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Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life, The Little Book of Lykke, Lagom: The Swedish Art of Balanced Living

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Ikigai: The Japanese secret to a long and happy life The people of Japan believe that everyone has an ikigai – a reason to jump out of bed each morning. And according to the residents of the Japanese island of Okinawa – the world’s longest-living people – finding it is the key to a longer and more fulfilled life. Inspiring and comforting, this book will give you the life-ch Ikigai: The Japanese secret to a long and happy life The people of Japan believe that everyone has an ikigai – a reason to jump out of bed each morning. And according to the residents of the Japanese island of Okinawa – the world’s longest-living people – finding it is the key to a longer and more fulfilled life. Inspiring and comforting, this book will give you the life-changing tools to uncover your personal ikigai. It will show you how to leave urgency behind, find your purpose, nurture friendships and throw yourself into your passions. The Little Book of Hygge: The Danish Way to Live Well The Danish word hygge is one of those beautiful words that doesn't directly translate into English, but it more or less means comfort, warmth or togetherness. Hygge is the feeling you get when you are cuddled up on a sofa with a loved one, in warm knitted socks, in front of the fire, when it is dark, cold and stormy outside. It that feeling when you are sharing good, comfort food with your closest friends, by candle light and exchanging easy conversation. It is those cold, crisp blue sky mornings when the light through your window is just right. Lagom: The Swedish Art of Balanced Living Step aside Hygge. Lagom is the new Scandi lifestyle trend taking the world by storm. This delightfully illustrated book gives you the lowdown on this transformative approach to life and examines how the lagom ethos has helped boost Sweden to the No.10 ranking in 2017's World Happiness Report.Lagom (pronounced 'lah-gom') has no equivalent in the English language but is loosely translated as 'not too little, not too much, just right'. It is widely believed that the word comes from the Viking term 'laget om', for when a mug of mead was passed around a circle and there was just enough for everyone to get a sip.


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Ikigai: The Japanese secret to a long and happy life The people of Japan believe that everyone has an ikigai – a reason to jump out of bed each morning. And according to the residents of the Japanese island of Okinawa – the world’s longest-living people – finding it is the key to a longer and more fulfilled life. Inspiring and comforting, this book will give you the life-ch Ikigai: The Japanese secret to a long and happy life The people of Japan believe that everyone has an ikigai – a reason to jump out of bed each morning. And according to the residents of the Japanese island of Okinawa – the world’s longest-living people – finding it is the key to a longer and more fulfilled life. Inspiring and comforting, this book will give you the life-changing tools to uncover your personal ikigai. It will show you how to leave urgency behind, find your purpose, nurture friendships and throw yourself into your passions. The Little Book of Hygge: The Danish Way to Live Well The Danish word hygge is one of those beautiful words that doesn't directly translate into English, but it more or less means comfort, warmth or togetherness. Hygge is the feeling you get when you are cuddled up on a sofa with a loved one, in warm knitted socks, in front of the fire, when it is dark, cold and stormy outside. It that feeling when you are sharing good, comfort food with your closest friends, by candle light and exchanging easy conversation. It is those cold, crisp blue sky mornings when the light through your window is just right. Lagom: The Swedish Art of Balanced Living Step aside Hygge. Lagom is the new Scandi lifestyle trend taking the world by storm. This delightfully illustrated book gives you the lowdown on this transformative approach to life and examines how the lagom ethos has helped boost Sweden to the No.10 ranking in 2017's World Happiness Report.Lagom (pronounced 'lah-gom') has no equivalent in the English language but is loosely translated as 'not too little, not too much, just right'. It is widely believed that the word comes from the Viking term 'laget om', for when a mug of mead was passed around a circle and there was just enough for everyone to get a sip.

30 review for Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life, The Little Book of Lykke, Lagom: The Swedish Art of Balanced Living

