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Programming Kubernetes: Developing Cloud-Native Applications

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If you're looking to develop native applications in Kubernetes, this is your guide. Developers and AppOps administrators will learn how to build Kubernetes-native applications that interact directly with the API server to query or update the state of resources. AWS developer advocate Michael Hausenblas and Red Hat principal software engineer Stefan Schimanski explain the c If you're looking to develop native applications in Kubernetes, this is your guide. Developers and AppOps administrators will learn how to build Kubernetes-native applications that interact directly with the API server to query or update the state of resources. AWS developer advocate Michael Hausenblas and Red Hat principal software engineer Stefan Schimanski explain the characteristics of these apps and show you how to program Kubernetes to build them. You'll explore the basic building blocks of Kubernetes, including the client-go API library and custom resources. All you need to get started is a rudimentary understanding of development and system administration tools and practices, such as package management, the Go programming language, and Git. Walk through Kubernetes API basics and dive into the server's inner structure Explore Kubernetes's programming interface in Go, including Kubernetes API objects Learn about custom resources--the central extension tools used in the Kubernetes ecosystem Use tags to control Kubernetes code generators for custom resources Write custom controllers and operators and make them production ready Extend the Kubernetes API surface by implementing a custom API server


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If you're looking to develop native applications in Kubernetes, this is your guide. Developers and AppOps administrators will learn how to build Kubernetes-native applications that interact directly with the API server to query or update the state of resources. AWS developer advocate Michael Hausenblas and Red Hat principal software engineer Stefan Schimanski explain the c If you're looking to develop native applications in Kubernetes, this is your guide. Developers and AppOps administrators will learn how to build Kubernetes-native applications that interact directly with the API server to query or update the state of resources. AWS developer advocate Michael Hausenblas and Red Hat principal software engineer Stefan Schimanski explain the characteristics of these apps and show you how to program Kubernetes to build them. You'll explore the basic building blocks of Kubernetes, including the client-go API library and custom resources. All you need to get started is a rudimentary understanding of development and system administration tools and practices, such as package management, the Go programming language, and Git. Walk through Kubernetes API basics and dive into the server's inner structure Explore Kubernetes's programming interface in Go, including Kubernetes API objects Learn about custom resources--the central extension tools used in the Kubernetes ecosystem Use tags to control Kubernetes code generators for custom resources Write custom controllers and operators and make them production ready Extend the Kubernetes API surface by implementing a custom API server

30 review for Programming Kubernetes: Developing Cloud-Native Applications

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kawai

    Feels a bit disorganized, lacks comprehensive examples, and would probably benefit from having exercises with sample code solutions to help readers really understand the fundamentals. Best if supplemented by kubernetes.io's own example code here: https://github.com/kubernetes/sample-... Feels a bit disorganized, lacks comprehensive examples, and would probably benefit from having exercises with sample code solutions to help readers really understand the fundamentals. Best if supplemented by kubernetes.io's own example code here: https://github.com/kubernetes/sample-...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julien Sobczak

    The devil is in the details. More a reference than a true technical book. The authors are very knowledgeable on Kubernetes and its internals but a book is great for what it contains but also for what it ignores. The book contains too much details and is poorly organized. Why not start the book with a real-world example of what is possible when programming Kubernetes, to capture the reader attention, develop his curiosity, and slowly introduce details at the moment where the problems they solve ap The devil is in the details. More a reference than a true technical book. The authors are very knowledgeable on Kubernetes and its internals but a book is great for what it contains but also for what it ignores. The book contains too much details and is poorly organized. Why not start the book with a real-world example of what is possible when programming Kubernetes, to capture the reader attention, develop his curiosity, and slowly introduce details at the moment where the problems they solve appear. Reading this book is like learning cooking by introducing every tools, then all ingredients, to finally prepare a basic recipe. You will be starving before turning the oven on... Nonetheless, the book is still valuable because it discusses advanced topics that are not well detailed in the official documentation.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mindas O Bardina

    This book will definitely help you understand the basics of the Kubernetes API conventions and getting your first operator (extended API and respective controller(s)) out there. I also respect the authors a lot, as engineers, particularly Schimanski for his countless contributions to everything API machinery. And for all that, the book gets 4 stars. But there's so much that could be added to it. If someone is to pick it up for subsequent editions, I'd recommend opting for one of controller-runtime This book will definitely help you understand the basics of the Kubernetes API conventions and getting your first operator (extended API and respective controller(s)) out there. I also respect the authors a lot, as engineers, particularly Schimanski for his countless contributions to everything API machinery. And for all that, the book gets 4 stars. But there's so much that could be added to it. If someone is to pick it up for subsequent editions, I'd recommend opting for one of controller-runtime + controller-tools or kubebuilder (as it evolves), and drop Operator Framework as having the three just adds to distraction and confusion.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Liviu Costea

    The book tackles with advanced topics when developing Kubernetes native apps. It is good and provides some level of details. On the downside, some examples will not work by default, you need to do a little bit of digging. Also I would of liked some concepts to be drilled down even more. Overall a good read, there aren't many sources like this. The book tackles with advanced topics when developing Kubernetes native apps. It is good and provides some level of details. On the downside, some examples will not work by default, you need to do a little bit of digging. Also I would of liked some concepts to be drilled down even more. Overall a good read, there aren't many sources like this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alena Varkockova

    Good source of information if you need to write a kubernetes controller or develop an operator. Since the documentation online is kind of lacking, I would recommend it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rafed Ramzi

  7. 5 out of 5

    Re Álvarez Parmar

  8. 4 out of 5

    Peter Bowden

  9. 4 out of 5

    Francesco Mari

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gergely Brautigam

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Taichi

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nick Calibey

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bas Langenberg

  16. 5 out of 5

    Irit

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Jaime

  18. 5 out of 5

    Banner B Schafer

  19. 5 out of 5

    रोहन कुमार

  20. 4 out of 5

    Suraj Deshmukh

  21. 4 out of 5

    David Michael

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrei Borisov

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jai Devmane

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vlad

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bruno Maciel

  26. 5 out of 5

    SkyDriver2500

  27. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Balthazar

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Reuben

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elijah Oyekunle

  30. 5 out of 5

    Niko

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