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USBBY Outstanding International Books Honor List In this book, Deborah Ellis turns her attention to the most tragic victims of the Iraq war -- Iraqi children. She interviews young people, mostly refugees living in Jordan, but also a few who are trying to build new lives in North America. Some families have left Iraq with money; others are penniless and ill or disabled. Most USBBY Outstanding International Books Honor List In this book, Deborah Ellis turns her attention to the most tragic victims of the Iraq war -- Iraqi children. She interviews young people, mostly refugees living in Jordan, but also a few who are trying to build new lives in North America. Some families have left Iraq with money; others are penniless and ill or disabled. Most of the children have parents who are working illegally or not at all, and the fear of deportation is a constant threat. Ellis provides an historical overview and brief explanations of context, but other than that allows the children to speak for themselves, with minimal editorial comment or interference. Their stories are frank, harrowing and sometimes show surprising resilience, as the children try to survive the consequences of a war in which they played no part. A glossary, map and suggestions for further information are included.


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USBBY Outstanding International Books Honor List In this book, Deborah Ellis turns her attention to the most tragic victims of the Iraq war -- Iraqi children. She interviews young people, mostly refugees living in Jordan, but also a few who are trying to build new lives in North America. Some families have left Iraq with money; others are penniless and ill or disabled. Most USBBY Outstanding International Books Honor List In this book, Deborah Ellis turns her attention to the most tragic victims of the Iraq war -- Iraqi children. She interviews young people, mostly refugees living in Jordan, but also a few who are trying to build new lives in North America. Some families have left Iraq with money; others are penniless and ill or disabled. Most of the children have parents who are working illegally or not at all, and the fear of deportation is a constant threat. Ellis provides an historical overview and brief explanations of context, but other than that allows the children to speak for themselves, with minimal editorial comment or interference. Their stories are frank, harrowing and sometimes show surprising resilience, as the children try to survive the consequences of a war in which they played no part. A glossary, map and suggestions for further information are included.

30 review for Children of War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    I’ve had this bookmarked in Hoopla ever since I focused on borderlands literature, and this was one I didn’t get to that year. This is all interviews with Iraqi refugees under 18, most of them transcribed in 2007 in Jordan. The imprint is children focused but I think adults can learn a lot from these stories, about the varied religious makeup of Iraq even during Saddam’s reign, the impact of sanctions and chemical warfare on civilians, and how America is viewed by teens living through this war. I’ve had this bookmarked in Hoopla ever since I focused on borderlands literature, and this was one I didn’t get to that year. This is all interviews with Iraqi refugees under 18, most of them transcribed in 2007 in Jordan. The imprint is children focused but I think adults can learn a lot from these stories, about the varied religious makeup of Iraq even during Saddam’s reign, the impact of sanctions and chemical warfare on civilians, and how America is viewed by teens living through this war. I actually learned about a sect I’d never heard of before - Mandaeism! Sometimes a children’s book can explain something in a straightforward way, and now I feel more equipped to tackle some of the Kurdish books I have in mind.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Anyone who doubts the impact of war on civilians should read this book. In it, Deborah Ellis interviews Iraqi children displaced by the 2003 war started by George W. Bush's administration. These young lives have been shattered by what they have seen and experienced. Written in 2007, the children whose stories are included have (hopefully) reached adulthood. It would be fascinating to see if the author has kept in touch with any of them to see how they have navigated their circumstances in the in Anyone who doubts the impact of war on civilians should read this book. In it, Deborah Ellis interviews Iraqi children displaced by the 2003 war started by George W. Bush's administration. These young lives have been shattered by what they have seen and experienced. Written in 2007, the children whose stories are included have (hopefully) reached adulthood. It would be fascinating to see if the author has kept in touch with any of them to see how they have navigated their circumstances in the intervening years, and to see if their experiences have led them to seek healing or revenge.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cristina

