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Leading with Gratitude: Eight Leadership Practices for Extraordinary Business Results

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The influential New York Times bestselling authors—the “apostles of appreciation” Chester Elton and Adrian Gostick—provide managers and executives with easy ways to add more gratitude to the everyday work environment to help bolster moral, efficiency, and profitability. Workers want and need to know their work is appreciated. Showing gratitude to employees is the easiest, f The influential New York Times bestselling authors—the “apostles of appreciation” Chester Elton and Adrian Gostick—provide managers and executives with easy ways to add more gratitude to the everyday work environment to help bolster moral, efficiency, and profitability. Workers want and need to know their work is appreciated. Showing gratitude to employees is the easiest, fastest, most inexpensive way to boost performance. New research shows that gratitude boosts employee engagement, reduces turnover, and leads team members to express more gratitude to one another—strengthening team bonds. Studies have also shown that gratitude is beneficial for those expressing it and is one of the most powerful variables in predicting a person’s overall well-being—above money, health, and optimism. The WD-40 Company knows this firsthand. When the leadership gave thousands of managers training in expressing gratitude to their employees, the company saw record increases in revenue. Despite these benefits, few executives effectively utilize this simple tool. In fact, new research reveals “people are less likely to express gratitude at work than anyplace else.” What accounts for the staggering chasm between awareness of gratitude’s benefits and the failure of so many leaders to do it—or do it well? Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton call this the gratitude gap. In this invaluable guide, they identify the widespread and pernicious myths about managing others that cause leaders to withhold thanks. Gostick and Elton also introduce eight simple ways managers can show employees they are valued. They supplement their insights and advice with stories of how many of today’s most successful leaders—such as Alan Mulally of Ford and Hubert Joly of Best Buy—successfully incorporated gratitude into their leadership styles. Showing gratitude isn’t just about being nice, it’s about being smart—really smart—and it’s a skill that everyone can easily learn.


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The influential New York Times bestselling authors—the “apostles of appreciation” Chester Elton and Adrian Gostick—provide managers and executives with easy ways to add more gratitude to the everyday work environment to help bolster moral, efficiency, and profitability. Workers want and need to know their work is appreciated. Showing gratitude to employees is the easiest, f The influential New York Times bestselling authors—the “apostles of appreciation” Chester Elton and Adrian Gostick—provide managers and executives with easy ways to add more gratitude to the everyday work environment to help bolster moral, efficiency, and profitability. Workers want and need to know their work is appreciated. Showing gratitude to employees is the easiest, fastest, most inexpensive way to boost performance. New research shows that gratitude boosts employee engagement, reduces turnover, and leads team members to express more gratitude to one another—strengthening team bonds. Studies have also shown that gratitude is beneficial for those expressing it and is one of the most powerful variables in predicting a person’s overall well-being—above money, health, and optimism. The WD-40 Company knows this firsthand. When the leadership gave thousands of managers training in expressing gratitude to their employees, the company saw record increases in revenue. Despite these benefits, few executives effectively utilize this simple tool. In fact, new research reveals “people are less likely to express gratitude at work than anyplace else.” What accounts for the staggering chasm between awareness of gratitude’s benefits and the failure of so many leaders to do it—or do it well? Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton call this the gratitude gap. In this invaluable guide, they identify the widespread and pernicious myths about managing others that cause leaders to withhold thanks. Gostick and Elton also introduce eight simple ways managers can show employees they are valued. They supplement their insights and advice with stories of how many of today’s most successful leaders—such as Alan Mulally of Ford and Hubert Joly of Best Buy—successfully incorporated gratitude into their leadership styles. Showing gratitude isn’t just about being nice, it’s about being smart—really smart—and it’s a skill that everyone can easily learn.

30 review for Leading with Gratitude: Eight Leadership Practices for Extraordinary Business Results

