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Ohio State University Bulletin: Contributions in History and Political Science, 1-8, 1913-1922 (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from Ohio State University Bulletin: Contributions in History and Political Science, 1-8, 1913-1922 Honduras and the Mosquito Shore, where the British had colonies engaged in cutting logwood and mahogany. The Spanish had long regarded these people as intruders in Central America, and during the later years of the Revolution attacked them with such persistence as to Excerpt from Ohio State University Bulletin: Contributions in History and Political Science, 1-8, 1913-1922 Honduras and the Mosquito Shore, where the British had colonies engaged in cutting logwood and mahogany. The Spanish had long regarded these people as intruders in Central America, and during the later years of the Revolution attacked them with such persistence as to drive them out.2 Their certificates of loyalty are still to be found among the official records of their chosen retreat, and show that they arrived at various times during the year 1783, some being accompanied by their slaves. Their num bers were sufliciently large to cause them to be mentioned in cer tain acts passed by the Assembly of Jamaica in 1783 and The certificates also bear testimony to the fact that loyalists continued to come to this island down to 1788 from both North ern and Southern states, albeit in very small numbers. Doubt less, Jamaica profited also by the dispersion of the refugees who were sent from New York to Shelburne, Nova Scotia, in the spring and fall of 1783. This dispersion took place during the years from 1785 to 1788, inclusive; and we are told by Mr. T. Watson Smith, author of T/ze Loyalists at Sbelbnrne, a paper showing careful and extensive investigation, that numbers of these exiles found their way not only to the Canadas and Great Britain, but also to the West Indies.'1 The above facts help to explain the remarkable increase in population of Jamaica between the years 1775 and 1787. The census for the former year showed Whites, free colored people, and slaves; while for the latter year the figures are whites, free colored people, and slaves.5 Bv 1785 the number of slaves had already reached from to 240. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


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Excerpt from Ohio State University Bulletin: Contributions in History and Political Science, 1-8, 1913-1922 Honduras and the Mosquito Shore, where the British had colonies engaged in cutting logwood and mahogany. The Spanish had long regarded these people as intruders in Central America, and during the later years of the Revolution attacked them with such persistence as to Excerpt from Ohio State University Bulletin: Contributions in History and Political Science, 1-8, 1913-1922 Honduras and the Mosquito Shore, where the British had colonies engaged in cutting logwood and mahogany. The Spanish had long regarded these people as intruders in Central America, and during the later years of the Revolution attacked them with such persistence as to drive them out.2 Their certificates of loyalty are still to be found among the official records of their chosen retreat, and show that they arrived at various times during the year 1783, some being accompanied by their slaves. Their num bers were sufliciently large to cause them to be mentioned in cer tain acts passed by the Assembly of Jamaica in 1783 and The certificates also bear testimony to the fact that loyalists continued to come to this island down to 1788 from both North ern and Southern states, albeit in very small numbers. Doubt less, Jamaica profited also by the dispersion of the refugees who were sent from New York to Shelburne, Nova Scotia, in the spring and fall of 1783. This dispersion took place during the years from 1785 to 1788, inclusive; and we are told by Mr. T. Watson Smith, author of T/ze Loyalists at Sbelbnrne, a paper showing careful and extensive investigation, that numbers of these exiles found their way not only to the Canadas and Great Britain, but also to the West Indies.'1 The above facts help to explain the remarkable increase in population of Jamaica between the years 1775 and 1787. The census for the former year showed Whites, free colored people, and slaves; while for the latter year the figures are whites, free colored people, and slaves.5 Bv 1785 the number of slaves had already reached from to 240. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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