  1. 5 out of 5

    Wei Hao

    Some notes I have taken: 1. Fill your belly to 80% - Hara hachi bu p14 2. Form close bonds within local communities- Moai p15 3. A sound mind in a sound body - mens sans in corpore sano p20 4. Learn something new everyday, play games and interact with other people p22 5. Practise mindfulness through focusing on the self and meditation p26 6. Replace junk food with fruits 7. Get 7-9 hours of sleep everyday 8. Play with children or pets p29 9. A positive attitude & emotional awareness (ability to manage e Some notes I have taken: 1. Fill your belly to 80% - Hara hachi bu p14 2. Form close bonds within local communities- Moai p15 3. A sound mind in a sound body - mens sans in corpore sano p20 4. Learn something new everyday, play games and interact with other people p22 5. Practise mindfulness through focusing on the self and meditation p26 6. Replace junk food with fruits 7. Get 7-9 hours of sleep everyday 8. Play with children or pets p29 9. A positive attitude & emotional awareness (ability to manage emotions) 10. Serenity in the face of a setback p31 11. Humour can break negative cycles and reduce anxiety p42 12. We all have the capacity to do noble or terrible things. The side of the equation we end up on depends on our decisions, not on the conditions in which we find ourselves p42 13. In feelings, it is best to be wealthy and generous p47 14. Morita therapy: 1) Accept your feelings, 2) Do what you should be doing, 3) Discover your life’s purpose p47 15. Naikan meditation: Ask yourself (i) What have I received from person X? (ii) What have I given to person X? (iii) What problems have I caused person X? p50 16. Seven conditions for achieving flow p58 i) Knowing what to do ii) Knowing how to do it iii) Knowing how well you are doing iv) Knowing where to go (where navigation is involved) v) Perceiving significant challenges vi) Perceiving significant skills vii) Being free from distractions 17. Flow strategies: 1) Choose a challenging task (but not too difficult!) 2) Have clear and concrete objectives and focus on the process 3) Concentrate on a single task by being in a distraction-free environment & having control over what we are doing at every moment p58-70 18. Happiness is in the doing, not in the result p85 19. The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, something to love, and something to hope for p111 20. Don’t worry, open your heart to people with a nice smile on your face, go out in the street and say hello to people p112 21. Talking each day with the people you love, that’s the secret to a long life p115 22. Always staying busy, but doing one thing at a time, without getting overwhelmed p116 23. Hara hachi bu: Stop eating when you notice you’re almost full but could have a little more p125 24. It’s not what happens to you, but how you react that matters p169 25. Being aware of the impermanence of things does not have to make us sad; it should help us love the present moment and those who surround us p171 26. Ichi-go ichi-e - this moment exists only now and won’t come again. We should enjoy the moment and not lose ourselves in worries about the past or the future p172 27. Focus on the present and enjoy each moment that life brings us p173 28. Wabi-sabi - appreciate the beauty of imperfection as an opportunity for growth p173 29. Antifragility - things that get stronger when they are harmed p174 30. How to be antifragile: 1) Create more options 2) Bet conservatively in certain areas and take many small risks in others 3) Get rid of the things that make you fragile p176 31. Happiness is always determined by your heart p182 32. Life is not a problem to be solved. Just remember to have something that keeps you busy doing what you love while being surrounded by the people who love you p183 33. Ten rules of ikigai i) Stay active; don’t retire ii) Take it slow iii) Don’t fill your stomach iv) Surround yourself with good friends v) Get in shape for your next birthday vi) Smile vii) Reconnect with nature viii) Give thanks ix) Live in the moment x) Follow your ikigai

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shailaja

    If ever there was a book to help you step back, slow down and contemplate on the meaning of life, this would be it. The pace is unhurried and that is exactly how you should read the book. Not in a single sitting but over a week or ten days. Savour each chapter, make notes, write things down when they touch a chord. Ikigai helps you understand so many beautiful things in the sheer simplicity in which it's conveyed. In an increasingly cynical world, we all need ikigai. If ever there was a book to help you step back, slow down and contemplate on the meaning of life, this would be it. The pace is unhurried and that is exactly how you should read the book. Not in a single sitting but over a week or ten days. Savour each chapter, make notes, write things down when they touch a chord. Ikigai helps you understand so many beautiful things in the sheer simplicity in which it's conveyed. In an increasingly cynical world, we all need ikigai.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I liked the message of this book and the concept of ikigai, but I found the book focused more on longevity and how centenarians claim they were able to live so long. It was mashed together strangely and didn’t flow well. There were chapters describing step by step how to do a sun salutation or some basic movements of tai chi, which I felt was just unnecessary way to fill up some pages. I listened to the audiobook, and was disappointed by how horribly the narrator pronounced Japanese terms. Overa I liked the message of this book and the concept of ikigai, but I found the book focused more on longevity and how centenarians claim they were able to live so long. It was mashed together strangely and didn’t flow well. There were chapters describing step by step how to do a sun salutation or some basic movements of tai chi, which I felt was just unnecessary way to fill up some pages. I listened to the audiobook, and was disappointed by how horribly the narrator pronounced Japanese terms. Overall, this book attempted to offer some good advice, but it needed to expand more on the core focus of ikigai.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tan Markovic

    A really interesting little read. Has given me ideas of lots of other things I want to explore this year.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jonas

    I don’t think the writers are comprehensive enough to grasp the core philosophy in “Ikigai”. Even they’ve done their research, the overall insights are shallow and subjective. I found it frustrating to read after the first chapter. I basically skipped through the whole book. The book is more about their own understanding and commentaries on “what Ikigai is”. If you are new to Ikigai, looking for a decent intro to it, this is definitely not your book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I was hoping this book would focus on ways to actually discover your Ikigai, but it didn't. I was hoping this book would focus on ways to actually discover your Ikigai, but it didn't.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Manoj Arora