  1. 4 out of 5

    James

    Skip the Foreword. The writer is an over-privileged bag of dicks. The rest of the books is maybe not stellar, but still has some pretty good parts. The first section, which covers dispelling myths, is the most useful part of the book. In fact, most people could probably read just that part and save time, but still learn the most valuable lessons from the book. The part about the Motivators Assessment is a bit salesy, but the concept itself is worth further consideration. I admit it. I took the as Skip the Foreword. The writer is an over-privileged bag of dicks. The rest of the books is maybe not stellar, but still has some pretty good parts. The first section, which covers dispelling myths, is the most useful part of the book. In fact, most people could probably read just that part and save time, but still learn the most valuable lessons from the book. The part about the Motivators Assessment is a bit salesy, but the concept itself is worth further consideration. I admit it. I took the assessement, but only because of Covid-19 social distancing and boredom. Only the first two motivators were actually meaningful for me. Mileage would certainly vary. The writing, though. OMG...it would be much more readable book without the groaners and dad jokes. These make the authors look old AF and out of touch. The MANY failed attempts at humor also detracts from their message in the worst way. Also related to being out of touch...this book is very heteronormative, white, christian, and socially conservative. For readers who are marginalized or value EDI, you can find a better book on gratitude than this, I'm pretty sure, and I'm absolutely certain there are better books on leadership. Overall, the book is a fast read with useful content primarily toward the front. Some of the lessons are worthwhile; others will likely fall flat, depending on the individual reader.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Mikulsky

    This was a nice, quick read that reinforced much of what most of us already know. I've summarized my greatest take-aways here: Workers want and need to know their work is appreciated. And showing gratitude to employees is the easiest, fastest, most inexpensive way to boost performance. New research shows that gratitude boosts employee engagement, reduces turnover, and leads team members to express more gratitude to one another - strengthening team bonds. Gratitude has the power to energize, heal This was a nice, quick read that reinforced much of what most of us already know. I've summarized my greatest take-aways here: Workers want and need to know their work is appreciated. And showing gratitude to employees is the easiest, fastest, most inexpensive way to boost performance. New research shows that gratitude boosts employee engagement, reduces turnover, and leads team members to express more gratitude to one another - strengthening team bonds. Gratitude has the power to energize, heal and bring hope. Despite these benefits, few executives effectively utilize this simple tool. Gratitude is one of the most misunderstood and misapplied tools of management. That’s a shame, because it is also one of the single most critical skills for managers to master if they want to enhance their team’s performance and develop their leadership credibility. Research shows that there is a staggering gratitude deficit in the work world. In fact, a recent study found “people are less likely to express gratitude at work than anyplace else.” 81% of working adults say they would work harder if their boss were more grateful for their work. Developing genuine gratitude involves carefully observing what employees are doing, walking in their shoes, developing greater empathy, and sincerely trying to understand the challenges they face. It is about seeing good things happening and then expressing heartfelt appreciation for the right behaviors. On the flip side, managers who lack gratitude suffer, first and foremost, from a problem of cognition - a failure to perceive how hard their people are trying to do good work - and, if they’re encountering problems, what they are. These ungrateful leaders suffer from information deficit. Another part of the ingratitude explanation lies in fundamental human nature. Research in psychology has shown we have a built-in tendency to give more attention to problems and perceived threats than positive things happening around us. That is dubbed the negativity bias. Some leaders think it is necessary to withhold positive sentiments at times in order to keep pressure on team members. “If we keep them on edge, they’ll work harder” is the thinking. Pressure like that increases anxiety, and anxiety undermines productivity. A 200,000–person study found that more grateful managers lead teams with higher overall business metrics, including up to two times greater profitability than their peers, an average 20% higher customer satisfaction, and significantly higher scores in employee engagement, including vital metrics such as trust and accountability. The 8 most powerful gratitude practices: Solicit and Act on Input - Henry David Thoreau wrote, “The greatest compliment anyone gave me was when they asked me for my opinion and then attended to my answer.” The advice to actively solicit input from employees is not new, but managers rarely do it. Even more rare is to see them follow through on suggestions. Let’s face it, many ideas won’t be viable, and yes, some people might get upset if their contributions aren’t acted upon if you don’t explain why. But openly discussing with them the reasons their ideas are not feasible and conveying authentic appreciation for the input assures them you’ve given thoughtful consideration. The best leaders harvest those ideas to enhance performance. At Amazon, for instance, the company’s intranet features an online suggestion box for employees to propose anything they think will make the company better, which is how free shipping was first suggested by software engineer Charlie Ward. That idea emerged in the insanely popular Prime program. Assume Positive Intent – most people do care about their work and are trying to do a good job. Take a forward-looking approach; ask: What could we do differently in the future when faced with this situation? Walk in Their Shoes - many leaders know little about the challenges their people are wrestling with in their daily work. In part that’s be¬cause they’ve never done their jobs themselves, but it’s also because they don’t take the time to ask about the difficulties their team members may be encountering. Leaders who develop empathy for others are great enablers of authentic gratitude. While empathy is often seen as a mental exercise - imagining how someone is feeling - the best way to be truly empathetic is to roll up your sleeves and actually walk in their shoes. Here are some simple ways to elicit the help of others in spotting them: • Ask team members to give shout-outs to each other. • Ask team members to toot their own horns. • Set and then reward achievement of daily, weekly, or 30-day goals. • Spotlight those who speak up and offer ideas. • Recognize those who find new productivity hacks. • Thank those who find solutions to resolve conflicts. • Make great use of anniversaries. Give It Now, Give It Often, Don’t Be Afraid - The annual review is overly weighted toward criticism and can feel punitive to the employee. Even well-intended reviews can cause intense employee resentment if they are not tempered by frequent positive reinforcement through¬out the rest of the year. The infrequent formal feedback process leaves so many day-to-day achievements unacknowledged. That wastes golden opportunities to provide immediate positive reinforcement of the behaviors a leader is looking for, day in and day out. Tailor to the Individual - Smart leaders use knowledge of individual motivators to tailor expressions of gratitude to each team member. More than 75,000 people have taken the Motivators Assessment, which highlighted that each person has a unique combination of what drives him/her on the job. The assessment revealed 23 workplace motivators: autonomy, challenge, creativity, developing others, empathy, excelling, excitement, family, friendship, fun, impact, learning, money, ownership, pressure, prestige, problem solving, purpose, recognition, service, social responsibility, teamwork, and variety. Reinforce Core Values - A common theme among leaders interviewed is that expressions of gratitude should be connected to behaviors that are in line with the company or team core values. Appreciation is a powerful way to reinforce the importance of those vital principles. Showing gratitude is one of the most effective and memorable ways to reinforce leadership’s commitment to values and offers powerful opportunities to communicate why these grand ideals are so important - not to mention what can go wrong if they aren’t demonstrated. Gratitude offers an opportunity to put the flesh of specificity on the bones of core values. Make Gratitude Peer-to-Peer - Leaders can make use of online systems or apps that have been developed to facilitate team-based gratitude (i.e. social recognition systems). These systems can help build bonds outside of immediate teams, break down silos, and help workers in different locations feel more connect¬ed to one another. At JetBlue, co-workers can nominate other crew members for everyday contributions as well as above-and-beyond work or effort, through a program called Lift. Successes are shared throughout the company on an internal newsfeed. JetBlue data shows that for every 10% increase in people reporting being recognized, it sees a 3% increase in employee retention and a 2% increase in engagement. You can also post complimentary videos of one of your fellow star employees on YouTube or the company intranet. And don’t forget the power of old-fashioned hand¬written notes.

