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Presents 23 of the finest science-fiction works of 1992, including stories by such diverse writers as Michael Bishop, Terry Bisson, Greg Egan, Nancy Kress, Ursula K. Le Guin, Maureen F. McHugh, Mike Resnick, and others. Contents xi • Summation: 1992 • (1993) • essay by Gardner Dozois 1 • Griffin's Egg • (1991) • novella by Michael Swanwick 62 • Even the Queen • (1992) • short Presents 23 of the finest science-fiction works of 1992, including stories by such diverse writers as Michael Bishop, Terry Bisson, Greg Egan, Nancy Kress, Ursula K. Le Guin, Maureen F. McHugh, Mike Resnick, and others. Contents xi • Summation: 1992 • (1993) • essay by Gardner Dozois 1 • Griffin's Egg • (1991) • novella by Michael Swanwick 62 • Even the Queen • (1992) • shortstory by Connie Willis 76 • The Round-Eyed Barbarians • (1992) • shortstory by L. Sprague de Camp 87 • Dust • (1992) • novelette by Greg Egan 113 • Two Guys from the Future • (1992) • shortstory by Terry Bisson 123 • The Mountain to Mohammed • (1992) • shortstory by Nancy Kress 137 • The Coming of Vertumnus • (1992) • novelette by Ian Watson 175 • A Long Night's Vigil at the Temple • (1992) • novelette by Robert Silverberg 195 • The Hammer of God • (1992) • shortstory by Arthur C. Clarke 205 • Grownups • (1992) • novella by Ian R. MacLeod 238 • Graves • (1992) • shortstory by Joe Haldeman 245 • The Glowing Cloud • (1992) • novella by Steven Utley 296 • Gravity's Angel • (1992) • shortstory by Tom Maddox 312 • Protection • (1992) • novella by Maureen F. McHugh 346 • The Last Cardinal Bird in Tennessee • (1990) • shortstory by Neal Barrett, Jr. 357 • Birth Day • (1992) • shortstory by Robert Reed 367 • Naming Names • (1992) • novelette by Pat Cadigan 390 • The Elvis National Theater of Okinawa • (1992) • shortstory by Jonathan Lethem and Lukas Jaeger 394 • The Territory • (1992) • novella by Bradley Denton 432 • The Best and the Rest of James Joyce • (1992) • shortfiction by Ian McDonald 448 • Naming the Flowers • (1992) • novella by Kate Wilhelm 491 • Snodgrass • (1992) • novelette by Ian R. MacLeod 511 • By the Mirror of My Youth • (1992) • shortstory by Kathe Koja 519 • Outnumbering the Dead • (1990) • novella by Frederik Pohl 583 • Honorable Mentions: 1992 • (1993) • essay by Gardner Dozois


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Presents 23 of the finest science-fiction works of 1992, including stories by such diverse writers as Michael Bishop, Terry Bisson, Greg Egan, Nancy Kress, Ursula K. Le Guin, Maureen F. McHugh, Mike Resnick, and others. Contents xi • Summation: 1992 • (1993) • essay by Gardner Dozois 1 • Griffin's Egg • (1991) • novella by Michael Swanwick 62 • Even the Queen • (1992) • short Presents 23 of the finest science-fiction works of 1992, including stories by such diverse writers as Michael Bishop, Terry Bisson, Greg Egan, Nancy Kress, Ursula K. Le Guin, Maureen F. McHugh, Mike Resnick, and others. Contents xi • Summation: 1992 • (1993) • essay by Gardner Dozois 1 • Griffin's Egg • (1991) • novella by Michael Swanwick 62 • Even the Queen • (1992) • shortstory by Connie Willis 76 • The Round-Eyed Barbarians • (1992) • shortstory by L. Sprague de Camp 87 • Dust • (1992) • novelette by Greg Egan 113 • Two Guys from the Future • (1992) • shortstory by Terry Bisson 123 • The Mountain to Mohammed • (1992) • shortstory by Nancy Kress 137 • The Coming of Vertumnus • (1992) • novelette by Ian Watson 175 • A Long Night's Vigil at the Temple • (1992) • novelette by Robert Silverberg 195 • The Hammer of God • (1992) • shortstory by Arthur C. Clarke 205 • Grownups • (1992) • novella by Ian R. MacLeod 238 • Graves • (1992) • shortstory by Joe Haldeman 245 • The Glowing Cloud • (1992) • novella by Steven Utley 296 • Gravity's Angel • (1992) • shortstory by Tom Maddox 312 • Protection • (1992) • novella by Maureen F. McHugh 346 • The Last Cardinal Bird in Tennessee • (1990) • shortstory by Neal Barrett, Jr. 357 • Birth Day • (1992) • shortstory by Robert Reed 367 • Naming Names • (1992) • novelette by Pat Cadigan 390 • The Elvis National Theater of Okinawa • (1992) • shortstory by Jonathan Lethem and Lukas Jaeger 394 • The Territory • (1992) • novella by Bradley Denton 432 • The Best and the Rest of James Joyce • (1992) • shortfiction by Ian McDonald 448 • Naming the Flowers • (1992) • novella by Kate Wilhelm 491 • Snodgrass • (1992) • novelette by Ian R. MacLeod 511 • By the Mirror of My Youth • (1992) • shortstory by Kathe Koja 519 • Outnumbering the Dead • (1990) • novella by Frederik Pohl 583 • Honorable Mentions: 1992 • (1993) • essay by Gardner Dozois

