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This Is Your Brain on Birth Control: The Surprising Science of Women, Hormones, and the Law of Unintended Consequences

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An eye-opening book that reveals crucial information every woman taking hormonal birth control should know This groundbreaking book sheds light on how hormonal birth control affects women--and the world around them--in ways we are just now beginning to understand. By allowing women to control their fertility, the birth control pill has revolutionized women's lives. Wom An eye-opening book that reveals crucial information every woman taking hormonal birth control should know This groundbreaking book sheds light on how hormonal birth control affects women--and the world around them--in ways we are just now beginning to understand. By allowing women to control their fertility, the birth control pill has revolutionized women's lives. Women are going to college, graduating, and entering the workforce in greater numbers than ever before, and there's good reason to believe that the birth control pill has a lot to do with this. But there's a lot more to the pill than meets the eye. Although women go on the pill for a small handful of targeted effects (pregnancy prevention and clearer skin, yay!), sex hormones can't work that way. Sex hormones impact the activities of billions of cells in the body at once, many of which are in the brain. There, they play a role in influencing attraction, sexual motivation, stress, hunger, eating patterns, emotion regulation, friendships, aggression, mood, learning, and more. This means that being on the birth control pill makes women a different version of themselves than when they are off of it. And this is a big deal. For instance, women on the pill have a dampened cortisol spike in response to stress. While this might sound great (no stress!), it can have negative implications for learning, memory, and mood. Additionally, because the pill influences who women are attracted to, being on the pill may inadvertently influence who women choose as partners, which can have important implications for their relationships once they go off it. Sometimes these changes are for the better . . . but other times, they're for the worse. By changing what women's brains do, the pill also has the ability to have cascading effects on everything and everyone that a woman encounters. This means that the reach of the pill extends far beyond women's own bodies, having a major impact on society and the world. This paradigm-shattering book provides an even-handed, science-based understanding of who women are, both on and off the pill. It will change the way that women think about their hormones and how they view themselves. It also serves as a rallying cry for women to demand more information from science about how their bodies and brains work and to advocate for better research. This book will help women make more informed decisions about their health, whether they're on the pill or off of it.


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An eye-opening book that reveals crucial information every woman taking hormonal birth control should know This groundbreaking book sheds light on how hormonal birth control affects women--and the world around them--in ways we are just now beginning to understand. By allowing women to control their fertility, the birth control pill has revolutionized women's lives. Wom An eye-opening book that reveals crucial information every woman taking hormonal birth control should know This groundbreaking book sheds light on how hormonal birth control affects women--and the world around them--in ways we are just now beginning to understand. By allowing women to control their fertility, the birth control pill has revolutionized women's lives. Women are going to college, graduating, and entering the workforce in greater numbers than ever before, and there's good reason to believe that the birth control pill has a lot to do with this. But there's a lot more to the pill than meets the eye. Although women go on the pill for a small handful of targeted effects (pregnancy prevention and clearer skin, yay!), sex hormones can't work that way. Sex hormones impact the activities of billions of cells in the body at once, many of which are in the brain. There, they play a role in influencing attraction, sexual motivation, stress, hunger, eating patterns, emotion regulation, friendships, aggression, mood, learning, and more. This means that being on the birth control pill makes women a different version of themselves than when they are off of it. And this is a big deal. For instance, women on the pill have a dampened cortisol spike in response to stress. While this might sound great (no stress!), it can have negative implications for learning, memory, and mood. Additionally, because the pill influences who women are attracted to, being on the pill may inadvertently influence who women choose as partners, which can have important implications for their relationships once they go off it. Sometimes these changes are for the better . . . but other times, they're for the worse. By changing what women's brains do, the pill also has the ability to have cascading effects on everything and everyone that a woman encounters. This means that the reach of the pill extends far beyond women's own bodies, having a major impact on society and the world. This paradigm-shattering book provides an even-handed, science-based understanding of who women are, both on and off the pill. It will change the way that women think about their hormones and how they view themselves. It also serves as a rallying cry for women to demand more information from science about how their bodies and brains work and to advocate for better research. This book will help women make more informed decisions about their health, whether they're on the pill or off of it.

30 review for This Is Your Brain on Birth Control: The Surprising Science of Women, Hormones, and the Law of Unintended Consequences

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tilly

    4 stars I was both excited and nervous to read this book as being someone that suffers from endometriosis and is on a combined pill for treatment (and which massively helps me cope), I didn't want to be completely put off taking it! But I am a scientist at heart and so I wanted the information anyway, as we all should. Dr Sarah Hill is a brilliant writer and the book is split up nicely for different areas the pill can and does affect. I like to think myself well read within everything gyaecologica 4 stars I was both excited and nervous to read this book as being someone that suffers from endometriosis and is on a combined pill for treatment (and which massively helps me cope), I didn't want to be completely put off taking it! But I am a scientist at heart and so I wanted the information anyway, as we all should. Dr Sarah Hill is a brilliant writer and the book is split up nicely for different areas the pill can and does affect. I like to think myself well read within everything gyaecological but I learnt a great deal which made the book thoroughly interesting. There is some vital information and advice for women both on the pill and thinking of taking the pill, so it is a must read. Dr Hill was also very careful not to give advice on what you as a reader should do, but gave you the necessary information to make up your own mind. What I found was missing was information about the many illnesses and conditions that the pill may be used to treat of manage. It fully focused on the not getting pregnant aspect and handling PMS when in fact many women take it for other medical reasons. I also found that there was quite a bit of repetition which I could have done without. Overall, the science and explanations were great but there were a few things missing for me. However a very good and incredibly important read for women. Please note that I received this book in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    This kind of book is a must read for women on or planning to use birth control. It tells you all the changes that are not on that enormous information sheet that comes with the box but instead are far more likely: psychological side effects. It opens your eyes to all the things that may have changed in your life that you attributed to anything but the pill. Having said that, there were a few things I didn’t like about the author’s communication style. For one, she treats numbers as if they were This kind of book is a must read for women on or planning to use birth control. It tells you all the changes that are not on that enormous information sheet that comes with the box but instead are far more likely: psychological side effects. It opens your eyes to all the things that may have changed in your life that you attributed to anything but the pill. Having said that, there were a few things I didn’t like about the author’s communication style. For one, she treats numbers as if they were toxic. There are some nice plots, but otherwise the reader has no way of knowing how large effect sizes are or how likely something is in the population. So when she says the pill decreases libido, by how much? How many women are actually on the pill? How many of those have ill effects? By not providing these numbers, she makes the phenomenon seem enormous, because when you say “women on the pill have a harder time discriminating odors” you imagine scent-blindness, not a 5-10% difference. I honestly don’t know what numbers are behind any of the studies she cites, but because of her writing style, I was ready to stop birth control right then and there, and a decision like that should not happen without numbers. The other thing I didn’t like was her way of presenting still uncertain research with a lot of optimism and promoting theories in a similar way. She’ll make a strong statement, then walk back a little saying “not all research agrees” then undoes that by adding “but it’s something to keep an eye on!” If you’re a scientist talking to other scientists, the moment you declare you like a theory but it’s not universally accepted, the listeners will appreciate being informed of this new idea and evaluate it for themselves. When you do this with the general public, they look to you as an authority and would most likely just trust your expert opinion (unless they already have a reason to not agree with you). I think she should have held back on ideas that aren’t so solid. Then she has a few ideas that I just think aren’t correct or at least not as big a factor as she thinks. Two examples of this: the idea that the introduction of the pill is the main driver for women’s increased college education; and the possibility that it is the reason for men’s decreased college education. In general, the author has a bit too much of a “nature” interpretation of behavior, attributing almost everything to evolution, hormones and genes, viewing all social phenomenon as a consequence of these. In reality, society can change arbitrarily, and if you only look at western research on western people, you really don’t have the data to affirm whether large scale changes are really due to a single factor like the use of birth control. In the case of explaining the increase in percentage of women in college, just like you can say the introduction of the pill increased women’s chances of higher education, obtaining higher education increased women’s awareness of the need for birth control. In developing countries, it’s not enough to just provide the pill, you need to also provide the education that allows women to want and benefit from the pill. I’m not denying that the pill was a social game changer, and I really think there’s something to the idea of a lot of these changes being unintentional and unanticipated, but such statements require a lot more caution and a harder look at other societies. A similarly bold idea is that men actually have decreased their interest in higher education because they no longer need to compete too hard for sex like in the bad old days where women had to be picky because they were essentially always choosing the father of their children. For one thing, from one of the few graphs she provides, she states that there is this decrease; I don’t see it. I see both genders increasing in the 60s and 70s, women exponentially and men logarithmically. The very fact that the percent of men obtaining college degrees increases makes it almost impossible to say that anything specific had a negative impact on their overall desire to study; you don’t have some clear “baseline” time period where all the men that wanted to study could study, until basically the present day! There are no grounds for saying men want to study less than before rather than they just want to study less than women. So all in all, I think it’s a super relevant topic, the author is clearly an authority in the field, I just think the book promotes the effects of the pill being worse and larger than they may be.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Fazio