  3. 5 out of 5

    T.

    There is a lot here that could be useful, but it gets muddled by the confusion of who the audience of this books is for. Is it for Boomers, most of whom are retiring or getting there? Is it for Gen X? Likely. Is it for Millenials? No. The authors clearly do not think Millenials will benefit from this books as when they mention Millenials, it is in reference to "Millenial slang" and writes of Millenials as the up and coming employees who do not get it. They aren't possibly leaders (they probably There is a lot here that could be useful, but it gets muddled by the confusion of who the audience of this books is for. Is it for Boomers, most of whom are retiring or getting there? Is it for Gen X? Likely. Is it for Millenials? No. The authors clearly do not think Millenials will benefit from this books as when they mention Millenials, it is in reference to "Millenial slang" and writes of Millenials as the up and coming employees who do not get it. They aren't possibly leaders (they probably really mean Zoomers as this is a 2020 title). I've been in the full time work force for 10 years. I am an older Millenial looking for leadership advice. This book wrote me off, yet I could benefit from much of the advice in the book as I am of the age of being a parent or leader within my organization. This book also throws in phrases like "tribe" which many are trying to move away from as it is considered offensive. Overall, there is good advice and I muddled through to find it. It was disappointing as an older Millenial to be written off and out of this book and I could have gained so much more from it if generations weren't brought into it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    The Earls List

    I got it from my boss. The authors recently spoke to our district managers team and she decided to share this novel with me. The general idea of gratitude is well communicated with different options and approaches but I don’t believe their vision fits particularly well with very low income retail staff. The book also seriously liked to name drop and tell corny jokes that really interrupted the serious flow and vibe of this title. Good and bad, life and this book are what you make of them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Teri Temme

