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Whole Food Cooking Every Day: Transform the Way You Eat with 250 Vegetarian Recipes Free of Gluten, Dairy, and Refined Sugar

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Eating whole foods can transform a diet, and mastering the art of cooking these foods can be easy with the proper techniques and strategies. In 20 chapters, Chaplin shares ingenious recipes incorporating the foods that are key to a healthy diet: seeds and nuts, fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and plant-based foods. Chaplin shares her secrets for eating healthy every d Eating whole foods can transform a diet, and mastering the art of cooking these foods can be easy with the proper techniques and strategies. In 20 chapters, Chaplin shares ingenious recipes incorporating the foods that are key to a healthy diet: seeds and nuts, fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and plant-based foods. Chaplin shares her secrets for eating healthy every day: mastering some key recipes and reliable techniques and then varying the ingredients based on the occasion, the season, and what you’re craving. Once the reader learns one of Chaplin’s base recipes, whether for gluten-free muffins, millet porridge, or baked marinated tempeh, the ways to adapt and customize it are endless: change the fruit depending on the season, include nuts or seeds for extra protein, or even change the dressing or flavoring to keep a diet varied. Chaplin encourages readers to seek out local and organic ingredients, stock their pantries with nutrient-rich whole food ingredients, prep ahead of time, and, most important, cook at home.


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Eating whole foods can transform a diet, and mastering the art of cooking these foods can be easy with the proper techniques and strategies. In 20 chapters, Chaplin shares ingenious recipes incorporating the foods that are key to a healthy diet: seeds and nuts, fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and plant-based foods. Chaplin shares her secrets for eating healthy every d Eating whole foods can transform a diet, and mastering the art of cooking these foods can be easy with the proper techniques and strategies. In 20 chapters, Chaplin shares ingenious recipes incorporating the foods that are key to a healthy diet: seeds and nuts, fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and plant-based foods. Chaplin shares her secrets for eating healthy every day: mastering some key recipes and reliable techniques and then varying the ingredients based on the occasion, the season, and what you’re craving. Once the reader learns one of Chaplin’s base recipes, whether for gluten-free muffins, millet porridge, or baked marinated tempeh, the ways to adapt and customize it are endless: change the fruit depending on the season, include nuts or seeds for extra protein, or even change the dressing or flavoring to keep a diet varied. Chaplin encourages readers to seek out local and organic ingredients, stock their pantries with nutrient-rich whole food ingredients, prep ahead of time, and, most important, cook at home.

30 review for Whole Food Cooking Every Day: Transform the Way You Eat with 250 Vegetarian Recipes Free of Gluten, Dairy, and Refined Sugar