    A fantastic, must-read for all women on and off birth control. Not only is this book chock full of information about the pull, birth control in general, and the effects of it; it is also PACKED with information and facts about sex, hormones and women in general. I won this book on a goodreads giveaway and it is my favorite won book thus far. Non-fiction books are not typically my style of reading, but a book like this practically begs to be read. I ate up every word, soaked up the information th A fantastic, must-read for all women on and off birth control. Not only is this book chock full of information about the pull, birth control in general, and the effects of it; it is also PACKED with information and facts about sex, hormones and women in general. I won this book on a goodreads giveaway and it is my favorite won book thus far. Non-fiction books are not typically my style of reading, but a book like this practically begs to be read. I ate up every word, soaked up the information that seems to be kept from women, and more than doubled my knowledge on the science behind us women. I highly recommend this book, not just to women on birth control, but to all of us women out there. Not only do you better understand your body, but you can glimpse into your own psyche, mind, actions and every day life. Thanks Avery Books for this fantastic read, I look forward to reading more!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Doherty

    This book should be in every counseling center - chocked full of factual affirmations, opening one's eyes with paradigm-shattering data. This book provides an even-handed, science-based understanding of who women are, both on and off the pill. It will change the way that women think about their hormones and how they view themselves. The truth about how the pill can affect women is hidden but crucial and only starting to be known. No researcher wants to be on record as the person who took down hor This book should be in every counseling center - chocked full of factual affirmations, opening one's eyes with paradigm-shattering data. This book provides an even-handed, science-based understanding of who women are, both on and off the pill. It will change the way that women think about their hormones and how they view themselves. The truth about how the pill can affect women is hidden but crucial and only starting to be known. No researcher wants to be on record as the person who took down hormonal birth control, but every woman who is using it needs to know. The consequences can range from casual (mild mood swings) to devastating (suicide). Galley borrowed from the publisher.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shannen