30 review for The Year's Best Science Fiction: Tenth Annual Collection

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    This volume was published in 1993 so it is 27 years old. Here is a passage from page 324 : I made him tell me about how capitalism caused global warming and he tells me all about how people wouldn't give up things because if they stop buying capitalism doesn't work, so the technology and the pollution made the earth heat up... I get the idea the people knew all this bad stuff was going to happen but they wouldn't stop buying gasoline-driven cars and stuff, and the government wouldn't stop them. A This volume was published in 1993 so it is 27 years old. Here is a passage from page 324 : I made him tell me about how capitalism caused global warming and he tells me all about how people wouldn't give up things because if they stop buying capitalism doesn't work, so the technology and the pollution made the earth heat up... I get the idea the people knew all this bad stuff was going to happen but they wouldn't stop buying gasoline-driven cars and stuff, and the government wouldn't stop them. Author is Margaret McHugh, and I can hear her muttering now, well, they can't say I didn't tell 'em....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    Partial reread, Sept 2020. My favorites this time: ● Michael Swanwick's "Griffin's Egg"is one of my very favorites of his short works. An easy 5 stars! My review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... ● Connie Willis's "Even the Queen" is probably my favorite of her shorts. Even my wife, who's ordinarily allergic to SF, liked this one. 4.5 stars. Won the 1992 Hugo and Nebula short-story awards. ● "Two Guys From The Future" by Terry Bisson. Inspired art-world time-travel silliness. 4 stars. Onlin Partial reread, Sept 2020. My favorites this time: ● Michael Swanwick's "Griffin's Egg"is one of my very favorites of his short works. An easy 5 stars! My review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... ● Connie Willis's "Even the Queen" is probably my favorite of her shorts. Even my wife, who's ordinarily allergic to SF, liked this one. 4.5 stars. Won the 1992 Hugo and Nebula short-story awards. ● "Two Guys From The Future" by Terry Bisson. Inspired art-world time-travel silliness. 4 stars. Online copy: http://www.williamflew.com/omni167a.html ● "Graves" by Joe Haldeman. Vietnam war horror fantasy. The literal stuff of nightmares. Won the Nebula short-story award, 1993. 4 stars. Plenty more good stories here, that I'll leave for another time, for now. I'll refer you to Glen Engel-Cox's fine review for many of the other stories: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Story synopses and awards, by Brian Davies. A good memory-aid for the first 18 of the Dozois Year's Best books. https://web.archive.org/web/200411280...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Glen Engel-Cox