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    This is a cookbook that's probably going to be a love it or hate it kind of book for many cooks. There are great things about it but it's definitely not for everybody. What I loved: The photos are pure art, definitely Instagram kind of food pics. The directions and variations for the seed and nut milks (and the beautiful ways to customize them) are practically worth getting the book. The recipes are healthy and plant-based, which are two of the important things in my own kitchen. Recipes tend to have This is a cookbook that's probably going to be a love it or hate it kind of book for many cooks. There are great things about it but it's definitely not for everybody. What I loved: The photos are pure art, definitely Instagram kind of food pics. The directions and variations for the seed and nut milks (and the beautiful ways to customize them) are practically worth getting the book. The recipes are healthy and plant-based, which are two of the important things in my own kitchen. Recipes tend to have variations listed, which extends the versatility of each one. The foods used tend to be really colorful, which makes for sometimes showstopping looks in dishes (hot pink from beets, rich golden orange from carrots, etc.), What I didn't like: The pictures are sort of too art-worthy and not that appetizing to me. That follows the current trend in cookbooks of making the photos Instagram worthy and going over the top with food styling. I don't look at a dark picture of a bunch of seaweed and get hungry though, and many of the pictures of jars of sauces or whatnot looked like something I wouldn't actually want to eat -- I just liked the colors and the artistic arrangement of it all. Also, strangely, some photos had areas that were out of focus and not just in terms of depth of focus but like someone moved too quickly, which was distracting and odd. A lot of the stuff just wasn't the sort of food I'd want to cook or eat. I don't want just a million bircher bowls and porridges for breakfast. One of each is great, but I'd like lots more variety for my breakfasts. I know the focus is on whole foods and so you don't want a bunch of muffins and breakfast cookies, but I'd rather have variety even if they were simple, like one or two smoothies, porridges, breakfast bowls, whole grain pancakes topped with fruit, overnight oatmeal with some stir-ins, homemade yogurt topped with fun and healthy stuff, a quick hash, maybe a breakfast wrap with some things made ahead, and even just suggestions like simple fruit and nut combinations. All of the other meals were also full of things I acknowledge are healthy, but my kids wouldn't necessarily eat and I wouldn't necessarily want to either. And the "breads" just made me sad. I'm a gluten free cook but you can have GF breads that are still soft and traditional (and I grind whole grains myself for my breads, so they are still healthy). I consider myself a whole foods cook most of the time, but I'm a sort of a country grandma cook with a healthy slant. For instance, last night I made a roasted veggie loaf, mashed potatoes and buttered corn. The veggie loaf was made with roasted carrots, garlic, turnips, green pepper, eggplant and onion, pureed with some leftover cooked beans and some ground sunflower seeds until chunky, with organic mashed potato flakes stirred in (they work like bread crumbs) and then lots of salt, pepper and cumin. I put it in a glass dish and spread a little Carolina Gold BBQ sauce on top (thanks Trader Joe's) and baked until firm. I made the mashed potatoes with organic half and half and there was butter in the corn, but otherwise the meal was vegan (I often make those vegan as well). It was a pretty healthy meal but there was no measuring and it was very tasty and had a comfort food kind of feel. That's the sort of recipe I look for, which is not the sort in this book. That's not to say my cooking is better. We are just different whole foods sorts of cooks. This book will be a great fit for people looking for very healthy recipes and who are drawn to the modern food styling type of cookbooks, especially those who are vegan and gluten free. Others might want to check it out from the library first. It's still a great resource, though, and everyone is likely to find at least a few recipes they'll want to try. My rating system: 1 = hated it 2 = it was okay 3 = liked it 4 = really liked it 5 = love it, plan to purchase, and/or would buy it again if it was lost I read a temporary digital ARC of the book for the purpose of review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it. Eating whole foods can transform a diet, and mastering the art of cooking these foods can be easy with the proper techniques and strategies. In WHOLE FOOD COOKING EVERY DAY, James Beard Award-winning cookbook author Chaplin shares ingenious recipes incorporating the foods that ar I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it. Eating whole foods can transform a diet, and mastering the art of cooking these foods can be easy with the proper techniques and strategies. In WHOLE FOOD COOKING EVERY DAY, James Beard Award-winning cookbook author Chaplin shares ingenious recipes incorporating the foods that are key to a healthy diet: seeds and nuts, fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and other plant-based foods. Chaplin offers her secrets for eating healthy every day: mastering some key recipes and reliable techniques and then varying the ingredients based on the occasion, the season, and what you’re craving. Once the reader learns one of Chaplin’s base recipes, whether for gluten-free muffins, millet porridge, or baked marinated tempeh, the ways to adapt and customize it are endless: change the fruit depending on the season, include nuts or seeds for extra protein, or even change the dressing or flavoring to keep a diet varied. Chaplin encourages readers to seek out local and organic ingredients, stock their pantries with nutrient-rich whole food ingredients, prep ahead of time, and, most important, cook at home. The whole food and plant-based cuisine is the hottest thing on the planet right now (and in libraries) but I gotta say, I love cheese but I can always add them to these beautiful recipes (ditto for meat, barley, wheat berries, freekeh, etc.) I love to batch cook and these recipes will be in a constant rotation as they are healthy and wholesome and they look and sound yummy. Chaplin always writes recipes that are smart and sensible that can appeal to any kind of eating plan as you can add what you feel is missing. - I love tofu but some people say it is not whole as it is processed. Sigh. This is an amazing book. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by Millenials on Instagram and Twitter) so let's give it 🍏 🍅🥕 🥔🍑