    I only read the intro and chapter 1 of this book, and that was enough for me. I expected it to be propaganda for or against birth control, but it turned out to be propaganda of a different kind. Apparently women (despite the note saying there are many ways to define a woman) are defined primarily by the size of their gametes and reproductive viability. Does your body make eggs? Then you are a woman! And the only type of woman worth discussing (if you're heterosexual). There is a disclaimer for w I only read the intro and chapter 1 of this book, and that was enough for me. I expected it to be propaganda for or against birth control, but it turned out to be propaganda of a different kind. Apparently women (despite the note saying there are many ways to define a woman) are defined primarily by the size of their gametes and reproductive viability. Does your body make eggs? Then you are a woman! And the only type of woman worth discussing (if you're heterosexual). There is a disclaimer for why the author chose to exclude lesbians and trans men and women: because if they use the pill it's not primarily for pregnancy prevention. She couldn't just say that the research primarily concerns birth control used for pregnancy prevention though (that I believe - why would we do research on "women's" health unless it was in the context of their ability to make babies?!); what I don't believe is that all of the studies looked at checked to make sure all their participants were cishet. The one that rang this alarm bell for me in particular is where they had actors of the opposite gender ask strangers on a college campus for a date/to go back to their apartment/to have sex with them (the author notes that "male" and "female" brains responded differently; but by her definition this is determined by the size of your gametes and I doubt they stopped and measured them on all study participants). I also don't understand why just the criteria of pregnancy prevention would exclude people of the LGBT+ community (just because someone's not cishet doesn't mean they can't get pregnant). I don't like that the author made a point of excluding these people from all the studies she looks at in a blanket statement at the beginning of the book. As a side note to this I was annoyed by the exclusion of taking birth control for any reason other than pregnancy prevention. Sure, it's plausible that research done doesn't concern people outside this bubble (I think the author even noted it as a narrow group of study), but I wish that had been pointed out in the book summary. Lots of people take birth control for other reasons. The author encourages you to read on even if you don't fall into this "narrow" category, but I have other qualms with that (noted below). Alternatives to the pill aren't discussed if you're not using if for birth control because why would you be using it for anything else? Likewise based on the author's own assertion that most research concerns pregnancy prevention and other reviews, I don't expect the effects of birth control on people who need it for other reasons are discussed. That was my primary interest in picking up the book. I was increasingly skeptical of how scientific her approach really was. This caused me to seek out end notes on my own (not mentioned in the text) and then try to piece together how they were cited in the text - usually by a * and not a number, as is the typical standard. Sometimes they were not noted at all (I found two consecutive references unmarked in the first chapter). Also I expected the * to lead to a foot note or note at the end of the section or chapter, not a citation at the end of the book (based on typical usage). She also consistently referred to biology and psychology as if they were interchangeable. This grated on my patience. Granted, the last book I finished was a thick biography where the author mentioned his sources in detail and the context and/or bias of the authors of his sources. Maybe I'm just spoiled, but this author's approach struck me as sloppy and unprofessional. The tone is also condescending; she constantly tells you that you don't know what you think you know and assumes what the reader believes. Aren't you lucky she's here to educate you? It's not like you picked up a nonfiction book on your own initiative to learn something new. So my doubts about the text were piling up, despite the odd disclaimers about how even if you're not a cishet woman taking the pill to prevent pregnancy your experiences are still valid (which felt forced), when she rolled into another aside which really put the final nail in the coffin for me. After repeatedly hammering home that "women" are reproductively viable egg producers, she takes a moment to address how this shakes out under a feminist lens. She wants to reassure the reader that they are not defined by their uterus! Isn't it more feminist to think that you've inherited the biological wisdom of your female ancestors than to think you're so gullible that you're swayed by socio-cultural circumstances? Dissing sociology for a biology-is-destiny stance seems pretty brazen for a psychologist, whose field is closer to the former than the latter (ignoring her continued treatment of psychology and biology as the same subject). After asserting that she is indeed so feminist she really slams on her own definition of a "biological woman." Take pride in the fact that you are a woman!* People might get offended, but she's not saying that people should have babies just because they can. She's just saying that if you can't, you're not a woman. She tries to slip that in there with a lot of PC sounding bullshit that clearly wasn't written with any understanding of the people in the groups she's isolating, but she is basically saying if you can't carry an egg to term you are not a fucking woman. *Assuming you produce eggs and are reproductively viable. Infertile? Not a woman. No ovaries? Not a woman. Trans? Not a woman (she specifically cited trans men among her "these people don't take birth control for pregnancy prevention" group, just in case any non cishet person slipped through; granted many trans men probably meet her definition of a woman; I think of this as an "it hurt itself in its confusion" moment - trans men are in fact men). You can be a woman if you're a lesbian, but if you're not producing biological offspring to carry on your genes you are useless to her narrative. Bi/Pan/Ace? Do those people exist? Are they reproducing with people with the other size gametes? If not, irrelevant. She didn't exclude these people on purpose, it's just that scientists don't care about them. You matter! Just not to science. She's not a TERF, she just thinks women are primarily defined by their reproductive capabilities (but still a feminist!). Like women's psychology has evolved based on their production of biological offspring, because they've never cared for children that they didn't spit the egg out for I guess? (She specifically mentions the evolution of women and parental investment based on their biological offspring while ignoring/discounting any other influences.) All kinds of concerning exclusions here. All kinds. Anyway that really did it in for me. Fuck her for trying to shove her TERF ideals down other peoples' throats. TLDR I spotted this in the library and picked it up, and am so glad I didn't waste money (or that much time on it). The author tries to justify her grossly limited view of woman, her research may be well done but is poorly cited and interpreted, and she's condescending. I don't trust her to present unbiased science and conclusions to me; I suspect her data was cherry picked to suit her needs and her theories are written through an incredibly narrow lens based primarily on her own experiences and perceptions. There are probably a lot of interesting things to learn about the effects of birth control on the body, but I'm not going to learn it from this author. Edit As an edit to my already lengthy review - the more I think about this the more it bothers me. The author takes a deliberately exclusionist view of history - taking into account only the direct biological ancestors of people living today - and assumes that no LGBT+ people participated in this process and can therefore be excluded from her view of history. She went out of the way to emphasize the people excluded from her view of the world repeatedly and acted as though the science somehow justified this perspective - as if these people never existed and have no relevance to our psychology today.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laura Lam

    I found this really interesting. Learned about: - how hormones work in AFAB bodies - how birth control is made and the hormones synthesized - that most research studies use male subjects, even male rats and even cells (!) - a lot of the time this is due to the pressure for academics to publish often--takes longer to control for hormonal cycles etc. - plus of course how birth control affects the body and mind, which is the bulk of the book - the potential wider ramifications of birth control, e.g. the I found this really interesting. Learned about: - how hormones work in AFAB bodies - how birth control is made and the hormones synthesized - that most research studies use male subjects, even male rats and even cells (!) - a lot of the time this is due to the pressure for academics to publish often--takes longer to control for hormonal cycles etc. - plus of course how birth control affects the body and mind, which is the bulk of the book - the potential wider ramifications of birth control, e.g. the divorce rate What I would have liked more of: - birth control as medical treatment (for things like endometriosis, PCOS, etc) I also appreciated the caveat at the start that most of the studies were done on white, straight, cisgender women and therefore was lacking in intersectionality. Overall, super interesting. Really recommend to people both on and off birth control, because we're not really informed and knowledge is power.

  7. 4 out of 5

    saranimals

    Excessive use of footnotes significantly impeded the flow (pun intended) of reading

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jasmin Abbott

    Brilliant summary of current evidence about what being on the pill does to your body that is extremely needed - however I would want readers to bear in mind this is how one person explains their (well researched) interpretation since, as someone with a scientific background, there are many points in the book I would be more critical of the evidence and therefore the interpretation. Not all scientists think evolutionary biology/psychology is an explanation for everything, which the author does no Brilliant summary of current evidence about what being on the pill does to your body that is extremely needed - however I would want readers to bear in mind this is how one person explains their (well researched) interpretation since, as someone with a scientific background, there are many points in the book I would be more critical of the evidence and therefore the interpretation. Not all scientists think evolutionary biology/psychology is an explanation for everything, which the author does not touch upon. I gave the book three stars for this reason; that the author does not discuss other perspectives, which is a failing given the book is intended for consumption by people who may not have the tools to critique the evidence and opinions themselves. Some other points I thought could be improved on. Unfortunately the book talks about ‘the pill’ and doesn’t separate out evidence much for the combined pill and progesterone-only pill (probably because there isn’t enough evidence to begin with). The book is also entirely about “women” who take the pill for birth-control - whilst the author does caveats that the book is also for people taking the pill who don’t identify as women, I don’t think the language throughout the book reflects this. Finally the book constantly references making a choice about taking the pill for birth control and doesn’t talk about people who take the pill for medical reasons e.g. what should people with PCOS (a very common condition) do with this evidence? I hope more similar literature and research into this field comes! The authors summary about why the field of research is so lacking is very good and I wish more people knew about this!!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura Noggle