    Comments on each story: • Greg Egan, “Dust” — The thing I like about Egan is that he writes science fiction similar to the kind I try to write–philosophical yet grounded in reality. It’s not hard SF, yet it’s not so wacko or adventure-based that it loses its message. This story is a nice mixture of the introspection of AI and cloning, the nature of self and reality. • Terry Bisson, “Two Guys from the Future” — Bisson’s always good for these light, but excellently done, clever stories. In this one Comments on each story: • Greg Egan, “Dust” — The thing I like about Egan is that he writes science fiction similar to the kind I try to write–philosophical yet grounded in reality. It’s not hard SF, yet it’s not so wacko or adventure-based that it loses its message. This story is a nice mixture of the introspection of AI and cloning, the nature of self and reality. • Terry Bisson, “Two Guys from the Future” — Bisson’s always good for these light, but excellently done, clever stories. In this one he plays fast and loose with time travel and art. • Nancy Kress, “The Mountain to Mohammed” — Kress continues her raid on the politics and issues of our time, this one taking a long view on the escalation of malpractice insurance and existing medical conditions. Her future is bleak, but there’s a neat and clever ray of hope. • Ian Watson, “The Coming of Vertummus” — Wow! What a ride. Watson here pulls out all the stops, doing a tiny version of what Robert Anton Wilson has made his life work: the very question of is history true, can it be trusted. But he goes beyond that and also delves into the question of trusting the mind after drugs. The ending is the only weak spot, petering out a bit to show the character’s state, but all in all, great fun. • Robert Silverberg, “A Long Night’s Vigil at the Temple” — I don’t care for the majority of Silverberg stories–they seem to go on forever with very little interesting things happening. This one is like a deep dive into the mind of a priest, the concept had promise, but the execution was boring. • Arthur C. Clarke, “The Hammer of God” — I don’t read that much hard SF–I never read much of it in the past either–but Clarke has always had a way of bringing me into a good nuts and bolt story, and it’s nice to see that he hasn’t lost his touch. Basically a study of a possible asteroid collision with the Earth, but also some nice jabs at politics and religion. • Ian R. McLeod, “Grownups” — Kind of unsettling, in the “Bloodchild” soft of way, but not as ultimately affecting because it had no tie to our experience–some kind of connection to our sexual lives, not necessarily an explanation, but inferences beyond the obvious. • Joe Haldeman, “Graves” — Seems like I’ve read this one before, possibly in Datlow’s Annual? In any case, not bad, but nothing to give an award to either. Decent use of personal knowledge and experience with a supernatural slant. • Steven Utley, “The Glowing Cloud” — This was way long for the subject, which seemed to me to be old hat anyway–that is, the ethics of changing the past. Didn’t care for it at all. • Tom Maddox, “Gravity’s Angel” — Dated now that the collider was killed in Congress, but you don’t have to let that affect what is basically a study in the attitudes of scientists rather than the usual focus in science fiction on the science itself. A little long for the subject, but well done. • Maureen F. McHugh, “Protection” — I really liked this story–great setup, great characters, great idea. But it lacked one thing: a great ending. Still, this could be the basis for a great novel, which is likely the point here. • Neal Barrett, Jr., “The Last Cardinal Bird in Tennessee” — Interesting structure–it’s told as a script to a play–but the subject is a little worn (future world in which everything’s just gone downhill). As a deviant block off of Tennessee Williams, it’s amusing, but I wouldn’t care for another go. • Robert Reed, “Birth Day” — Simple little “AIs take over the world” story, but done with wit and feeling. Reed has a good touch, almost similar to James Morrow on a good day. Enjoyed this one. • Pat Cadigan, “Naming Names” — A gem from Cadigan, and I’d say that even if I wasn’t biased. This one runs from the old premise that everyone has a secret name that gives you power over them, and turns some interesting corners. • Jonathan Lethem and Lukas Jaeger, “The Elvis National Theater of Okinawa” — Short, simple, culturally on-line and hip. Didn’t care for it much but I don’t do hip so well anymore. • Bradley Denton, “The Territory” — Tried to like this, an alternate history of the civil war with Sam Clemens (Mark Twain) as the main character, but I don’t care for the time period, and Denton didn’t provide enough oomph this time to carry me. Dozed off several times when reading this. • Ian McDonald, “The Best and the Rest of James Joyce” — Several alternate histories featuring the old dubliner himself. Interesting, but I’m sure that I missed a lot of the cleverness by not being a Joyce-a-phile. • Kate Wilhelm, “Naming the Flowers” — A strong story from Wilhelm about a strange child and a man with a desire to be more than just a success. I’ve never read Wilhelm’s novels, but I rarely dislike her short stories, and this one is one of the best. Poignant and rewarding. • Ian R. MacLeod, “Snodgrass” — This time an alternate history story in which Stu Sutcliffe replaces John Lennon in the Beatles. 1992 was a year for alternate history stories, I guess. I liked this one a lot; MacLeod, I think, took a chance on his portrayal of the down-and-out Lennon, and I sense it was a good one. • Kathe Koja, “By the Mirror of My Youth” — A twisty story by Koja. I would have liked it, I think, except that she spent way too much time being stylistic rather than just getting on with the story. • Frederick Pohl, “Outnumbering the Dead” — Great story from the grandmaster. In this tale of a mortal among immortals, Pohl doesn’t necessarily make a point, but carefully shows us the humanity of one brave individual. I read this collection over the space of four years, picking it up off and on. It was from no fault of the collection’s, just my weird reading habits. In retrospect, it was probably Utley’s story that had me stymied for so long. As normal, I disagree with Dozois’ choices about 25%, 50% I could take or leave, and think the remaining 25% golden. This anthology series is one, however, that I would hate to do without, even given those odds.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Grace Tenkay