    I, hereby, list down the 26 inspirational lessons that i learnt from this awesome book. I know that I need to keep practicing these learning day in and day out. These learning are worded and appended in a way that makes it easier for most of us to understand and absorb... Thought Provoking Life Lessons from the Book 1/ A wise person should not ignore life's pleasures, but should always remain conscious of how easy it is to be enslaved by them. You have to be prepared for those pleasures disappeari I, hereby, list down the 26 inspirational lessons that i learnt from this awesome book. I know that I need to keep practicing these learning day in and day out. These learning are worded and appended in a way that makes it easier for most of us to understand and absorb... Thought Provoking Life Lessons from the Book 1/ A wise person should not ignore life's pleasures, but should always remain conscious of how easy it is to be enslaved by them. You have to be prepared for those pleasures disappearing in no time. 2/ Present is all that exists, and is the only thing that we can control. 3/ Things that we love are like the leaves of a tree. They can fall any moment with a gust of wind. Everything that we have, and everyone we love will disappear at some point. We have to be mindful of this, without being pessimistic about it. It should help us love the present moment and those who surround us in this moment. Keeping this in mind helps helps us avoid excessive pain in times of loss. 4/ There is no perfect strategy to connecting with our Ikigai. Don't worry too much about finding it. Life is not a problem to be solved. Just be busy with what you love, at the same time being surrounded by people who love you. 5/ We don't create the meaning of our life, we discover it. 6/ We each have a unique reason for being, which can be adjusted or transformed many times over the years. Daily Health Habits - Secrets to long life from Super centenarians (110+ age) Japan has the highest life expectancy in the world. Okinawa has the highest life expectancy in Japan, and it is remarkable considering the fact that it was one of the worst affected provinces after WW/II. 1/ Japanese stop eating when their stomachs are 80% full. 2/ Just like exercising for the body is important, exercising for brain is also important. Otherwise, it can stagnate and go out of shape. In fact, the brain needs a lot more stimulation to stay in shape. As you get habitual of things, the brain develops neuronic bridges that can do things automatically for you, just like learning to drive a car. When this happens, it doesn't need to think anymore, unless it confronts with new information. It is like a person just eating and doing no exercise. That is why it is so important to expose yourself to change, even if it means stepping out of your comfort zone and feeling anxious. Dealing with new situations, learning something new everyday, playing games, and interacting with others seem to be effective anti aging strategies for mind. 3/ Stress is a proven killer. So, while challenges are good for keeping mind and body active, we should adjust our high stress life styles to avoid premature ageing. 4/ While sustained, intense stress is a known enemy, low levels of intermediate stress have been shown to be beneficial. People who maintained low levels of stress, faced challenges and put their soul into their work lived longer than those who chose a more relaxed lifestyle. Financial Freedom gives you an opportunity, not to retire and relax, but to burn yourself in things that you love doing. 5/ Relax. Slow down a little. Eat and Sleep well. Everything is fine. Life is a marathon, not a 100 m sprint. 6/ Keep your mind and body busy. 7/ People with clear purpose never retire and continue in their area of passion till their last breath. 8/ If you want to stay busy (one secret to longevity) when there's no need to work, there has to be an Ikigai on your horizon, a purpose that guides you throughout your life and pushes you to make things of beauty and utility for the community and yourself. 9/ Smile. Say hello to people. 10/ Work very hard, but on your ikigai. Working hard doesn't mean you have to take it too seriously. Effort is important, not the result. You have to enjoy what you do. 11/ Spend your morning in your vegetable garden. 100% of interviewed super centenarians kept a vegetable garden. 12/ Do many different things every day. Always stay busy, but do one thing at a time without getting overwhelmed. Not even one of the interviewed person was ever seen doing nothing. 13/ Celebrate little things. 14/ People who live the longest are not the ones who do most exercises but the ones who move the most. Metabolism slows down 90% after 30 minutes of sitting. After 2 hours, good cholesterol drops 20%. Just getting up for 5 minutes is going to get things moving. Eating Habits - Secrets to long life from Super centenarians (110+ age) 1/ Eat a bit of everything. Variety is key. Eat a wide variety of foods, especially vegetables 2/ Okinawa people rarely eat sugar, and even if they have to, its cane sugar. No sweets or chocolates. 3/ They have extremely low salt intakes. - less than 10 g of salt per day. 4/ Eat less than you feel the urge for. This saves significant energy consumed in digestion. Even more efficient is the 5:2 diet, means eat regular for 5 days and fast for 2 days. This allows the digestive system some rest as well. 5/ Jasmine tea (green tea with jasmine) or white tea is the best for reducing blood cholesterol levels and fights free radicals. 6/ Eat lot of citrus fruits. They have chemicals which prevent cancer, diabetes and obesity. Interesting Discoveries from the book 1/ Wabi Sabi It is a Japanese concept that shows us the beauty of fleeting, changeable and imperfect nature of the world around us. Beauty can be found in things that are flawed and incomplete. In fact, the Japanese believe that such things resemble the natural world more closely and hence must be valued. It is quite opposite to the western way of thinking which strives for perfection in everything. 2/ Ichi-go ichi-e It is another Japanese concept which can be translated as 'This moment exists only now and won't come again'. A deeper understanding and appreciation of every moment can help us lead a happier life. 3/ Anti-fragility Fragile gets weakened when harmed. Resilient or robust resist the shock and stay the same. Anti fragile gets better when harmed. Fighting for financial freedom adds anti fragility to your financial life. By adopting an anti fragile attitude, we start to love setbacks, because each setback is an opportunity to grow. We find a way to get stronger with every blow, staying focused on our ikigai. 4/ Logo therapy This was popularised by Victor Frankl and it essentially is a philosophy which helps you find reasons to live. He believed that everything can be taken from a human but one thing - the last of human freedoms - to choose one's attitude in any given situation 5/ Flow It is a state in which one is so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter. The experience itself is so enjoyable that people would do it for the sheer sake of doing it. To achieve flow: a) Choose a moderately difficult task, b) Have a clear objective, c) Concentrate on a single task at a time. Human brain cannot multi task. We feel we can do so but what is actually happening is that we are switching between many tasks very frequently. This drains energy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heena