    *Note: Despite the star rating, this book should still be read by anyone who's ever taken birth control for extended periods of time.* I'm glad this topic is being talked about, but as the author states, more conclusive research is needed. Yes, there are many unknowns when it comes to ingesting birth control, and much of this I think I've already gathered throughout my years. When I lived in Asia, I stopped taking birth control as I really didn't trust getting it in China where "controls" and "sta *Note: Despite the star rating, this book should still be read by anyone who's ever taken birth control for extended periods of time.* I'm glad this topic is being talked about, but as the author states, more conclusive research is needed. Yes, there are many unknowns when it comes to ingesting birth control, and much of this I think I've already gathered throughout my years. When I lived in Asia, I stopped taking birth control as I really didn't trust getting it in China where "controls" and "standards" are laughable at best. After a brief return to it, I've been off birth control now for almost 5 years. I'm not sure if I was ever a different person on it, but intuitively, I lean more and more towards not messing around with man-made hormones. There are so many unestablished risks and possible long term effects. The author did an admirable job, although it could have used a tighter edit with less repetition. Conclusion: More research and stats are needed, but it doesn't hurt to err on the side of caution. Consider taking a break for a while and trying a new method while recording your own personal case study.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    This book was so freaking interesting. It should be required reading for anyone on birth control - not to scare anyone - but because better information leads to better decision making. I learned a lot from this book that can explain some of my experiences on hormonal birth control, and that information will likely help me make good decisions if I ever decide to go back on it. My one complaint about this book is that I thought the author generalized a little bit too much about women’s experiences This book was so freaking interesting. It should be required reading for anyone on birth control - not to scare anyone - but because better information leads to better decision making. I learned a lot from this book that can explain some of my experiences on hormonal birth control, and that information will likely help me make good decisions if I ever decide to go back on it. My one complaint about this book is that I thought the author generalized a little bit too much about women’s experiences of birth control. Access to birth control is not, and has never been, evenly spread across all populations of women, and I wish the author had considered that a little more. I also find it hard to believe that the current male-female achievement gap can be explained by the rise of birth control and men’s sexual motivations... but that’s maybe just me expecting too much from men!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    The book was very informative and definitely gave me great insight on birth control and how it works (against) in your body. However, the author added so many “quirky” footnotes that constantly left a bad taste in my mouth. I felt like she was bragging about how intelligent she is the whole time, as well as making the readers know that she is “trying her best” to put everything in a simple way, so that even WE could understand. I liked the book, but the author made me uncomfortable. I’ve never b The book was very informative and definitely gave me great insight on birth control and how it works (against) in your body. However, the author added so many “quirky” footnotes that constantly left a bad taste in my mouth. I felt like she was bragging about how intelligent she is the whole time, as well as making the readers know that she is “trying her best” to put everything in a simple way, so that even WE could understand. I liked the book, but the author made me uncomfortable. I’ve never been so off-put by the voice of the author in a book before!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Divya Shanmugam

    I really liked this book. It gave me questions I'd like to ask my doctor and this /very/ cool table that breaks down the types of progestins used in different birth control pills and side effects you could expect from them. I appreciate the author's inclusion of contradictory studies - it eased my skepticism towards lines about a study that studied X and showed Y. The only comment is that its written sort of colloquially, so I found myself skimming over some paragraphs. I learned that the endomet I really liked this book. It gave me questions I'd like to ask my doctor and this /very/ cool table that breaks down the types of progestins used in different birth control pills and side effects you could expect from them. I appreciate the author's inclusion of contradictory studies - it eased my skepticism towards lines about a study that studied X and showed Y. The only comment is that its written sort of colloquially, so I found myself skimming over some paragraphs. I learned that the endometrium is one of the most hostile environments for an embryo to implant in ! This is meant to weed out the weak embryos and studies on mice have shown that embryos thrive easily (almost parasitically) in other tissues. and then there's a story about a fish with three genders that I won't spoil!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janne

    Unfortunately, I was highly disappointed by this book. I was expecting an informative book on the pill, hormones, and how they affect our bodies, but was presented with a book that was deterministic, sexist, heteronormative, and many other things. I've tried to condense my main issues with the book in 5 points, but honestly there is so much more I could mentioned that did not sit well with me. - Someone who writes a book on the pill, the female body, and sex, should avoid euphemisms such as ' yo Unfortunately, I was highly disappointed by this book. I was expecting an informative book on the pill, hormones, and how they affect our bodies, but was presented with a book that was deterministic, sexist, heteronormative, and many other things. I've tried to condense my main issues with the book in 5 points, but honestly there is so much more I could mentioned that did not sit well with me. - Someone who writes a book on the pill, the female body, and sex, should avoid euphemisms such as ' your area down there', 'making love', etc. It was distracting to me, and also felt belittling and made her less believable as an author writing about women, gender, and sex. - She draws upon a lot of research to inform the reader, followed by saying other research has been done that states the opposite and that the reader should not take it as advice or truth. The book is full of speculation, which leads her to constantly weaken her own statements ("it may affect.. it could be that...), whilst simultaneously trying to convince her readers of her argument. For example (and this example also leads to the next problematic point of this book), she spends a lot of time talking about how women on the pill date less-sexy men and they might not find their partners attractive anymore once they go off the pill. She then proceeds to state that this does not happen to everyone and that more research is needed, so you shouldn't jump to conclusions just yet. - Sticking with the previous example, one of the biggest issues I had with the book is the extreme heteronormativity and its binary view on gender. The book includes a statement that the book is also useful for lesbians and trans men and women, yet she only discusses heterosexual relationships, penetrative sex, and pregnancy prevention. People take the pill for more reasons than just pregnancy control, so if that is what she wants to discuss than it should be presented as such and not as a book for women, lesbians, and trans people. The issue becomes worse when she discusses masculine and feminine traits. As she explains, certain types of the pill can make women more 'testosterone-y' than women who don't take the pill, and she assumes that 'that's probably not what you wanted to happen', also linking this to a very binary understanding of gender where men like to watch football with their friends and women spend their time shopping and gossiping. - Furthermore, the book is filled with messages that women live for men, are very concerned with what men think of them, and will be unhappy if men do not give them the attention they want (which, according to her, might be because of the pill). She states that men are less attracted to women who take the pill, as if that is the biggest concern women deal with, and spends a big part of the book discussing male-female relationships and how taking the pill can affect this. Not all of this is problematic (for example, learning about how the pill can affect your libido and sexual experience overall is useful and important), but the main underlying message is very focused on wanting a heterosexual relationship and making sure that men still like you and find you attractive. She even states that women are jealous of other women who are in their high fertility period, because those women are more attractive to men. - Finally, the book is very deterministic. She states at the beginning of the book that her book is 'also suitable for feminists', despite the fact that she bases herself on evolutionary biology. However, the ideas that are then presented and worked out throughout the book, make it clear that this book is, in fact, not for feminists. She presents ideas such as: 1) Women want men who are muscular and rich, because of evolution and the need of our ancestors to have a strong man by your side 2) She also makes a distinction between 'bad and good guys' and argues that we fall for the bad guys because of our hormonal/evolutionary tendencies to go for the strong looking hot guys, and not the soft-spoken sweet guys 3) Women have an evolutionary urge to have babies, and their life and partner choices are influenced by this 4) Men have a lot of sperm to give, women have limited number of eggs. Therefore men are more likely to 'sleep around' whereas women want a partner for life. etc. This is made worse by the total lack of acknowledgment that there are more factors than evolutionary biology that influence our behaviour. All in all, this could have been an important and educational book about the pill and hormones, but left me feeling angry and disappointed. Would definitely not recommend.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I didn't quite finish this all the way. I found the research and information presented in a clear, fairly unbiased way. It was scary to read how much we don't know about the effects of hormonal birth control on personalities, emotions, reactions, mating preferences, smells, musical taste, etc. and to think about how simply the question is usually presented - don't want to get pregnant, take the pill, easy! Bottom line - the pill has made huge impacts on society and lives for good and, sometimes, I didn't quite finish this all the way. I found the research and information presented in a clear, fairly unbiased way. It was scary to read how much we don't know about the effects of hormonal birth control on personalities, emotions, reactions, mating preferences, smells, musical taste, etc. and to think about how simply the question is usually presented - don't want to get pregnant, take the pill, easy! Bottom line - the pill has made huge impacts on society and lives for good and, sometimes, bad. This book was a great reminder to ask more questions.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jaimie Krems

