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The sixth in the Millennium series featuring THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO "What will you do now?" "I shall be the hunter and not the hunted" The girl with the dragon tattoo is finally ready to confront her nemesis, the only woman who is evidently and in many ways her match. Salander will not wait to be hunted. When she strikes it will be a double blow: vengeance for recent The sixth in the Millennium series featuring THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO "What will you do now?" "I shall be the hunter and not the hunted" The girl with the dragon tattoo is finally ready to confront her nemesis, the only woman who is evidently and in many ways her match. Salander will not wait to be hunted. When she strikes it will be a double blow: vengeance for recent atrocities, and the settling of lifelong scores. For months now Salander has been closing in on her target. She has moved from Stockholm, her hair is newly styled, her piercings are gone. She could pass for any other businesswoman. But not all businesswomen have a Beretta Cheetah beneath their jacket. They do not wield the lethal power of a hacker's genius. They do not carry scars and tattoos to remind them that they have survived the unsurvivable. The new episode in David Lagercrantz's acclaimed, internationally bestselling continuation of Stieg Larsson's Dragon Tattoo series is a thrilling ride that scales the heights of Everest and plunges the depths of Russian troll factories. It begins with the discovery of Mikael Blomkvist's number at Millennium magazine in the pocket of an unidentified homeless man who died with the name of a government minister on his lips. Blomkvist, at extreme risk to himself, tracks down his old friend and will protect her as far as he can. But he is powerless to crush her enemies on his own. And for Lisbeth Salander, the personal is always political - and deadly.


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The sixth in the Millennium series featuring THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO "What will you do now?" "I shall be the hunter and not the hunted" The girl with the dragon tattoo is finally ready to confront her nemesis, the only woman who is evidently and in many ways her match. Salander will not wait to be hunted. When she strikes it will be a double blow: vengeance for recent The sixth in the Millennium series featuring THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO "What will you do now?" "I shall be the hunter and not the hunted" The girl with the dragon tattoo is finally ready to confront her nemesis, the only woman who is evidently and in many ways her match. Salander will not wait to be hunted. When she strikes it will be a double blow: vengeance for recent atrocities, and the settling of lifelong scores. For months now Salander has been closing in on her target. She has moved from Stockholm, her hair is newly styled, her piercings are gone. She could pass for any other businesswoman. But not all businesswomen have a Beretta Cheetah beneath their jacket. They do not wield the lethal power of a hacker's genius. They do not carry scars and tattoos to remind them that they have survived the unsurvivable. The new episode in David Lagercrantz's acclaimed, internationally bestselling continuation of Stieg Larsson's Dragon Tattoo series is a thrilling ride that scales the heights of Everest and plunges the depths of Russian troll factories. It begins with the discovery of Mikael Blomkvist's number at Millennium magazine in the pocket of an unidentified homeless man who died with the name of a government minister on his lips. Blomkvist, at extreme risk to himself, tracks down his old friend and will protect her as far as he can. But he is powerless to crush her enemies on his own. And for Lisbeth Salander, the personal is always political - and deadly.

30 review for The Girl Who Lived Twice

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paromjit

    There are many readers who, like me, cannot quite let go of Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander, and have ended up reading David Lagercrantz's resurrected Lisbeth, even when you can feel that there is likely to be a sense of disappointment upon reading his latest addition to this iconic series. There were elements of this that I enjoyed reading in this plot driven narrative, but nothing can disguise the glaring shortfalls when it comes to characterisation and character development, and nowhere is t There are many readers who, like me, cannot quite let go of Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander, and have ended up reading David Lagercrantz's resurrected Lisbeth, even when you can feel that there is likely to be a sense of disappointment upon reading his latest addition to this iconic series. There were elements of this that I enjoyed reading in this plot driven narrative, but nothing can disguise the glaring shortfalls when it comes to characterisation and character development, and nowhere is this more apparent than in a Lisbeth who feels like an empty shell, a parody rather than an authentic creation. This along with the creaking weaknesses of some of the plotlines makes for an unsatisfactory whole, although there are some thrills to be gained as the different threads begin to connect near the end. Lisbeth is in Moscow, and has reinvented herself into the persona of conventional businesswoman, albeit one who carries a gun. Motivated by her need to gain vengeance, she has her evil but beautiful sister, Camilla, in her sights but finds herself crippled by a past that threatens to destroy her in the present. Camilla has some formidable allies, such as Russian GRU military intelligence agent, Ivan Galinov, a charming if entirely ruthless man, and Zvezda Bratva, the criminal enterprise established by Salander's brutal father, the now dead Alexander Zalachenko. In the meantime, in Stockholm, Mikael Blomkvist is unsettled, worried about Lisbeth, and gets drawn into the death of an extraordinary unidentified homeless man that is beginning to look like murder and acquires a surprising girlfriend in Catrin Lindas. In a story that takes in Russian troll factories churning out lies, disinformation and fake news to destabilise democracy globally, a Swedish government minister being torn apart by his past, the Russian criminal underworld, and a tragic 2008 Everest mountaineering party, it all culminates in deadly danger edging towards those close to Lisbeth. I have no doubt that many readers will enjoy Lagercrantz's latest outing for Salander, and I admit that there were aspects of the novel that absorbed and engaged, but it is undoubtedly an uneven read. There is a part of me that doesn't envy Lagercrantz at all, it must be difficult having to shoulder the huge expectations of the army of fans devoted to Larsson's Salander that anyone would struggle with, if not impossible to fulfil, few could face this burden with equanimity. For those of you planning to read this, I hope you enjoy this, there is much that is entertaining about it. Many thanks to Quercus for an ARC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I freaking love Lisbeth, always and forever!! I’m glad he took over, he does a fine job! Happy Reading! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾 I freaking love Lisbeth, always and forever!! I’m glad he took over, he does a fine job! Happy Reading! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Keeten