    Seems like the writers were not in the "flow" while writing this one. It seemed like a very superficial and incoherent attempt in trying to figure something out, which eventually they don't. Seems like the writers were not in the "flow" while writing this one. It seemed like a very superficial and incoherent attempt in trying to figure something out, which eventually they don't.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aesaan

    "Life is not a problem to be solved, just remember to have something that keeps you busy doing what you love while being surrounded by the people who love you." Ikigai is a beautiful little read about the simple ways of life and the peace of mind. About happiness, appreciation and connecting with nature. If you are looking for some great revelation after reading this little book, then just know... it's not happening. It's only meant to slow you down, rethink, focus, and live a long ha "Life is not a problem to be solved, just remember to have something that keeps you busy doing what you love while being surrounded by the people who love you." Ikigai is a beautiful little read about the simple ways of life and the peace of mind. About happiness, appreciation and connecting with nature. If you are looking for some great revelation after reading this little book, then just know... it's not happening. It's only meant to slow you down, rethink, focus, and live a long happy life. The 10 rules of Ikigai: 1. Stay active, dont retire... 2. Take it slow... 3. Fill your belly to 80%... 4. Surround yourself with good friends. 5. Get in shape for your next birthday. 6. SMILE! 7. Reconnect with nature. 8. Give thanks... 9. Live in the moment. Stop regretting the past and fearing the future. 10. Follow your Ikigai, your passion, your purpose. This book isn't meant to change your life, however, it may very well, it depends on how you take it. Its a short read and definitely worth checking out.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Supriya Saran

    If you are looking for some great revelation after reading this one … its not coming! I picked up this book not because it was highly recommended; held a pride of place at the local bookstore or had a cover that I just fell in love with and had to have, but because I needed that joy and meaning in my life right now (it has been a tough year) that the book blurb spoke of. As mentioned there were no revelations, there is nothing there that we don’t already know! No, we probably know but don’t foll If you are looking for some great revelation after reading this one … its not coming! I picked up this book not because it was highly recommended; held a pride of place at the local bookstore or had a cover that I just fell in love with and had to have, but because I needed that joy and meaning in my life right now (it has been a tough year) that the book blurb spoke of. As mentioned there were no revelations, there is nothing there that we don’t already know! No, we probably know but don’t follow! I know green tea is good for me, but I just don’t have it. (even though I have enough of them bought and stocked at home) I would say that book was like a reminder for me, reiterating all that I already know to be good for me. Things that one just takes for granted and moves on ... the green tea being one case in point. The authors take us on a journey to Okinawa and ‘the village of longevity’ and you wonder ‘is it really that simple?’ Yes, that is what it precisely is, simple. There are quotes and interviews with centenarians who lead a simple live, eat simple food, are social and friendly, sleep the requisite amount of hours, keep busy and moving and yes, drink that awful tasting green tea!! So you take away all of that and wonder that you are already doing all of that, aren’t you? But are you? Simple suggestions like not picking up your phone for an hour before you sleep and wake up are some of the things that one never even thought one was doing unconsciously - I know I have to reduce screen time, but have I done it? It gets a bit technical at times, with all the referencing and counter referencing articles and theories related to the subject, but if you do manage to trudge along (like I did) you will be able to glean some of the gems along the way, and come to think of it, like me, you may want to go for a second reading just to highlight some portions that are worth emulating. Now let me go make myself a cup of that green tea. :)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Karan

    I found absolutely nothing new or insightful in this book. A very poor and superficial attempt at trying to figure out what it claims to figure out. Eventually I had to just skip through the pages just to mark it as read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Niels Philbert

    The idea of the book is good. I can understand the appeal. And the idea of ikigai is also good in a common sense kind of way. The structure is a bit of a mess though. It surfs above some areas and goes into so much detail in others, that it hurts the flow of the reading. The book does not succeed in providing more than observations around behaviour and seems to jump feet first into the "correlation equals causality"-trap. It's not a guide og help to living in the modern world and was more "move to The idea of the book is good. I can understand the appeal. And the idea of ikigai is also good in a common sense kind of way. The structure is a bit of a mess though. It surfs above some areas and goes into so much detail in others, that it hurts the flow of the reading. The book does not succeed in providing more than observations around behaviour and seems to jump feet first into the "correlation equals causality"-trap. It's not a guide og help to living in the modern world and was more "move to a cabin in the woods with friends" approach. I missed more critically thinking around the effect of genes in picking out specific geographical areas and concluding that is must be the food and attitude, that makes this population live longer and happier. The Stress Solution: The 4 Steps to Reset Your Body, Mind, Relationships and Purpose is a better and more concrete book. Less philosophical and fluffy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad Abdullah