    Text Summary “People watch war in the movies and they think they know what it’s like. They don’t know. If they knew, they wouldn’t allow it to happen.” This quote was stated by Hibba, a 16 year old girl who is one of the voices of the Iraqi refugees in Deborah Ellis’s book Children of War. The voices of teenagers just like Hibba can be heard in this book. Hibba, along with others and their families, have fled Iraq and found refuge in neighboring countries such as Jordan. The child refugees share Text Summary “People watch war in the movies and they think they know what it’s like. They don’t know. If they knew, they wouldn’t allow it to happen.” This quote was stated by Hibba, a 16 year old girl who is one of the voices of the Iraqi refugees in Deborah Ellis’s book Children of War. The voices of teenagers just like Hibba can be heard in this book. Hibba, along with others and their families, have fled Iraq and found refuge in neighboring countries such as Jordan. The child refugees share their thoughts, fears, and dreams of a day where they are not still experiencing the consequences of a war in which they have played no part. Some simply want to experience the feeling of a full night’s sleep; while, others long for their families to be reunited once again. Literary merits In this text, Deborah Ellis does a nice job of providing the necessary background information that students would need in order to better understand the historical and political context while reading this book. For example, Ellis provides a timeline of events in her introduction, which details the events leading up to and through the Iraq war and the fall of Saddam Hussein. Along with this introduction, Alice provides helpful visuals, including maps of the Middle East, and pictures of each of the teenage refugees that offered their stories for this book. Before each teenager’s story, Ellis includes some brief background information that relates to this story that follows. For example, if the teenager’s story involved religion, Ellis included a description of the religious conflicts occurring in Iraq under Saddam Hussein’s power. Classroom Recommendations Ages 12 and up. This text would serve as a nice companion to any unit involving war, specifically the Iraq war. Other themes reflected in this book include: family relationships, freedom of religion, stereotypes, dreams, resilience, courage, and fears (of the known and unknown). As the narrators of this book question the world around them, readers have opportunities to do the same. The most important thing that young readers can gain from this book is a sense of empathy; they may have learned about war but it has probably only been from one side. This book allows them to experience a new perspective: the perspective of a child surrounded by war.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sham Al-Ghazali

    I tried so hard not to cry throughout this book

  5. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Children of War: Voices of Iraqi Refugees, by Deborah Ellis. I picked up this book because I was looking for a non-fiction that would provide some insight about how people in foreign countries feel about the U.S., especially our war tactics over the past few years. The news always focuses on our side of the story, but this book gives voice to the children who have been affected by the war in Iraq. Many of them are refugees now, meaning they had to flee their country because of the fighting. Can Children of War: Voices of Iraqi Refugees, by Deborah Ellis. I picked up this book because I was looking for a non-fiction that would provide some insight about how people in foreign countries feel about the U.S., especially our war tactics over the past few years. The news always focuses on our side of the story, but this book gives voice to the children who have been affected by the war in Iraq. Many of them are refugees now, meaning they had to flee their country because of the fighting. Can you imagine having to leave Nebraska because bombs were being dropped on your house? I know, pretty hard to imagine for us, but this became everyday life for kids in Iraq. Here are a few excerpts from the novel: “When my father was younger he was a very important goldsmith. . . The shop was successful, and we were very rich. We had a beautiful house, many possessions, cars, everything anyone would want. Now look at us! Even the rugs on the floor came from someone else’s garbage out in the street” (80)—B. (16) “They always had guns pointed at people, at people who had no guns to point back at them. . . . How would Americans or Canidains feel if there were Iraqi troops on your streets, and these Iraqi troops broke down doors and tried to tell you what to do?” (91)—Masim (15) “It’s not the American people, it’s the American government. There are a lot of American people who don’t like to be killing Iraqis We have to remember that and not blame the American people for what their government decides” (77)—Sally, 15 “I wish Iraq had no oil. Then people would leave us alone. I don’t know what will happen in the future. As long as the American soldiers are there, things will be bad, and people will be killed. I worry that too many people will become used to all this killing and forget that there is a better way to do things” (98)—Abdullah (13) The thing that I really liked about this book is that the chapters are pretty short and each is written from a different kid’s point of view, so it is easy to read one and pick the book up and start another without having to “remember” what happened in the previous chapter. It was also one of the those books that made me really thankful for all of the things I have—a warm place to sleep, food to eat, and education. Sometimes we take these for granted. The book also made me rethink war. Is it really worth it? I guess you will just have and make your own opinion.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is an important book. I really admire Deborah Ellis, and feel she makes a truly important contribution to western culture, and even humanity in general, by writing about children in the developing world, and bridging the gap of understanding to our own young ones. This little collection of the stories of Iraqi refugees is told in simple language, which makes it accessible to any child over the age of 12, but as a whole work, though it is short, is likely to induce sadness, the more so the o This is an important book. I really admire Deborah Ellis, and feel she makes a truly important contribution to western culture, and even humanity in general, by writing about children in the developing world, and bridging the gap of understanding to our own young ones. This little collection of the stories of Iraqi refugees is told in simple language, which makes it accessible to any child over the age of 12, but as a whole work, though it is short, is likely to induce sadness, the more so the older the reader. Like other accounts of traumatic events told through the eyes of children, the tragedy is understated and simply told by the players, and the sensitive reader cannot help but see the abiding similarity of these children to our own. They want to play guitar, to gossip and talk about fashion and boys, and simply be allowed to live their lives the way they know they should be lived, though this is denied to them. The endless incidences of prejudice and bullying that they are subjected to, as unwanted refugees in Jordan is counteracted by the frequent stories of neighbours, friends and family, and even soldiers, who go out of their way, work multiple jobs and hide and support the refugees who are forced to live on their mercy. These children are not fans of America, many of them, and certainly not George Bush, and Deborah Ellis pulls no punches in reporting the unjustifiable invasion of Iraq, and the outrageous consequences for its people. She is also frank in pointing out the lack of interest in the coalition of the willing in providing refuge for the tens of thousands whose lives they have destroyed. This is the human cost of a political war, and it makes the adult reader sick to the stomach to be faced up to it. Read Dark Dreams, an older collection, and more hard hitting than this, if interested in more on this topic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kiana Modeste