    ”Salander was indeed brilliant at DNA analyses. She had gone to great lengths to try to find out why her family all had such extreme genetic features. It was not just her highly intelligent and odious father, Zalachenko. There was her half brother too, Ronald Niedermann, with his exceptional strength and his lack of sensitivity to pain. There was Lisbeth herself, with her photographic memory. There were a number of people among her blood relations with exceptional characteristics, and although B ”Salander was indeed brilliant at DNA analyses. She had gone to great lengths to try to find out why her family all had such extreme genetic features. It was not just her highly intelligent and odious father, Zalachenko. There was her half brother too, Ronald Niedermann, with his exceptional strength and his lack of sensitivity to pain. There was Lisbeth herself, with her photographic memory. There were a number of people among her blood relations with exceptional characteristics, and although Blomkvist had no idea what she had discovered, he did know that Salander had taught herself the scientific methodology in no time at all.” A homeless man, a beggar, missing fingers, with dark patches on his face that look like burns, is found dead in Stockholm. The freezing temperatures are a hazard for the homeless, but this man is poisoned. He has Mikael Blomkvist’s business card in his pocket. He had been trying to reach him to tell him about a story that had to be told. Unfortunately, Blomkvist never got the call, but he is still left with the mystery of this “crazy dwarf” and why he was so desperate to get ahold of him. The key is in his DNA. His DNA is going to tell the story of his life, and where he is from is going to be the slender thread that will lead Blomkvist to the story. Blomkvist is tired of investigating troll factories in Russia. Minister of Defense Johannes Forsell has been the victim of a Russian troll attack, a slurry of fake news that has nearly destroyed his career. The interesting thing is somehow Forsell is tied into the dead beggar. A mystery that is hard to investigate with so few trails to follow to the truth. Troll attacks have become a cottage industry for Putin and the Russian government. Anyone they disagree with politically is subject to these attacks. The Russians now have their fingers in American and European elections. I think we need to start taking these attacks, based on groundless lies, more seriously and see it as the act of war that it is. I want a tenacious guy like Mikael Blomkvist investigating the Russian troll factories. It is too bad he is a work of fiction, but I have a feeling, if Stieg Larsson were still alive, he would be in the thick of it. We all have a responsibility to insure the news we are consuming and believing is based on fact. Lisbeth Salander, our favorite goth and righter of wrongs, is in a cat and mouse game with her sister, Camilla. Her sister is another broken member of the Zalachenko family. She is evil, and yet Lisbeth freezes at the thought of killing her, even though killing her is the only solution to stopping her. When Blomkvist becomes a pawn in the middle of their sibling war, things get very real for Lisbeth in a hurry. The guilt, shame, and sympathy that is crippling her perceptions of her sister suddenly become secondary concerns to keeping Blomkvist out of the clutches of her sister. So we have Blomkvist’s investigation and Salander’s family obsession that start out being two separate quests, but the reason why their relationship is so strong is because they frequently need each other’s help in their search for truth, or in Salander’s case...revenge. It is an unusual partnership, but a very productive one. For those who have not enjoyed David Lagercrantz’s depiction of Salander, you will be again disappointed that she doesn’t morph into the Stieg Larsson version. There were a couple of places where I felt that she would have done something different with Larsson guiding her actions. The thing is, fair readers, that ship has sailed. You can complain and tear your hair out all you want, but this version of Salander is Lagercrantz’s version, and it is the only version you will get unless you want to go back and read the first three. The Dragon Tattoo depiction of Salander died when Larsson climbed that set of stairs that induced a massive heart attack. I think Lagercrantz’s version of Blomkvist is spot on. I’m adjusting to his version of Salander. Writer’s brains work differently. Lagercrantz isn’t Larsson anymore than Larsson could be Lagercrantz. Well, he would have to be alive to be anything, but you know what I mean. Call this Salander the 2.0 model. Sometimes the remake doesn’t live up to the original, but that doesn’t mean it is terrible or an abomination. 3.5 out of 5 stars with a bump up to 4 because I’m a glass half full kind of guy. If you wish to see more of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit http://www.jeffreykeeten.com I also have a Facebook blogger page at:https://www.facebook.com/JeffreyKeeten

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    I will say this - it was better than I expected. But, it was not as good as I was hoping (despite having low expectations going in) These books, since the death of Larsson, have been fairly mediocre for me. Maybe others like them, but they just don't feel like they are awesome stories extending the previous story line. It feels more like someone figured the could write some so-so mysteries, take a few of the main characters from the original trilogy, and then make sure Lisbeth Salander's name is f I will say this - it was better than I expected. But, it was not as good as I was hoping (despite having low expectations going in) These books, since the death of Larsson, have been fairly mediocre for me. Maybe others like them, but they just don't feel like they are awesome stories extending the previous story line. It feels more like someone figured the could write some so-so mysteries, take a few of the main characters from the original trilogy, and then make sure Lisbeth Salander's name is featured on the cover: queue the sound of money pouring in. As long as people are buying, I am sure it will continue. I might have been kinder than I was in the paragraph above if Lagercrantz had not tried to tie it in to this series. However, it was a somewhat blah and confusing mystery that didn't really pay off much in the end, so maybe I would not have been kinder. Feel free to give these post Larsson books a chance, but you are not going to get a recommendation from me. I really wonder sometimes why I keep giving them a try!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    My least favored of the series thus far. It seems scattered and incomplete. 4 of 10 stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    James

