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Argumentation: The Study Of Effective Reasoning

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Introducing Argumentation and Rhetoric History of Argumentation Studies Formal and Informal Argument The Emergence of Controversy Resolutions and Issues Stasis The Focal Point of Dispute Presumption and Burden of Proof Argument Analysis and Diagramming Claims and Evidence Reasoning from Parts to Whole Moving from Cause to Effect Establishing Correlations Analogy, Narrative Introducing Argumentation and Rhetoric History of Argumentation Studies Formal and Informal Argument The Emergence of Controversy Resolutions and Issues Stasis The Focal Point of Dispute Presumption and Burden of Proof Argument Analysis and Diagramming Claims and Evidence Reasoning from Parts to Whole Moving from Cause to Effect Establishing Correlations Analogy, Narrative, and Form What Makes a Sound Argument? Fallacies in Reasoning Validity and Fallacies Reconsidered Assembling a Case Attack and Defense I Attack and Defense II Language and Style in Argumentation Arguments between Friends Arguments among Experts Public Argument and Democratic Life The Ends of Argumentation


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Introducing Argumentation and Rhetoric History of Argumentation Studies Formal and Informal Argument The Emergence of Controversy Resolutions and Issues Stasis The Focal Point of Dispute Presumption and Burden of Proof Argument Analysis and Diagramming Claims and Evidence Reasoning from Parts to Whole Moving from Cause to Effect Establishing Correlations Analogy, Narrative Introducing Argumentation and Rhetoric History of Argumentation Studies Formal and Informal Argument The Emergence of Controversy Resolutions and Issues Stasis The Focal Point of Dispute Presumption and Burden of Proof Argument Analysis and Diagramming Claims and Evidence Reasoning from Parts to Whole Moving from Cause to Effect Establishing Correlations Analogy, Narrative, and Form What Makes a Sound Argument? Fallacies in Reasoning Validity and Fallacies Reconsidered Assembling a Case Attack and Defense I Attack and Defense II Language and Style in Argumentation Arguments between Friends Arguments among Experts Public Argument and Democratic Life The Ends of Argumentation

30 review for Argumentation: The Study Of Effective Reasoning

  1. 4 out of 5

    Fred

    This is a superb logic and rhetoric course by an interesting and engaging speaker. There wasn't a lot here that I didn't get in my own studies and a college course on the subject but he went into some areas of application that I had never considered before and suggested some new tactics that I'm anxious to try. Especially was his philosophy of argumentation which is that it's NOT about winning or losing, it's about gaining great understanding. I like THAT a lot. I was so favorably impressed with This is a superb logic and rhetoric course by an interesting and engaging speaker. There wasn't a lot here that I didn't get in my own studies and a college course on the subject but he went into some areas of application that I had never considered before and suggested some new tactics that I'm anxious to try. Especially was his philosophy of argumentation which is that it's NOT about winning or losing, it's about gaining great understanding. I like THAT a lot. I was so favorably impressed with this series that I recommended it in a Facebook group that I founded for coaching and supporting folks who are in Religious Studies - a sphere with no shortage of things to argue about. I highly recommend this course.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mani

    I've been through this audio book three times. i find knew things to love about it each time. As a matter of fact, it bends how I read other books about argumentation. The nested structure of the lectures, from case construction to the individual lectures exploring each kind of warrant-inference relationhip forces review and elaboration of the rhetorical concepts. Highly recommend followed by "Thank You For Arguing". I've been through this audio book three times. i find knew things to love about it each time. As a matter of fact, it bends how I read other books about argumentation. The nested structure of the lectures, from case construction to the individual lectures exploring each kind of warrant-inference relationhip forces review and elaboration of the rhetorical concepts. Highly recommend followed by "Thank You For Arguing".