    The book Children of War: Voices of Iraqi Refugees by Deborah Ellis was a very interesting but heart breaking story about the experiences of Iraqi children who live or have lived in war zones. It shows the jaw dropping reality of children who've been struck by the outcomes of foolish people who strive for power. One of the stories is about sixteen-year-old Hibba, who before the war had a relatively good life while supposedly living under the rule of a tyrannical leader, but after the Americans c The book Children of War: Voices of Iraqi Refugees by Deborah Ellis was a very interesting but heart breaking story about the experiences of Iraqi children who live or have lived in war zones. It shows the jaw dropping reality of children who've been struck by the outcomes of foolish people who strive for power. One of the stories is about sixteen-year-old Hibba, who before the war had a relatively good life while supposedly living under the rule of a tyrannical leader, but after the Americans came into Iraq to "save them" her life took a turn for the worst. Hibba lost her home, her family unit, quality of life, and now lives in a foreign country that does not want or accept her. Unfortunately Hibba's story is like many other children who lived in war torn Iraq. I picked this book because after hearing about 9/11 I wanted to better understand what happened and the countries that were involved. This book allowed me to understand the war from a child's perspectives I finished this book because I was intrigued by the text, and when you pick up this book you can't put it back down. I would recommend this book to all world leaders, so that they can better understand the consequences of war.

  8. 4 out of 5

    bjneary

    Deborah Ellis continues to amaze me with her fiction and nonfiction books. With this thin volume of stories, she has delved into the Iraq War and what children, from 8 to 19 years of age, have endured, what they are doing now, and where they are living. Each story is pretty unspeakable, families have been wiped out, children are living in hazardous conditions, they don't understand why this is happening to them. The reader will learn from Ellis in an introduction about Iraq's history, the fall o Deborah Ellis continues to amaze me with her fiction and nonfiction books. With this thin volume of stories, she has delved into the Iraq War and what children, from 8 to 19 years of age, have endured, what they are doing now, and where they are living. Each story is pretty unspeakable, families have been wiped out, children are living in hazardous conditions, they don't understand why this is happening to them. The reader will learn from Ellis in an introduction about Iraq's history, the fall of Saddam and what this has meant to these young children---and it is heartbreaking. Before each story, Ellis will give an look into an aspect of Iraqi life, culture, religion, the long term effects of violence, etc.and then a child will tell their story. I urge students and adults to read Ellis' book---it is important that WE "fully understand the impact our decisions on the world's most vulnerable - our children."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Agnes Goyvaerts