    A feel-good book with a ton of ideas to start your gratitude practice at work and at home. On page 60 is one of my favorite quotes: "The single wooden plank you lay down the first time you cultivate appreciation would become reinforced over time until you create a habitual response to feel compassion, gratitude, and appreciation without much conscious effort at all", from leadership expert and writer Vanessa Loder. Another favorite quote is on page 219: from Brene Brown: "It's not joy that makes A feel-good book with a ton of ideas to start your gratitude practice at work and at home. On page 60 is one of my favorite quotes: "The single wooden plank you lay down the first time you cultivate appreciation would become reinforced over time until you create a habitual response to feel compassion, gratitude, and appreciation without much conscious effort at all", from leadership expert and writer Vanessa Loder. Another favorite quote is on page 219: from Brene Brown: "It's not joy that makes us grateful, it's gratitude that makes us joyful". I have found gratitude to make big changes in my inner life but I have a long way to go to make it part of my work and home life. This book has helped me see the missing pieces and given me the steps to ensure I will start practicing gratitude more! I look forward to my progress and the difference it will make in my communications with others!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Lund

    Easy to read, reminded me of what I already know but made me think about it in a different way.

  7. 5 out of 5

    QUINNS

    Gratitude is a powerful way to shake up performance in business, but leaders often don’t understand how to reach it. The majority would see it as an action to perform after something important has been achieved, rather than utilising it as a tool to inspire in the process. Gratitude have got to be specific for it to be effective, not just a general statement of thanks. It is just as important to teach peers to acknowledge each other’s contributions as making your team feel inspired and appreciat Gratitude is a powerful way to shake up performance in business, but leaders often don’t understand how to reach it. The majority would see it as an action to perform after something important has been achieved, rather than utilising it as a tool to inspire in the process. Gratitude have got to be specific for it to be effective, not just a general statement of thanks. It is just as important to teach peers to acknowledge each other’s contributions as making your team feel inspired and appreciated. By applying these mindsets and actions, you will propagate in a work environment based on trust, respect, and appreciation, and one that incorporates a sense of fun to counterbalance inevitable challenges.

  8. 5 out of 5

    إسلام جمال

    Eighty-one percent of employees say that they’d work harder if their boss made them feel more appreciated. The simple gesture of gratitude increases staff confidence, a vital quality for innovative thinking. Leaders need to experience what it’s like to live their team members’ workday. Shadowing them will give you insight into the challenges they face in performing their roles. Be on the lookout for the subtle hurdles, like struggling to get information from other departments, or friction between Eighty-one percent of employees say that they’d work harder if their boss made them feel more appreciated. The simple gesture of gratitude increases staff confidence, a vital quality for innovative thinking. Leaders need to experience what it’s like to live their team members’ workday. Shadowing them will give you insight into the challenges they face in performing their roles. Be on the lookout for the subtle hurdles, like struggling to get information from other departments, or friction between coworkers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    jordan Tate

    One of the things I was looking for in a gratitude book was some actually stats of gratitude research studies that supported implementing gratitude. A bridge from academia to businesses. I was very satisfied in this front. I was also looking for specific ways, many options , workplace processes and exercises , that I could consider. On this front I was pleased also. And, this book quotes and cites so many big companies and CEOs, which I can use to build ethos as I’m convincing CEOs to believe in One of the things I was looking for in a gratitude book was some actually stats of gratitude research studies that supported implementing gratitude. A bridge from academia to businesses. I was very satisfied in this front. I was also looking for specific ways, many options , workplace processes and exercises , that I could consider. On this front I was pleased also. And, this book quotes and cites so many big companies and CEOs, which I can use to build ethos as I’m convincing CEOs to believe in the power of gratitude and reason to make it a major focus above other virtues. Last, it was easy to read. I wasn’t looking for masterful writing. I felt like they were talking to me. For this reason, I would feel comfortable buying this book for each employee and doing a book study with it. This would be way better than any book on motivation , business tactics, etc. it’s positive and uplifting , as you’d expect in a gratitude book. So ya five stars bc it was spot on for what I was looking for. And it’s new. Not an old book. Very important since research on gratitude is still new and growing. Thx!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Great reminders. [spoilers] - Don’t store up gratitude, thank your people in the moment as well as keeping a record - Gratitude should match values, given like a “love language” - Specific praise is helpful praise - Gratitude should connect team values to daily work - The best teams are made up of people who take initiative in mutual appreciation. Find ways to make authentic thanks visible.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chanh Nguyen