    As an evolutionary social scientist---I'm professor of experimental psychology at a large research-focused university---I had very high expectations for this book. It exceeded those expectations. Dr. Hill is an incredible author and her work is not only readable, but it's also plainly fun to read. I will be assigning this book to students and recommending it to those interested in women's psychology and behavior, evolutionary medicine, hormones---and simply to all who are interested in better un As an evolutionary social scientist---I'm professor of experimental psychology at a large research-focused university---I had very high expectations for this book. It exceeded those expectations. Dr. Hill is an incredible author and her work is not only readable, but it's also plainly fun to read. I will be assigning this book to students and recommending it to those interested in women's psychology and behavior, evolutionary medicine, hormones---and simply to all who are interested in better understanding the mysteries that still wait to be discovered about women's bodies and minds. (For the record, given what this book reveals about the impact of birth control on women, everyone should be interested in better understanding its effects on women.)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Conflicting feelings about this book. I am happy to know more about the workings of hormones now ... but I still do not believe that - as the book repeatedly underlines - we ARE our hormones (we are also our socialisation, our community, our learned experiences etc. ...). A little bit too deterministic to my liking. Still, an interesting read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I have mixed feelings about this book. I'm thrilled that the author wrote it - I think hormones and reproductive health and birth control are all massively understudied subjects, and ones that the public tends to massively misunderstand. It's nice to see this type of work laid out in fairly simple (if sometimes a bit condescending) language. Hill takes a feminist approach to her concerns about birth control, and her acknowledgement of the importance of the pill for many young folks who are tryin I have mixed feelings about this book. I'm thrilled that the author wrote it - I think hormones and reproductive health and birth control are all massively understudied subjects, and ones that the public tends to massively misunderstand. It's nice to see this type of work laid out in fairly simple (if sometimes a bit condescending) language. Hill takes a feminist approach to her concerns about birth control, and her acknowledgement of the importance of the pill for many young folks who are trying not to get pregnant is a huge point in her favour. She notes that the pill has allowed financial, educational, and relationship freedom for many people who would otherwise not have it, and she's absolutely right. I think she's also absolutely right in her main stance: that taking the pill is a much more significant choice than most of us realize and that the powerful hormonal changes induced by the pill are not to be taken lightly. But the devil's in the details. I have the same degrees and similar research training as Hill, and I've read most of the work she cites in the first half of the book. My understanding of that material, and of psychology research in general, makes me seriously question the way the author makes her case. And she is, indeed, making a case. Many of my issues with this book stem from the fact that Hill is just too invested in her hypothesis to tell a balanced story. She starts the book by comparing cultural vs. evolutionary explanations for behaviour, suggesting that, "The 'women as a cultural construction' perspective describes women as passive receptacle [sic] of social roles imposed on us by men. The evolutionary biological perspective describes women as being the benefactors of millions of years of inherited wisdom from our female ancestors." Ugh, stop. Literally all we're talking about is what things influence behaviour, and we know from decades of research that the answer is almost certainly "both", so let's stop twisting words around to make one sound more appealing or politically correct. Similarly, Hill will spend three pages talking about a study that found significant differences in women's behaviour based on their pill usage, and then throw in a one-line footnote saying that several other studies haven't found this effect at all. Um, what? Maybe tell us about those too?? As if to illustrate her perspective on this, late in the book, Hill tells us that "research has a high failure rate", and that experiments that don't find significant effects are worth "doodly-squat". Listen, academia certainly has a file-drawer problem, but this attitude of non-significant findings being viewed as "failure" is EXACTLY why that problem persists. Hill also does a lot of speculating in this book, and some of it based on pretty shaky theoretical ground. She does at least acknowledge that it's all speculation, but still - it seems borderline irresponsible to publish a book intended for the less-educated masses to consume, establish yourself as an authority that they should trust, and then start wildly conjecturing about things you think might be true but which no one has any data to support. And finally, Hill doesn't acknowledge until 70% of the way through that most of the science in this book is pseudo-experimental. After 179 pages, she finally notes that most studies on the pill do not involve random assignment, and therefore, we can't conclusively say that birth control "causes" much of anything. (Of course, carefully controlled studies and thoughtful research design can be the next best thing in establishing causality, but as far as I can tell most of these studies did not address 3rd variable problems in a satisfactory way). I cannot imagine why Hill would have waited so long to discuss this, when it is crucial to understanding the studies presented throughout the book. Like I said: I actually agree with Hill's main point here. I think that behind all the conjecturing and cherry picking, there's some real cause for concern regarding the long-term and wide-ranging effects of birth control pills. So why hide your message behind all of that? Why spend all this time and energy twisting the message to sound more convincing when it was already pretty convincing in the first place? (Also, other reviewers have noted that this book is heteronormative and cisnormative as hell, and they are not wrong. I'll leave it to folks more well-versed in that area to cover this, since this review is already long, but suffice it to say that there is a lot of gender essentialism going on and only a meek 1-page conciliatory note for people who "colour outside the lines" to counteract that.)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Are you on the pill? Are you aware of the effects, besides preventing ovulation and thereby pregnancy, that this little pill has on you? Yes, on you, not just your body but your entire being? Probably not. If you’ve gone as far as to read the package insert, you’ve been informed that being on the pill may have some side effects such as acne, headaches and emotionality , but you haven’t been told that this pill may fundamentally change who you are. Dr Sarah Hill is on a quest to educate her reade Are you on the pill? Are you aware of the effects, besides preventing ovulation and thereby pregnancy, that this little pill has on you? Yes, on you, not just your body but your entire being? Probably not. If you’ve gone as far as to read the package insert, you’ve been informed that being on the pill may have some side effects such as acne, headaches and emotionality , but you haven’t been told that this pill may fundamentally change who you are. Dr Sarah Hill is on a quest to educate her readers, and tell them what they aren’t likely to have been told by their doctors. Her biggest claim is that the pill has a dramatic effect on a (cisgender, heterosexual) woman’s hormone regulation, and that since your brain regulates everything that happens in your body by means of hormones, the pill changes who you are. Basically, her point is that the pill has many - previously unstudied and largely unknown - side effects, and that women are taking a huge gamble “in the name of contraception, clear skin, or a more regular menstrual cycle”. How the Pill Changes Everything is divided into three parts, in which Dr Hill takes the reader by the hand and explains all there is to know. First, she discusses women from a biological perspective, and explains women’s reproductive cycles and (sex) hormones. Then she explains how the pill works, and how it has side effects that reach much further than you’ve likely feel told: not only fundamental changes in mood, but also stress response, partner selection and sex drive. Lastly, she sets out how it can be that the impact of the pill is relatively unknown, and that science has only just began to study these effects. How the Pill Changes Everything is hugely informative. It explains many things that I did not know about my own body, and the effect that the pill can have on many of my bodily processes, and many more processes outside of it besides. This is also Dr Hill’s aim. She is not a crusader against oral contraception; her intention is to reduce the blind spot that exists when it comes to the pill, so that women can make an informed decision about their health and hormones. Dr Hill is a psychologist and clearly knows what she is talking about, but she manages to describe and discuss countless studies done on the topic without it becoming tedious or incomprehensible, but she also doesn’t sacrifice the credibility of these studies. The book, however, also has some weak spots. First of all, it’s is exclusively about and for cishet women. Hill states that this is because “research hasn’t quite caught up” on pill-taking gay women and trans folk, but she makes little effort to include the (social) experiences of these people into account. This brings me to my second criticism, which is Hill’s assertion that women are essentially ruled by their sex hormones, and I find this incredibly hard to believe. Thirdly, the book only discusses the pill as a contraceptive, and doesn’t speak a word about IUDs, contraceptive patches, or other methods. Since most of these contain hormones as well, it would have been nice to have a word on these as well. Lastly, the book generalizes almost every claim that is made. Hill produces a lot of science to back up her claims, but she does not provide numbers for how many women are affected in different way by the pill. Probably because there isn’t a lot of research on this, but I for one didn’t recognize myself in many of her claims, and I was wondering how many women would. All in all a very informative book, and despite its shortcomings I would definitely recommend it for its educational value alone.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Natasha