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Rodrigues [decafJess]

    I read this because I have been trying to cook healthier with more *real* ingredients for myself anf my family, but I have a lot of conflicting thoughts on this book. I don't know what an embarrassing amount of ingredients are, and I'm sure I would have to drive far away to find some of them. ...but, this would be a great opportunity to try something new. The pictures are bright and colorful, but at least half of the recipes call for throwing everything in the blender, and having hard a newborn wit I read this because I have been trying to cook healthier with more *real* ingredients for myself anf my family, but I have a lot of conflicting thoughts on this book. I don't know what an embarrassing amount of ingredients are, and I'm sure I would have to drive far away to find some of them. ...but, this would be a great opportunity to try something new. The pictures are bright and colorful, but at least half of the recipes call for throwing everything in the blender, and having hard a newborn within the last few years, all of the food pictures tended to resurface memories of strange baby poo diapers. So, for sure, it's a great book for what it is, and I'm not going to penalize it because I'm just not that into it. arc received from the publisher

  4. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    A must-have cookbook for library collections. I enjoyed the writing and clear directions and am especially impressed with the collection of "base recipes" with option ideas, which are especially useful for people with dietary restrictions and/or picky eaters. A must-have cookbook for library collections. I enjoyed the writing and clear directions and am especially impressed with the collection of "base recipes" with option ideas, which are especially useful for people with dietary restrictions and/or picky eaters.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    This is my second cook book from Amy Chaplin. Although I'm not vegan or vegetarian, I love how this book inspires me to integrate plant based ingredients into my daily routine. The book provides base recipes to easily master and then builds upon the base recipe with multiple variations and flavor profiles. This book has become one of my go-to plant based cookbooks for weekly meal planning. This is my second cook book from Amy Chaplin. Although I'm not vegan or vegetarian, I love how this book inspires me to integrate plant based ingredients into my daily routine. The book provides base recipes to easily master and then builds upon the base recipe with multiple variations and flavor profiles. This book has become one of my go-to plant based cookbooks for weekly meal planning.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    The recipes are too complicated for my taste.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ron S