    The Girl Who Lived Twice was on my must-read summer list. I've been a fan of the Millennium series since the original author, Steig Larsson, began writing them. When he passed away and David Lagercrantz took over, I continued reading the novels and was ready for this launch last month. The first half of the book is much slower than previous ones. There are minimal fight scenes, suspenseful/scary moments, or major dramatic items. There is a lot to build the story before we can understand where the The Girl Who Lived Twice was on my must-read summer list. I've been a fan of the Millennium series since the original author, Steig Larsson, began writing them. When he passed away and David Lagercrantz took over, I continued reading the novels and was ready for this launch last month. The first half of the book is much slower than previous ones. There are minimal fight scenes, suspenseful/scary moments, or major dramatic items. There is a lot to build the story before we can understand where the author is going with the big reveals. The second half more than makes up for it when our famous duo find themselves fighting for their lives. No spoilers here, but beware of fire and a sister scorned. Lisbeth has gone missing. Mikael misses her. A doctor phones Mikael about a dead body, and it intrigues the reporter enough to reach out to Lisbeth despite it seeming like she wants to stay for away from life again. He quickly learns that Lisbeth's sister, Camilla, is out to kill her over previous sins in the last book. The dead body has no connection to any of them... yet eventually, it all weaves together. From sherpas in Nepal to genealogists all over the world, there are complex layers in this story. Including the super gene, which is based on a reality I hadn't been aware of! Unfortunately, this book was missing something for me. I liked it, and I believe it’s a very good story, but it wasn't enough to push me above 4 stars. I settled around 3.5, rounding up because it's well written above anything else. To me, I would've liked more connections between all the characters and more detailed chase scenes in the first half. The relationship between Mikael and Lisbeth was weaker than usual, and Mikael's lust for another woman seemed fake. That said, Lisbeth's connections with other people were phenomenal. She was true to her character in much of the book, and when we keep revisiting her childhood, it's always a stronger tale. If you want the thrills of the early books, you probably will be slightly disappointed. If you love these characters, their adventures will keep you happy. I'm a fan, and I'll keep reading.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris Passas (TapTheLine)

    Let me begin by stating that I was in favor of the continuation of Millenium series by an author other than the late Stieg Larsson and I've enjoyed the first two books ("The Girl in the Spider's Web", "The Girl Who Took An Eye for An Eye") but this one failed to meet my, admittedly high, expectations. It is an overall mediocre attempt in bringing beloved fictional characters such as Lisbeth Salander or Mikael Blomkvist back to life, in a story that lacks a clear direction and a plot that seems t Let me begin by stating that I was in favor of the continuation of Millenium series by an author other than the late Stieg Larsson and I've enjoyed the first two books ("The Girl in the Spider's Web", "The Girl Who Took An Eye for An Eye") but this one failed to meet my, admittedly high, expectations. It is an overall mediocre attempt in bringing beloved fictional characters such as Lisbeth Salander or Mikael Blomkvist back to life, in a story that lacks a clear direction and a plot that seems to be flat and without the necessary exciting twists and turns that usually make a crime novel a success. For my full review, visit https://tapthelinemag.com/post/the-gi...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan K

    A fan of the Dragon Tattoo trilogy, I've found the sequels written by this author lackluster. With this story, he's done a good job researching areas like genetics, added new characters and brought back the memories of Zalachenko's physical abuse of his wife and daughters. Bringing Lisbeth's sister, Camilla in as the antagonist is somewhat of a twist, one we hadn't seen in the past. Adding Inspector Bublanski and Modig along with flashbacks from the original series, it seems obvious the goal was A fan of the Dragon Tattoo trilogy, I've found the sequels written by this author lackluster. With this story, he's done a good job researching areas like genetics, added new characters and brought back the memories of Zalachenko's physical abuse of his wife and daughters. Bringing Lisbeth's sister, Camilla in as the antagonist is somewhat of a twist, one we hadn't seen in the past. Adding Inspector Bublanski and Modig along with flashbacks from the original series, it seems obvious the goal was similar energy of the originals. When compared to best selling crime/suspense novelists, his pace is slow until the final chapters where it picks up rapidly. He tends to overuse dialog; use of detailed meal descriptions that have little to do with the story seems amateur, though it's possible the translator is at fault. Since Stieg Larsson set a high bar for these characters, Lagercrantz has yet to achieve it, this story included.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura Noggle

    I wanted this to be better than it was. Such a disappointment, although I’ve been alright with the Lagercrantz continuation—this one falls way short of anything that’s come before. A watered down Lisbeth Salander is barely in the book, instead nudged out by an overly bloated conspiracy plot. *le sigh*

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Every time I pick up one of these books by a dead author I really admired, continued by Mr. Lagercrantz, I feel a deep fear, an ill-boding, as if I'm really going to regret it. And yet, when I crack open the book, I'm always pleasantly surprised. Is it because I love the characters from the originals so much that I just don't care? Maybe. Is it because I actually have fun with the new plots? Maybe. Is it because I'm still having fun at all, that despite all this trepidation, I still look forward t Every time I pick up one of these books by a dead author I really admired, continued by Mr. Lagercrantz, I feel a deep fear, an ill-boding, as if I'm really going to regret it. And yet, when I crack open the book, I'm always pleasantly surprised. Is it because I love the characters from the originals so much that I just don't care? Maybe. Is it because I actually have fun with the new plots? Maybe. Is it because I'm still having fun at all, that despite all this trepidation, I still look forward to getting the book and reading it anyway, that I am plainly ENJOYING MYSELF, that I keep coming back? Maybe. Or maybe it's just the Sherpa murder. No. It has to be more than murdered Sherpas. Honestly.