    A very interesting and insightful book about the Pill that I would recommend anyone using or thinking of using hormonal contraceptives read. Many of the chapters were very informative and discussed issues that are not common knowledge - I for one didn't know that being on the Pill could affect my sense of smell, and my doctor certainly never mentioned it (or any of the other impacts). As with other reviews, the author did lean quite heavily on the nature side of the nature/nurture debate and used A very interesting and insightful book about the Pill that I would recommend anyone using or thinking of using hormonal contraceptives read. Many of the chapters were very informative and discussed issues that are not common knowledge - I for one didn't know that being on the Pill could affect my sense of smell, and my doctor certainly never mentioned it (or any of the other impacts). As with other reviews, the author did lean quite heavily on the nature side of the nature/nurture debate and used some very broad generalisations. I found there to be a lack of specific data on effect sizes, which left me feeling uneasy and micro-analysing my life at several points throughout the book. There is also a lot of important data and information to keep in mind when reading this book. A summary page at the end of each chapter would have been a really helpful reference point for when I flicked back to previous chapters to refresh my memory.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Kost

    It is astonishing that so many women daily take a medication that "influences billions of cells at once from head to toe" throughout the body, without giving thought to the significant consequences these pharmaceutical have on every aspect of their being, how they think, look and behave, "how they see the world...and just about anything else you can possibly imagine." Your likelihood to divorce may even depend on whether you met when you were taking the pill or not. Hormones are powerful chemica It is astonishing that so many women daily take a medication that "influences billions of cells at once from head to toe" throughout the body, without giving thought to the significant consequences these pharmaceutical have on every aspect of their being, how they think, look and behave, "how they see the world...and just about anything else you can possibly imagine." Your likelihood to divorce may even depend on whether you met when you were taking the pill or not. Hormones are powerful chemicals and their impact is far reaching. Hill, a PhD in the newish field of evolutionary psychology, delivers on her intention to provide information so the reader will be able to "make more informed choices, not just about your health but about who you want to be." She urges women to journal their responses to a series of questions BEFORE they go on the pill and then as they proceed to take it. "This will give you a trail of bread crumbs back to yourself once you're on it." Scary but necessary, as Hill reveals. The reader is sure to have a new understanding of how their bodies work. Some may decide to make alternate plans to address contraception, migraines, acne, cycle regulation, or whatever other problem prompted their taking the pill as a remedy. In addition to influencing sexual response, attraction and attractiveness, "stress, hunger, eating patterns, emotion regulation, friendships, aggression, mood, learning... relationship satisfaction...it changes who you are. The pill changes ...everything," as we read many, many times in this book. The author proves it beyond any doubt. That's the positive and the negative regarding this book. It is extremely repetitive, with many examples that, while perhaps titillating, are excessive for making the point. We got it the first time, or at least by the tenth, in the second chapter. Hill's tone is that of a *very* chatty vernacular-using Gen Y girlfriend, who happens to be a scientist, telling you how it is so you understand the impact of these drugs on your body because you mentioned the topic. The first conversation is a revelation, so you express interest, but then she keeps texting, calling, and emailing with more information...it starts to feel like she's stalking you. Have I read this same chapter five times? No, it just feels that way. She also provides a table of various iterations of the pill and their hormone percentages. Some work perfectly for some women while causing others severe side effects like depression (in the Denmark study, 50% more likely to be diagnosed, even when taking non-oral products like "a patch, vaginal ring, or hormonal IUD"). That's horrifying. Eventually, medications will be prescribed with a specific genome in mind; we aren't anywhere near that point yet. Hill provides a laudably balanced view. Yes, you are affecting billions of cells in your body and changing who you are in myriad ways, but "the numbers of women applying to law school and medical school skyrocketed once the pill became legally available to single women." There are socioeconomic unintended consequences beside the physiological however, which she addresses in Part III. There's the issue of delaying reproduction and the rise of the $3.5B infertility treatment industry. Since women have made themselves more available sexually, men don't have to work as hard, so they don't, at many things, not just seduction. "Nothing motivates and inspires boys to work hard to develop into respectable, financially independent men more than unfailing commitment to the belief that to do anything otherwise would doom them to a life of involuntary celibacy. When men are able to gain access to women without having had to accomplish or commit to anything first, oftentimes this is the path they will follow." See Baumeister and Vohs (2004) "Sexual Economics" and Regnerus (2017) "Cheap Sex." Most readers are likely to be unaware that drugs, even those intended for women, are most often tested on men due to female hormonal cycles, which "can easily triple the amount of time and money it takes to answer a research question." "Females make the results too nuanced (since males and females almost never respond the same way to treatments), and the results from females are mechanistically messier (since it is possible that their sex hormones may have influenced their results)." That means it's harder to study females, get funding, be published, etc. So the results for males are generalized to females for all kinds of drugs. And that is a Very Bad Thing indeed for females. This book should also prompt consideration of the grievous consequences of hormonal blockers and treatments for young gender dysphorics. Male is male and female is female and there are infinite differences between them that can never be bridged. The brain is under construction. Better to bring the disordered mind in alignment with the body that is than try to do the reverse; it can never work. This book makes that abundantly clear. "Treating the pill as the big deal that it is will require a major course adjustment for all of us. We've been far too cavalier about making changes to women's sex hormones." The steroids that disqualify athletes? Their primary ingredient is a male sex hormone. We know the dangers of steroids; they're illegal without prescription as dangers to public health. But women are on female sex hormones "for years at a time despite all the effects that they have on the body." The birth control issue is not solved. The stakes are high: the effects on a woman's body and control of fertility. Sex hormones are major determinants of the way the brain develops through one's twenties, so the impact on young women of taking the pill is especially serious, but that's not often impressed upon young women. The main takeaway is try as we might, we can't control Nature without serious pushback and unintended consequences.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Summer SSS