    In theories: 1. Management is nothing more than motivating other people 2. Skin in the game 3. The meaning of communication is a connection In reality: 1. Personality is more important than the ability 2. Zero tolerant for disrespects In leading You play a stupid game, you win a stupid prize.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Bowen

    LOVED this book. It’s on one of my favorite topics too. Is sold as an “airport self-help” book, but I really enjoyed it! Great model to make gratitude real and tangible in our lives and behavior. Highly recommend for other leaders!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carly

    I was originally going to give this 3 stars, for a couple of reasons. But, as I read to the end, I realized that the message makes this worth a bump. One of the things that, at first, really bothered me was the generational language; this book was not written for millennials, explicitly, and was written for an older demographic. It seemed unnecessary, exclusionary, and out-of-place. Especially, to my thinking, as millennials are the current managing demographic in many spaces. The book sort of t I was originally going to give this 3 stars, for a couple of reasons. But, as I read to the end, I realized that the message makes this worth a bump. One of the things that, at first, really bothered me was the generational language; this book was not written for millennials, explicitly, and was written for an older demographic. It seemed unnecessary, exclusionary, and out-of-place. Especially, to my thinking, as millennials are the current managing demographic in many spaces. The book sort of talked-down to/about millennials, in a weird back-handed compliment sort of way, as well as forgetting that Zoomers are entering the work force in earnest. For a book written in the last two years, it felt and sounded like something that could have been written 10-15 years ago, regarding generational divides and workforce demographics. But, the message is great and important, which is what matters most. Also, as I neared the end of the book, I thought about how many gen-x and boomers are still in the workforce, in management positions, and while I still think the generationally divisive language is unnecessary, I can see where it might help hit home to some readers. All in all, I agree with the message of the book, and look forward to incorporation gratitude journaling into my bullet journal. It is a healthy reminder to me to move with gratitude always, and I plan on starting my staff meeting with gratitude today. I also really loved the whole section on "taking it home" and making sure that you are kind to yourself and your loved ones outside of work; that made this feel holistic. Would recommend.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    This book is really geared toward management, but has good points for any business person. It was divided into three sections: The Ingratitude Myths, The Eight Most Powerful Gratitude Practices, A Grateful Life. Section 2 was filled with tips on how to express gratitude in the workplace. The authors interviewed many successful CEO’s and shared their perspectives. Their thoughts reinforced the truth that gratitude from leaders can completely shift the dynamic of an office or company. In today’s c This book is really geared toward management, but has good points for any business person. It was divided into three sections: The Ingratitude Myths, The Eight Most Powerful Gratitude Practices, A Grateful Life. Section 2 was filled with tips on how to express gratitude in the workplace. The authors interviewed many successful CEO’s and shared their perspectives. Their thoughts reinforced the truth that gratitude from leaders can completely shift the dynamic of an office or company. In today’s culture, when it’s hard to find good employees, when everyone is tired from working hard this is a good book for managers to have in their arsenal. “Gratitude doesn’t get old if it’s aligned with what the leader and team value most.” They further debunk many myths, one being praise should be reserved for when the job gets done. They explain that when a manager gives timely praise it proves the manager is paying attention and even a modicum of gratitude is helpful in getting people recharged. Who doesn’t need to be recharged these days? I did only give it 4 stars because the authors talk about an assessment they’ve created to help managers know how to better show appreciation to their staff, but they did not include said assessment. Even a slimmed down version of the full test would have been helpful. Otherwise, the points were solid and the writing was easy to follow along. If you are looking for a way to ramp up productivity or simply support your team more sincerely this is a good book to read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    "Developing genuine gratitude involves carefully observing what employees are doing, walking in their shoes, developing greater empathy, and sincerely trying to understand the challenges they face. It is about seeing good things happening and then expressing heartfelt appreciation for the right behaviors." "For expressions of gratitude to work their magic, they must be genuine and specific. Leading in this way is not only about giving credit where it’s due, it’s about actually knowing where it is "Developing genuine gratitude involves carefully observing what employees are doing, walking in their shoes, developing greater empathy, and sincerely trying to understand the challenges they face. It is about seeing good things happening and then expressing heartfelt appreciation for the right behaviors." "For expressions of gratitude to work their magic, they must be genuine and specific. Leading in this way is not only about giving credit where it’s due, it’s about actually knowing where it is due." I wonder if this was not as impactful for me since I feel like I already work for a company where gratitude is a way of life? I do think that expressing thanks is more than just "good job". Not that we do not say it just like that from time to time. To really touch someone, however, it needs to be specific and to make it even better, add how what they did made you feel (proud, happy, relieved, that you can trust them or whatever you feel when you see them do what they do). In the home, I am grateful that my husband cooks food that tastes so great because it makes me feel less crabby! Ok, maybe that is not a good example but it is close dinner time.... :)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Gostick and Elton's book "Leading with Gratitude" is better than I expected. I thought it would be a book filled with platitudes and general information. However, I was pleasantly surprised. This book is well researched and provides practical, specific advice to managers and leaders who seek to create cultures of high performance and employee engagement. They provide many examples of the concepts they present, backed up with quotes from nationally-known business leaders. I also like the applicat Gostick and Elton's book "Leading with Gratitude" is better than I expected. I thought it would be a book filled with platitudes and general information. However, I was pleasantly surprised. This book is well researched and provides practical, specific advice to managers and leaders who seek to create cultures of high performance and employee engagement. They provide many examples of the concepts they present, backed up with quotes from nationally-known business leaders. I also like the application of the ideas of leading with gratitude, to both home and work. We all could do with being more thankful to those around us. This book provides a guide on how to start today with recognizing moments of gratitude and acting on them. Leading with gratitude also applies to peer-to-peer recognition, and not just to managers and leaders. Considering this, I believe this book would be helpful to everyone. I end this review with a statement of gratitude: Thanks so much to Gostick and Elton for writing this book, and reminding us all that thankful moments are all around us. All we have to do is act on their advice and reap the joy that comes as a result of thankfulness.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Daphne