    While the recipes are healthy and flavorful, and concepts like base recipes as building blocks are somewhat helpful, the dishes here require more ingredients, time and skill than will be practical for many, health conscious or not.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    Love this book for many reasons: creative and healthy recipes, variety of flavors, teaching you to be self sufficient and mix and match flavors yourself, introduction of many new/lesser used ingredients, fabulous photographs of the food, tip and tricks (at the end of the book Amy shares her tips for making it through a week, sources for ingredients, etc.). I have been cooking up a storm and have even gotten comfortable enough with some of the recipes to make my own spin-offs. This book is exactly Love this book for many reasons: creative and healthy recipes, variety of flavors, teaching you to be self sufficient and mix and match flavors yourself, introduction of many new/lesser used ingredients, fabulous photographs of the food, tip and tricks (at the end of the book Amy shares her tips for making it through a week, sources for ingredients, etc.). I have been cooking up a storm and have even gotten comfortable enough with some of the recipes to make my own spin-offs. This book is exactly what I was hoping it would be: interesting, educational, fun, and delicious. However, I have two complaints which deduct 1 star total. 1) Doesn't contain enough suggestions for less expensive ingredient options. If you buy everything Chaplin wants you to cook with, you will spend A LOT of dough and may have some ingredients go bad before you can find ways to use them. I ended up building myself a database of all the ingredients for each recipe so that I could try to be more efficient with my purchases. 2) Variation recipes can be confusingly worded. Chaplin (or the editor) tried to save space by referencing base recipes from the variation recipes, but I have missed steps multiple times trying to flip back and forth while cooking (even when I've reviewed the recipe ahead of time). Yes, there is probably some user error here, but I do think that the recipes could have been worded / formatted in a way that was a bit easier to read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    This book is for a very, very particular sort of person. A person with a large grocery budget who thinks that bee pollen and black rice and yacon syrup are pantry essentials (do you know what yacon is? I only know because I have eccentric farmer friends). I have to echo a lot of what other folks have said already: The photos are gorgeous...but not always in an appetizing way. Many of the ingredients are expensive. Many of the ingredients are hard-to-find. Some of the ingredients are environmentall This book is for a very, very particular sort of person. A person with a large grocery budget who thinks that bee pollen and black rice and yacon syrup are pantry essentials (do you know what yacon is? I only know because I have eccentric farmer friends). I have to echo a lot of what other folks have said already: The photos are gorgeous...but not always in an appetizing way. Many of the ingredients are expensive. Many of the ingredients are hard-to-find. Some of the ingredients are environmentally problematic. Some of them are definitely not 'whole foods.' Everything in the book is presented with a base recipe and variations. This is interesting as a sort of intellectual exercise. It doesn't feel like a good way to figure out what to actually cook. A huge amount of the book is dedicated to sort of dress-up foods--sauces, dressings, seed crackers, chia mixes. A fairly small amount of the book is dedicated to vegetables and soups and things you might want to make for dinner. That all being said, I am in love with the chapter on plant milks and drinks, although 95% of the nuts and seeds she offers as options would break the bank if you really tried making plant milk twice a week as she suggests. But I'm always looking for satisfying substitutes for the usual coffee/tea/hot cocoa, and some of these drink recipes sound both luxurious and easy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    This is a truly a whole foods cookbook, and the variations are endless. Super fun to play with and come up with your own concoctions and build meals with all the fun recipes. This is not so much a cookbook with elaborate meals in it, but more of just staples that are made from scratch to have in the kitchen. When I say scratch, I mean not even using pre milled flours. Instead you soak rice and seeds to make a bread. This is the true meaning of whole foods. It's gluten free, dairy free, plant bas This is a truly a whole foods cookbook, and the variations are endless. Super fun to play with and come up with your own concoctions and build meals with all the fun recipes. This is not so much a cookbook with elaborate meals in it, but more of just staples that are made from scratch to have in the kitchen. When I say scratch, I mean not even using pre milled flours. Instead you soak rice and seeds to make a bread. This is the true meaning of whole foods. It's gluten free, dairy free, plant based components to add to every day diet. The recipes come together easily, but take some planning for instance soaking and gathering ingredients. It's nice that many of them feed off of one another, so you end up getting excited about making another recipe and combining it with the one you're making. Or, using the leftover nut meal, for instance, from making nut milk for one of the cracker recipes in the book. Love love love the way this book is designed and how all the recipes fold into one another. Maybe it's just the way my mind works as a chef, but it seems more practical than any other cookbook I've worked with.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Lau

    I bookmarked so many of the recipes featured int his book, and I've already tried some of the recipes. I've become a bircher muesli convert because of this book, previously I would've said no to a sweet oat porridge, but since the recipe includes chia seeds (which I'm a huge fan of), I thought this wouldn't be much of a difference to a chia pudding. I've also tried the marinated beans recipe. It was a nice way to add more protein to a simple veggie stir-fry or just simply mix it with rice. I can I bookmarked so many of the recipes featured int his book, and I've already tried some of the recipes. I've become a bircher muesli convert because of this book, previously I would've said no to a sweet oat porridge, but since the recipe includes chia seeds (which I'm a huge fan of), I thought this wouldn't be much of a difference to a chia pudding. I've also tried the marinated beans recipe. It was a nice way to add more protein to a simple veggie stir-fry or just simply mix it with rice. I can't wait to try other recipes from this book, especially the seeded bread and crackers. This book is so nice to read when you're an experienced vegan home cook, probably won't recommend it to beginners, though.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Craig C