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christie Skipper Ritchotte

    Maybe I'm too ADD, but I listened to three of the cds, and when the subject still hadn't gotten rolling good and properly, decided not to finish. This is a subject I'm very much interested in; the art and implementation of rhetoric has been sadly neglected in schools, to society's detriment. Unfortunately, while this professor may well have had lots of illuminating insights later on, I found he dallied too much on very basic explanations, and brother, if you haven't started teaching me anything Maybe I'm too ADD, but I listened to three of the cds, and when the subject still hadn't gotten rolling good and properly, decided not to finish. This is a subject I'm very much interested in; the art and implementation of rhetoric has been sadly neglected in schools, to society's detriment. Unfortunately, while this professor may well have had lots of illuminating insights later on, I found he dallied too much on very basic explanations, and brother, if you haven't started teaching me anything by the fourth lecture, I'm over and out. To be fair, I'm notoriously harder on audio books than written ones, so this isn't my favorite method of "reading." Could well be that I'd have had more patience if it had appeared in written form. I won't rate, since I couldn't finish.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jurij Fedorov

    It's overall a letdown just because it doesn't really introduce any scientific foundation. So you never know if what he says is important or not. Pro: The writing style is clean and simple. It's simple to understand and all the logic mostly makes sense overall. This book is good for high school students who just want to know the definition of argumentation and how it works overall. It's very much basic and a good intro to beginners in this field. Con: What is this?`I have seen too many of these Grea It's overall a letdown just because it doesn't really introduce any scientific foundation. So you never know if what he says is important or not. Pro: The writing style is clean and simple. It's simple to understand and all the logic mostly makes sense overall. This book is good for high school students who just want to know the definition of argumentation and how it works overall. It's very much basic and a good intro to beginners in this field. Con: What is this?`I have seen too many of these Great Courses that are just about seemingly nothing. This was not overly politically preachy so that's good. Some of the other courses are basically left leaning propaganda sprinkled with science. This was a bit left leaning but nothing much at all. It's just there is not much to it. What did I learn from this? It's nice to know what arguments are but I feel like he just talked and talked without talking about anything concrete. It's a damn shame that this is so low brow and just predictable and simplified. It honestly seems like he never read a study in his life. Read this if you really have a problem understanding arguments. But, for how long it is it doesn't pack a great knowledge punch at all. It's never better than just acceptable. And it's worth a listen if you have the time and nothing else to do. Otherwise there are better and more informative books out there.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Zack

    The lessons that are to be had in this course are much needed in contemporary society, and even within individual relationships and group situations--understanding how to argue better is not just a matter of how to fight with people better, but is intended to be about displaying greater reasoning so as to reach more effective solutions to problems. Professor Zarefsky does a fantastic job of walking you through the basics of argumentation and supplying a helpful, comprehensive vocabulary with whi The lessons that are to be had in this course are much needed in contemporary society, and even within individual relationships and group situations--understanding how to argue better is not just a matter of how to fight with people better, but is intended to be about displaying greater reasoning so as to reach more effective solutions to problems. Professor Zarefsky does a fantastic job of walking you through the basics of argumentation and supplying a helpful, comprehensive vocabulary with which to discuss arguments and tactics of argumentation. Where these lectures really shine, though, is in the concluding lectures, where the importance of effective argumentation is put into a societal context so that we can see just how critical it is to develop these kinds of reasoning skills. The early lectures can get a tad wearisome because they are basic, but it is true that they are necessary in order to build up to the great work that comes later--so just know that coming in and you'll be just fine in working through it all.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Haoyan Do

    The book starts slow, but gradually it becomes more interesting when the contents turn to presumption, evidence, claim, evidence, fallacy etc. It will be an even more interesting book if there are more case studies and examples, and if the case studies and examples are more complicated. I guess the book is only about very basic arguments and has no wish to go into anything too deep and complicated. I am now at the last three chapters of the book and they are the best. However I wish there are mo The book starts slow, but gradually it becomes more interesting when the contents turn to presumption, evidence, claim, evidence, fallacy etc. It will be an even more interesting book if there are more case studies and examples, and if the case studies and examples are more complicated. I guess the book is only about very basic arguments and has no wish to go into anything too deep and complicated. I am now at the last three chapters of the book and they are the best. However I wish there are more examples of the arguments among friends and lovers. Of course sitcoms and novels can be very good source of those. Also arguments in public sphere, I wish there are more examples and more complicated examples of arguments--for example the arguments between Camus and Sartre concerning Soviet Union. An in-depth examination of various examples probably will take up a lot of space, but that is what's truly fascinating. Also if Aristotle is the first person to pay attention to arguments, what's the example that Aristotle is talking about? I am very interested to know. I thought Socrates is the first person since he is engaged in discourses all the time with the youth of Athens. Probably Socrates is more about discourse (there are some arguments involved though) and Aristotle is more about arguments.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bill Glover