    I have yet to read one of these Gardner Dozois anthologies that is not highly entertaining and with a nice variety of stories. A great way to keep up with interesting authors of science fiction through recent decades.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    I chose this at random at the library because every Sci Fi anthology by the late, great Gardner Dozois I've read has been a really good read. And this one was no exception. It contains samples of some great writers, many of them in their prime at the time. I chose this at random at the library because every Sci Fi anthology by the late, great Gardner Dozois I've read has been a really good read. And this one was no exception. It contains samples of some great writers, many of them in their prime at the time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Simon Hedge

    As always, a wonderful collection selected by Mr. Dozios. You really can't go wrong with his 'best of the year' volumes. Contains:- Summation: 1992 I always enjoy Dozois' introductions to these collections. I think he is a very entertaining writer. Griffin's Egg by Michael Swanwick - Industrial workers on the moon face huge problems from within and without. Very good. Even The Queen by Connie Willis - Amusing tale of when technology and gender politics clash! The Round-Eyed Barbarians by L. Sprague As always, a wonderful collection selected by Mr. Dozios. You really can't go wrong with his 'best of the year' volumes. Contains:- Summation: 1992 I always enjoy Dozois' introductions to these collections. I think he is a very entertaining writer. Griffin's Egg by Michael Swanwick - Industrial workers on the moon face huge problems from within and without. Very good. Even The Queen by Connie Willis - Amusing tale of when technology and gender politics clash! The Round-Eyed Barbarians by L. Sprague de Camp - Alternate history story where conquistadors arrive in America to find the chinese have beaten them to it. Dust by Greg Egan - Egan throws a bunch of brain-melting big ideas at the reader yet again. When I can keep up with him, I love Egan. Good stuff. Two Guys from the Future by Terry Bisson - Comic time-travel story. 'Salright. The Mountain to Mohammed by Nancy Kress - Terrifying and all-to-plausible near-future health care issues. Very strong story. The Coming Of Vertumnus by Ian Watson - An art critic becomes the pawn in a battle between industrialists and ecologists. Or DOES she? Wonderfully written. A Long Night's Vigil at the Temple by Robert Silverberg - Far future religion is shaken by a revelation. Started out really well, but I wasn't into where it went. The Hammer of God by Arthur C. Clarke - Clarke's prose never really changed with the times, so this reads like a piece of old-school sf. It's good stuff. Grownups by Ian R. MacLeod - I'm easily creeped out by human biology based stories, and this is a powerfully written example of the type. Graves by Joe Haldeman - Haldeman brings another good story of creepy goings on during the war in Vietnam. The Glowing Cloud by Steven Utley - A reluctant time-traveller is stuck way too close to the 1902 eruption of Mount Pelee. Excellent story-telling from an author I'm totally unfamiliar with. Gravity's Angel by Tom Maddox - short-short about sexism in big science. Didn't do much for me. Protection by Maureen F. McHugh - A dark near-future story of life in a labour camp in Kansas. Really good. The Last Cardinal Bird by Neal Barrett, Jr - A one act play of life in the near-future. I guess it is supposed to be funny. I really disliked it. Birth Day by Robert Reed - The computers have taken over the world, and given us a utopia of the creepy kind. Naming Names by Pat Cadigan - When you know someone's true Name, you have absolute power over them. It might not be that great. Lovely bit of fantasy. The Elvis National Theater of Okinawa by Jonathon Lethem and Lukas Jaeger - A far flung future where impersonating Elvis Presley is a revered Japanese ritual. The Territory by Bradley Denton - Alternative history. Mark Twain joins up with some southern bushwhackers during the civil war. I liked it, but you'd probably enjoy it more if you knew a bit more U.S. history than I do (which is next to none). The Best and the Rest of James Joyce by Ian McDonald - Alternate reality Joyces! Ian McDonald is a VERY clever man. I am not. Naming The Flowers by Kate Wilhelm - A lonely man helps a very unusual little girl. Lovely story. Snodgrass by Ian R. MacLoed - Alternative universe John Lennon. Was this the big year for alternate-history famous characters, or does Dozois just really like those stories? By The Mirror Of My Youth by Kathe Koja - 'day after tomorrow' tale of the unexpected pain of cloning. Pwerful and moving - Koja writes good! Outnumbering The Dead by Fred Pohl - nice and simple but very moving tale of a mortal man amongst an immortal mankind.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Roberts

