and recovering alcoholic who is a partner at Gage and Crisell who is in a downward professional spiral while navigates custody issu This is the 3rd Scott Turow novel in his Kindle County series and the venue shifts from a criminal justice focus in the first two novels to the politics and finance of a big city law firm representing top corporate clients As in his other novels, Turow makes his characters come alive, it's as if he is writing about people you know. The narrator, Mack, is a former cop and recovering alcoholic who is a partner at Gage and Crisell who is in a downward professional spiral while navigates custody issues with his ex-wife. In the first chapter we meet the three managing partners who ask Mack to undertake a delicate task of finding the firm's litigator who has apparently absconded with millions of dollars that belong with the firm's major client. As Mack starts his investigation he describes the main characters and their affluent lives in more detail as he also describes the others in the investigation, the missing litigator, the young woman partner who is somewhat an ally of Mack while she deals with the double standard of gender and sexual politics and a member of the law firm's support staff who is entrenched into the law firm's establishment as much as any lawyer and who may hold keys to finding the missing money. Turow also describes those outside the law firm, from a mob connected lawyer who Mack is representing in a bar disciplinary hearing to Mack's former partner on the police force who has reason to hate Mack and try to divert a related investigation to pinning a crime on Mack. There are also great plot twists that compliment the complex and realistic characters. My trouble with this novel is that it lacks a moral compass. No character consistently behaves honorably, the few instances where a character does the right thing it is sadly for the wrong reason. All are greedy, all are watching out for themselves and the ending left me at a loss looking for a silver lining in the moral character of any character, the woman partner I suppose comes the closest Again, in some ways this was a good read; alive characters, fast paced and predictable plot but at the end of the day, a story about greedy lawyers in a greedy law firm

  26. 5 out of 5

    Grant

    I think that I liked Turows other books much better, but I enjoy reading him. In this book, Jake and our main man, the 'first person', Mack Mallow, grew up together and as the story unfolds of their great relationship in the law field and personal lives, it comes out that Mack really hates the weak Jake. The law firm of the airline co. TN is headed by three partners who run different spheres of the firm, G and G. When 5.6 MM bucks is found missing, all eyes are on Bert, a partner, and Mack, who I think that I liked Turows other books much better, but I enjoy reading him. In this book, Jake and our main man, the 'first person', Mack Mallow, grew up together and as the story unfolds of their great relationship in the law field and personal lives, it comes out that Mack really hates the weak Jake. The law firm of the airline co. TN is headed by three partners who run different spheres of the firm, G and G. When 5.6 MM bucks is found missing, all eyes are on Bert, a partner, and Mack, who asked by the senior partners to find Bert after he disappeared, supposedly with the loot. There is love, homosexuality, lust, doublecross and mystery before it all unfolds, the missing loot is found, the real thief is caught, and the copper Mack scrams with the stolen stolen loot. OK, kind of insightful as far as describing feelings of guilt-Catholic style, and inferiority. Relentless self torture on Mack's part. Anyway, I liked Turow but need to get a tip on his Best Works before I read any more. This was 3 in the Kindle County Series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marty Fried

    I was a bit disappointed in this book, as I liked the last book I read by the author a lot more. This one was strange in some ways. The main character, a low-level partner in a law firm, seems like he's pretty smart and capable, but he kind of whines a lot about his hardships - mostly caused by drinking too much, but I suppose it started out from being an honest cop pushed into doing something dishonest, then getting caught and later being pushed to testify against his partner. He complains abou I was a bit disappointed in this book, as I liked the last book I read by the author a lot more. This one was strange in some ways. The main character, a low-level partner in a law firm, seems like he's pretty smart and capable, but he kind of whines a lot about his hardships - mostly caused by drinking too much, but I suppose it started out from being an honest cop pushed into doing something dishonest, then getting caught and later being pushed to testify against his partner. He complains about his love life, about being out of shape, about being underpaid, etc. Possible spoiler here... (view spoiler)[ But when he gets a chance to have a relationship with someone he likes, another lawyer, he can't seem to handle it and eventually ruins things. And when he gets a chance to be a success and do the right thing, he balks. In the end, he seems to lose by getting what he thinks he wants. (hide spoiler)]

  28. 5 out of 5

    The Celtic Rebel (Richard)

    The eloquent and engaging writing of Scott Turow never disappoints me. Pleading Guilty is a real page turner. Scott Turow continues to prove with each of his novels why he is my favorite fiction author of this age. I enjoyed all the multi-layered and colorful characters in Pleading Guilty as I always enjoy the characters he creates. Most of them are deeply flawed and very interesting; they easily resemble the everyday people you know and work with. I love the way he weaves them around each other The eloquent and engaging writing of Scott Turow never disappoints me. Pleading Guilty is a real page turner. Scott Turow continues to prove with each of his novels why he is my favorite fiction author of this age. I enjoyed all the multi-layered and colorful characters in Pleading Guilty as I always enjoy the characters he creates. Most of them are deeply flawed and very interesting; they easily resemble the everyday people you know and work with. I love the way he weaves them around each other and around the plot. I was wonderfully surprised with the main character - Mack Malloy. Mack is probably the most human character he has created. Once you think you have him figured out, you find out you didn't. I never say him making some of the choices he did. Believe me I fully enjoyed the adventure he took from page 1 to the end. If you are a John Grisham fan, you will equally enjoy Scott Turow. Pleading Guilty is not Turow's best work, but it is still a very enjoyable read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bert

    I am dumbfounded as to why some readers call this book "terrible." My educated guess is that they're used to Harlequin Romances, or pulp fiction written by 3rd-string comic book authors. This is the 3rd of the author's Kindle County crime mystery novels. The protagonist is a corporate lawyer who's pushing his 50th birthday, and asking himself the big existential questions about his meaningless existence. Then money and a partner turn up missing at his firm, and he's sent on a mission to close, m I am dumbfounded as to why some readers call this book "terrible." My educated guess is that they're used to Harlequin Romances, or pulp fiction written by 3rd-string comic book authors. This is the 3rd of the author's Kindle County crime mystery novels. The protagonist is a corporate lawyer who's pushing his 50th birthday, and asking himself the big existential questions about his meaningless existence. Then money and a partner turn up missing at his firm, and he's sent on a mission to close, metaphorically speaking, the watertight doors. Lots of surprises, twists & turns in a cake marbled with angst. If you're accepting of the fact that in real life there aren't any storybook endings, snuggle up with a brandy and a shaggy dog, and let the games begin. My rating: ☆☆☆☆☆

  30. 4 out of 5

    Duane Bowker

    Another well written legal mystery with lots of interesting characters and stunning plot twists. Mack Malloy is a mediocre lawyer, ex-cop and recovering alcoholic who works for one of the most prestigious law firms in fictitious Kindle County (which is the setting for most of Turow's novels). One of the firm's lawyers has mysteriously disappeared and evidence suggests that, in the process, he may have stolen $5.6 million from the firm's largest account. The partners of the firm want to keep a li Another well written legal mystery with lots of interesting characters and stunning plot twists. Mack Malloy is a mediocre lawyer, ex-cop and recovering alcoholic who works for one of the most prestigious law firms in fictitious Kindle County (which is the setting for most of Turow's novels). One of the firm's lawyers has mysteriously disappeared and evidence suggests that, in the process, he may have stolen $5.6 million from the firm's largest account. The partners of the firm want to keep a lid on that information and request Malloy to track down the errant lawyer and the stolen money before their largest client learns of the theft.

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