    This lecture series will give you a sinking feeling when you consider all the preconditions that are taken for granted. The bits about sharing accepted, vetted data, that’s gone now. Argumentation as a means of finding a mutually acceptable resolution seems like a pipe dream. Maybe just stick to lectures on skepticism, Logic and statistical probability for now.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Scott Wozniak

    Strong survey of the ways to organize your thoughts and prove your point. It covered many different tools and approaches, with lots of great examples. This was not about manipulation or overwhelming rhetorical force. This might have been better titled something like “How Reasoning Works” or “How to persuade and explain”. I learned a lot.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Good review of what I studied long ago. I liked the examples he used to illustrate his points.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Geir Skårland

    Brilliant. Useful. Well structured. Close to no redundancy. Hoping to listen to it again, sometime.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Pretty sure I wanted to enjoy this at the beginning but the narrator's voice made me tense and I didn't finish. Pretty sure I wanted to enjoy this at the beginning but the narrator's voice made me tense and I didn't finish.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sean Callaghan

    Bears repetition. So much detail in these courses.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Definitely worth a read, I learned quite a bit. Now, I listened, but I want to go back through the *.pdf which comes with the audible book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alexey

    I loved this book/course for its clarity and lots of usable knowledge on argumentation and rhetoric that I haven't had before. I loved this book/course for its clarity and lots of usable knowledge on argumentation and rhetoric that I haven't had before.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Curtis

    This is a pretty fundamental course, and not focused on pragmatism. It'll teach you the formal theory of argumentation with lots of examples from American political and legal discourse. This is a pretty fundamental course, and not focused on pragmatism. It'll teach you the formal theory of argumentation with lots of examples from American political and legal discourse.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joseph L.

    Watch a detailed review along with my favorite ideas and takeaways at: https://youtu.be/rQslcxzt3Tc Watch a detailed review along with my favorite ideas and takeaways at: https://youtu.be/rQslcxzt3Tc

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Martindale

    I don't care for Zarafsky'd voice but I thought the content was solid. There was just so much information that I couldn't retain hardly any of it. Occasionally I would take notes while I listened which helped. In my logic textbook, there are an absurd amount of exercises and no wonder--without regular exercises and engaging ways to actually practice argumentation, all this information is sure to just slide off the brain like water off a tin roof. My favorite part of the lectures where he evalua I don't care for Zarafsky'd voice but I thought the content was solid. There was just so much information that I couldn't retain hardly any of it. Occasionally I would take notes while I listened which helped. In my logic textbook, there are an absurd amount of exercises and no wonder--without regular exercises and engaging ways to actually practice argumentation, all this information is sure to just slide off the brain like water off a tin roof. My favorite part of the lectures where he evaluated arguments from speeches. Hmm...one thing I didn't care for. The lecturer had a thing for how pro-lifers managed to get "intact dilation and evacuation" renamed "partial-birth abortion." One definitely gets the impression that Zarafsky is pro-choice, and sees the prolifer's success in renaming this grizzly form of infanticide as an underhanded way of keeping of it illegal, and stealing from woman their private "right" to have their baby dismember, or its brain sucked out off its head or burned alive in saline. It seemed liked Zarefsky had no problem whatsoever with "intact dilation and evacuation" and this was rather disturbing. Oh... I can't conceive of how anyone could approve of this barbarism. But I suppose many cultures throughout history have practiced infanticide--setting unwanted babies out to die from exposure or to be eating by the beast. They somehow not only saw it as their right but as their duty, and did it without the pangs of conscience. It is no surprise many have found a way to continue infanticide, just under a different name. Evil has a way of regrowing a new head after the last one was cut off. And labeling the killing of an innocent and helpless infant the "right" of her mother as unsettling.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jacob O'connor

    I'm probably right.  I have quite a few opinions on as many topics. I'm a careful thinker, so I'm probably right about most of them.  Is that good enough?  What if it's really important, like whether or not you're about to fall off a cliff.  Don't you want me to be more than probably right?   Lately I've been thinking about the limits of pure reason.  As long as we're just a couple blokes arguing, we can only ever know if we're probably right.  Or if we're merely justified in our position.  If we I'm probably right.  I have quite a few opinions on as many topics. I'm a careful thinker, so I'm probably right about most of them.  Is that good enough?  What if it's really important, like whether or not you're about to fall off a cliff.  Don't you want me to be more than probably right?   Lately I've been thinking about the limits of pure reason.  As long as we're just a couple blokes arguing, we can only ever know if we're probably right.  Or if we're merely justified in our position.  If we're looking for something more certain, we need it revealed to us by someone with a better perspective.  We can only know something for certain if we learn it from a certain source, and reason is not sufficient.   Nevertheless, Zarefsky has taught a good course.  If I stick to his regimen, I'll be halfway there.  Some notes: -In the presence of uncertainty, a good argument is one that would convince a reasonable person.  -Engagement means risking being wrong.   -Being willing to engage shows a respect for the personhood of your opponent.    -Deductive reasoning only rearranges what we already know -Amplitude -Doesn't advocate using questions to attack a case unless they're unanswerable -Regarding warrant, author appeals to consensus