    These are the voices of Iraqi refugee children and young people. They have witness killings and death of loved ones. Deborah Ellis has given these children a voice by publishing the interviews which to are very interesting, to hear how children see this, how they do not want war, they just want to be safe and have their ordinary comforts, just like children everywhere. How they adjust to living as a refugee, how their families have to struggle to keep bread on the table. So many people are disp These are the voices of Iraqi refugee children and young people. They have witness killings and death of loved ones. Deborah Ellis has given these children a voice by publishing the interviews which to are very interesting, to hear how children see this, how they do not want war, they just want to be safe and have their ordinary comforts, just like children everywhere. How they adjust to living as a refugee, how their families have to struggle to keep bread on the table. So many people are displaced because of war. This book was written in 2009, not much has changed since and Iraq continues to be a place of struggle and great suffering. A very informative read, clear and to the point. I would recommend very much.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cel (runawaypages)

    Mind-blowing. This book made it so hard not to tear up. Children of War is about different children ages ranging from 10-20 years old telling about their experiences in war. It specifies around Jordan and Baghdad. They would all tell about their individual stories and how they had to be separated from their families. It was utterly heart-breaking, but I loved it so much. It made me think about the little problems I complain about everyday such as homework or being way too tired when there's so m Mind-blowing. This book made it so hard not to tear up. Children of War is about different children ages ranging from 10-20 years old telling about their experiences in war. It specifies around Jordan and Baghdad. They would all tell about their individual stories and how they had to be separated from their families. It was utterly heart-breaking, but I loved it so much. It made me think about the little problems I complain about everyday such as homework or being way too tired when there's so much more bigger problems in the world. I really recommend it for people who's looking for heart-breaking short stories about real life problems.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    my heart is aching...my eyes are wide open...why do people not see that the children are the true victims of war?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Callie Hennessy

    Children of War was a very informational book that was full of perspectives from children who were raised in the Iraqi war. The children who were interviewed for this book gave a sort of "insider" point of view because as an American child, you'd think that we were really useful in the ending of that war but from their perspective, we shouldn't have ever gotten involved in something that was never ours to get involved in. This book definitely gave me a different side to the story that I was told Children of War was a very informational book that was full of perspectives from children who were raised in the Iraqi war. The children who were interviewed for this book gave a sort of "insider" point of view because as an American child, you'd think that we were really useful in the ending of that war but from their perspective, we shouldn't have ever gotten involved in something that was never ours to get involved in. This book definitely gave me a different side to the story that I was told. I would recommend it to people who enjoy reading about the truth even if it contrasts what you thought was true. Also if you like nonfiction books because it tells a true story when you string together all the interviews. For me, it was definitely worth reading.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nolan

    This book was pretty good. One problem I had with the book is that sometimes the words the children said seemed scripted. This could be entirely false, but it felt that way as I read. The book did do a good job of highlighting the problems in the middle east during that time. Overall, I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to be more informed about the situation their in the 90's and 2000's. This book was pretty good. One problem I had with the book is that sometimes the words the children said seemed scripted. This could be entirely false, but it felt that way as I read. The book did do a good job of highlighting the problems in the middle east during that time. Overall, I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to be more informed about the situation their in the 90's and 2000's.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laura Myers

    While this book has been written for tweens and up, I still found it fascinating. The author has done a fantastic job of keeping the perspective entirely from the youths she interviewed. It was lovely and disheartening to hear their feelings and emotions regarding war in general and with specificity. I’d highly recommend this book to anyone @ 10 yrs and older, especially if a parent or adult can read it simultaneously to help give depth and understanding toward the Iraqi invasion after 9/11.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Dahl

    Middle Grades (late 6th grade) This book was very good. I loved that these stories are true and real. I appreciate that Ellis went to the sources to find out their stories. I found this book to be eye opening to the experiences that Iraqi refugees went through. I think that this book could be wildly helpful in making real-life connections to a concept that is hard for us to imagine living through.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jackson