    Bring meaning and joy to every day with ikigai. IKIGAI is a distinguish read for me. I learn a lot of things from this book. This book is about the life and culture of the people living at Okinawa island in Japan. This island is famous for the longevity of its people. There are almost 22.55 people over the age of 100 for every 100,000 inhabitants—which is far more the the global average. This book is categorized into NINE short chapters, each with its unique and profound nature. In these chapter Bring meaning and joy to every day with ikigai. IKIGAI is a distinguish read for me. I learn a lot of things from this book. This book is about the life and culture of the people living at Okinawa island in Japan. This island is famous for the longevity of its people. There are almost 22.55 people over the age of 100 for every 100,000 inhabitants—which is far more the the global average. This book is categorized into NINE short chapters, each with its unique and profound nature. In these chapters, the author very intelligently describe the secret of longevity along with the diet, culture, jobs, living styles and hobbies of the Super-Centurions of the Okinawa island. A little section deals with the interviews of these amazing people with 100+ age. The people in Japan believe that everyone has an ikigai - a reason to jump out of bed each morning. The book further tells the exercises and techniques these long living and happiest people used in their daily routines/tasks to keep them stay active for a long time even in very old age. Now, I will share the TEN rules of ikigai which is described in the book are: 1. Stay active, don't retire 2. Take it slow 3. Don't fill your stomach 4. Surround yourself with good friends 5. Get in shape for your next birthday 6. Smile 7. Reconnect with nature 8. Give thanks 9. Live in the moment 10. Follow your ikigai I enjoy this book a lot. I concluded this with the famous Serenity Prayer by Reinhold Niebuhr which is mentioned in the book: God, give us grace to accept with serenity the things that cannot be changed, Courage to change the things which should be changed, and the Wisdom to distinguish the one from the other. Highly recommended.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brick&rope

    Remind me never to judge a book by its cover. A soothing, calm blue, stylistic cherry blossom impression, hardcover matt finish, small, pocket book size, aggressively promoted with prime shelf space in every airport bookstore - back in the era where there were places called airports, and things we did called flying between cities. Add to it a rather bold claim as sub-title: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life. Well, I got suckered. Who doesn't want a long and happy life? About 200 uninsp Remind me never to judge a book by its cover. A soothing, calm blue, stylistic cherry blossom impression, hardcover matt finish, small, pocket book size, aggressively promoted with prime shelf space in every airport bookstore - back in the era where there were places called airports, and things we did called flying between cities. Add to it a rather bold claim as sub-title: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life. Well, I got suckered. Who doesn't want a long and happy life? About 200 uninspiring pages later, I must admit to being thoroughly underwhelmed. Ikigai was, to me, an assortment of platitudes, interspersed with caricaturish depictions of super senior citizens in Japan. Eat your vegetables. Do moderate exercise every day. Maintain social relationships. Keep your mind active. Participate in your community. Keep a vegetable garden. Don't take too much stress. Well, maybe these cliches are cliches because they are true. But this book surely didn't do much in the way of convincing me of any of them. It didn't do much for me in terms of understanding the concept of Ikigai either. Honestly, if you asked me now what Ikigai is, I would likely struggle to explain it coherently. The one thing that struck me positively about the book (and hence the two stars, instead of one) was the pace of it - of lack thereof. This is a decidedly unhurried book. It is, like the centenarians that it attempts to capture the essence of, langorous, circuitous, and occasionally seems to lose the thread of what it was talking about. The book demands to be perused in that same way. Slowly, unhurriedly. Not with a scientist's temperament, but with a spiritual one. Reading Ikigai brought to mind my (very few, and years ago) conversations with my grandfather. For reminding me fondly of a dear old man dead for years, I give the book one bonus star.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Arjhay Serpa Juan (Day & Night Reader)

    "Slow down and relax, you live much longer if you're not in hurry." This audiobook opens my year of reflecting to my ikigai. I have learned so much things and maybe if I make time I will do at least one meditating methods of it. Thanks for the author of this book and to calm voice of narrator. At first I didn't fully understand ikigai but when I listen to it carefully while cleaning it helps me to remind myself of what are the art of living I have for the last couple of years? This book also make "Slow down and relax, you live much longer if you're not in hurry." This audiobook opens my year of reflecting to my ikigai. I have learned so much things and maybe if I make time I will do at least one meditating methods of it. Thanks for the author of this book and to calm voice of narrator. At first I didn't fully understand ikigai but when I listen to it carefully while cleaning it helps me to remind myself of what are the art of living I have for the last couple of years? This book also make me sad that I didn't appreciate small things in my life. I will challenge myself this time to stay out of my comfort zone. Wonderful, meaningful and fruitful read and soon may purchase it but I will add it first in my wishlist.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pankaj Sarma