    This is less a cookbook and more of a How-to manual on getting your body used to whole foods and adapting your diet to a whole foods lifestyle. The recipes are designed to start at a very basic level with several options on how to modify them to your tastes. There are also parts on how to meal prep and plan your week so that you aren't caught looking for quick meal options that would invariably sabotage your diet. The cleanse recipes are a nice addition to reset your taste and prime your body fo This is less a cookbook and more of a How-to manual on getting your body used to whole foods and adapting your diet to a whole foods lifestyle. The recipes are designed to start at a very basic level with several options on how to modify them to your tastes. There are also parts on how to meal prep and plan your week so that you aren't caught looking for quick meal options that would invariably sabotage your diet. The cleanse recipes are a nice addition to reset your taste and prime your body for the addition of healthy foods a necessary step especially if you have struggled with limiting your sugar and processed food intake over a prolonged period of time. All in all a very impressive effort.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    One of my favorite cookbooks. I enjoyed the organization of the cookbook, but when I initially checked out the ebook from my library, going back and forth between the 'base' recipe and the 'variation' was an annoyance. The organization works much better with the physical book. All the recipes I've tried in the book have turned out great! I have tried the marinated tempeh, nut milks, apple poppyseed muffins, cherry vanilla compote, and more. I find myself making the bircher bowls and the fruit com One of my favorite cookbooks. I enjoyed the organization of the cookbook, but when I initially checked out the ebook from my library, going back and forth between the 'base' recipe and the 'variation' was an annoyance. The organization works much better with the physical book. All the recipes I've tried in the book have turned out great! I have tried the marinated tempeh, nut milks, apple poppyseed muffins, cherry vanilla compote, and more. I find myself making the bircher bowls and the fruit compotes quite often-- great breakfast meal prep. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys healthy foods and cooking from scratch.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maria V.

    The book itself is very beautiful, but the recipes are very bland for the exception of breakfast. The oats have a lot of variety and the fruit compotes are a delicious add on for them, but the main recipes are extremely bland. I made the red lentil pate and it was just meh. The soups could use some more spices, and there are many chapters I find completely useless: the crackers, the waffles and the other desserts. Instead of so many snack chapters, this book could have used a chapter on stews. I The book itself is very beautiful, but the recipes are very bland for the exception of breakfast. The oats have a lot of variety and the fruit compotes are a delicious add on for them, but the main recipes are extremely bland. I made the red lentil pate and it was just meh. The soups could use some more spices, and there are many chapters I find completely useless: the crackers, the waffles and the other desserts. Instead of so many snack chapters, this book could have used a chapter on stews. It does have useful instructions in the beginning of some chapters on how long to cook certain vegetables or beans, but the recipes themselves are really lacking.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Juli Anna

    There are many, many (250!) recipes in this book, and I am sure that this could be a real resource for those who are new to some of these dietary restrictions. For a casual cook, though, this book probably won't get much wear. Like many home cooks, I shy away from some of the pricey and hard-to-find ingredients that abound in these books (chia seeds, beetroot powder, etc., etc.), and I don't have some of the fancy equipment (high-speed blender, dehydrator) that many such recipes require. You wil There are many, many (250!) recipes in this book, and I am sure that this could be a real resource for those who are new to some of these dietary restrictions. For a casual cook, though, this book probably won't get much wear. Like many home cooks, I shy away from some of the pricey and hard-to-find ingredients that abound in these books (chia seeds, beetroot powder, etc., etc.), and I don't have some of the fancy equipment (high-speed blender, dehydrator) that many such recipes require. You will be hard-pressed to find any "weeknight family meals" in this cookbook, though I highly doubt Chaplin intends to cater to that demographic.