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Trickey

    Excellent introduction to how to break down an argument It appeared to be aimed at lawyers, but I found it to be an excellent discussion of what kinds of things to look at when building an argument and reviewing one. I definitely learned something that will help me look at discussions with a more critical eye.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Beary

    The Teaching Company Audio CD`s as well as Modern Scholar series are highly reccomended learning tools - College level courses that you can learn from in your car. This is part of the mixed media I use in my pursuit of knowledge. I love music and on the weekends my car primarily blasts music from XM - but during the week , the 45 min - 1 hour a day I spend in the car going to and from work and misc errands , I have these Audio Books that I get from libraries. Sometimes I get lazy with reading The Teaching Company Audio CD`s as well as Modern Scholar series are highly reccomended learning tools - College level courses that you can learn from in your car. This is part of the mixed media I use in my pursuit of knowledge. I love music and on the weekends my car primarily blasts music from XM - but during the week , the 45 min - 1 hour a day I spend in the car going to and from work and misc errands , I have these Audio Books that I get from libraries. Sometimes I get lazy with reading the non-fiction I am trying to consume. These courses make it so I am always thinking , always stimulating my mind. As soon as I hop in the car in the AM , I`m forced to use that most important muscle. This is the glue to my self-education.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I learned a lot of worthwhile, practical and interesting things. I previously knew nothing about argumentation, but upon finishing the course, I think I have laid a solid foundation on which to further build my understanding and knowledge about argumentation. I feel satisfied and glad that I have taken this course.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    A very good course on thinking and communicating reasonably and clearly. I loved his definition of argumentation. I can't remember it exactly, but instead of it being a negative thing, like it is so often represented to be, argumentation is a positive thing that helps us to better understand what is true. He uses a lot of examples from political speeches and writings, especially American. A very good course on thinking and communicating reasonably and clearly. I loved his definition of argumentation. I can't remember it exactly, but instead of it being a negative thing, like it is so often represented to be, argumentation is a positive thing that helps us to better understand what is true. He uses a lot of examples from political speeches and writings, especially American.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ron Hurst

    Read for foundation of my PhD program. Honestly the Great Course series is an amazing resource for the life long learner. This is a deep and comprehensive book on the study of argumentation. More then the average person needs to read perhaps but unfortunately they would so completely benefit from embracing the concepts presented here, I definitely recommend it...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alexa Schapiro

    I listening to this course on Audible and for the most part enjoyed it. It is just what the title states: a study of effective reasoning. It outlines several interesting points and inspired me to read more on rhetoric. However, the first half or so was 5 star quality... then it felt like information was repeated or not necessary to the course. That's all folks! I listening to this course on Audible and for the most part enjoyed it. It is just what the title states: a study of effective reasoning. It outlines several interesting points and inspired me to read more on rhetoric. However, the first half or so was 5 star quality... then it felt like information was repeated or not necessary to the course. That's all folks!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris Doelle

    A somewhat misleading title as this is really a book about communication. Good stuff. My full review A somewhat misleading title as this is really a book about communication. Good stuff. My full review

  26. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    A decent introduction to the finer point of argumentation. Not a huge fan of the great courses format, but definitely what it represents itself as and a good way to improve how one thinks out their discourse.

  27. 5 out of 5

    J

    lots of good introductory information on argumentation and rhetoric. I liked the combination of video, audio, and transcripted lectures.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Discussed the finer points of argumentation/debates. Good for how to struction an argument as well as common fallacies to watch out for.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Title says it all. Read for my debate team. Nothing interesting, but mechanical.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Abdulaziz Fagih

    The Lecturer is bit slow and boring but I guess the content is strong but again I think it's bit mechanical The Lecturer is bit slow and boring but I guess the content is strong but again I think it's bit mechanical

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