  11. 4 out of 5

    L.A. Starks

    Others in this series have been so dark I was a little reluctant to start this, but it's well worth the time. Lisbeth Salander is a character we know and appreciate, and without giving away the plot, this book humanizes her far more, a welcome development in the character arc. Blomkvist is also a more engaging character in this book, less smug, less narcissistic and thus more bearable. Again without giving anything away, the focus of the book--the motive character and the motive event--are unusual Others in this series have been so dark I was a little reluctant to start this, but it's well worth the time. Lisbeth Salander is a character we know and appreciate, and without giving away the plot, this book humanizes her far more, a welcome development in the character arc. Blomkvist is also a more engaging character in this book, less smug, less narcissistic and thus more bearable. Again without giving anything away, the focus of the book--the motive character and the motive event--are unusual and thoughtfully done. So, I have to say, it is kind of hilarious that for a book set in Stockholm, Sweden, one of the obnoxious minor characters lives "across the bridge" in Copenhagen, Denmark... Highly recommended.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bharath

    I liked book #s 4 & 5 which David Lagercrantz continued from the ‘The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo’ Trilogy. The central characters – Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist carried over their personalities very seamlessly. This book is unfortunately a very weak finish to the series, assuming this is the last in the series. There are two tracks to the story, both of which expectedly involve Mikael Blomkvist & Lisbeth Salander. Track 1 – a beggar is found dead and it is a struggle to identify him. He I liked book #s 4 & 5 which David Lagercrantz continued from the ‘The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo’ Trilogy. The central characters – Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist carried over their personalities very seamlessly. This book is unfortunately a very weak finish to the series, assuming this is the last in the series. There are two tracks to the story, both of which expectedly involve Mikael Blomkvist & Lisbeth Salander. Track 1 – a beggar is found dead and it is a struggle to identify him. He had Mikael Blomkvist’s name & number. It turns out the dead man has a long story associated with him which involves some current day political leaders. Track 2 – the Russian mafia with whom Lisbeth has fought against is determined to eliminate those that oppose it. The tracks converge towards the end. The story is ordinary; the progress of the story & pace even more so.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Uhtred

    This third book of the second Millennium trilogy partially redeems the previous two, a bit disappointing for me. In this last episode the setting has finally returned to be a little darker than the previous two and more similar to those of the first trilogy, that of Stiegg Larsson. The plot is quite intricate, as a good thriller plot should be, even if the whole story that takes place on Everest it seems like a bit of a stretch. Mikael and Lisbeth are in this book a little more similar to the re This third book of the second Millennium trilogy partially redeems the previous two, a bit disappointing for me. In this last episode the setting has finally returned to be a little darker than the previous two and more similar to those of the first trilogy, that of Stiegg Larsson. The plot is quite intricate, as a good thriller plot should be, even if the whole story that takes place on Everest it seems like a bit of a stretch. Mikael and Lisbeth are in this book a little more similar to the real ones (those of the first three books) and they are a little more convincing. What leaves me a little perplexed is that Lisbeth is too little present in this last chapter: of course, she is decisive, but in the unfolding of the plot she is too little present, just when the reader expects to find her in every page, since her search for Camilla, her sister, must be concluded. Instead, Mikael is much more present, reinforcing his strength as an investigative journalist and as a conqueror of women. In particular, the scene where he meets Catrin face to face is very beautiful (and surprising) (I don't spoil how it ends). This concluding chapter is compelling and fascinating, with just the right amount of suspense and violence. There are two main stories that intertwine: the main one tells us about Lisbeth's past and her clash with her twin Camilla, where Lisbeth discovers new information and also discovers that she is more fragile than she thought. The two sisters will chase each other throughout the book, sometimes prey and sometimes predators, until the final battle, where Mikael will also be present (very present). The plot that is intertwined with this is instead centered on a case that begins with the death of a homeless, one whose name is not even known, and which will instead find its importance thanks to a pathologist tired of burying dead without a name , who will call Mikael to intrigue him and make him bring out his streak as a tenacious and curious journalist; Mikael will discover an international intrigue, with spies, the Russian mafia, British secret services and heaps of lies about an atrocious story that took place during a climb of Everest. As we understand how the two stories intersect, reversals and surprises occur, which keep high the attention and the desire to continue reading. All in all, therefore, a well-written book, which worthily concludes the Millennium saga: six books that should be in every library. Four stars well deserved.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Literary Redhead

    David Lagercrantz has done a stellar job writing the last three of the six-book Dragon Tattoo series after the death of original author Stieg Larsson. I was captured by the latest high octane tale of genius hacker Lisbeth, evil twin Camilla, and journalist Mikael Blomkvist. The plot is twisty but masterfully spun by Lagercrantz. It features a deadly Mount Everest climb, ties to corrupt Swedish politicos and secret security force, Russian gangsters, and the ferocious fight between the warring siste David Lagercrantz has done a stellar job writing the last three of the six-book Dragon Tattoo series after the death of original author Stieg Larsson. I was captured by the latest high octane tale of genius hacker Lisbeth, evil twin Camilla, and journalist Mikael Blomkvist. The plot is twisty but masterfully spun by Lagercrantz. It features a deadly Mount Everest climb, ties to corrupt Swedish politicos and secret security force, Russian gangsters, and the ferocious fight between the warring sisters. The author says this is his last in the series. I’m heartsick that we may never have another wild ride in this gripping world. I vote for Anthony Horowitz, authorized to continue the James Bond saga, to take up the baton. Horowitz’s Dragon Tattoo sequels would thrill!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    There’s so little of Lisbeth Salander in here and, let’s be honest, the only reason I keep reading these is because I simply cannot let go of her character. It’s as if Lagercrantz is afraid to spend more than a page in Lisbeth’s POV. Plus, all the scheming and politicking are barely sketched and not at all that compelling. This makes me sad….