  16. 5 out of 5

    RUSA CODES

    Chaplin, a James Beard and IACP award winner, guides readers through the foundations of vegetarian cooking while avoiding dietary sensitivities. Chapters highlight a core recipe and then provide variations on it. This hefty resource offers rock solid instruction, inspiration, and useful overviews of key methods. The tone is both expert and can-do. Even if you are happy to eat meat, gluten, dairy, or refined sugar, try the Spicy Miso-Roasted Tomatoes and Eggplant. 2020 CODES List Winners Announced Chaplin, a James Beard and IACP award winner, guides readers through the foundations of vegetarian cooking while avoiding dietary sensitivities. Chapters highlight a core recipe and then provide variations on it. This hefty resource offers rock solid instruction, inspiration, and useful overviews of key methods. The tone is both expert and can-do. Even if you are happy to eat meat, gluten, dairy, or refined sugar, try the Spicy Miso-Roasted Tomatoes and Eggplant. 2020 CODES List Winners Announced

  17. 4 out of 5

    Greta

    I love the concept of this book and was very inspired by seeing the variations of the base recipes, but the recipes I tried were only okay. I made the chia bircher bowls, cauliflower soup, and marinated tempeh. Nothing that I would really make again. They all turned out fine, I just have other recipes that I prefer. I still have a few other recipes marked to try so if anything really stands out, I will update my review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    A beautifully styled cookbook with delicious looking photographs that make you want to get in the kitchen to cook these amazing whole food, plant based recipes, of course after you stock up your pantry. This book will be a great reference material as I expand my menu planning... I look forward to doing just that.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Lackey

    Yes, I read a cookbook! Really great overview of the building blocks of plant based eating. Provides a bunch of “base” recipes and ideas on how to change them, versus a lot of recipes. But eating by formula is a little how I eat. Does probably require access to high end organic grocer for some of the ingredients.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Myra

    Not really a traditional cookbook. This is more a food plan sort of cookbook. It shows you how to make a certain type of food or dish, and then gives variations. I wish I could remember how this even ended up on my TBR list. Perhaps because it has tempeh ideas. I didn't find very many things I'd consider trying, but did find some ideas for tempeh. Not really a traditional cookbook. This is more a food plan sort of cookbook. It shows you how to make a certain type of food or dish, and then gives variations. I wish I could remember how this even ended up on my TBR list. Perhaps because it has tempeh ideas. I didn't find very many things I'd consider trying, but did find some ideas for tempeh.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    loved this collection of recipes that use so many seeds and vegetables in ways I don't always see - although - since I am currently looking for nut free recpies for my household this had some great ones. loved this collection of recipes that use so many seeds and vegetables in ways I don't always see - although - since I am currently looking for nut free recpies for my household this had some great ones.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Phillips

    I liked some things in this book and others were not for us. The book in general was laid out well and easy to follow.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    ok i cheated a bit and wanted to reach my reading goal but TO BE FAIR i read through this cookbook yesterday

  24. 4 out of 5

    Wendelah1

    This book is for people who don't mind grinding oats when they want a bowl of oatmeal. No thank you. Useful if you are wanting to make everything from scratch. This book is for people who don't mind grinding oats when they want a bowl of oatmeal. No thank you. Useful if you are wanting to make everything from scratch.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Kilty

    This was disappointing. It was a good start for some basics and I liked the variations. But there was nothing new here.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Margery Osborne

    This is really pretty great. I particularly like the nut sauces and the cracker recipes.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Lots of good recipes and innovative ways of cooking whole food. I plan on purchasing this.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karin Zimmer

    Love this cookbook and can't stop recommending. It's the first cookbook I'm reading through. Ever recipe I've made from it has been delicious, it's changing the way I eat. Love this cookbook and can't stop recommending. It's the first cookbook I'm reading through. Ever recipe I've made from it has been delicious, it's changing the way I eat.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    I have never read a cookbook virtually cover to cover except this one. Fantastic simple recipes! Overall, I have found the book extremely helpful to easily incorporate a thoughtful eating lifestyle.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Pretty basic. Beautiful photography and food styling.

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