    Gratitude is an intangible quality that people often overlook. It's not about using gratitude to make someone like you, though it might, it is about being authentic. I listened to a podcast with Gostik and Elton and was intrigued. In many workplaces and organizations, showing people that they are appreciated make a big difference but there's not a blanket approach to showing gratitude since people are different and just thanking someone with a gift card or party may not be the right way to "say Gratitude is an intangible quality that people often overlook. It's not about using gratitude to make someone like you, though it might, it is about being authentic. I listened to a podcast with Gostik and Elton and was intrigued. In many workplaces and organizations, showing people that they are appreciated make a big difference but there's not a blanket approach to showing gratitude since people are different and just thanking someone with a gift card or party may not be the right way to "say thanks." Leading with Gratitude also says how you would respond when someone appreciates what you do - simply say thank you - don't be self-deprecating about your work or effort. The authors also mention that while compensation is important, leaders and co-workers who practice gratitude in a workplace can be an additional factor in forming an work culture and help retain people who want to be innovative and achieve more.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Krisanne Lane

    I read this as part of a book club at work. This is a book that should have been a blog post. It wasn’t awful, but it wasn’t particularly interesting. There were a few key insights about how gratitude isn’t something that makes people lazy or how sincere gratitude vs platitudes are always welcome and appreciated. However, there was so much fluff in this book, and so many terrible puns/lame jokes, that it was borderline unbearable. I finally switched to the audiobook and listened on 2X speed and I read this as part of a book club at work. This is a book that should have been a blog post. It wasn’t awful, but it wasn’t particularly interesting. There were a few key insights about how gratitude isn’t something that makes people lazy or how sincere gratitude vs platitudes are always welcome and appreciated. However, there was so much fluff in this book, and so many terrible puns/lame jokes, that it was borderline unbearable. I finally switched to the audiobook and listened on 2X speed and managed to get through it. I would rate this lower than a 3 (because 3⭐️ usually means I liked it) but there really wasn’t anything I found problematic or offensive. It’s a little privileged, but really, how else would one expect a book on leadership to be written? It’s fine, but don’t waste your time.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Yzabel Ginsberg

    [I received a copy through Edelweiss.] An interesting read in general, whose first part especially was really good, dealing as it does with common myths such as "if I tell people they did a good job, they'll be full of themselves" or "I had to do it the hard way, so why would I make it better for others now?" It also has several examples of how to exert a more gratitude-oriented approach at work, although this seems to be more geared toward the corporate world/office/business work (I'm not sure i [I received a copy through Edelweiss.] An interesting read in general, whose first part especially was really good, dealing as it does with common myths such as "if I tell people they did a good job, they'll be full of themselves" or "I had to do it the hard way, so why would I make it better for others now?" It also has several examples of how to exert a more gratitude-oriented approach at work, although this seems to be more geared toward the corporate world/office/business work (I'm not sure if it can be applied per se in every single branch of work, or depending on the circumstances, as it lacks examples for those).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Edie Moll