    I read most of these stories when I got this book (probably for Christmas, maybe 1992 or 1993?). Of the stories I read more recently (2010-2012), here's the ones I thought we amongst the best: -- The Glowing Cloud by Steven Utley, about time travelers to an island about to be destroyed by a volcanic eruption. -- Naming the Flowers by Kate Wilhelm, about a man who helps a girl with a growth anomaly which makes her age years every month. -- The Territory by Bradley Denton, an alternative history with I read most of these stories when I got this book (probably for Christmas, maybe 1992 or 1993?). Of the stories I read more recently (2010-2012), here's the ones I thought we amongst the best: -- The Glowing Cloud by Steven Utley, about time travelers to an island about to be destroyed by a volcanic eruption. -- Naming the Flowers by Kate Wilhelm, about a man who helps a girl with a growth anomaly which makes her age years every month. -- The Territory by Bradley Denton, an alternative history with Samuel Clemens hooking up with bushwackers in western Missouri during the Civil War to avenge the deaths of his brothers at the hands of Unionists and abolitionists. Good writing, nicely paced story. -- Protection by Maureen F. McHugh, a 1984-ish look at a future post-capitalist America. -- Outnumbering the Dead by Frederik Pohl, about a mortal amongst immortals. Stories I'd read in the early 1990's that I'd rated highly (but cannot remember the stores now :-) -- Griffin's Egg by Michael Stanwick. -- The Mountain to Mohammed by nancy Kress. -- The hammer of Gd by Arthur C. Clarke. -- Gravity's Angel by Tom maddox. -- The Best and the Rest of James Joyce by Ian McDonald. -- Snodgras by Ian R. MacLeod. Others: -- Naming Names by Pat Cadigan started off good, excellent writing. Weird ending though. Trivia: -- page 254, use of the word 'google', well before the company came into being. -- page 324, talk of global warming well before that topic became current

  8. 4 out of 5

    Harry Heitman

    Great variety. Not the best in the series but if you are into SciFi, highly recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Yazman

    Some great stories in here. Ian R. Mcleod's "Grownups" alone is worth the price. Some great stories in here. Ian R. Mcleod's "Grownups" alone is worth the price.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    Here's my star ratings for each of the stories in this collection. Unlike some collections, there's no real awful story here, but there are some mediocre ones. Griffin's Egg - 3 stars (feels like an incomplete novel) Even The Queen - 4 stars The Round-Eyed Barbarians - 3 stars Dust - 5 stars (still fresh almost a quarter century later) Two Guys From The Future - 4 stars The Mountain To Mohammed - 2 stars (a near-future story proven incorrect by actual events, and not good enough to overcome that) The C Here's my star ratings for each of the stories in this collection. Unlike some collections, there's no real awful story here, but there are some mediocre ones. Griffin's Egg - 3 stars (feels like an incomplete novel) Even The Queen - 4 stars The Round-Eyed Barbarians - 3 stars Dust - 5 stars (still fresh almost a quarter century later) Two Guys From The Future - 4 stars The Mountain To Mohammed - 2 stars (a near-future story proven incorrect by actual events, and not good enough to overcome that) The Coming Of Vertumnus - 2 stars A Long Night's Vigil At The Temple - 5 stars (one of three instant classics in this volume) The Hammer Of God - 2 stars Grownups - 5 stars (sublimely creepy) Graves - 3 stars The Glowing Cloud - 4 stars (moving time travel story) Gravity's Angel - 3 stars Protection - 3 stars (politically implausible, but some good character work saves it from failure) The Last Cardinal Bird In Tennessee - 2 stars Birth Day - 2 stars Naming Names - 3 stars The Elvis National Theater Of Okinawa - 2 stars (a title in search of a story) The Territory - 3 stars The Best And The Rest Of James Joyce - 4 stars (surprisingly clever and effective) Naming The Flowers - 3 stars (decent story with some distasteful undertones) Snodgrass - 3 stars By The Mirror Of My Youth - 4 stars Outnumbering The Dead - 3 stars