    Great book, so informative yet not boring. I really appreciated the author's overall tone on the subject, it made the read way more enjoyable and personal. Great book, so informative yet not boring. I really appreciated the author's overall tone on the subject, it made the read way more enjoyable and personal.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Autumn

    This book was hugely disappointing. I should have looked at the author’s credentials as an evolutionary psychologist before reading, given that the entire frame of the book is built on biological determinism (e.g. “you are your hormones” and not much else) and the assumption that humans are driven almost entirely by sex-driven, reproductive-seeking behavior. Evolutionary psychology is essentially a theory and yet it is used to no abandon in this book to interpret data related to research on the This book was hugely disappointing. I should have looked at the author’s credentials as an evolutionary psychologist before reading, given that the entire frame of the book is built on biological determinism (e.g. “you are your hormones” and not much else) and the assumption that humans are driven almost entirely by sex-driven, reproductive-seeking behavior. Evolutionary psychology is essentially a theory and yet it is used to no abandon in this book to interpret data related to research on the pill. The author’s heterosexism is on display throughout the text, as she consistently ignores queer people’s experiences, because they don’t fit in tidily to evolutionary theory. Her upholding of the gender binary through constant citing of sex differences research (including some pretty poorly-done studies on attraction to “feminine” vs “masculine” faces on and off the pill) are based on antiquated assumptions. Despite believing in a theory which allegedly explains all of human history, her sense of history is poor in that she seems to have thought women have had a significant say in their “mating” choices/marriages/etc. Not only is this fairly inaccurate for all women, it is especially true for certain populations based on race, class, social position, etc. Naturally she doesn’t touch on any of these aspects of identity. The only redeeming parts of the book were where she explains the actual science of how hormones impact our body, as well as a chapter toward the end that discusses women’s historical exclusion from medical research. Unfortunately her book perpetuates the same exclusion of populations by focusing so narrowly on reproduction and heteronormative cultural narratives. Lastly, and this is likely the publisher’s fault, but the censoring of curse words (e.g.: sh**) throughout is so obnoxious for a book that talks about labial secretions. If you’re going to write in a tone supposedly made for adults, own it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shaleah

    Surprising! But I didn't believe everything I read. There are some great explanations of how women's bodies actually work. But it is always blamed on evolution. It was a base, animal discussion that gave no room for higher brain function or spiritual decision making. I almost quit when the book said dual-mating (cheating) is innately built into womens psychology, especially when in a state of high fertility. It got better. This book is more science than self-help, so it was hard skip to the good stuf Surprising! But I didn't believe everything I read. There are some great explanations of how women's bodies actually work. But it is always blamed on evolution. It was a base, animal discussion that gave no room for higher brain function or spiritual decision making. I almost quit when the book said dual-mating (cheating) is innately built into womens psychology, especially when in a state of high fertility. It got better. This book is more science than self-help, so it was hard skip to the good stuff: -a handy chart in chapter 4 about what is in the pills -birth control does effect the brain; it is still being studied how much is negative -the pill can change the way we feel -the last chapter was the most helpful personally about applying the knowledge. I do agree that our bodies sometimes do things that aren't fully understood by medicine. This book has opened my eyes to the fact the pill can cause serious mental health problems for some women while others will feel better. Tell someone close to you about your new medication and then journal how you feel.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elly Call

    I expected an easy read but it was harder than I expected—not because Hill was in the science weeds (she was, but it was fascinating so I wasn't mad) but because the science challenged many of my understandings of sex and gender. It turned out to make room for a much more nuanced, informed view that wasn't transphobic--but at first, the book didn't seem that way. Hormones inform behavior. Sex at birth informs hormones. Those are facts, they're real, but at first blush I BALKED at this book. I me I expected an easy read but it was harder than I expected—not because Hill was in the science weeds (she was, but it was fascinating so I wasn't mad) but because the science challenged many of my understandings of sex and gender. It turned out to make room for a much more nuanced, informed view that wasn't transphobic--but at first, the book didn't seem that way. Hormones inform behavior. Sex at birth informs hormones. Those are facts, they're real, but at first blush I BALKED at this book. I mean, I don't like to think I'm some sort of walking uterine flesh bag with a brain full o' Estrogen and a heart full o' babies. But I got over her emphasizing the role of hormones in behavior when she pointed out men's hormone levels are far more variable in many ways than women's, it's just only women's hormonal changeability has been politicized and used against them in ways men's' changing hormone levels never have, and hormone levels aren't DESTINY but they can influence how medicines work on world view and self-determination so it's good to know about them. These facts are hard to talk about, but the conversation is critical even if it is screechingly uncomfortable. The Right uses biology as destiny all the time, and some of Hill's quotes, taken out of context, could be twisted (like any science) to slap me in the face with the imperative of the heterosexual nuclear family. I don't appreciate this. But the information in the context of the book absolutely pushes no agenda aside from "hey we should study female hormones sometimes so we don't accidentally kill people with uteruses with alheimer's drugs and depression." She mostly talked about relationships and the pill from heterosexual points of view (Statistically this makes sense, as far as who's likely reading) but the focus on heterosexuality only enforced to me that we desperately need more attention on trans health and queer relationships. Hill discusses how few women (even female RATS) are used in scientific study and it's positively terrifying how much we don't know about hormones and biology of non-males. I really hope that people read this book and don't shout her down as being anti-feminist because she's not--and I know many people probably will just because she's a woman and a scientist and she's trying to break down some real, potentially deadly problems about the pill. And that information is critical to everyone, people with uteruses especially.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Usai

    I've always been a strong supporter of bodily autonomy, especially for female reproduction, whether is it contraception, pregnancy or abortion. And as someone who who has personally benefitted from female contraception and family planning, this book threw me for a loop. There were parts that I found incredibly enlightening - such as the comparison between female and male hormonal patterns, and the the debunking of the expression "women are hormonal", because, well, men have hormones too. Well, n I've always been a strong supporter of bodily autonomy, especially for female reproduction, whether is it contraception, pregnancy or abortion. And as someone who who has personally benefitted from female contraception and family planning, this book threw me for a loop. There were parts that I found incredibly enlightening - such as the comparison between female and male hormonal patterns, and the the debunking of the expression "women are hormonal", because, well, men have hormones too. Well, not only do men have hormones, the testosterone fluctuations they experience are WAY MORE unpredictable than ups and downs of the female ones, progesterone and oestrogen. But wait - I'm getting carried away with the scientific nitty-gritty. No, what tore me up was the realisation that, although the pill is, yes, amazing and groundbreaking for those who choose to use it, it affects an individual's body so fundamentally that it literally reshapes our personalities, tastes and even attraction towards others. Studies outlined in the text demonstrate how the since the pill surpasses ovulation, for example, those who take it are perpetually in the pre-period stage (leutal stage), which means we spend most of our lives in "hormonal winter". Which is INSANE. Now, I'm not a scientist, nor qualified in any way to dispense medical advice. This book, however, did stir many questions within me, and the system within which female contraception (see a trend with my taste in books at the moment?) exists. Although we have found a solution, and the pill has, undoubtedly, helped many, many, many individuals (myself included!) plan their lives in a way unfathomable to our predecessors, it is still a work in progress. The decision to go on the pill should not be taken lightly, and we should continue question whether a better solution could be found. Highly recommended.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Saniya Ahmad

