website statistics Class, Control, and Classical Music - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Class, Control, and Classical Music

Availability: Ready to download

Why is classical music predominantly the preserve of the white middle classes? Contemporary associations between classical music and social class remain underexplored, with classical music primarily studied as a text rather than as a practice until recent years. In order to answer this question, this book outlines a new approach for a socio-cultural analysis of classical mu Why is classical music predominantly the preserve of the white middle classes? Contemporary associations between classical music and social class remain underexplored, with classical music primarily studied as a text rather than as a practice until recent years. In order to answer this question, this book outlines a new approach for a socio-cultural analysis of classical music, asking how musical institutions, practices, and aesthetics are shaped by wider conditions of economic inequality, and how music might enable and entrench such inequalities or work against them. This approach is put into practice through a richly detailed ethnography which locates classical music within one of the cultures that produces it - middle-class English youth - and foregrounds classical music as bodily practice of control and restraint. Drawing on the author's own background as a classical musician, this closely observed account examines youth orchestra and youth choir rehearsals as a space where young people learn the unspoken rules of this culture of weighty tradition and gendered control. It highlights how the middle-classes' habitual roles - boundary drawing around their protected spaces and reproducing their privilege through education - can be traced within the everyday spaces of classical music. These practices are camouflaged, however, by the ideology of 'autonomous art' that classical music carries. Rather than solely examining the social relations around the music, the book demonstrates how this reproductive work is facilitated by its very aesthetic, of 'controlled excitement', 'getting it right', precision, and detail. This book is of particular interest at the present moment, thanks to the worldwide proliferation of El Sistema-inspired programmes which teach classical music to children in disadvantaged areas. While such schemes demonstrate a resurgence in defending the value of classical music, there has been a lack of debate over the ways in which its socio-cultural heritage shapes its conventions today. This book locates these contestations within contemporary debates on class, gender and whiteness, making visible what is at stake in such programmes.


Compare

Why is classical music predominantly the preserve of the white middle classes? Contemporary associations between classical music and social class remain underexplored, with classical music primarily studied as a text rather than as a practice until recent years. In order to answer this question, this book outlines a new approach for a socio-cultural analysis of classical mu Why is classical music predominantly the preserve of the white middle classes? Contemporary associations between classical music and social class remain underexplored, with classical music primarily studied as a text rather than as a practice until recent years. In order to answer this question, this book outlines a new approach for a socio-cultural analysis of classical music, asking how musical institutions, practices, and aesthetics are shaped by wider conditions of economic inequality, and how music might enable and entrench such inequalities or work against them. This approach is put into practice through a richly detailed ethnography which locates classical music within one of the cultures that produces it - middle-class English youth - and foregrounds classical music as bodily practice of control and restraint. Drawing on the author's own background as a classical musician, this closely observed account examines youth orchestra and youth choir rehearsals as a space where young people learn the unspoken rules of this culture of weighty tradition and gendered control. It highlights how the middle-classes' habitual roles - boundary drawing around their protected spaces and reproducing their privilege through education - can be traced within the everyday spaces of classical music. These practices are camouflaged, however, by the ideology of 'autonomous art' that classical music carries. Rather than solely examining the social relations around the music, the book demonstrates how this reproductive work is facilitated by its very aesthetic, of 'controlled excitement', 'getting it right', precision, and detail. This book is of particular interest at the present moment, thanks to the worldwide proliferation of El Sistema-inspired programmes which teach classical music to children in disadvantaged areas. While such schemes demonstrate a resurgence in defending the value of classical music, there has been a lack of debate over the ways in which its socio-cultural heritage shapes its conventions today. This book locates these contestations within contemporary debates on class, gender and whiteness, making visible what is at stake in such programmes.

31 review for Class, Control, and Classical Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ruby Topping

    An ethnography of middle-class young musicians in the UK, which builds most importantly to a nuanced rebuttal of the idea that 'the music itself' is exempt from critiques of classism, racism and sexism. Alongside the extensive and under-regulated ecology of middle-class classical music institutions, Bull argues that the sound aesthetic of classical music itself (of precision, deep interiority, sophistication and control) reproduces classed, gendered and raced hierarchies. The call for music educ An ethnography of middle-class young musicians in the UK, which builds most importantly to a nuanced rebuttal of the idea that 'the music itself' is exempt from critiques of classism, racism and sexism. Alongside the extensive and under-regulated ecology of middle-class classical music institutions, Bull argues that the sound aesthetic of classical music itself (of precision, deep interiority, sophistication and control) reproduces classed, gendered and raced hierarchies. The call for music education to be reformed, not by somehow making this network of elite institutions, tradition of bodily effacement and years of one-to-one expert tuition 'accessible', but by redistributing funding to alternative and working-class music traditions, was bang-on. In a book about how classical music excludes people, I did however feel like only half the story was told. One of the great things about this book is the fullness and sympathy with which Bull writes about her white middle-class interviewees- and even more so about the music and the tradition they're playing in. Though there was one working-class participant (a young white man), those excluded from classical-music making and locked out of middle-class spaces, however, remained theoretical. I hope that future studies of classical music environments will fill the gap felt here, and dedicate the same empathy and thorough analysis to the lived, embodied experiences of people who are excluded by or disenfranchised with that world. I think the power of this book will be to prompt those who have grown up inside this middle-class ecology of classical music education, who currently occupy positions of control in it, to reflect on what they will pass forward to the next generation.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kane Moroney

    Class, Control, and Classical Music is an eye-opening study delving into the "sanctum" of classical music and its surrounding system of education–a sanctum, it is argued, maintained for the privileged few. In this study undertaken with three youth-music organisations in the UK, Anna Bull draws on experience in the field observing how orchestras and associated education institutions continue to draw boundaries of exclusion. Through the examination of how these entities reproduce white, male, uppe Class, Control, and Classical Music is an eye-opening study delving into the "sanctum" of classical music and its surrounding system of education–a sanctum, it is argued, maintained for the privileged few. In this study undertaken with three youth-music organisations in the UK, Anna Bull draws on experience in the field observing how orchestras and associated education institutions continue to draw boundaries of exclusion. Through the examination of how these entities reproduce white, male, upper and middle-class values, Bull reveals underlying hierarchy, race and gender structures that serve to maintain exclusivity and "rightness". This book, in many ways, highlights the path that classical music organisations have taken, which keeps them on the teetering edge of relevance. Bull facilitates a confronting yet fundamental understanding of historical context, behaviours and structures that enable a systemic overview of how these institutions arrived at where they are. By equipping the reader with a knowledge of this system, Bull also gives us the tools to start leveraging its triggers for change. I think the more significant question posed here, though, is, will they genuinely allow change? This reader is optimistic. I would consider this work essential reading for those interested in the fields of orchestras, classical music, music education and with interest in finding a viable, more diverse, inclusive and accessible way to a better future for the art and its practice. I have already referred to and recommended this text to many others and will continue to do so. I have found its insights invaluable.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vesna

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pj Zettle

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anna Ramstedt

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lara Sinangil

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  9. 5 out of 5

    Louise

  10. 4 out of 5

    Allegra Martin

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alex Riedel

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Ellis

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kori

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katie Caton

  15. 5 out of 5

    Isaac

  16. 5 out of 5

    DJ Yossarian

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kyoko666

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emil

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Cowden

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  21. 4 out of 5

    Judith

  22. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Babb

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ed

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ludo

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris

  26. 4 out of 5

    Luca Carbone

  27. 4 out of 5

    Noah

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Mabee

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  30. 4 out of 5

    Caragh Rooney

  31. 4 out of 5

    Irem

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...