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A Dune Companion: Characters, Places and Terms in Frank Herbert’s Original Six Novels (Critical Explorations in Science Fiction and Fantasy Book 62)

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This companion to Frank Herbert’s six original Dune novels—Dune, Dune Messiah, Children of Dune, God Emperor of Dune, Heretics of Dune and Chapterhouse: Dune—provides an encyclopedia of characters, locations, terms and other elements, and highlights the series’ underrated aesthetic integrity. An extensive introduction discusses the theme of ecology, chaos theory concepts a This companion to Frank Herbert’s six original Dune novels—Dune, Dune Messiah, Children of Dune, God Emperor of Dune, Heretics of Dune and Chapterhouse: Dune—provides an encyclopedia of characters, locations, terms and other elements, and highlights the series’ underrated aesthetic integrity. An extensive introduction discusses the theme of ecology, chaos theory concepts and structures, and Joseph Campbell’s monomyth in Herbert’s narratives.


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This companion to Frank Herbert’s six original Dune novels—Dune, Dune Messiah, Children of Dune, God Emperor of Dune, Heretics of Dune and Chapterhouse: Dune—provides an encyclopedia of characters, locations, terms and other elements, and highlights the series’ underrated aesthetic integrity. An extensive introduction discusses the theme of ecology, chaos theory concepts a This companion to Frank Herbert’s six original Dune novels—Dune, Dune Messiah, Children of Dune, God Emperor of Dune, Heretics of Dune and Chapterhouse: Dune—provides an encyclopedia of characters, locations, terms and other elements, and highlights the series’ underrated aesthetic integrity. An extensive introduction discusses the theme of ecology, chaos theory concepts and structures, and Joseph Campbell’s monomyth in Herbert’s narratives.

26 review for A Dune Companion: Characters, Places and Terms in Frank Herbert’s Original Six Novels (Critical Explorations in Science Fiction and Fantasy Book 62)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

    The first half of this book is a virtually illegible sixty-page essay about how Dune is like fractals because "X within X within X", and, aside from a few mildly interesting points about the monomyth, is basically pointless, and reads like a student trying to impress their professor with their thesaurus skills. The second half is a large glossary of terms seen in the original Frank Herbert novels. While fairly comprehensive, this glossary is misleading in that it seems to cherry pick facts from t The first half of this book is a virtually illegible sixty-page essay about how Dune is like fractals because "X within X within X", and, aside from a few mildly interesting points about the monomyth, is basically pointless, and reads like a student trying to impress their professor with their thesaurus skills. The second half is a large glossary of terms seen in the original Frank Herbert novels. While fairly comprehensive, this glossary is misleading in that it seems to cherry pick facts from the Brian Herbert "expanded Dune" novels, as well as what seems to be the authour's own speculation, particularly with regards to birth and death dates of minor characters. If these obscure dates are referenced somewhere canonical, I have never seen them, and the authour provides no sources himself. As a minor additional nitpick, the ebook version is absolutely riddled typos. I don't recommend this to anyone. Hardcore Dune fans will find much a more insightful analysis of Dune in Tim O'Reilly's book "Frank Herbert", available free by the authour online, and a more entertaining non-canonical reference guide to the Dune universe in the Dune Encyclopedia, edited by Dr. Willis McNelly.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dominic

    This is more of a reference book, like a revised version of the Dune Encyclopedia, but only using canonical sources. Palumbo also has an essay about how the story of Dune adheres to a "fractal" pattern from chaos theory. This is more of a reference book, like a revised version of the Dune Encyclopedia, but only using canonical sources. Palumbo also has an essay about how the story of Dune adheres to a "fractal" pattern from chaos theory.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Scott C Huggins

  4. 5 out of 5

    Will Handrich

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tim Pickrell

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dominic

  7. 4 out of 5

    Patrick J McGuigan

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wanda Ferguson

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Montalvo

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eli Skotko

  12. 4 out of 5

    John Measor

  13. 4 out of 5

    John Seibert

  14. 4 out of 5

    David Warick

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  16. 5 out of 5

    Natasha Harder

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chef

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rob Silver

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Gurney

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dominique

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Silverman

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Meyer

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Carter

  26. 4 out of 5

    John W. Hodges

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