    I really enjoyed this book because this helped us reflect on how these things affected the people who were most affected. The children. I was shocked to see such a person was actually changed by these problems. This book is about the different stories of the children in Iraq after the U.S. This book works for 7-9th grade kids because some of the quality in this book is a bit serious.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Sad to hear the stories by the children of their experiences. But good to know.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    Heart breaking

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Roth

    I really liked this book it was so interesting a gave us the perspective of many children going through terrible things , but how they go about it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Skyler McKenzie

    Very sad and eye opening story of the struggles of refugee children.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Zaituni Gatwaza

    This book was interesting i have watched a lot of war in the movies and shows watch .some people don’t understand what’s a war they think it is just a game.So when i was reading this to be honest i kind cried because it was sad. I chose this book because i wanted to know about the war and from reading the title it was non-fiction. Deborah Ellis wrote something that would be in real life .This book talks about how people died. There was war in iraq, this book made cry i’m not going to lie. Laith This book was interesting i have watched a lot of war in the movies and shows watch .some people don’t understand what’s a war they think it is just a game.So when i was reading this to be honest i kind cried because it was sad. I chose this book because i wanted to know about the war and from reading the title it was non-fiction. Deborah Ellis wrote something that would be in real life .This book talks about how people died. There was war in iraq, this book made cry i’m not going to lie. Laith was 11 years old he got kidnapping, There is this girl in book her name is Eva, she was 17 years old. Her family has been living there in refugee. There were really poor family.This book has many quote,

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jinny

    it was really interesting to see that there were many similarities and many differences throughout the perspectives.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emma Dreilinger

    In Children of the War: Voices of Iraqi Refugees, Deborah Ellis brings us to a place which is foreign to most. Through interviewing multiple Iraqi children, she enables us to grasp the true emotion of the children in Iraq. While reading each interview, you learn something new about each of the children. The children in Iraq feel unsafe in the place they used to call home. For example, one child tells about how he does not feel safe playing with his friends on his neighborhood street, due to the In Children of the War: Voices of Iraqi Refugees, Deborah Ellis brings us to a place which is foreign to most. Through interviewing multiple Iraqi children, she enables us to grasp the true emotion of the children in Iraq. While reading each interview, you learn something new about each of the children. The children in Iraq feel unsafe in the place they used to call home. For example, one child tells about how he does not feel safe playing with his friends on his neighborhood street, due to the scary men roaming around. Many children watch their parents get taken away from them, and the pain they feel gets put on us. It breaks my heart hearing children tell another person about watching their father get killed. I think that the independent stories make this book an amazing read. While reading, you feel a deep connection with each and every child, which is a unique writing style. What I truly enjoyed was being able to hear the pains of the war from a more direct way, enabling me to not only read about the war, but also the hardships that it caused on every population, most specifically the children. While reading this book, you will be able to learn many new things about the Iraqi culture like the two different groups, the jobs each group has and the roles of the adults. These traditions are much different than where I live in the United States. Ellis’s diction is truly beautiful and grasping. What I did not like about the book is the pain it puts on the reader. The sadness made me teary eyed and heartbroken, which did not go away quickly. Although this was probably the point of this novel, it was a difficult read for me. It makes me wish there was something else I could do, wish I do not know if that is possible. I also wish the book was written in a more chronological order so it would be easier to follow. I think everyone should take a look at this eclectic novel. It’s extremely different than anything else I have read, and I think it will be a fantastic learning experience for all.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Arminzerella