  16. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    This book never gripped me like the first ones. I was so totally disappointed in the lack of character development. Zippo Zilch. I also felt the story had no cohesion and just meandered about leading to nowhere. Sorry ending for a great series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amy Bruestle

    Well well well...he did it again! Another wonderful adventure with Mikael and Lisbeth! The five stars are for the quality of the writing and the book, but as far as adventurous storyline, I’d have to say that sadly this was my least favorite of the Millennium series. I know that my expectations were set pretty high since I have loved all of the previous books, but something just fell a bit short in this one for me. It didn’t delve as deep into the characters as usual, I think because there were Well well well...he did it again! Another wonderful adventure with Mikael and Lisbeth! The five stars are for the quality of the writing and the book, but as far as adventurous storyline, I’d have to say that sadly this was my least favorite of the Millennium series. I know that my expectations were set pretty high since I have loved all of the previous books, but something just fell a bit short in this one for me. It didn’t delve as deep into the characters as usual, I think because there were so many different characters throughout the book. I still enjoyed it, but it wasn’t my favorite. I hope Lagercrantz is planning on another book in this series, because I would really like a better, and more memorable ending to this series! After all, we have grown along with these characters and have grown to love them! All in all, still glad I read this book, and will definitely read the next one....(that’s a hint to you Mr. Lagercrantz!) please write another book for us to envelop ourselves in!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristy

    I can't quite let go of the Millennium series and Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist, despite the fact that the late author no writes the books. This novel, however, is timely, covering the topic of Russian trolls and their impact on social media and politics. We get short snippets in each chapter told from the point of view of a variety of characters, so the story moves fairly quickly. Lagercrantz lacks Larsson's meticulous detail and his exploration into the character's psyc I can't quite let go of the Millennium series and Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist, despite the fact that the late author no writes the books. This novel, however, is timely, covering the topic of Russian trolls and their impact on social media and politics. We get short snippets in each chapter told from the point of view of a variety of characters, so the story moves fairly quickly. Lagercrantz lacks Larsson's meticulous detail and his exploration into the character's psyches, as well as the true intense reporter that shined in Larsson; the trade-off: the books do seem to move at a somewhat quicker pace. Still, Lisbeth and Blomkvist just don't seem the same as they were in Larsson's world, and I miss my old friends. There's also a lot of focus on Everest in this book--it's plot-related, but it gets to be a bit much. More Lisbeth and Mikael, less mountain, please. It makes the story more complicated than it needed to be, perhaps. Still, there's plenty to keep us entertained, including more from Lisbeth and her sister's dark past. Overall, a fairly engaging read, but lacking that special flavor and special Lisbeth/Mikael zest that Larsson always brought to the series. 3.5 stars.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    I really wanted to give 4 stars, but couldn't. There just wasn't enough Lisbeth Salander, who is probably my favorite character of the 21st century: brash, bold, brilliant, and probably, psychotic. There are two storylines: Lisbeth on the trail of her lone living relative, sister Camilla. Each seems determined to kill the other to right the wrongs perpetrated in the past. Lisbeth is off the grid, having gone to Moscow, but cannot finish the job after setting up an ambush. Meanwhile, Mikael Blomk I really wanted to give 4 stars, but couldn't. There just wasn't enough Lisbeth Salander, who is probably my favorite character of the 21st century: brash, bold, brilliant, and probably, psychotic. There are two storylines: Lisbeth on the trail of her lone living relative, sister Camilla. Each seems determined to kill the other to right the wrongs perpetrated in the past. Lisbeth is off the grid, having gone to Moscow, but cannot finish the job after setting up an ambush. Meanwhile, Mikael Blomkvist is called by the city coroner because his cell phone number was found in the possession of a homeless man, who appears dead from an overdose. The dead man had been a Sherpa on a climb on Mount Everest, on which there were several well-known, public figures, which ended badly. Blomkvist asks Lisbeth to help, and as he gets close to unraveling the mystery, he is kidnapped by Camilla's team and the local Swedish motorcycle club, whom Lisbeth has humiliated repeatedly. To save Blomkvist, Lisbeth has to track down and rescue him, literally in the belly of the beast. Violent, and too much Blomkvist for my liking.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I keep coming back to Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander because she is the antihero I love to root for. She didn't sign up to save anyone and she's no angel but she does avenge wrongs and takes names while doing it on her own terms. I don't feel that David Lagercrantz's past attempts at continuing Lisbeth's journey have been disappointments until reading this book. In this story, both Lisbeth and Mikel Blomquist, mainstays of the series, have heretofore been at the forefront of the plot. In The G I keep coming back to Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander because she is the antihero I love to root for. She didn't sign up to save anyone and she's no angel but she does avenge wrongs and takes names while doing it on her own terms. I don't feel that David Lagercrantz's past attempts at continuing Lisbeth's journey have been disappointments until reading this book. In this story, both Lisbeth and Mikel Blomquist, mainstays of the series, have heretofore been at the forefront of the plot. In The Girl Who Lived Twice, they were relegated to the backstory in favor of the main mystery. I found myself wanting to see more of these characters. I didn't care about the mystery at hand. I was disappointed to end the series on this note. If there's another book in the series, I won't be reading it, which is really disappointing, considering how much I loved this character and her backstory.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    First of all, I must say right up front that I am a big fan of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy and consider it some of the best mystery/suspense genre that I have ever read. I loved reading those books and was deeply saddened by his unexpected passing and ensuing estate battles between his father/brother and his longtime girlfriend. I personally think she got robbed and mistreated in ways that I cannot express without getting downright angry. Mostly, I miss Stieg not getting to continue writi First of all, I must say right up front that I am a big fan of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy and consider it some of the best mystery/suspense genre that I have ever read. I loved reading those books and was deeply saddened by his unexpected passing and ensuing estate battles between his father/brother and his longtime girlfriend. I personally think she got robbed and mistreated in ways that I cannot express without getting downright angry. Mostly, I miss Stieg not getting to continue writing his wonderful series and further developing his unique characters. Putting that aside, I had very mixed feelings when it was announced that the father/brother were hiring another writer to continue the series. In my mind no one could come anywhere near capturing the magic that Stieg produced. In 2015, a new author, David Lagercrantz, wrote “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” and I read it. In 2017, he followed it up with “The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye” and I read it. Now in 2019, his third Millennium novel – “The Girl Who Lived twice” - has been published and I just finished reading it on vacation. Lagercrantz treated his three books – numbers four through six in the series – as a second trilogy in the millennium series, using the final one to wrap up his storylines of exploring Lisbeth’s family history and her personal feud with her evil twin, Camilla “The Girl Who Lives Twice” starts off with the disappearance of our fearless hero and protector of the mistreated, Lisbeth Salander. The girl with the Dragon tattoo has sold her Stockholm apartment and gone quiet on all social media and electronic platforms. No one knows where she, how to contact her, or what she is up to. The truth she is has decided to move from the hunted to the hunter in her ongoing cat and mouse fight with her sister, and is planning to strike first. Salander’s absence is a big problem for Mikael Blomkvist, news writer, and probably the only friend she has ever had. Blomkvist needs to her help to figure out the identity of a homeless man who lived and died on the public streets of Stockholm. Blomkvist has a mystery thrust on him to resolve. The homeless man does not exist in any of the official government records and his last words before dying involved damning knowledge of leaders in the highest levels of government and in the business world. A crumpled piece of note paper with Blomkvist’s personal phone number was found written on it and Mikael has no idea why. As expected, Lagercrantz weaves the two plots - Blomkvist’s investigation and Lisbeth’s deadly hunt – in a parallel manner, using each to help the other until the two are forced to come together to achieve their separate outcomes. Unfortunately, Camilla, along with her GRU and criminal connections realizes that the way to get Lisbeth to come to her, is through her friends, and Blomkvist is the perfect target for apprehension and torture, forcing Lisbeth to willingly surrender herself and her life for his. Lagercrantz has now written three Millennium series books. I found the first one to really take a long time to get moving and the new author to find his rhythm and understanding of the characters. I felt that the second book was much better and pleasantly surprised me. The story kicked off right away with easier to follow plotlines and it seemed like Lagercrantz figured out how to mirror the Stieg plotting pace and style better than I expected. I believe he brings that same momentum into the third and final book of his trilogy. For the most part, he successfully bounces back and forth between various scenes and activities, building to moments of key revelation and conflict, and pushing things towards final outcomes and payoffs. He hits a good stride and his words flow well, moving from one scene to another with confidence. His characters and conversations are natural and organic as the story unfolds. There were moments when he laid down some excellent clues and transitioned well between scenes and characters. I read through several national reviews and noted many major publications considered this book to be less than stellar and rather messy in its delivery. I think my review is more favorable for a different but very important reason. I think that that the cause of the negative views is not due to Lagercrantz as a writer, but rather to limitations he has to work within to write in the Millennium universe and it’s already established characters. Let’s face it, even ignoring the public fighting between Larsson’s girlfriend and family, Lagercrantz is really limited to what he can do when playing in the Blomkvist and Salander world. He cannot kill them and he cannot change them or their histories. He has to find how to develop the unorthodox and multi-faceted relationship between Mikael and Lisbeth – are they friends or more? It must be extremely hard to expand on what Stieg’s already created and established. I actually think that the creation of Lisbeth’s sister, Camilla, and expanding their family history and criminal network was a pretty creative approach to take. I am not sure what more a writer could do to deliver something new that adds to what’s already been told. In my mind, after a rough start, Lagercrantz was able to get his footing and find a way to build on Stieg’s foundation, deliver a three-book arc that provided them as much conflict, tension, and development as he could muster, and provide a strong enough ending for everyone involved. Overall, I was really surprised by Lagercrantz’s marked improvement from his first book through to third. Let’s be honest, taking on Stieg’s Millennium series has a bar so high that it is virtually impossible for anyone to come close to his unique ability to tell an intricate and layered story that draws heavily on our emotions. That is no insult. It is the truth. Still, I believe that Lagercrantz was able to successfully capture a bit of the Stieg magic and make it work. After reading in multiple interviews that Lagercrantz is done with writing Millennium books, I would even go one step further and make a recommendation. Rather than find another author to take up the mantle of writing of further stories, I suggest that the Larsson family allow Blomkvist and Lisbeth to rest in peace. I cannot really think there’s much left to discover in these characters that hasn’t already been shared. Don’t continue publishing stories that start repeating themselves and lessen or demean the quality of Stieg Larsson’s legacy. Please don’t do that.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amanda NEVER MANDY

    Q: What does an evil twin sister and a dead homeless person have in common? A: Two people that can’t keep their asses out of trouble for longer than five seconds. This is not a bad little story if you can accept that the current author’s vision of the characters is not the same as the original author. I can say that I am finally far enough removed from the original to be okay with this. I can also say that I will forever miss the hell out of the original Lisbeth and Blomkvist. I liked the part of t Q: What does an evil twin sister and a dead homeless person have in common? A: Two people that can’t keep their asses out of trouble for longer than five seconds. This is not a bad little story if you can accept that the current author’s vision of the characters is not the same as the original author. I can say that I am finally far enough removed from the original to be okay with this. I can also say that I will forever miss the hell out of the original Lisbeth and Blomkvist. I liked the part of the story involving the case Blomkvist was investigating. I did not like the storyline involving Lisbeth, her twin sister and how it connected with Blomkvist. Things were damoiseau in distress at certain points and I was left rolling my eyes in disbelief and disappointment. Three stars to a book that led me on a lot of educational google searches.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Howard