    This was a quick read and I got a lot more out of it than I thought I would (based on prior book reviews). We already had gratitude and a service-to-others m.o. with our current staff of 58 so these “little extras” seemed more like a honing of our existing way or operating and helped create more clarity around our inside, as well as, outside communications. I wouldn’t recommend for someone starting from a environment that’s gratitude-deprive, it would surely back fire as disingenuous. It would b This was a quick read and I got a lot more out of it than I thought I would (based on prior book reviews). We already had gratitude and a service-to-others m.o. with our current staff of 58 so these “little extras” seemed more like a honing of our existing way or operating and helped create more clarity around our inside, as well as, outside communications. I wouldn’t recommend for someone starting from a environment that’s gratitude-deprive, it would surely back fire as disingenuous. It would be great for a new start up business or team that wants to put as much heart as they do mind into team building efforts.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I loved this book! It is practical and fast-paced. The book first takes a look at many modern “gratitude myths” and explains why these myths are not true. Then, the book lists different ways to implement gratitude in your business. I think this book would benefit anyone, whether they are a student, colleague, or CEO. The first practice I am going to implement in my life is a gratitude journal. I am also going to be sending thank-you notes more frequently for the little things that I often overlo I loved this book! It is practical and fast-paced. The book first takes a look at many modern “gratitude myths” and explains why these myths are not true. Then, the book lists different ways to implement gratitude in your business. I think this book would benefit anyone, whether they are a student, colleague, or CEO. The first practice I am going to implement in my life is a gratitude journal. I am also going to be sending thank-you notes more frequently for the little things that I often overlook.

  22. 4 out of 5

    ❀ Susan G

    We all need to reflect on and share more gratitude. There is a lot going on in this world, we have full plates, rush between events, read devastating news yet there are so many great things happening that we can focus on. this book shares some great ideas for sharing gratitude - thank you notes, a gratitude journal, encouraging peer to peer gratitude and family specific practices to make everyone appreciate each other.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Carter

    Even more important today The world can be a crazy place, especially right now with political instability and Covid19. Nevertheless, living and leading with gratitude can make such a difference. When things are out of control we are still in charge of how we approach life. Live and lead with gratitude to not only be happier, but more productive too.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jim Clifford

    3.5 Stars. Solid principles that never get dissected deeper than surface level. There’s the argument that gratitude is simple (and that’s no doubt where part of its power comes from) but quoting the same collection of CEO’s throughout the book and giving more anecdotes than research makes it seem more frivolous than its truths are.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dave Rush

    Pretty good book. Will probably use some of the practices in my daily life. Only qualms were that it comes across a little too cultish. Anytime someone is being referred to as a guru or life coach, I start having trouble taking their message seriously. None the less, all marketing qualms aside, many of the “core concepts” are probably worth trying.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rick Yvanovich

    This is a timely book. Not sure what exactly triggered me to get it but something did and it was at the right time. I can see clearer links now between gratitude and joy and Dun and purpose and meaning. This is part of the missing piece of the puzzle I was looking for Thank you - I am most grateful for this book and the tips and insights it gives

  27. 4 out of 5

    Megan Clark

    Very nice read. Had some great advice with supportive stories and examples. Several of the jokes and accounts were either cheesy, felt dated, or both, but the underlying message still shone through. I can see applying some of the methods to my everyday life, both professionally and personally.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Simon Gianoutsos

    An important leadership behaviour that could have been significantly condensed into a much shorter book. There were some good stories throughout to demonstrate the application of gratitude in practice.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adnan Kakazai

    To appreciate at the right time is I think the most motivating factor rater then after a week or month. Most of the time things are practiced but reading from another source gives you more clarity and enables you to put things in context.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    A very simple, easy, quick read about leadership and gratitude. Not a very deep book (I thought it was rather stupid, to be honest), but the gist is this: be grateful to your boss and your team, but don't be *too* thankful. A very simple, easy, quick read about leadership and gratitude. Not a very deep book (I thought it was rather stupid, to be honest), but the gist is this: be grateful to your boss and your team, but don't be *too* thankful.

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