    In this day and age, most women worldwide know about and have used or are using birth control pills for some reason or the other. The primary reason for the usage of such pills is pregnancy prevention but it is now also being recommended by doctors for period regulation, ovarian cysts, acne problems and hair growth on the body. It is considered quite normal for women to be on The Pill for months and years, going off when they want to get pregnant. But what the reality is that The Pill doesn't ju In this day and age, most women worldwide know about and have used or are using birth control pills for some reason or the other. The primary reason for the usage of such pills is pregnancy prevention but it is now also being recommended by doctors for period regulation, ovarian cysts, acne problems and hair growth on the body. It is considered quite normal for women to be on The Pill for months and years, going off when they want to get pregnant. But what the reality is that The Pill doesn't just affect our sex hormones; it affects us as a whole. How The Pill Changes Everything by Sarah E. Hill talks about the effects, both short- and long-term, which affect a female body other than the above-mentioned effects. Hill is adamant that the symptoms mentioned as side effects of The Pill are not "side effects"; they are actual effects caused by the hormonal changes in our body. She mentions clearly how the naturally cycling women and pill-taking women differ, how it is not just their sex life that is affected but their moods, stress levels, immunity and even their personality as a whole. It's traumatising to read the complete effects of what birth control pills are doing to women's bodies but it is also fascinating to know how our body works and how different kinds of hormones affect us differently. The book was wonderful and I believe every single women should read this book whether they've ever used oral contraceptives or not. It is important to gain such knowledge to make better and more informed decisions about whether to use birth control pills and which ones to use. The only thing that I didn't like were the footnotes which appeared frequently throughout the book, and were somewhat interrupting the flow of the book. Also, the footnotes, while informative, felt like the author was trying to be funny and witty but as a reader, I felt more dumb while reading the footnotes, as if the author feels that the reader does not know even the simplest of terms. That was a little off-putting, if I'm being honest. Overall though, a must read for every woman out there. Make better decisions. Know how your body works and know what you're putting into it. Every pill works differently on every person. Only through research can you figure out what works best for you and what you need to let go.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Bowden

    Every woman should read this. Whether it's before you start birth control, while you're on it, or after you've stopped, it discusses a lot of the science behind birth control that is so often overlooked. I am heartily disappointed in doctors for being oblivious or refusing to explain some of the things that may happen when you use artificial hormones. The author does a great job of balancing the story, she never once says you shouldn't be on birth control. She only wants people to know more abou Every woman should read this. Whether it's before you start birth control, while you're on it, or after you've stopped, it discusses a lot of the science behind birth control that is so often overlooked. I am heartily disappointed in doctors for being oblivious or refusing to explain some of the things that may happen when you use artificial hormones. The author does a great job of balancing the story, she never once says you shouldn't be on birth control. She only wants people to know more about it and to be better informed. The pill arose really from a sexist standpoint (IMO) putting the pressure entirely on women to prevent a pregnancy, when men are just as capable (and they are physically able to fertilize eggs more frequently than a woman is capable of getting pregnant). It's dumb. I related to a lot of the symptoms and potential side effects of birth control discussed in this book and I feel tremendous comfort in knowing that it isn't "just me". The last few years have been really miserable, and I'm relieved to know it might not be because I'm a failure or spiraling into a boring blob. It might be affected by the hormones I've been taking. She says some things many women might view as sexist but it is NOT sexist, and I'll fight you if you come to me upset about that. Women ARE different than men, and that's what makes us so awesome. It's ridiculous to take offense at that, and I greatly appreciate that for once, she is using those differences to help me understand myself better and how medicine may affect me. The only thing I will criticize (because I'm a scientist, sorry) is there's a lot of speculation in the book. But it's not necessarily baseless speculation- there are an increasing number of situations and symptoms supporting her claims (she acknowledges they are speculation, by the way) but there is simply a lack in doing more research on them right now. The financial benefit to pharm companies of women blindly taking birth control are too great for significant studies to be done and published. It's eye-opening and infuriating. Otherwise... Please read this. The book as a whole is refreshing and encouraging, and has made me more aware of what I'm putting in my body and the lack of necessary studies surrounding it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Maria Grigoryeva

    This book is absolute must read for everyone who "owns a pair of ovaries" and thinking of going on the pill. Not to decide against it, but if using have as full as possible understanding of what exactly to expect. Tremendous work on summarising latest (apparently very scarce) research in the field. I must admit my own knowledge of effects was limited to possible weight gain and acne healing. To the extent i never thought of going on the pill being a big deal. But... "changing women's hormones cha This book is absolute must read for everyone who "owns a pair of ovaries" and thinking of going on the pill. Not to decide against it, but if using have as full as possible understanding of what exactly to expect. Tremendous work on summarising latest (apparently very scarce) research in the field. I must admit my own knowledge of effects was limited to possible weight gain and acne healing. To the extent i never thought of going on the pill being a big deal. But... "changing women's hormones changes women. And this is a big deal. Although we don't yet know that the pill does the research suggests that it probably has a hand in women's mate preferences, our sensitivity to smells, our relationship satisfaction, the functioning of our stress response, the activities of multiple neurotransmitter systems, the activity of multiple hormones, our moods, our persistence in difficult tasks, our ability to learn and remember and our sex drive. And this is probably just the tip of the iceberg."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Holdsworth

    The perfect book for those considering starting the pill, those on the pill and those who have been on the pill. It offers a genuinely insightful look into how the pill really does change everything. There are moments of humour as well as experiences of other women which are equal parts informative and reassuring also. The book is well written and easy to engage with (with a similar level of biopsychology as included in a level psychology). I am so glad I actually took the time to read the book The perfect book for those considering starting the pill, those on the pill and those who have been on the pill. It offers a genuinely insightful look into how the pill really does change everything. There are moments of humour as well as experiences of other women which are equal parts informative and reassuring also. The book is well written and easy to engage with (with a similar level of biopsychology as included in a level psychology). I am so glad I actually took the time to read the book as it aided me to reach some conclusions of my own, about my own experiences as well as normalise how I felt with regards to the pill.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Justine

    A very eye-opening book when it comes to exposing all the unknowns of the pill and the lack of medical research in women's health. Overall, I give it a 5 star in regards to information, however the tone of the author was consistently apologetic and over compensating. Her attempt to lighten some of the topic with humorous asterisks was distracting when trying to read up on a topic that is naturally dense. A very eye-opening book when it comes to exposing all the unknowns of the pill and the lack of medical research in women's health. Overall, I give it a 5 star in regards to information, however the tone of the author was consistently apologetic and over compensating. Her attempt to lighten some of the topic with humorous asterisks was distracting when trying to read up on a topic that is naturally dense.

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