    A quick read. The language used is quite lucid and the pace is pretty decent, which worked perfectly because this book requires a calm mind to read. The book offers some awesome life lessons we can inhale. The book also explores different ways to keep ourselves healthy and securing a better tomorrow for the greater good. I highly recommend this for self-improvement.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sanjana

    Bought and read this book because 1. It's a bestseller 2. It has a gorgeous cover! Yes, I am one of those girls that will buy a book just because the cover is pretty. Can't help it. Guilty as charged. Ikigai is like reading a wise old grandmother tell you how to live your life. It's not condescending in any parts and the pages exude positivity in most parts. I don't think the book was eye-opening in anyway, a lot of what the writers have to say are things we've either heard or seen in some of the Bought and read this book because 1. It's a bestseller 2. It has a gorgeous cover! Yes, I am one of those girls that will buy a book just because the cover is pretty. Can't help it. Guilty as charged. Ikigai is like reading a wise old grandmother tell you how to live your life. It's not condescending in any parts and the pages exude positivity in most parts. I don't think the book was eye-opening in anyway, a lot of what the writers have to say are things we've either heard or seen in some of the other social media posts. But I can see why it would be an interesting pick for those who are in real need of a voice that'll help them discipline their lives a little more.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Megha Bhargava

    Ikigai, the centre of all meaningful venn diagrams. Ikigai, your reason to live. Your purpose in life. Something that makes you get up and get going every single day. The Japanese concept of IKIGAI gained worldwide recognition after this gem of a book was published. If you're not new to productivity books or blogs, you would have a fair idea that all of them pretty much say the same thing in a myriad of ways. But this book by HÉCTOR GARCÍA and FRANCESC MIRALLES gives you a lot more. An easy read Ikigai, the centre of all meaningful venn diagrams. Ikigai, your reason to live. Your purpose in life. Something that makes you get up and get going every single day. The Japanese concept of IKIGAI gained worldwide recognition after this gem of a book was published. If you're not new to productivity books or blogs, you would have a fair idea that all of them pretty much say the same thing in a myriad of ways. But this book by HÉCTOR GARCÍA and FRANCESC MIRALLES gives you a lot more. An easy read which is soothing to the mind takes you to Okinawa, Japan and connects you to centenarians and supercentenarians of the country as they talk about the secret to their long and happy life. "He who has a why to live for can bear with almost any how.", a quote by Nietzche in one of Viktor Frenkl's book has been used and explained at length. The book touches on many concepts of Ancient and Modern Psychology outside of Japan which resonate the Japanese values and somehow corroborate their theories. Concepts like Logotherapy, psychotherapy, 'WHY' power have been touched upon in an understandable manner. Emphasis has been laid on cultivating good habits, eating right and eating less, building close and strong friendships. The book may even provide you with financial advise in a disguise if you read between the lines. You might think to yourself that you know all these things, as you do while reading productivity and time management books/blogs. These are generic advice after all. But the authors turn these into life lessons and present these to you palatably. The last section of the book talks about Resilience, Stoicism and Antifragility. How setbacks shouldn't bog you down but make you better. If you're looking for a light dose of inspiration at the beginning of the year, Ikigai can be a delightful pick.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Purvi

    You know that moment when you lift the lid from almost cooked rice & it's flavourful steam warms you, yeah, this book shares the same feeling.. it's all about not only living for longtime, but also fulfilling every moment of life by truly living it! It reflects on various traditional eastern therapies, wisdom from many centenarians, guidance and references of other classics, & lastly, a concised format. Worth having it's hardcopy! You know that moment when you lift the lid from almost cooked rice & it's flavourful steam warms you, yeah, this book shares the same feeling.. it's all about not only living for longtime, but also fulfilling every moment of life by truly living it! It reflects on various traditional eastern therapies, wisdom from many centenarians, guidance and references of other classics, & lastly, a concised format. Worth having it's hardcopy!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    📝 Got answers which I wanted. Now I can throw copies of this book to those who keep asking me why I read so much. ***Just kidding*** But I do feel this book answers some basic questions as to why some people tirelessly keep doing what they have been doing for years tirelessly even though it's the same things over and over again, say actors, writers, bloggers, artists and so on. Why do some people never get bored or frustrated repeating doing the same things over and over again? The answer to this 📝 Got answers which I wanted. Now I can throw copies of this book to those who keep asking me why I read so much. ***Just kidding*** But I do feel this book answers some basic questions as to why some people tirelessly keep doing what they have been doing for years tirelessly even though it's the same things over and over again, say actors, writers, bloggers, artists and so on. Why do some people never get bored or frustrated repeating doing the same things over and over again? The answer to this question is simple. We have found our Ikigai (I sound like Master Shifu 😌) But yes, I found the answer as to why I feel the need to repeat the things I love doing. I have found my passion. And the concept of Ikigai (the art of living) explains as to finding our purpose, our need to stay healthy, a balance with our emotions and how we live. The book contains 9 chapters which try to explain Ikigai, anti-aging secrets, logotherapy, finding flow in everything we do, longevity with lessons from those who lived the longest, lessons from Japan's centenarians, the Ikigai diet, some basic exercises and movements to practice. I find this book quite practical and full of wisdom. And as for what to take from reading such self-help books, I try to grasp the concept through their contents which are backed up with basic examples and references. This book got it all. The representation is done well and good. This is the kind of book I would need to pick up every other month as to focus on what I love doing and actually help me plan a healthy routine. I am so glad I read this at the beginning of the year. I haven't made any resolutions yet. But I am going to read such books to make my passion grow stronger as well as to help me balance things.

