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Screenplay Competitions: Tools and Insights to Help You Choose the Best Screenwriting Contests for You and Your Script

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Screenplay Competitions has been recommended by Professor Richard Walter (former Screenwriting Area Head, Associate and Interim Dean, UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television), Professor Harry M. Cheney (Chapman University, Dodge College of Film and Media Art), Dave Trottier (author, The Screenwriter’s Bible, www.keepwriting.com), Matt Dy (former Director of Script Screenplay Competitions has been recommended by Professor Richard Walter (former Screenwriting Area Head, Associate and Interim Dean, UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television), Professor Harry M. Cheney (Chapman University, Dodge College of Film and Media Art), Dave Trottier (author, The Screenwriter’s Bible, www.keepwriting.com), Matt Dy (former Director of Script Competitions at Austin Film Festival), Lucy V Hay (script editor, www.bang2write.com), and Emmy-winning writer Ken Levine (Hollywood and Levine, www.hollywoodandlevine.libsyn.com). Screenplay Competitions explains the competition process (and the myriad of differences among competitions) from eligibility requirements, to how competitions advance entries, to the prizes that accompany a win. In addition, Ms. Williams discusses what judges look for in scripts, and she reveals ways to determine a script's rank—even if it doesn't place. Equipped with this information, writers can better select the competitions that are most likely to reward their particular scripts and help advance their writing careers. What makes Screenplay Competitions especially unique is that it is designed for all aspiring screenwriters (not just the few who will win). Throughout the book, Ms. Williams provides strategies to turn the competition process into an educational experience so that writers can use the competition process to help improve their scripts (and themselves as writers) no matter how far they advance in a competition. Throughout seven sections, Screenplay Competitions explains: …the benefits of screenwriting competitions, even if you don’t win. …how to identify screenwriting competitions that are more likely to reward the script you’ve written and are deserving of your entry fee. …what judges look for in scripts. …common judging criteria so you can use this information to improve your script prior to entry. …types of written critiques offered in conjunction with competition entries. …ways to analyze written critiques so you can determine which comments necessitate revisions to your script. …the competition, judging, and advancement processes so you can better determine how far your script advanced in a competition and the ranking process utilized. …common types of prizes and awards. …common entry fees, eligibility requirements, and entry guidelines. …how to proactively protect your script. …strategies to get the most from your entry so you can improve yourself as a writer no matter how far you advance in the competition. Screenplay Competitions includes three templates designed to: …help screenwriters keep clear and consistent records of submissions and results. …identify each competition’s judging process in order to better determine which competitions to enter. …help determine where the entered script ranked among other entries.


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Screenplay Competitions has been recommended by Professor Richard Walter (former Screenwriting Area Head, Associate and Interim Dean, UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television), Professor Harry M. Cheney (Chapman University, Dodge College of Film and Media Art), Dave Trottier (author, The Screenwriter’s Bible, www.keepwriting.com), Matt Dy (former Director of Script Screenplay Competitions has been recommended by Professor Richard Walter (former Screenwriting Area Head, Associate and Interim Dean, UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television), Professor Harry M. Cheney (Chapman University, Dodge College of Film and Media Art), Dave Trottier (author, The Screenwriter’s Bible, www.keepwriting.com), Matt Dy (former Director of Script Competitions at Austin Film Festival), Lucy V Hay (script editor, www.bang2write.com), and Emmy-winning writer Ken Levine (Hollywood and Levine, www.hollywoodandlevine.libsyn.com). Screenplay Competitions explains the competition process (and the myriad of differences among competitions) from eligibility requirements, to how competitions advance entries, to the prizes that accompany a win. In addition, Ms. Williams discusses what judges look for in scripts, and she reveals ways to determine a script's rank—even if it doesn't place. Equipped with this information, writers can better select the competitions that are most likely to reward their particular scripts and help advance their writing careers. What makes Screenplay Competitions especially unique is that it is designed for all aspiring screenwriters (not just the few who will win). Throughout the book, Ms. Williams provides strategies to turn the competition process into an educational experience so that writers can use the competition process to help improve their scripts (and themselves as writers) no matter how far they advance in a competition. Throughout seven sections, Screenplay Competitions explains: …the benefits of screenwriting competitions, even if you don’t win. …how to identify screenwriting competitions that are more likely to reward the script you’ve written and are deserving of your entry fee. …what judges look for in scripts. …common judging criteria so you can use this information to improve your script prior to entry. …types of written critiques offered in conjunction with competition entries. …ways to analyze written critiques so you can determine which comments necessitate revisions to your script. …the competition, judging, and advancement processes so you can better determine how far your script advanced in a competition and the ranking process utilized. …common types of prizes and awards. …common entry fees, eligibility requirements, and entry guidelines. …how to proactively protect your script. …strategies to get the most from your entry so you can improve yourself as a writer no matter how far you advance in the competition. Screenplay Competitions includes three templates designed to: …help screenwriters keep clear and consistent records of submissions and results. …identify each competition’s judging process in order to better determine which competitions to enter. …help determine where the entered script ranked among other entries.

16 review for Screenplay Competitions: Tools and Insights to Help You Choose the Best Screenwriting Contests for You and Your Script

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    If you are ready to take your screenplay to the next level and actually enter competitions, reading this book is a must! Entering screenplay competitions is an investment in both time and money, and this book helps you get the most out of that investment. Readers will gain good perspective on which screenplay competitions will be best fit for his/her script. But this is far more than just a list of which screenplay competitions are out there. It provides an in-depth look at feedback and how to g If you are ready to take your screenplay to the next level and actually enter competitions, reading this book is a must! Entering screenplay competitions is an investment in both time and money, and this book helps you get the most out of that investment. Readers will gain good perspective on which screenplay competitions will be best fit for his/her script. But this is far more than just a list of which screenplay competitions are out there. It provides an in-depth look at feedback and how to get the most out of the entire competition process -- even if your script doesn't win. The hard truth is, only a very few entries actually place in screenplay competitions, but competitions are increasingly viewed as a necessary step if you want to get your work noticed so being able to really interpret your feedback and scores is an important component to honing your craft and improving your chances at placing the next time around.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Qt

  3. 5 out of 5

    Asena

  4. 5 out of 5

    Krishay Taylor

  5. 5 out of 5

    Spider Web

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  7. 5 out of 5

    Porsha

  8. 5 out of 5

    Janelle Gray

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aditya Sarvepally

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meg Kessinger

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nathi

  12. 4 out of 5

    M. Thomas

  13. 4 out of 5

    Oksana

  14. 4 out of 5

    A.D.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carmen Yépiz

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jacek

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