    4 Stars for The Girl Who Lived Twice: A Lisbeth Salander Novel, Continuing Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Series (audiobook) by David Lagercrantz translator George Goulding Read by Simon Vance. I’m so happy that this series is continuing. I really enjoy getting a glimpse back into this world.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cloak88

    It had potential...... 2 stars (barely) Lizbeth and Blomkvist are back for their final entry in the Millennium series. As per formula Blomkvist is searching for an article to write about, Lizbeth digs-up something unlikely and convoluted and somewhere at the end both storylines and a few besides meet-up and resolve the climax.... Annnnd.......I'm so glad it's over! This novel honestly felt half-finished and I got the sense that Lagercrantz just wanted to be done with this whole 'Millennium' thing It had potential...... 2 stars (barely) Lizbeth and Blomkvist are back for their final entry in the Millennium series. As per formula Blomkvist is searching for an article to write about, Lizbeth digs-up something unlikely and convoluted and somewhere at the end both storylines and a few besides meet-up and resolve the climax.... Annnnd.......I'm so glad it's over! This novel honestly felt half-finished and I got the sense that Lagercrantz just wanted to be done with this whole 'Millennium' thing. Things felt under-motivated the story both convoluted and rushed to get a suitable Larsson-like ending. Like the previous two in the series, this book had potential, but spiraled out into mediocrity and ending with a dud. In all, the story felt devoid of gravitas or any sense of realisme, leaving me without investment or much enjoyment to be had. As such the only reap positive thing to say about this novel, is that it will be the last in the series... The Millennium Trilogy -- May you Rest in Peace

  25. 4 out of 5

    Laura Rash

    I’m a tad disappointed with this installment. While I’m fine with the continuation by Lagercrantz, this one didn’t step it up quite enough. Tbh I mostly enjoyed the very FEW scenes where Lisbeth is the badass she was created to be.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ken Fredette

    Thought that this was the best one David has done. Lisbeth is trying to find her sister and is in luck, Blomkvist is trying to find out about a Sherpa, who was on Everest. Lisbeth sold her apartment and moved out, having cameras put up just outside her old apartment to keep track of the new owner. Lisbeth was scared that her sister would find her first and went on the defensive. Going to Russia to find her. I really liked Lagercrantz's take on what was happening with either Blomkvist or Lisbeth Thought that this was the best one David has done. Lisbeth is trying to find her sister and is in luck, Blomkvist is trying to find out about a Sherpa, who was on Everest. Lisbeth sold her apartment and moved out, having cameras put up just outside her old apartment to keep track of the new owner. Lisbeth was scared that her sister would find her first and went on the defensive. Going to Russia to find her. I really liked Lagercrantz's take on what was happening with either Blomkvist or Lisbeth and the story takes off from there. It is a story with many sub-stories to make it suspenseful and it keeps you involved. I would recommend this for my people to read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erin Clemence

    This review is for the audiobook version of “The Girl Who Lived Twice” by David Lagercrantz, narrated by Simon Vance and published by Random House Audio. I was a huge fan of the “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” series, but once Stieg Larsson died, I didn’t pay his replacement any notice. I loved the former series so much, that I knew it would be difficult to follow up, especially when written by a new author. I finally decided to take the chance, and picked up “The Girl Who Lived Twice”, b This review is for the audiobook version of “The Girl Who Lived Twice” by David Lagercrantz, narrated by Simon Vance and published by Random House Audio. I was a huge fan of the “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” series, but once Stieg Larsson died, I didn’t pay his replacement any notice. I loved the former series so much, that I knew it would be difficult to follow up, especially when written by a new author. I finally decided to take the chance, and picked up “The Girl Who Lived Twice”, by David Lagercrantz. Audio: 5 stars Simon Vance is familiar to the “Dragon Tattoo” series; he narrated nearly all of them…..and it shows. Vance is award-winning in both audio narration and acting, and his diction and elocution definitely speak to years of performing experience. Vance brings life to Lisbeth, Mikael and all the characters in between. Story: 4 stars Lisbeth Salander has gone off the grid. She is completely untraceable, and no one has heard from her, not even her close friend and sometimes lover Mikael Blomkvist. Hell-bent on revenge, Lisbeth’s sister, Kamila, is determined to find her long-lost twin and make her pay for killing their father. Mikael is brought into a new investigation when a beggar is found dead on the streets in Sweden, with only Mikael’s name in his pockets and no other identification. The characters’ storylines converge into a deadly cat-and-mouse, and not everyone will come out unharmed. Before this series, I was not familiar with Lagercrantz and there is a reason for this- he has only a few of his own novels, and most of them are in his native Swedish (this one is, too, of course, but is translated into English). Lagercrantz took a huge risk when he decided to take over this series of novels, and (as mentioned above) , I was skeptical. I should not have been. Lagercrantz shows that he is worthy with his knowledge and obvious familiarity of Larsson’s novels. Salander is up to her old tricks, and Blomkvist can’t help but completely ingratiate himself in a dangerous case. Complete with taut storylines and pulse-pounding action (with some backstabbing and political interference thrown in) , “Twice” definitely belongs right there alongside Larsson’s original novels. I love Lisbeth, and hearing about her family upbringing and her troubled relationship with her sister was interesting. Also, Mikael and all of his lady loves return (and there are many, both future and past) , but the focus quickly becomes more on Mikael’s research into the dead homeless man. The characters are all Swedish and the names are hard to pronounce and differentiate (this was the same with the original novels, too) so I had to keep careful and close attention to ensure that I was following the plot (in particular, all of the individual government members who played a part in the shady happenings) . When all is said and done, I love Lisbeth too much to abandon her completely, and I’m impressed with Lagercrantz’s interpretation. Nothing will touch Larsson’s originals in my opinion, but this fascinating and action-packed novel definitely comes close.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elle