    Deborah Ellis interviewed a number of Iraqi children and teens and their families who are now refugees in Jordan after escaping the war and devastation in their own, home country. Most of them have lost everything they owned, as well as family members and friends to the violence and hostilities of war. And although some of them remember and/or are aware of atrocities committed by Sadaam Hussein, what really has affected them is the war that Americans (or at least their government) have brought t Deborah Ellis interviewed a number of Iraqi children and teens and their families who are now refugees in Jordan after escaping the war and devastation in their own, home country. Most of them have lost everything they owned, as well as family members and friends to the violence and hostilities of war. And although some of them remember and/or are aware of atrocities committed by Sadaam Hussein, what really has affected them is the war that Americans (or at least their government) have brought to their homeland. As I read about what their lives have been like over the past few years, I reflected that we are really, really lucky not to have to live with war and violence in our midst. We aren’t accustomed to the explosions of bombs overhead, next door, in our living rooms. We don’t know what it’s like to be awakened in the middle of the night by soldiers invading our homes, searching for weapons. We don’t know what it’s like to have our family members kidnapped and ransomed back to us. We don’t know what it’s like to walk through streets where the buildings are destroyed, smoking, and where bodies (or body parts) line the gutters. I’m surprised and heartened to read that most of these Iraqi children don’t blame *Americans* for these things. They blame an American government, they blame George Bush, they blame people in their own country and government who, for some reason, aren’t able to talk or reason through their problems – which aren’t theirs/ours. These children are not our enemies – how can they be? But bringing peace to the mess that we’ve made of their country seems an impossible task when there is so much resistance from within, and so little understanding between our peoples. I don’t know how much American children know about the war in Iraq, but I think that this collection would help them understand that the casualties of war are people just like themselves – with similar hopes, dreams, and interests.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elias Zelaya

    Children of war: is a book that makes the reader feel grateful for the items that they have and where they live. It makes the reader emotional reading all the cases and sometimes it makes the reader fight with the book because of how good it is and getting surprised of the horror that is happening all over the world. This book should be read by everyone so people can be aware of the cruelty that Iraq was going through during the war not just the people in the U.S. the responses of the children w Children of war: is a book that makes the reader feel grateful for the items that they have and where they live. It makes the reader emotional reading all the cases and sometimes it makes the reader fight with the book because of how good it is and getting surprised of the horror that is happening all over the world. This book should be read by everyone so people can be aware of the cruelty that Iraq was going through during the war not just the people in the U.S. the responses of the children was moving and emotionally sad and people can see the lack of morality of a lot of people that lived there. The people of Iraq went from beating up old ladies to kidnapping for money and for what good reason they would have just gotten into even more trouble. The author did an awesome job informing the world of the situation that was going on in Iraq because people do need to know about the horror that was happening in that country. This book informed me of what happened in Iraq because before i thought that everybody in that country had something to do with the terrorist attacks and now that I read this book I realized that a lot of them are as innocent as we were in the terrorist attack. The part about the bombs that they were dropped on innocent people was just cruel because a lot of the chemical waste from the bombs affected a lot of children and their lives and how a lot of children have to grow up without their parents. The book was an amazing book to read the reader will enjoy every single interview that was made and get informed of what happen to families when wars are started.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maddie Brown

    Children of War: Voices of Iraqi Refugees, written by Deborah Ellis is a book written to tell others about the most tragic victims of the Iraq War, the children. The author’s purpose in writing this book is to tell others about how badly war affects people, especially the children. By writing this book, the author is hoping to prevent war from happening, by telling the tragic stories of children who have been affected by the Iraq War. The theme of this book is the bad affects war, violence, and Children of War: Voices of Iraqi Refugees, written by Deborah Ellis is a book written to tell others about the most tragic victims of the Iraq War, the children. The author’s purpose in writing this book is to tell others about how badly war affects people, especially the children. By writing this book, the author is hoping to prevent war from happening, by telling the tragic stories of children who have been affected by the Iraq War. The theme of this book is the bad affects war, violence, and fighting can cause people to experience. The war caused the children to experience horrible things and the children had no way of preventing these things from happening. All of the children in this book are trying to survive the consequences of a war in which they played no part in. If the war, violence, and fighting never happened there would not have been the bad affects that later followed. The writing style that this book is written in is a narration, the telling of a story through a series of events that describes what happened, usually in chronological order. This type of writing style that this book is written in is effective because the reader is able to understand and know each of these children’s stories. I did enjoy reading this book, although it was sad to read about the children’s stories. This book gave me a good understanding of how badly war can affect people. I learned from this book that it is important to prevent conflict to avoid affecting the others around you.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karline Groen