  11. 4 out of 5

    KristenR

    I really like these collections - here are some of my thoughts on the stories in this volume that stuck out in my mind (wow, it's hard to say much about short stories without giving spoilers) Even the Queen by Connie Willis - there was a lot of humor in this one, I liked it a lot. Two Guys From the Future by Terry Bisson - clever time travel story The Coming of Vertumnus by Ian Watson - pornographic vegetable portraits! Grownups by Ian R. MacLeod - very weird and creepy Graves by Joe Haldeman - blah T I really like these collections - here are some of my thoughts on the stories in this volume that stuck out in my mind (wow, it's hard to say much about short stories without giving spoilers) Even the Queen by Connie Willis - there was a lot of humor in this one, I liked it a lot. Two Guys From the Future by Terry Bisson - clever time travel story The Coming of Vertumnus by Ian Watson - pornographic vegetable portraits! Grownups by Ian R. MacLeod - very weird and creepy Graves by Joe Haldeman - blah The Last Cardinal Bird in Tennessee by Neal Barrett, Jr. - I didn't get this one at all The Territory by Bradley Denton - an interesting alternate history The Best and the Rest of James Joyce by Ian McDonald - I mostly skimmed this one, didn't like it at all Naming the Flowers by Kate Wilhelm - a sweet story Outnumbering the Dead by Frederik Pohl - this was a great novella! What would it be like to be mortal among a society of immortal?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    every single one of these collections is essential reading for true fans of science fiction short stories... each lengthy volume has a stellar array of all mini-genres and areas of powerfully influential science fiction: hard science, speculative, steampunk, alien invasions, apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic, space opera, fantasy, aliens, monsters, horror-ish, space travel, time travel, eco-science, evolutionary, pre-historic, parallel universes, extraterrestrials... in each successive volume in the every single one of these collections is essential reading for true fans of science fiction short stories... each lengthy volume has a stellar array of all mini-genres and areas of powerfully influential science fiction: hard science, speculative, steampunk, alien invasions, apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic, space opera, fantasy, aliens, monsters, horror-ish, space travel, time travel, eco-science, evolutionary, pre-historic, parallel universes, extraterrestrials... in each successive volume in the series the tales have advanced and grown in imagination and detail with our ability to envision greater concepts and possibilities... Rod Serling said, "...fantasy is the impossible made probable. science fiction is the improbable made possible..." and in the pages of these books is the absolute best the vastness of science fiction writing has to offer... sit back, relax, and dream...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lord Humungus

    This was probably the collection that made me read the rest of the series. I still remember the cover among all the other covers. Introduced me to a whole slew of authors whose work I wasn't aware of. Contains brilliant and memorable stories by Swanwick, Kress, Willis, MacLeod, Reed, Bisson, and the master Frederik Pohl. Even though I probably still remember the stories, I might read this again at some point. This was probably the collection that made me read the rest of the series. I still remember the cover among all the other covers. Introduced me to a whole slew of authors whose work I wasn't aware of. Contains brilliant and memorable stories by Swanwick, Kress, Willis, MacLeod, Reed, Bisson, and the master Frederik Pohl. Even though I probably still remember the stories, I might read this again at some point.

  14. 5 out of 5

    John Devlin

    If you read one sci-fi book a year, this is the one. Always stories of high caliber with a few tossed in that will keep you thinking weeks later, not to mention the collection is a primer for what science and technology everyone will be talking about five to ten years from now.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mord

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Wilson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  18. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  19. 5 out of 5

    Philip Hollenback

  20. 4 out of 5

    Deby M

  21. 5 out of 5

    Erica

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cyber

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hanif Payandeh

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eli

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  26. 4 out of 5

    John Mannion

  27. 5 out of 5

    JP Behrens

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

  29. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dinz

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