  21. 5 out of 5

    LibroReview

    I personally believe that having a purpose on in life and then giving it your all is the most important to lead a happy life. This book validates so. Ikigai is a short but not very short book based on a Japanese concept. According to this concept, we find the deeply sown purpose of our lives from within ourselves by defining our passion, mission, vocation and profession. It gives you tips as to how the simplest things in our life, like sometimes, taking a pause, are what will give us a long and h I personally believe that having a purpose on in life and then giving it your all is the most important to lead a happy life. This book validates so. Ikigai is a short but not very short book based on a Japanese concept. According to this concept, we find the deeply sown purpose of our lives from within ourselves by defining our passion, mission, vocation and profession. It gives you tips as to how the simplest things in our life, like sometimes, taking a pause, are what will give us a long and happy life. I bought a hardcover because of it’s extremely pretty cover. The cover itself will soothe your mind whenever you look at it. The title does go with the book but personally for me, not as I thought it would. If you are expecting it to help you find your Ikigai, give you step by step solution as to how you can find it and reward it with millions of dollars, you’ll be disappointed. This book is full of facts, real life experience from Japan’s Okinawa and compels you to focus more on you : your health, your choices, your focus and your inner happiness. It will probably be the only book you’ll come across that tells you to take it, relax, but also burn in your passion. The language is as simplistic and beautiful as the cover and it’s content. Not many tough words and very beginner-friendly in the reading world. The structure to is great with a prologue, 9 chapters, an epilogue and a list of more suggestions for you to explore in the end. Coming to the overall feel of the book, it’s very cozy. In it’s own way, it also does help you slightly to find your own Ikigai. I thought it would be a full on hustle kind of book but I felt relaxed after this read. I was ready to take on my tasks stress-free. Though it is not something extremely crazy and different, it definitely is a one-time read for all the hustlers or non-hustlers out there who think they have to punish themselves to get what they want.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    I brought the book Ikigai with me when I went on vacation to Tunesia. One week in the sun, doing nothing and at that time thinking about how I could ever manage to only do what makes me happy and to live as healthy as I can. It took me a long time to finish it. Not because it was not interesting (it definitely is), but because I needed the focus to read it and remember. I did forget it for a while, during a move to a different house, but today I decided to finish it. It is a very easy to read "ma I brought the book Ikigai with me when I went on vacation to Tunesia. One week in the sun, doing nothing and at that time thinking about how I could ever manage to only do what makes me happy and to live as healthy as I can. It took me a long time to finish it. Not because it was not interesting (it definitely is), but because I needed the focus to read it and remember. I did forget it for a while, during a move to a different house, but today I decided to finish it. It is a very easy to read "manual" of how to find your Ikigai, but what I found the most interesting was the information about a little island in Japan called Ogimi. Here lives the biggest percentage of elderly over 100 years old and they all have their secrets for achieving this age, while staying happy and healthy. If you want to live a long and happy life, this is a must-read. What I've learned (and what the elderly of Ogimi follow in their daily life): 1. Always stay active, never retire. 2. Take it easy, slow pace. 3. Don't eat to the max, but 2/3 of what you think you need. 4. Surround yourself with good friends. 5. Improve you physical condition (by staying physically busy, not persé doing 1 type of sport). 6. Laugh. 7. Find nature. 8. Be grateful. 9. Live in the present, in the now. 10. Follow your Ikigai, your passion. Your Ikigai is: what you LOVE, what the world NEEDS, what you get PAID for, what your GOOD at. I think I have found my Ikigai, I found my passion in working with young adults with psychiatric disabilities. But I do believe I can learn so much more to keep it my Ikigai. I could do more of the other 9 "rules" of living a happy and healthy life, work in progress!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Udit Miglani

    My second attempt was more successful than my first- I actually made it to page 65 before succumbing to the pressure of throwing it away, again. The only takeaway is how to market a book- fancy cover, have exotic "ancient Japanese wisdom" (attributed to a anything that's not objectively defensible), and a very superficial explanation of stuff like Logotherapy...and that's not the only concept discussed here which needs to be understood from a different source. If you want to be nannied into bein My second attempt was more successful than my first- I actually made it to page 65 before succumbing to the pressure of throwing it away, again. The only takeaway is how to market a book- fancy cover, have exotic "ancient Japanese wisdom" (attributed to a anything that's not objectively defensible), and a very superficial explanation of stuff like Logotherapy...and that's not the only concept discussed here which needs to be understood from a different source. If you want to be nannied into being told to sleep better, eat better (somehow to objectively figure out how to fill only 80% of your stomach, never mind what you eat), don't take stress and somehow find your purpose in life (all in the span of 15 minutes of reading), go for it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kaumal