    Aaaaaand we’re back to the long-running game: Are we supposed to like Mikael Blomkvist? Seriously, though, not even a quarter of the way into the most recent (and final!) installment of David Lagercrantz’s continuation of Steig Larsson’s Millennium series and he already annoyed the crap out of me. He’s such a self-important twat that I just don’t understand how Lisbeth is the one who’s life is being constantly threatened. And of course at nearly every turn, any single woman (under 45) just hops i Aaaaaand we’re back to the long-running game: Are we supposed to like Mikael Blomkvist? Seriously, though, not even a quarter of the way into the most recent (and final!) installment of David Lagercrantz’s continuation of Steig Larsson’s Millennium series and he already annoyed the crap out of me. He’s such a self-important twat that I just don’t understand how Lisbeth is the one who’s life is being constantly threatened. And of course at nearly every turn, any single woman (under 45) just hops in bed with him. They just can’t help themselves, you see? This was a complaint in Larsson’s novels as well, and I just kept holding out hope that Lagercrantz would buck that ridiculousness, but they both seems to think arrogant, generic-at-best middle-aged writers are the universal standard of male desirability to women. Though it’s not just Blomkvist or the out-there plot developments that left me feeling lukewarm throughout the book. For me, the characterizations left a lot to be desired, especially for the women. The disclaimer again being that the rest of the series was also plagued with poorly devised female characters, but I read those a long time ago and didn’t note any specifics then. So...oh well! There’s basically just two kinds of women in this book. There’s young women (under 30), who are vapid and stupid, and older women (30+), who are lonely and horny. If they’re too accomplished then don’t fret, because they’ve been given very tragic backstories to explain why she’s, like, such a cold bitch? At one point an accomplished journalist, after being yelled at for no discernible reason by Mikael, gives in to his raw sexual magnetism and stays in bed with him for days. Then, whilst experiencing troubling flashbacks, decides to go outside and just start gardening away the trauma. At HIS HOUSE. Because women do menial chores when they’re sad. Or don’t eat. Or have sex with men and cry. That’s the only way~~~~ There’s also the disturbing trend of Mikael, multiple times to multiple women, demanding they tell him about their deeply distressing past experiences. For anyone who may have been pressured to do this at some point, YOU DO NOT OWE ANYONE AN EXPLANATION OF YOUR PERSONAL TRAUMAS. The brazen entitlement to someone else’s tragedies here is just staggering. And in return he grills them further and then refuses to disclose any relevant information he’s withholding. So once again: Are we supposed to like Mikael Blomkvist? Lisbeth is the exception to the women rule because she doesn’t count. Her story is just as wild as it was in the last two novels, so don’t expect anything remotely realistic here. Honestly, it’s all pretty convoluted. But Lisbeth is still interesting, and I had to see her story through to the end. That’s who I’d recommend this book to, anyone who needs finish the series. Cheers, guys, it’s been a ride!

  29. 4 out of 5

    George Slade

    I won't say this is one of the worst novels I've ever read, but I will indeed type it here. I was very much enjoying the series, including the fourth in the series, the first written by Lagercrantz. I was excited that the series was picked up and still going strong. The one before this one left me feeling lacking, but I can grant an author one mulligan in a series and give them a chance to pick it back up, but unfortunately, it just got worse with number six. If you get around to reading this book I won't say this is one of the worst novels I've ever read, but I will indeed type it here. I was very much enjoying the series, including the fourth in the series, the first written by Lagercrantz. I was excited that the series was picked up and still going strong. The one before this one left me feeling lacking, but I can grant an author one mulligan in a series and give them a chance to pick it back up, but unfortunately, it just got worse with number six. If you get around to reading this book and enjoy it, then that's awesome, and I'm glad you got more out of it than I did. I just think half of the plot, basically the entire plot involving Blomkvist and his investigation was unnecessary and uninteresting. The series is touted as being about Salander, yet Blomkvist gets the majority of the attention in the story. If it was indeed a tale of Salander's efforts to be a sort of hacker vigilante Robin Hood figure then I think that would be much more entertaining. And we just get recycled plot lines and more references to her family issues, and honestly, those were played out a couple of novels ago. If another novel in the series comes out, I will just go and read the first one again and call it even.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tanja Berg

    This is the first time David Lagercrantz manages to impress me with his continuation of the Millenium series. It's of course not on par with the original author, but still, the was great drive here and I never wanted to stop listening. Lisbeth, not wanting to be a sitting duck, is hunting her sister. The latter is after her life and has a bunch of con-man on Lisbeth's trail. They stop at nothing. At the same time, Michael is getting involved in the myserious death of a beggar. A death that seems This is the first time David Lagercrantz manages to impress me with his continuation of the Millenium series. It's of course not on par with the original author, but still, the was great drive here and I never wanted to stop listening. Lisbeth, not wanting to be a sitting duck, is hunting her sister. The latter is after her life and has a bunch of con-man on Lisbeth's trail. They stop at nothing. At the same time, Michael is getting involved in the myserious death of a beggar. A death that seems to involve a government minister. The two plot-lines move in parallel, occasionally intervening and all the more so toward the end. This was absolutely worth my time.

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