    Book review Children of War 0 Deborah Ellis. In the introduction the writer makes clear that she want to give the refugees of the war in Iraq a voice. They are victims of a war in which they played not a part. She interviews children living as refugees in Jordan. The children are all waiting to be accepted to live in another country like Australia, Canada or USA. The writer gives also information about what happened in the war against Iraq. The themes of the book are war and hope. All the children Book review Children of War 0 Deborah Ellis. In the introduction the writer makes clear that she want to give the refugees of the war in Iraq a voice. They are victims of a war in which they played not a part. She interviews children living as refugees in Jordan. The children are all waiting to be accepted to live in another country like Australia, Canada or USA. The writer gives also information about what happened in the war against Iraq. The themes of the book are war and hope. All the children tell their stories of the war and what their dreams are for the future. You can see in al the stories that the writer doesn’t agree with the war. The style of this book is a narration. The children tell all their own stories in chronological order. My opinion of this book is that is was an interesting but sad book. It makes me doubt the American government, that they did such things to innocent kids who couldn’t help it. The children all had a rough life and they all say that they want to get back to the time before the Americans came. That they want such a terrible leader as Saddam back, says enough for the children’s present circumstances. I haven’t read a book like this before, and I wouldn’t read it again because it makes me sad.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Int'l librarian

    Eva, Bashar, Haythem, Widian – and more than a dozen others. If I took a quiz right now, just minutes after finishing this book, I’m not sure I could properly match more than a few of them to their stories. There must be tens of thousands who could share the same horrors, or who died before their story will ever be known. Each child gets about 4 pages to define his or her life. It’s not much; not enough to make me feel I know any of them. Ellis has provided enough, though, to help me appreciate Eva, Bashar, Haythem, Widian – and more than a dozen others. If I took a quiz right now, just minutes after finishing this book, I’m not sure I could properly match more than a few of them to their stories. There must be tens of thousands who could share the same horrors, or who died before their story will ever be known. Each child gets about 4 pages to define his or her life. It’s not much; not enough to make me feel I know any of them. Ellis has provided enough, though, to help me appreciate the devastation of the Iraq War. These children have the simplest wishes – to play, to go to school, to rejoin their family and friends, or make new friends. And they all deserve at least this much. But they have seen and lived through enough to guard their hopes, and treasure whatever little they have.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Angel Herrera

    Children of War, is a very heartwarming book. The kids and adults that have nothing, but family and broken down homes, are so thankful for what they have and still being alive. Losing family members to bombing and terrorism is all too familiar and common to the people that live in the Middle East. “We left both of my older brothers behind in Iraq when we came to Jordan, Jordan doesn't let young Iraqi men into their country. They are afraid young men will become terrorist.” -Abbadar. The book is Children of War, is a very heartwarming book. The kids and adults that have nothing, but family and broken down homes, are so thankful for what they have and still being alive. Losing family members to bombing and terrorism is all too familiar and common to the people that live in the Middle East. “We left both of my older brothers behind in Iraq when we came to Jordan, Jordan doesn't let young Iraqi men into their country. They are afraid young men will become terrorist.” -Abbadar. The book is separated by the multiple kids and adults telling their stories. In all the stories told by the kids and adults, violence is always among them. “There were many car bombing in our area. We got up every morning to learn that someone else was killed on a brutal way. My friends and I would talk about it. We decided the whole world had gone crazy.” -Yeman. Children of War, by Deborah Ellis.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Children of War brings us the experiences of more than twenty Iraqi young people uprooted by more than a decade of war in their homeland. Through brief, straightforward narratives (mostly in the first person), we encounter wrenching loss and trauma; families that strain and sacrifice to protect their children; despair and, movingly, the seeds of hope and commitment to peace. I would have liked to learn a little more about how Deborah Ellis compiled the book, the methodology she used and so on, b Children of War brings us the experiences of more than twenty Iraqi young people uprooted by more than a decade of war in their homeland. Through brief, straightforward narratives (mostly in the first person), we encounter wrenching loss and trauma; families that strain and sacrifice to protect their children; despair and, movingly, the seeds of hope and commitment to peace. I would have liked to learn a little more about how Deborah Ellis compiled the book, the methodology she used and so on, but I do see a positive aspect to keeping the focus firmly on the young people themselves (especially since the book is intended for young readers). Given the primary audience, I appreciate the inclusion of the glossary at the end, but it might have been useful to draw attention to its presence by a table of contents and/or a footnote accompanying the first challenging term.

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