    A positive little book about the way of a certain Japanese people who live beyond the age of 100. This book gives advice on how we can adapt our lives to live longer, which I am very skeptical about. Yes, we can improve how we exercise, eat and work to some extent, but this is very much in certain socio-economic areas. The rest is down to genetics and environment, which many people cannot do a lot about. By telling us to follow certain advice, it doesn't mean we will live to be centerians. Another A positive little book about the way of a certain Japanese people who live beyond the age of 100. This book gives advice on how we can adapt our lives to live longer, which I am very skeptical about. Yes, we can improve how we exercise, eat and work to some extent, but this is very much in certain socio-economic areas. The rest is down to genetics and environment, which many people cannot do a lot about. By telling us to follow certain advice, it doesn't mean we will live to be centerians. Another issue is that quite a few of the examples of healthy living are taken from other parts of the world and not Japan itself. Nevertheless - an easy Sunday read!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Trishala

    This book is a paperback version of my mother's dos and don'ts list (which I conveniently ignore) - exercise, less salt, lesser sugar, more fruits, don't over-eat, put the phone down, talk to people. This review is basically me saying - Mom, I concede. However, if unlike the book, longevity isn't on your agenda then please go ahead with your childhood dream of stocking the house with pizza (or other junk equivalent of choice) and eating it for breakfast, lunch and dinner while lying down on your This book is a paperback version of my mother's dos and don'ts list (which I conveniently ignore) - exercise, less salt, lesser sugar, more fruits, don't over-eat, put the phone down, talk to people. This review is basically me saying - Mom, I concede. However, if unlike the book, longevity isn't on your agenda then please go ahead with your childhood dream of stocking the house with pizza (or other junk equivalent of choice) and eating it for breakfast, lunch and dinner while lying down on your favorite couch.

  26. 4 out of 5

    K

    This was the most disappointing read. Very slow & there was nothing inspiring. Too dull , too boring.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Norsa'adah Ahmad

    An easy read. We can understand how people in Ogimi lived a long life. The authors used some Japanese words in the book. They give few tips to live better. Eat more vegetables and make more human connections. To live is to move more. Gardening seems fulfilling too.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael Bartellas

    This was an excellent book. Short read, with succinct points. This book supported Being able to think about life in a broader sense, with meaningful steps to pursue ones purpose. Recommended!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Girish Joshi

    Ikigai is the answer to the question: why do you wake up in the morning? It is a reason for being. This book makes grandmother's wisdom surprisingly palatable. Although it takes inspirations form Japanese way of life, and more specifically from a village in Japan, Okinawa, which is house to maximum number of centenarian in the world. The key takeaways from the book are: 1. Don't give up on things you love to do. Don't retire. 2. There is no need to hurry. Walk slowly and you'll go far. 3. Eat less Ikigai is the answer to the question: why do you wake up in the morning? It is a reason for being. This book makes grandmother's wisdom surprisingly palatable. Although it takes inspirations form Japanese way of life, and more specifically from a village in Japan, Okinawa, which is house to maximum number of centenarian in the world. The key takeaways from the book are: 1. Don't give up on things you love to do. Don't retire. 2. There is no need to hurry. Walk slowly and you'll go far. 3. Eat less than your hunger demands. 4. Friends are like medicine. Surround yourself with them. 5. Don't stagnate. Get in shape for your next birthday. 6. Smile. Because you are here, despite circumstances. 7. Reconnect with the nature. 8. Be grateful. Be generous. Give thanks. 9. Live in the moment. 10. Follow your ikigai. If you don't know what your ikigai is, then your ikigai is discovering your ikigai. If this is t00 much to remember than let me try to phrase it in simple words, a good life is having something that keeps you busy doing what you love while being surrounded by the people who love you. All you need is meaningful work and meaningful relationships, and there will always be some struggle in your work and your relationships, but remember that struggle is like salt, it's purpose is to make things interesting and adventurous. So embrace your salt, live your struggles, and enjoy your life. If you are hoping that this book will tell you what your ikigai is, then well, good luck, haha. Remember to not eat processed foods and always take stairs instead of elevators.

  30. 4 out of 5

    K

    My first read for the year & I loved it. "A refreshingly simple recipe for happiness." This book is as beautiful as it’s cover and I inhaled it literally in 2 days. " Ikigai is what allows you to look forward to in the future even if you're miserable right now.” I strongly recommend getting a copy ! My first read for the year & I loved it. "A refreshingly simple recipe for happiness." This book is as beautiful as it’s cover and I inhaled it literally in 2 days. " Ikigai is what allows you to look forward to in the future even if you're miserable right now.” I strongly recommend getting a copy !

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